Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Upgrade Your eMac

pudge posted more than 10 years ago | from the or-don't-what-do-i-care dept.

Upgrades 90

Leo Bodnar writes "This eMac upgrade proves that with some effort Apple's entry-level consumer models like eMac can be converted into reasonably serious workhorse system at very reasonable cost. Not for everyone, but some find it useful!"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Impressive (5, Informative)

CptChipJew (301983) | more than 10 years ago | (#7979719)

This isn't the only old Mac that be somewhat upgraded.

Companies like MCETech [mcetech.com] sell DVDRW drives for the G3 iMac and iBook.

Re:Impressive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981380)

They don't sell 800Mhz eMacs anymore?

Re:Impressive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7982398)

Go to ebay and buy one. There are people there that will sell you one for way more than it is really worth

Re:Impressive (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7982601)

Sometimes Apple has eMac refurbs. They're typically sold in the $500 - $550 price range. Go the the store at apple.com, then look for the special deals section off on the right hand side.

There are also frequently other refurbished models, and they usually sell for a lot less than new equipment. All refurbs come with a standard one year Apple warranty, but Apple will gladly sell you extended warranty coverage if you want it.

Always have been upgradable (5, Insightful)

metalligoth (672285) | more than 10 years ago | (#7979761)

This all goes back to the original Macintosh and Jobs thinking it was a piece of artwork that shouldn't be tampered with. Most people want a computer they can improve, much like people that mod and tune their cars.

Obviously, it's not that big of a deal to most people, or they wouldn't be buying laptops in larger and larger quantities. I expect the old "you can't upgrade a Mac" argument to be history in a couple years.

Then again, lot's of people have no idea OS X exists.

Re:Always have been upgradable (2, Informative)

trouser (149900) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980474)

In my experience most people don't upgrade computers anymore, they replace them. And most people don't modify their cars either.

I actually know somebody who recently replaced a computer because she couldn't work out how to fix a simple virus infection and figured the machine was ruined.

Re:Always have been upgradable (2, Insightful)

vegetablespork (575101) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980522)

If that person would have had to pay a professional $100 or $200 to clean up the machine, and it was an older machine, replacing it may have been the most cost-effective option for her. Now if they have friends or relatives willing to do it for free, on the other hand :) . . .

Nope, most people don't... (3, Informative)

SofaMan (454881) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980978)

This all goes back to the original Macintosh and Jobs thinking it was a piece of artwork that shouldn't be tampered with. Most people want a computer they can improve, much like people that mod and tune their cars.


I used to sell Macs, and I can tell you this: people who buy eMacs are generally not these sort of people. They might add some extra RAM (which they can do easily), but that's it. If you want an upgradeable machine, buy a G5. eMacs are there for people who want something that will work out of the box, and don't want to take up space with room (or money) for upgrading they will never use. I use an eMac myself for this very reason: cheap, relatively small footprint, and will do what I need for a few years yet.

I've lost track of the number of people I know with Windows towers that still have the exact same amount of empty space in them as the day they bought them, and they will stay that way until the day they are disposed of. They bought them, having been sold the "Well, you might want to upgrade..." line, but never do. Consequently, they end up with a computer that takes up 3 times more deskspace than it needs to, filled with expensive empty space (the hardware for those expansion slots isn't free).

Most people are not l33t b0xen hax0r5. Don't knock the all-in-ones; they fill an important computing niche.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (4, Informative)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983258)

Bah. I voided my eMac warranty with upgrades less than an hour after I bought it! It's a fantastic machine to hack around with. I will give this little bit of advice, though:

Step 1: Know what the fuck you are doing.

Working on an eMac can kill you. I'm not saying that figuratively, I mean that if you touch the wrong parts just the wrong way, you can receive enough of a shock to stop a healthy young heart, and die. So if you don't know the proper way to work around exposed CRT's, make a point of learning before you even consider working on an eMac beyond a simple memory upgrade. Almost everything on the eMac is nestled inside a little Pita Pocket of shielding nestled under the picture tube. So do me a favor, and don't get yourself killed just for the sake of a little extra HD space. Buying a firewire drive is a lot cheaper than funeral services these days.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (0)

jetsfandb (446202) | more than 10 years ago | (#7984437)

Next time, try unplugging it first.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (4, Informative)

EricWright (16803) | more than 10 years ago | (#7984497)

Doesn't matter. CRTs have some pretty hefty capacitors which store a charge even when unplugged. Hit it with a piece of metal in the right (wrong?) place and it'll ground the charge right through your body.

The parent poster has it right... futzing around inside an open CRT is a good way to end up in a box in the ground.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (2, Informative)

lbodnar (741368) | more than 10 years ago | (#7986966)

Not only they have hefty capacitors but also hefty discharge resistors that savvy engineers placed there to prevent brothers on repair floors from sitting on their benches until lunch, waiting for hefty capacitors to lose their hefty charges. As well as keep those brothers away from poking their hefty charge dischargers right into the guts of CRTs and summoning hefty sparks that kill hefty capacitors much sooner than aforementioned engineers have planned.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (3, Informative)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985612)

You are a perfect example of my need to re-emphasize rule 1.

Rule 1: Know what the fuck you are doing!

A CRT can kill you, even if it is unplugged.

Re:Nope, most people don't... (1)

jetsfandb (446202) | more than 10 years ago | (#7996975)

And you didn't mention that useful fact in the original post because...?

Re:Nope, most people don't... (1)

jetsfandb (446202) | more than 10 years ago | (#7997011)

Disregard my previous post (Was written without thinking, just like my first post!).

I do think it would have been helpful if you had mentioned that the source of the shock you spoke of was from a capacitor. While IANAEE, I do understand what capacitors do, but did not realize that CRTs would have one's with that much stored up. Also in my (weak) defense, I do know people who have attempted to upgrade their PCs/Macs while they plugged in AND powered up!

Re:Nope, most people don't... (1)

lbodnar (741368) | more than 10 years ago | (#8005209)


Well, almost anything can kill either plugged or not.

However, in case somebody needs it, here is Apple's CRT discharge manual [mac.com]

Re:Nope, most people don't... (4, Informative)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 10 years ago | (#7986105)

As the othe two posters mentioned, you are a likely candidate for doing something wrong. The issue is with capacitors. Capacitors are used to increase the voltage available to the CRT. The voltage they build up is many magnitudes higher than what comes through the mains. The catch is even when unplugged they maintain their charge, unless they are either properly discharged, or find themselves the nearest human tinkering with them.

Just to give you an idea, from Repair FAQ [repairfaq.org] :

"TVs and monitors may have up to 35 KV on the CRT but the current is low - a couple of milliamps. However, the CRT capacitance can hold a painful charge for a long time. In addition, portions of the circuitry of TVs and monitors - as well as all other devices that plug into the wall socket - are line connected. This is actually more dangerous than the high voltage due to the greater current available - and a few hundred volts can make you just as dead as 35 KV!"

Re:Nope, most people don't... (1)

martingunnarsson (590268) | more than 10 years ago | (#7987916)

Yeah, but you don't have to pay for the funeral yourself! ;-)

% of people who upgrade? (3, Insightful)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981040)

Most people want a computer they can improve, much like people that mod and tune their cars.

I wonder if the percentage of upgraded computers is really that high? I know people think they "want" expandability, but I doubt that many consumers actually take the plunge and upgrade anything. Likewise, I wonder how many large corporations routinely upgrade the hardware on their desktops (rather than replacing them with all new models).

As with cars, I suspect that a small minority actually modify their machines. I'd bet that the vast majority of computers get discarded with the same hardware that they came with. I know that most of the old computers that I see at garage sales are factory stock.

Anybody any numbers?

Re:% of people who upgrade? (4, Interesting)

York the Mysterious (556824) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981917)

Think of it like an SUV. Everyone wants and SUV they can go offroading in. They all want the AWD or 4WD models, but how many ppl see anything more than going over a curb in a parking lot?

Re:If people wanted to offroad (1)

Bastian (66383) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983220)

They wouldn't be buying Durangos and Escalades.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (2, Informative)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983815)

No, it's a myth that people are buying SUV's for the fantasy of off-roading.

People buy SUV's because the CAFE standards have made it nearly impossible for a middle-class family to own a large car. Vehicles with truck frames are exempt from these standards, so the SUV (and to a lesser extent, the mini-van) have replaced both the station wagon and the luxury sedan. Notice that nobody makes station wagons anymore, and Lincoln no longer makes the Town Car.

The AWD and 4WD are popular packages because they make the vehicles safer for on-road driving. This is especially true in places like my home state of Minnesota, where snow, ice, and sleet are all factors which can compromise your ability to control the vehicle.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (2, Interesting)

John Harrison (223649) | more than 10 years ago | (#7986111)

I think you are misstating the cause and effect here. People don't buy SUVs rather than station wagons because of CAFE. The average consumer is unaware of CAFE. Automakers push SUVs because of CAFE. SUVs are less expensive than a car of similar size because of CAFE.

People do buy SUVs because they like the sense of power, and it is nice to sit up higher and be able to have a clearer picture of the road. The 4WD is nice in a pinch too.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7987864)

I think you are misstating the cause and effect here... SUVs are less expensive than a car of similar size because of CAFE.

Actually, that was my exact point.

I will agree that the safety of big SUV's is a factor for some people, to a point... except for the fact that the #1 truck in America is the Ford F-150, which had the absolute worst off-set front-side crash test rating of any truck on the market. Worse than a lot of compact cars. The engine compartment fails to absorb much impact, resulting in the cab space becoming completely crushed.

(They updated it this year, and I have not seen the new results, but the F-150 design up until 2003 was a death trap, and sold like hotcakes.)

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

jhunsake (81920) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988573)

Any idea where one could find independent/government crash test results?

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

Golias (176380) | more than 10 years ago | (#7991833)

Consumer Reports.

Or the insurance companies. (They do their own crash tests in order to assess risk.)

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

John Harrison (223649) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988581)

Perceived saftey and actual safety are two different things. You feel safe in a big tall, heavy vehicle.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (2, Informative)

BigBir3d (454486) | more than 10 years ago | (#7986353)

ahem...

AUDI, M-B, BMW, Volvo, Subaru all make good station wagons, all available as AWD, IIRC.

BIGGER == BETTER (for most Aemricans)

Re:% of people who upgrade? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8022150)

4WDing on regular, paved road is LESS safe than FWD (front wheel drive).

Most 4WD drive equipped cars specifically say in their respective Owner's Manuals not to activate 4WD unless driving on unstable terrain.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

kev0153 (578226) | more than 10 years ago | (#7987306)

Our club goes off road all the time, but I think that we are in the minority.

SUV's Offroad [electricsphere.com]

Re:Upgradeability (1)

Bastian (66383) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983208)

So I buy a PC thinking I can upgrade it when I feel like it.

A while later, I put in some RAM. No problem.

Then I decide I want a new hard drive. But I have the old version of the hard drive controller, and to get full performance out of a new hard drive, I decide to buy a new hard drive controller to plug in.

Then I decide I want a new graphics card. But my motherbord has an AGP x slot, and the card I want uses AGP 4x, so I end up buying a new motherboard.

After that, I decided I wanted a new CPU. But I had a Pentium 3. Nowadays, I can get a P4/2ghz for cheaper than a slower P3. So I have to get yet another motherboard. And then of course I need RDRAM to get the best performance out of the new P4, so I go and buy new RAM to replace the old stuff I got way back at the beginning.

Yessir, upgrading your computer is definitely cost-effective.

Re:Upgradeability (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983895)

OK, that's why there are places that will buy your old hardware.

Re:Upgradeability (1)

Trurl's Machine (651488) | more than 10 years ago | (#7984105)

OK, that's why there are places that will buy your old hardware.

Wow, you begin to grasp the Macintosh way of upgrading, sir!

Re:Upgradeability (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 10 years ago | (#7992836)

Personally, my way of upgrading is this: upgrade it as far as it will go, then push it as long as it'll run, and then when it dies, replace it (and sell off working, but unusable parts, and use the other working parts). My Celery box will come back to life as one of the first Pentium M desktops once PowerLeap releases their adaptor for the Pentium M to run on any Socket 478 motherboard. The box I'm typing this on, an old PMMX-233 with 96MB of RAM, has two HDDs - one of which is pulled from my Celery. I don't buy a box, and when it breaks or gets too old, buy a new one. I rebuild boxes (I said I didn't build my own computer on the poll, but I have done all of the steps to do so, just only when they were needed), upgrade them, etc., etc.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

travail_jgd (80602) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985572)

[Getting offtopic, but anyway...]

There are a good number of computer and electronics stores around here selling various upgrade components -- hard drives, faster CD/DVD drives, video cards, etc. Even Walmart, which requires a high sell-through, has some "internal" upgrades! I'm pretty sure there aren't enough geeks in the area to keep those departments open.

Many computer stores have a service department for computers, so that non-techies can have their upgrades installed (sometimes for free, sometimes not).

Or, think about it this way: how many people's computers have you personally upgraded? For myself, I know about a half-dozen computers that I've installed more RAM or a second hard drive into (not including the ones in my household). Also, the majority of computers are sold to businesses -- in my experience, they tend to be recycled and upgraded far more often than home PCs (computers are considered "assets" and are easier to upgrade than purchase).

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 10 years ago | (#7989323)

I'm pretty sure there aren't enough geeks in the area to keep those departments open.

No, but there are enough of them to call when the buyer can't manage the upgrade on their own.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

singleantler (212067) | more than 10 years ago | (#7996596)

Generally I find businesses do not upgrade, because it can take a lot of staff time to do. From what I've seen computers get shuffled around the office to people who don't need the latest & greatest, while certain people get brand new computers.

The classic in an office is to see a boss with a top of the range box who uses it for e-mail and the occasional bit of word processing, while their secretary has a much less powerful computer and is doing all the multi-tasking and heavy spreadsheet work. The trickle-down can't happen fast enough in these sorts of cases.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

shotfeel (235240) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988034)

I don't know if you remember the outcry when Apple started selling Macs with "only" 3 NuBus slots instead of 6. The PC press especially was "outraged".

Funny thing is, when Apple did a little research, they found that the overwhelming majority of users (particularly home users) never added an expansion card. It was extremely rare to find anyone who added more than two.

Re:% of people who upgrade? (1)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 10 years ago | (#7989412)

And that was at a time when on the Mac you could use multiple monitors without a hitch, and you couldn't on a PC.

Re:Always have been upgradable (1)

curious.corn (167387) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981420)

Yeah. I have this dead rat old box I'd like to upgrade but there aren't any compatible components for it any more. I've been told AGP isn't electrically compatible with the AGP I have on my box and the RAM wouldn't work either (a 66 MHz SDR DIMM system). Can I find a slot1 cpu to max out my mobo today? Nah... upgradability is a false icon... it's just componentization useful for VARs; the end user (old term... correct is 'consumer') will go for the various USB/FW devices...

Re:Always have been upgradable (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981593)

Uh, more like most users, when they can't get IE to open say something like "The internet isn't working."

It is always tempting to think that the world around you is similar to the rest of the world. Watch out for that mentality, it can be very dangerous.

Reasonable (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7979792)

Yep, that sounds quite reasonable...

Is the eMac the only one? (2, Interesting)

stevebob2019 (601185) | more than 10 years ago | (#7979797)

The main upgrade I'm concerned about is the processor; 800 mhz to 1.33 ghz is a huge leap! Could this be done as easily on other models? I have a 1ghz TiBook (not that I'm willing to experiment on it) but it would be interesting to see what it's "full potential is." But, overall, this upgrade is a sweet way to get a over 1.3 ghz machine for around 1100 USD. That's less than a dollar a mhz.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (0)

stevebob2019 (601185) | more than 10 years ago | (#7979828)

My math was off; The total price of the eMac is approx. $1500 USD. =sb=

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (4, Informative)

JoshWurzel (320371) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980116)

Sorry, you're gonna be out of luck. All of the titanium powerbooks have the CPU soldiered(sp?) directly to the motherboard. To upgrade, you'd have to completely disassemble the unit and get a new motherboard.

Not cheap or easy. What you want is a machine which has a processor daughtercard (G4 towers, G3 powerbooks). Those make it easy to upgrade the processors.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (4, Informative)

asquared256 (637499) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980389)

Well the author of this article did not actually *replace* the CPU, he only *overclocked* it from 800 MHz to 1.33 GHz by changing some traces on the motherboard. It should work on any motherboard that supports more than one type of CPU, without removing the actual chip. This also assumes, however, that the existing chip will run at the increased speed without additional cooling, which may be difficult in a laptop.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981570)

Having a cool laptop can sometimes be nicer than having a fast one. i.e. Word will chew up 100% processor time on any compuer I have used, but it works just as well and fast on all of them... thats why I run my laptop with reduced speed and drip LN on the keyboard when it gets too hot.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981592)

LN?

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981651)

liquid nitrogen

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981869)

LN2 would have been better then.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7987351)

N2(s)

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7994819)

If the world were rational, yes. However, all the labs I have worked at we just called it LN.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

bash_jeremy (703211) | more than 10 years ago | (#7982465)

frozen fingers

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

vasqzr (619165) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985762)


Word will chew up 100% processor time on any compuer I have used, but it works just as well and fast on all of them

It doesn't look [dyndns.org] like it does on mine.

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 10 years ago | (#7994811)

Sorry, good point, only Access chews up 100% all the time. Word only eats 100% when you are using it (and then for the next several seconds).

Re:Is the eMac the only one? (1)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 10 years ago | (#7983461)

> Sorry, you're gonna be out of luck. All of the titanium
> powerbooks have the CPU soldiered(sp?) directly to the
> motherboard.

The same as the eMac processor that was upgraded from 800 to 1333mhz. TiBooks can be overclocked in the same fashion by moving resistors around but I would guess not as much as an eMac. The heat sink in an emac is gigantic.

Dear Apple (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7979878)

Dear Apple,

I am a homosexual. I bought an Apple computer because of its well earned reputation for being "the" gay computer. Since I have become an Apple owner, I have been exposed to a whole new world of gay friends. It is really a pleasure to meet and compute with other homos such as myself. I plan on using my new Apple computer as a way to entice and recruit young schoolboys into the homosexual lifestyle; it would be so helpful if you could produce more software which would appeal to young boys. Thanks in advance.

with much gayness,

Father Randy "Pudge" O'Day, S.J.

Dear Randy "Pudge" O'Day (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7979897)

Dear Father O'Day,

Thanks for your letter. Being Catholic myself, I know exactly what you're talking about! It has always been our plan here at Apple Computer Inc to revolutionize personal computing with our high-quality and highly gay products.

I'm happy to answer your letter by letting you know that YES we will be releasing an entire hLife ("homo-life") software line. You'll be able to recognize it in stores by the small stylized logo depicting a large cock entering a tight anus with an Apple logo on it. ("Suddenly it all comes together" indeed!).

Anyway, I hope you and other members of our community will join us on our mission, and purchase the exciting new hLife boxed set. Only the boxed set comes with translucent cock rings!

Sincerely,

Harry Rodman
Vice-president
Homosexual Liaison Services
Apple Computer, Inc.

All that work (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7979974)

Just to find that Emachines is offering a Athlon 64 3000+ machine for less than the price of an emac.

-1, flamebait to deluded overweight mac zealots
but 100, informative to everyone else!

Definately recommended, Emacs 21 rocks! (5, Funny)

LeninZhiv (464864) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980330)

I upgraded my Emacs to 21.2 a couple years ago and I've never been happier. Having icons in X (even though no one ever uses them) brings a more modern feel, and colours in the terminal is nice to have too. Unicode and multilingual support is now seamless.

By the way, has anyone else noticed how many typos there are on Slashdot these days...

:-)

Re:Definately recommended, Emacs 21 rocks! (1)

JDWTopGuy (209256) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981883)

Congratulations, that's one of the funniest posts I've seen on /. lately. :D

Re:Definately recommended, Emacs 21 rocks! (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988691)

yeah I've definitely seen a lot of typos here.

Interesting. (4, Interesting)

tweder (22759) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980333)

I'm writing this from an eMac right now - but mine is the latest revision with the 1GHz G4.

All of those upgrades were available to me as build-to-order options in the online store @ apple.com

I've got 160GB HD, 1GB of RAM, Superdrive, 1GHz G4 - seems to me I don't need to hack it to make it a decent workhorse out of the box.

Re:Interesting. (1)

BigBir3d (454486) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980427)

He ran at 1.33GHz instead of 1.0 that yours is at now. He reported reliability at 1.33GHz, but crashed at 1.4(2?)GHz after only 2 or 3 minutes.

Re:Interesting. (1)

tweder (22759) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981127)

While the extra 333MHz is impressive with just a quick solder job. My point is, the eMac is a great workhorse right out of the box. The story implied that it's anemic and slow without these hacks.

Re:Interesting. (1)

Analog Penguin (550933) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981264)

His probably was closer to being slow than yours, since he started with an 800 Mhz processor rather than the 1 Ghz you have. Not a huge difference, but worth pointing out--he squeezed over 500 Mhz extra out of that little thing.

Re:Interesting. (2, Informative)

BigBir3d (454486) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985915)

The point was it is the same processor for the 800MHz or 1GHz machines. The speed is limited on the motherboard. This is how processors from the same branch are made. Each is tested, the "good" ones are given higher speed rating, and sold as 1.33GHz, and the "average" are sold as 1GHz, and the "below average" were sold as 800/700MHz chips. Essentially, the chip was sold to be used in a underclocked application.

Re:Interesting. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7980986)

You can take them to 2GB RAM (mine has 1.5GB), and the 1GHz G4 I clocked up to 1.4, where it's been running stable for 4 days. I don't expect to have any problems with it either, after seeing others run slower G4s at 1.33 so well.

You're correct that they run well right out of the box, though, I'm an interminable tinkerer.

Re:Interesting. (1)

TedNugentRules! (724730) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981576)

I agree that the 'stock' 1GHz eMac is fine as is, although I can relate to people who chose to overclock their machines in search of more grunt. I dont think of the eMac as a games machine, but I couldnt resist installing a demo of the last version of UT just to see an application work the machine (1GHz, 1GB RAM, stock video card) hard. To my amazement, the demo was quite playable - well done, Apple.

Johnny see Warranty? (4, Insightful)

agent dero (680753) | more than 10 years ago | (#7980825)

Johnny see warranty go RIGHT out the window.

Why not just hold onto it a year, extend AppleCare, and then later when you want to upgrade, sell on eBay for about 80%-90% of the current price, and get a new one.

Sheesh, you don't have to mod everything, use some logic kiddos

Re:Johnny see Warranty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981272)

Yeah. One of the primary things mac bashers like to use is the old " macs cost so much more! " argument. I can always tell when a otherwise well meaning troll has never actually owned a mac becuase they always trot that one out first.

The problem is, macs retain incredible value over their lifespan, hundreds more per year than any PC. This can be proven - look at yer typical PIII PC on ebay, and then look at your mac G4 at the same speed. You'll always find the mac twice as much. In the case of dual procs, sometimes it can go 3 X for nice examples

When you can sell the mac for 700 bucks after 3 years of use but can only get 200 for the PC, and ya paid about as much after you finish tinkering with yer shit and buying those nice bling bling pretty blue and green fans.....well..... note the dual G5 are gonna be like money in the bank for at least 2 years. I bet I get 85% of my cost back if I sell it within 2 years. Cant do that with no fool PC.

Re:Johnny see Warranty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981505)

What kind of idiot sells a system after 2 years? Mac are supposed to be usable forever, aren't they?

If,in 2 years, you can find a sucker to pay $2550 bucks for a 2 year old ccomputer, then more power to you. But please post when you do, I could use a good laugh.

Re:Johnny see Warranty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7983063)

Exactly. More power to me, less power to you.

I did exactly that with a QS 733 - I used it for 1 year ( bought on the weekend after it was introed ) and used it for 1 year, 2 months. Paid 1799. Sold it on ebay for 1580, started the bidding at 1300. I had some games and I had maxed the RAM to 1.5GB (cheap) but those were the only changes.

I'll do the same thing with my new G5. Once again, more power to me, less power to you. You cant sell yer PC for 75 to 85% of it's purchase price, can you?

Monkey boy. Fag. Clueless PC troll. Fuck you.

Parent poster is right, or have you even bothered to look at the mac listings on ebay to check and see?

On behalf on all Mac users, bite me.

I WIN, YOU LOSE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7987920)

Re:Johnny see Warranty? (2, Informative)

bash_jeremy (703211) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981641)

I think it's a really great deal. You can buy a refurbished [apple.com] 800 Mhz emac for $529. If you overclock it to 1.33 Ghz, you get an inexpensive mac that should perform pretty well.

Re:Johnny see Warranty? (3, Interesting)

hey! (33014) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985445)

Why not just hold onto it a year, extend AppleCare, and then later when you want to upgrade, sell on eBay for about 80%-90% of the current price, and get a new one.

No question Macs hold their value amazingly well. Also that, if you really look at what you get, you get a pretty good deal for the money. While the components are quite conservatively rated, leaving room for overclocking etc., the price of a more powerful machine is so reasonable that if you paid yourself anything for your time you could have a machine with the performance characteristics you want and a warranty. Also you'd have more time to actually use it.

But all these things are equally true of a car like a Honda Civic; it still doesn't stop people from trying to customize them for higher performance.

Wisdom, in these cases, doesn't consist of deciding to mod or not to mod. It consists of understanding why you want to mod or not mod.

If you have plenty of dough and not much time, the idea that you'd be an idiot to do something like this to save money. However, if you do it for the challenge, or if you are somebody who needs the computer power, doesn't have much money, and has the time it may also make sense.

Other Mac Mod'ing Resource... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7981181)

For anyone interested in accelerating/modifying/etc your Mac, there is a huge repository of information at www.xlr8yourmac.com. In particular, it has searchable database of Mac upgrades rated by the people who installed them, often with useful comments appended by the Mike Breeden, the site's owner. It also has a fairly extensive FAQ (although it's not always easy to find the answer you're looking for) on a dizzying list of mac system & upgrade tweaks, gotchas, and little known issues that might be relevant to someone mod'ing a Mac. Finally, the site has a daily news page on all manner of Mac related topics, but most typically involving updates, tweaks, compatibility info, etc...

The compatibility database is great because it's really the only relatively complete resource for figuring out whether something like an aftermarket CD-RW drive is likely to be compatible with iTunes, etc... (A lot of drives are clones of one another, or really similar, and Apple doesn't list all of those on its site, so having a reference of actual compatibility reports is especially useful.)

Unfortunately the forum isn't currently accepting new members, and it seems like it has been that way for a really long time. : (

NOTE: I'm not affiliated with xlr8yourmac.com in any way, except that I visit the site and find it useful.

Re:Other Mac Mod'ing Resource... (2, Interesting)

questamor (653018) | more than 10 years ago | (#7981754)

If anyone wants to overclock an older mac (yes, way back into the 68k machines) take a look at http://homepage.mac.com/schrier/ [mac.com] .

If you're going to do something like this... (0, Flamebait)

codmate (741841) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985785)

...wouldn't it be easier to build a PC for yourself in the first place? Then you have all the advantages of picking your own hardware, learning how the thing works (so you can fix it when it goes wrong), having seperate warrenties on all the components and being able to install the O/S of your choice. I could understand why the verage Joe might want one of these MACs, but somebody cabable (or willing to learn how to) of upgrading their machine in this way should really not bother in the first place - it's a waste of money for them.

Re:If you're going to do something like this... (1)

MoneyT (548795) | more than 10 years ago | (#7987942)

maybe because you want to do overclocking that's more of a chalange than changing a setting in your BIOS?

Re:If you're going to do something like this... (1)

m_gear (741940) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988740)

If only! You can change the NVRAM settings without even going into OpenFirmware. Imagine that! Overclock your mac with nigh but a simple shell script. It would certainly be something to throw in the face of those constantly-rebooting PC overclockers, that's for sure.

Mac user != not tech savvy!!! (2, Informative)

Cybrex (156654) | more than 10 years ago | (#7997467)

Your argument is based on the assumption that Macs are an inherently inferior platform because they're not as hardware hackable. This simply isn't true. I'll certainly grant that the open architecture of PCs makes them more conducive to hardware hacking, but since my "O/S of choice" is Mac OS X it doesn't really matter.

I very much enjoy doing upgrades and case mods, and I've been doing hardware hacking since before it was called modding (1993). At home I run a mixed networked environment that (at the moment) consists of 4 PCs, a 12" PowerBook (connected via WAP) and the iMac I'm typing this on right now. All but one of the PCs are homebuilt from the ground up (the fourth was a freebie), and I've done some minor upgrades to the iMac (replaced the hard drive with a beefier one- a snap in a PC but a much more significant endeavour on an iMac!). I've also homebuilt PCs for friends who wanted something better than a stock Gateway machine but lacked the ability to do it themselves.

That said, when I want to play Call of Duty I use a PC. For everything else, however, Macs provide a much more enjoyable and productive environment. I can get into the OS nitty-gritty much moreso than I can with Windows, and there's simply no comparison in the user interface.

Cheers,
-Cybrex

17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (2, Interesting)

numbski (515011) | more than 10 years ago | (#7985838)

I can't help but wonder if the iMac model can see a similar performance gain. I own that one...should probably tear it down and see if I can find a similar resistor bank. Anyone able to beat me to it and look?

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7986426)

If it's a flat panel iMac, I wouldn't suggest it. I've been in several of the FP iMacs. If you don't know what you're doing it's really easy to put back together and then have it overheat and ruin iteself. Definitely have some thermal paste on hand for that heat sink. Another question - do you really want to introduce more heat to an enclosure of that size? Is it worth throwing away a 17" flat screen to find out?

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (1)

numbski (515011) | more than 10 years ago | (#7986511)

Well, I can test it outside of the enclosure for starters. I can also introduce extra cooling (I know, I know, that's just a terrible thing to do to a mac!) but I have considered it in the past.

It's worth a look to see if it is possible, IMHO.

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (1)

lbodnar (741368) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988543)

Have a look here: http://www.bekkoame.ne.jp/~t-imai/mainj2.html Sayonara!

I've done it! Sorta... (1)

numbski (515011) | more than 10 years ago | (#7993022)

I've blogged about this [numbski.net] , and I'd like to put more work into it.

Hopefully people are still reading...

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (2, Informative)

m_gear (741940) | more than 10 years ago | (#7988686)

Possibly, BUT there is one little problem. The iMac is a pain in the arse to get open. You can't tip it on any side, or you'll wreck the screen! How do you get around it? Simple, Apple gives all authorized service providers a foam shell that cradles the bottom and the screen in the perfect position to open it up. How a normal person such as you or myself would get one... that I do not know.

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (1)

singleantler (212067) | more than 10 years ago | (#7996649)

Erm... pillows? Or more likely - boxes with pillows on top?

Probably best would be a large empty cardboard box, put the iMac upside down so the screen is in the box but you can close the lid a bit and put something across to support the dome unit.

Re:17" iMac 800 to 1.33Ghz as well? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#7999228)

...and then you get to deal with the three different sizes / types of torx and phillips screws they use to hold the thing together. Again, I say thermal paste or you'll fry your iMac.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?