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Microsoft Launches RFID Software Project

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the no-surprises-here dept.

Microsoft 185

securitas writes "RFID Journal reports on the first Microsoft RFID software pilot project. Microsoft launched the six-month pilot in December with KiMs, Denmark's largest snack food producer. Microsoft plans to bring the new RFID-enabled supply chain management software (Axapta Warehouse Management) to market next year, targeting small- to medium-sized businesses. The news comes after Microsoft announced its Smarter Retailing Initiative, tools based on RFID and .Net Web services. More on this latest development at CNet and InformationWeek."

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185 comments

1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101013)


[Pilot-Project Test Warehouse in Denmark]

PHB: OK, the new MS inventory system automatically ordered 15 semi-trailer loads of Kotex Ultra Thick & Fluffy With Wings. Make sure we have room for that shipment.

GeekSlave: But.. Sir, we sell snack food, not..

PHB: Don't question the system; do you know how much it cost?!

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101081)

omg tehy set us up the rfid!!!

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (3, Informative)

PPGMD (679725) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101137)

Actually almost all applications under the Microsoft Business Solutions Brand (Axapta is one of them), have been around for quite a few years and are used in all sectors of industry. Also most of them weren't devloped by Microsoft.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101200)

Shut up, nigger.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101334)

I am posting this anonymously so I won't loose karma: you really shouldn't talk so bad about our black citizents.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101531)

Shut up, Mexicant.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (1)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101375)

Oh come on, this is Slashdot, home of the sheep hurd.

Ultra Thick & Fluffy?!? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101215)

Hmm... think there's a chance this was written by a male?

Re:Ultra Thick & Fluffy?!? (0, Offtopic)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101287)

Hmm... think there's a chance this was written by a male?

I was being sensitive to the female /.ers. I could have said "GoreSoaker2000(tm) 100 ml Capacity Manhole Covers" but opted against. :P

Re:Ultra Thick & Fluffy?!? (1)

badboy_tw2002 (524611) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101506)

This being Slashdot...Yes, yes I do.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101243)

what is the name of that conversion when you take the ascii values and move them up by 12 or 13 or something? doesn't it start with an R or something?

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101385)

RECTUM13

It stands for Rotational Equalized Checksum-Terminated Un-ciphering Method.

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (1)

inode_buddha (576844) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101521)

What if I bar-code my cock? Will the MS tools be able to parse it?

Re:1/2 joke, 1/2 premonition (1)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101540)


Perhaps, but that would require that you remove your hand first.

first walmart (2, Insightful)

Frymaster (171343) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101022)

well, with walmart and microsoft onside it's pretty much inevitable now...

microwave everything!

Re:first walmart (1, Interesting)

cgranade (702534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101061)

well, with walmart and microsoft onside it's pretty much inevitable now...

microwave everything!

Sounds funny coming from Frymaster...

Re:first walmart (5, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101075)


well, with walmart and microsoft onside it's pretty much inevitable now...

It's only inevitable if you support the system.

Buy from locally owned stores.

Buy locally produced products.

Support companies owned from within your country.

Don't support the big multinationals. They view consumers as nothing more than cattle at the trough.

It's no suprise that Levi Strauss closed its last US manufacturing plant after getting in bed with WalMart to make cheap jeans so consumers could save a couple of bucks while putting their neighbours out of work.

Re:first walmart (1)

lafiel (667810) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101109)

As nice of a plan that is, it's still inevitable... there's just a couple less people supporting the big corporations. There's still millions and millions supporting their own doom.

Re:first walmart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101132)

Don't sell everyone short. I know many people that no longer shop at WalMart, Home Depot, fast food places, etc. That number grows. Granted it's a small drop in the bucket but the more people that act and spread the word the better for everyone.

Re:first walmart (5, Insightful)

cgranade (702534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101156)

They view consumers as nothing more than cattle at the trough.

Strange thought: perhaps that's because many Americans are cattle at the trough... consider the inevitable stampeding over Friday-After-Thanksgiving sales. The sad thing about modern marketing? It actually works. People are, in general, so apathetic, that they are glad to be treated like cattle, insofar as they get shiny things.

Now, before I get modded flamebait, please consider what I've said, and recall that I am not ranting against any one person, but against the state of the society as a generality. Thanks.

Re:first walmart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101191)


perhaps that's because many Americans are cattle at the trough
The situation is getting worse world-wide. McJobs are creating an entire class of unskilled slave labour.

Re:first walmart then the world (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101528)

That is the way of the world. There has always been a class of slave labor, you just started noticing that it is beginning to match your ethnicicity.
North&South-Americans, Europeans, Asians, and Africans are sheep being lead to a slaughter. And Most will happily forge their own shackles, just as the poor fools in Russia did in 1919. They were trading one set of chains for another, and it took them 60 some years to undo that mistake.
It is a cyclical problem, mostly going unnoticed throughout history. But thanks to the US (even with all its shortcomings), there has been a semi-stable model of freedom to strive for - or use as a model of what to avoid as the people see fit.
As America slides into decadent socialism, the last true middle class population will disappear and the old tried and true class and caste systems will doom billions to the slavery or serfdom.

Re:first walmart (1)

akgoel (153089) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101312)

Calling the masses "stupid". You must love democracy.

Re:first walmart (1)

cgranade (702534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101340)

Not stupid. Apathetic.
Biiiig difference.

Re:first walmart (1)

aml666 (708712) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101368)

Actually, LEVIs was dying BEFORE Wal*Mart. They teamed up in a last ditch effort to save themselves. Wal*Mart is finishing them off by forcing cheaper wholesale prices on them.

Re:first walmart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101396)

Actually, LEVIs was dying BEFORE Wal*Mart.

..and what was killing them? Cheap clothes from overseas. Levis made good quality clothes but in the quest to save a few pennies they were killed by consumerism.

Re:first walmart (1)

aml666 (708712) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101489)

Good point.

Cost overrides quality.
Qaulity suffers to compete

Re:first walmart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101384)

Heh, you said locally owned stores and locally produced products...

You haven't taken a trip around the US lately, have you? =P

Re:first walmart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101432)


You haven't taken a trip around the US lately, have you?
I haven't been to the US since December 2002 and frankly don't feel like going back while the nazis run the show.

Microwaving doesn't work (3, Interesting)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101218)

From www.spychips.com [spychips.com] :

Q: Can I microwave products to kill any hidden RFID tags they might contain?

A: While microwaving an RFID tag will destroy it (a microwave emits high frequency electromagnetic energy that overloads the antenna, eventually blowing out the chip), there is a good chance the the tag will burst into flames first. The difficulty of destroying a hidden RFID chip is one reason we need legislation making it illegal to hide a chip in an item in the first place.

Howard Dean? More Like ADOLF HITLER! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101030)

Howard Dean's 'smart ID' plan

By Declan McCullagh
CNET News.com
January 26, 2004, 5:18 AM PT

COMMENTARY--After Howard Dean's unexpected defeat last week in Iowa, public attention has focused on his temper, his character, and that guttural Tyrannosaurus bellow of his not-quite-a-concession speech. But Dean's views on Americans' privacy rights may be a superior test of his fitness to be president.
Dean's current stand on privacy appears to leave little wiggle room: His campaign platform pledges unwavering support for "the constitutional principles of equality, liberty and privacy."

Fifteen months before Dean said he would seek the presidency, however, the former Vermont governor spoke at a conference in Pittsburgh co-sponsored by smart-card firm Wave Systems where he called for state drivers' licenses to be transformed into a kind of standardized national ID card for Americans. Embedding smart cards into uniform IDs was necessary to thwart "cyberterrorism" and identity theft, Dean claimed. "We must move to smarter license cards that carry secure digital information that can be universally read at vital checkpoints," Dean said in March 2002, according to a copy of his prepared remarks. "Issuing such a card would have little effect on the privacy of Americans."

Dean also suggested that computer makers such as Apple Computer, Dell, Gateway and Sony should be required to include an ID card reader in PCs--and Americans would have to insert their uniform IDs into the reader before they could log on. "One state's smart-card driver's license must be identifiable by another state's card reader," Dean said. "It must also be easily commercialized by the private sector and included in all PCs over time--making the Internet safer and more secure."

The presidential hopeful offered few details about his radical proposal. "On the Internet, this card will confirm all the information required to gain access to a state (government) network--while also barring anyone who isn't legal age from entering an adult chat room, making the Internet safer for our children, or prevent adults from entering a children's chat room and preying on our kids...Many new computer systems are being created with card reader technology. Older computers can add this feature for very little money," Dean said.

There's probably a good reason why Dean spoke so vaguely: It's unclear how such a system would work in practice. Must Internet cafes include uniform ID card readers on public computers? Would existing computers have to be retrofitted? Would tourists be prohibited from bringing laptops unless they sported uniform ID readers? What about Unix shell accounts? How did a politician who is said to be Internet-savvy concoct this scheme?

Perhaps most importantly, does Dean still want to forcibly implant all of our computers with uniform ID readers?

Unfortunately, Dean's presidential campaign won't answer any of those questions. I've tried six times since Jan. 16 to get a response, and all the press office will say is they've "forwarded it on to our policy folks." And the policy shop isn't talking.

Then there are the privacy questions. To curry favor among the progressive types who form the backbone of his campaign, Dean has positioned himself as a left-of-center civil libertarian. He's guest-blogged for progressive doyen Larry Lessig, embraced the Brady Bill and affirmative action, told audiences on the campaign trail that the Bush administration has "compromised our freedoms in the name of fighting terrorism," and pledged to repeal parts of the USA Patriot Act.

It's difficult to reconcile Dean's current statements with his recent support--less than two years ago--for what amounts to a national ID card and a likely reduction in Americans' privacy. "Privacy is the new urban myth," Dean said in that March 2002 speech.

"I know of no other Democratic candidate who has this view on national ID," said Chris Hoofnagle, associate director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. "I hope that he'd reconsider his policy on national ID because it has significant affects on individuals' right to privacy and does not make the country more secure. If you think about it, the implication is that children would have to be issued cards as well. Are we talking about ID cards from birth?"

Dean's March 2002 speech to a workshop at Carnegie Mellon University--given just six months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks--was designed to throw his support behind a standard ID proposal backed by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA). At the time, Dean was chairman of the National Governors Association, a key ally for the AAMVA as it lobbied to transform the humble state driver's license into a uniform national ID card.

"I'm not surprised," said Barry Steinhardt, director of the technology and liberty program at the American Civil Liberties Union and a former Vermont resident. "It's a backdoor national ID. It won't even work to protect against terrorism because we know that some of the 9-11 terrorists had phony driver's licenses that they were able to buy on the black market."

It's true that most American adults already carry around driver's licenses. But the AAMVA proposal would have mandated biometric identifiers such as digitized fingerprints or retinal scans. Depending on how the system was implemented, your license could be equipped with a smart card (which Dean suggested) that could store information about your movements whenever it was swiped in a reader. It could also be tied to a back-end database so all verifications would be logged with the time, date and location.

The idea never gained traction in Congress because of privacy concerns and opposition not only from conservative activists, but from Democratic-leaning groups including People for the American Way, National Consumers League, and National Council of La Raza.

One prominent group that did support a standardized ID at the time is the New Democrats' public policy wing, which has suggested that microchip-implanted smart cards could hold not only retinal scans or fingerprints but also "food stamps, voter registration, library cards, hunting and fishing licenses" and a wealth of corporate data like E-Z-Pass, gas station automatic billing, and banking information. In one of history's ironic flourishes, Dean lashed out at the New Democrats last month in Exeter, N.H., dubbing them "the Republican wing of the Democratic Party."

It's possible that Dean has a good explanation for his uniform ID card views, and can account for how his principles apparently changed so radically over the course of just two years. Perhaps he can't. But a refusal to answer difficult questions is not an attractive quality in a man who would be president.

biography
Declan McCullagh is CNET News.com's Washington, D.C., correspondent. He chronicles the busy intersection between technology and politics. Before that, he worked for several years as Washington bureau chief for Wired News. He has also worked as a reporter for The Netly News, Time magazine and HotWired.

Proof that Howard Dean is Hitler reincarnate!

Re:Howard Dean? More Like ADOLF HITLER! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101434)

i find it almost surprising that no one has said anything about this important privacy issue, i'm sure if it were bush who had this idea the unbathed socialist masses here would be screaming...

Try submitting this as a story! (0, Offtopic)

TrollBridge (550878) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101520)

The parent is offtopic as far as this story goes, but I think the information presented therin would spark a robust debate among Slashdot readers.

Knowing the Slashdot editors though, I doubt such a story would ever make it to the front pages.

Licensing (4, Funny)

panxerox (575545) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101031)

hmmm lets see 2000000 rfd tags at $399.00 for each license comes too ....

Re:Licensing (0)

1SmartOne (744638) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101087)

Luckily they don't have a patent on the technology so we don't have to worry about that yet.

There are tag suppliers and tag programming software out there already. MS will just steal it and claim that their new version had the same features in development. Ha!

Re:Licensing (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101247)

Well at least those tags don't run linux, that would add $699!

Big Brother is watching you... (0, Funny)

zephc (225327) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101037)

pig out on candy bars.

Virus (1)

millahtime (710421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101047)

Just wait until the system gets a virus. I can see it now... the systems orders truck loads of beans and toliot paper.

Re:Virus (1)

Uberwang (745233) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101115)

Yeah, Microsoft's security issues combined with RFID will lead to some craaazy shoplifting.

Re:Virus (1)

millahtime (710421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101155)

Or, will the system say you shoplifted even though you really didn't. And then you get busted for it, serve jail time. If microsoft had a back door to the system they could control it all themselves and get and trach whom ever they want.

This is all part of their sceme to rule the world. I wonder if Pinky and the Brain are really behind it all at Microsoft. I mean bill kind of looks like the Brain.

The Ballmer and The Bill. (0, Offtopic)

AceCaseOR (594637) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101496)

"What are we going to do tonight, Bill? Narf!"

"The same thing we do every night, Steve. Try to take to take over the world!"

Re:Virus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101285)

This is Microsoft, remember? It'll probably be truckloads of cheese and toilet paper.

Re:Virus (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101330)

The coup de gras would be beans and *cheap* toilet paper...ouch!

Re:Virus (1)

Deflagro (187160) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101455)

Well at least that's a combination that goes together. ;)

Pronunciation? (1)

samurairas (666175) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101052)

Okay, it was wierd when companies changed their names to titles that mean nothing (Altria) or just started naming them incomprehensibly (Zyprexa), but now we have SOFTWARE that has a name that is following the same trend. What's next?

What's next? (1)

PatrickThomson (712694) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101184)

I'm naming my firstborn Quixlio

Re:What's next? (1)

ClippyHater (638515) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101379)

Don't keep any guns in the house...

Re:What's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101391)

Anzexium (1)

Jerf (17166) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101364)

What's next?

Anzexium, the post with the answers to your questions!

So it's bad. (5, Funny)

SpaceCadetTrav (641261) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101053)

Microsoft AND RFID bashing all in one thread. Woohoo!

Patents (3, Funny)

reuben04 (740293) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101054)

news from the CNN today: Microsoft Patents the RFID supply chain management process!

Re:Patents (1, Insightful)

Jtheletter (686279) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101124)

I would have moderated this as funny if it weren't so frightfully inevitable.

Re:Patents (0)

reuben04 (740293) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101136)

couldn't help myself... Is there a scary mod??

This could be of medical use... (5, Funny)

loserbert (697119) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101056)

You RFID the food itself, not the wrapper, that way you can track its journey through your system and beyond!

Re:This could be of medical use... (1)

D-Cypell (446534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101320)

They should make this process mandatory for lawyers...

We would finally be able to keep track of their shit!

Re:This could be of medical use... (1)

ClippyHater (638515) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101414)

Then have an RFID reader in the toilet so you can tell if who stole your lunch from the shared fridge!

so how much db bloat will that cause (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101082)

even if your not using bloatware
pallet #245 has 300 items on it, how many bit is each rfid tag? 32 bits * 300 items (a bit over 1kB) per pallet (big items or small pallet) 64 bits? (over 2kB) what about the pallet of kazzos, 100000 * 64 bits (~800kB per pallet).

how large will the tracking databases have to get?
pallet #245 makes 3 stops before it gets to the final reseller, warehouse 1,2 and 3 then add 2kb per pallet of this product to each of their databases as they track it.

oh well, hard drives are cheap, bandwidth is cheap, heck even privacy is cheap (at the rate we watch it being given up, you'd think we where giving away air)

Re:so how much db bloat will that cause (1)

loserbert (697119) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101127)

That all may be true, but if you were the one worried about housing these databases, do you think you would have any doubts about doing it? This is the *in* thing now, these people stand to make pallet loads of cash.

Good news for SMB's... (3, Insightful)

TopShelf (92521) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101090)

This is good news for the small and medium-size businesses that might not otherwise spring for a more expensive, market-leading solution from a provider like Manhattan Associates. If a smaller biz can jump on the RFID-enabled supply chain bandwagon early in the game, it offers an opportunity to develop their relationship with the big boys like Walmart.

That said, it's definitely not an easy thing to implement and realize savings from. It requires a real white-board redesign of how your product flows from supplier all the way through to customer. I'm sure there will be many examples of companies falling on thier faces doing this, spending resources on capabilities that they never end up fully utilizing.

Hmmm... (3, Funny)

r_j_prahad (309298) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101514)

That's interesting. Somehow you made it sound like the perfect opportunity for an OSS project. Huge list of options that no one will ever use, commercial versions going bust right and left, stingy target demographic, not easy to implement, etc.

I think maybe someone should reserve a space on Sourceforge for RFID.

Good news (2, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101096)

Microsoft launched the six-month pilot in December

Great...good news that. I was worried that a capable outfit would get involved and RFID might gain traction. Now I can relax.

RFID + Palladium = ? (2, Informative)

Noryungi (70322) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101098)

The title says it all. These various... ahem... projects by Microsoft are getting creepier and creepier every day.

I still think Palladium will fail, simply because Linux and the BSDs have now attained critical mass, and that most Linux users simply won't accept a closed hardware platform like it. Therefore, someone will step up to the plate and provide a non-Palladium hardware platform -- simply because there is money to be made in such a platform.

Now, for a serious question: has anybody got any idea on how to quickly disable RFIDs? I don't want to be followed around, whether it is by Microsoft, a retailer or anybody else. Please don't say: "Just microwave it", because some things with embedded RFIDs cannot be microwaved...

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (1)

betelgeuse-4 (745816) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101310)

Could magnetic fields damage it? or could you shield it with something?

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (1)

Clockwurk (577966) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101346)

Critical mass is slightly more than the .2-.3% desktop share Linux enjoys. [macworld.com]

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (1)

Noryungi (70322) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101446)


Except, of course, that I was not talking about desktop computers (even though I use Linux on my desktop), but about servers, where Linux enjoys solid growth and market share. Don't believe me? Check out Netcraft.

Desktop computers are not really profitable for most PC makers anyway. Servers are.

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (2, Informative)

reuben04 (740293) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101430)

Here is an interesting idea for blocking them:
MIT BLOCKER TAG [mit.edu]

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (1)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101470)

Yeah, well...don't just think it's Microsoft you need to worry about. In this story [yahoo.com] (which I submitted yesterday, incidentally, but got rejected), it states that IBM and Philips are also collaborating on a system. From the article:

IBM and Dutch electronics maker Philips also announced on Monday that they are working together on an RFID solution. Philips' semiconductor unit will make the radio chips that can be stuck on items, while IBM will provide the computer services and systems.

I assume this is the same Philips that makes Philishave electric razors in most of the world, which are rebranded as Norelco shavers in the States. (Just in case you want to boycott them so they can't track your shaving and other personal hygiene habits.)

Re:RFID + Palladium = ? (1)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101473)

I still think Palladium will fail, simply because Linux and the BSDs have now attained critical mass, and that most Linux users simply won't accept a closed hardware platform like it. Therefore, someone will step up to the plate and provide a non-Palladium hardware platform -- simply because there is money to be made in such a platform.

You misunderstand what Palladium is for. And, really, if Linux/BSD have reached "critical mass", there will be a Palladium layer written for them.

AFAIK, Palladium will be a greater boon to sysadmins and creative-types than anything else. Unless, of course, you're the kind of guy who refuses to use Linux because it has a "closed" file system that doesn't let you set permissions without the admin's permission...

Now, for a serious question: has anybody got any idea on how to quickly disable RFIDs? I don't want to be followed around, whether it is by Microsoft, a retailer or anybody else. Please don't say: "Just microwave it", because some things with embedded RFIDs cannot be microwaved..

Don't buy them? It's still quite possible to make your own clothes.

As for not being followed around--I recommend living in a remote rural area and only making purchases via land-based telephone or internet. Oh, and walk everywhere--they'll probably be able to track your car soon enough.

Ok, I am trying to figure out (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101108)

Reasonable and realistic software geek response

Microsoft == good?
RFID == bad?

or (anti-Terrorist activist response)

Microsoft == bad?
RFID == good?

or (scumbag Liberal response)

Microsoft == bad?
RFID == bad?

or (far right wing response)

Microsoft == good?
RFID == good?

How much in US$? (1)

SiaFhir (686401) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101110)

For anyone who doesn't have a currency converter in their brain (like me), 17,500 Euros is US$22,125. Great way to convert: http://www.xe.com/ucc/

Re:How much in US$? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101145)

Oops, wrong topic :)

Re:How much in US$? (1)

djh101010 (656795) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101157)

Great point, but I think you missed the thread you wanted by a few inches.

Re:How much in US$? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101220)

And this is not the only thing he misses by a few inches.

-- his wife John

Re:How much in US$? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101460)

What--your mouth? Yeah, sorry about that.

Re:How much in US$? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101329)


Uhhh. yeah.

You probably want the thread one stoy back this [slashdot.org] way.
=P

Re:How much in US$? (1)

nelsonal (549144) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101367)

Some quick rules of thumb (not intended to be accurate to the day's range but get you in the right range)
Euro=about a buck (it's at $1.25ish now, but was as low as $0.80 last year. Yen=about a penny (ranged from about 1 USD=JPY60 ($0.02) to 1 USD=JPY200 ($0.005) Pound about $2.00 (it's been closer to $1.50 in the past (and it might have enven aproached parity pretty recently). Go check something accurate before you make a transaction, but those generally work for reading a news story and trying to place currencies in rough USD terms.

RFID and Microsoft (3, Interesting)

millahtime (710421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101119)

RFID tags can be a very useful tool in some industries. In the field I work it has the potential to save millions of dollars. But, here comes Microsoft. To have them involved usually means some proprietary standard pushed and all kinds of licensing costs. This I don't like. The licensing fees alone could negate the profits the technology is even good for.

Re:RFID and Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101209)

Alternatives:

sun
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/031105/sfw085_1 .html

sap ibm
http://www.microscopemagazine.com/Article1275 21.ht m

Re:RFID and Microsoft (1)

costas (38724) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101407)

IBM and Philips are also getting into the action [memigo.com] .

I was half expecting... (4, Interesting)

Inflatable Hippo (202606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101121)

... That they were going to embed RFIDs into the software CDs.

Having a key in the chip that's required to decode the CD would be an interesting variation of the dongle concept.

If there was a cheap USB RFID reader that shipped with the S/W it might even be practical.

Re:I was half expecting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101297)


O... M... G!!!

Shhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re:I was half expecting... (1)

Jim_Maryland (718224) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101298)

Having spent most of my time in the UNIX world, I'm surprised that PC's haven't taken to using the HostID or like you said, the use of dongles.

On the topic of RFID, how long till the stores start tracking the movement paterns of items through the store. Wouldn't sensors be able to group items in the cart to predict shopping patterns which analyst could then use to drive advertising, product placement, etc...?
br Jim

I feel much better about ... (3, Funny)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101163)

the privacy implications of RFIDs now that I know that Microsoft will be running the software that tracks them. And I look forward to my secure computing/Palladium/RFID implant. I know that my unimatrix team can help assimilate unique biological species to enhance the collective. I'm Five of Twenty Six Adjunct. Welcome!

Growing new market.. (4, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101165)

Since the biggest retailer on the planet is mandating RFID, it only makes sense that the largest software company will get on board too..

Just good business sence in this case.. noting much to see..move along.

KiMs (1)

gspr (602968) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101170)

DAMNIT! First, we all hear how Scandinavia's other large snack producer is owned by the devil itself - Kraft Foods, and now KiMs is cooperating with the other devil?
It's like some big conspiracy to make us all eat healthy stuff...

The brilliant rendition of Stan - MOD IT UP ASHOLZ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101238)

Slashdot's gone cold I'm wondering why I got out of bed at all
The morning rain clouds up my window and I can't see at all
And even if I could it'll all be gray but your picture on my wall
It reminds me, that it's not so bad -- it's not so bad

Dear Rob, I wrote but you still ain't callin
I left my email, my ICQ, and my yahoo chat at the bottom
I sent two emails back in autumn, you must not-a got 'em
There probably was a problem with your sendmail or somethin
Sometimes I scribble email addees too sloppy when I jot 'em
but anyways; fsck it, what's been up? Man how's your boxes?
My boxes is linux too, I'm bout to be a compiler
once I learn gcc,
I'ma go on and compile for hours
I read about your Palm Pilot too I'm sorry
I had a friend lose his Palm over at the airport in Maradonna
I know you probably hear this everyday, but I'm your biggest fan
I even read all your bullshit Linux news and Microsoft's man
I got a room full of your posters and your pictures man
I like the way you sold your ass out too, that shit was fat
Anyways, I hope you get this man, hit me back,
just to chat, truly yours, your biggest fan
This is Stan

Dear Rob, you still ain't called or wrote, I hope you have a chance
I ain't mad - I just think it's FSCKED UP you don't answer fans
If you didn't wanna talk to me outside your Linux World
you didn't have to, but you coulda signed an autograph for Matthew
That's my Senior sys admin he's only 26 years old
We waited on a 9600 baud for you,
four hours and you just said, "No."
That's pretty shitty man - you're like his fsckin idol
He wants to be just like you man, he likes you more than I do
I ain't that mad though, I just don't like bein lied to
Remember when we met in Boston - you said if I'd write you
you would write back - see I'm just like you in a way
I never had a clue about shit either
I gcc'd shit with my wife then beat her
I can relate to what you're saying in your page
so when I feel like rmusering I read Slashdot to begin the rage
cause I don't really got shit else so that shit helps when I'm depressed
I even got a tattoo of slashdot across the chest
Sometimes I even packet myself to see how much it floods
It's like adrenaline, the DDoS is such a sudden rush of blood
See everything you say is real, and I respect you cause you tell it
My girlfriend's jealous cause I talk about you 24/7
But she don't know you like I know you Rob, no one does
She don't know what it was like for people like us growin up
You gotta call me man, I'll be the biggest fan you'll ever lose
Sincerely yours, Stan -- P.S.
We should be together too

Dear Mister-I'm-Too-Good-To-Waste-A-Packet-On-My-Fans,
this'll be the last packet I ever send your ass
It's been six months and still no word - I don't deserve it?
I know you got my last two emails
I wrote the @ signs on 'em perfect
So this is my payload I'm sending you, I hope you hear it
I'm on my modem now, I'm doing 9600 baud so fear it
Hey Rob, I drank a fifth of vodka, you dare me to code?
You know the song by Deep Purple or Slayer
its irrelevant by playing on my linux player
while I write some php scripts and play some Dragonslayer
That's kinda how shit is, you coulda rescued me from drowning
Now it's too late - I'm on a 1000 downloads now, I'm drowsy
and all I wanted was a lousy letter or a call
I hope you know I ripped +ALL+ of your pictures off the wall
I love you Rob, we coulda been together, think about it
You ruined it now, I hope you can't sleep and you dream about it
And when you dream I hope you can't sleep and you SCREAM about it
I hope your conscience EATS AT YOU and you can't BREATHE without me
See Rob {*screaming*} Shut up bitch! I'm tryin to code
Hey Rob, that's my senior admin screamin from the comode
but I didn't cut the power off, I just rebooted, see I ain't like you
cause if rm -rf'd we'd suffer more, and then the boxes die too
Well, gotta go, I'm almost BGP bridged now
Oh shit, I forgot, how'm I supposed to send this packet out?

Dear Stan, I meant to write you sooner but I just been busy
You said your box is running now, how'd you like your gcc?
Look, I'm really flattered you would install 7.0 Redhat
and here's an autograph for your senior sys admin
I wrote it on the Starter cap
I'm sorry I didn't see you at the show, I musta missed you
Don't think I did that shit intentionally just to diss you
But what's this shit you said about you like to DDoS lamers too?
I say that shit just clownin dog,
c'mon - how fucked up is you?
You got some issues Stan, I think you need some counseling
so heres some more Linux stories to keep your ass busy when you get down some
And what's this shit about us meant to be together?
I sold Slashdot for thousands so now I'm a single jetsetter
I really think you and your boxes need each other
or maybe you just need to treat them better
I hope you get to read this letter, I just hope it reaches you in time
before you hurt yourself, I think that you'll be doin just fine
if you relax a little, I'm glad I inspire you but Stan why are you so mad?
Try to understand, that Linux and MS is just grand
I just don't want you to do some crazy shit
I seen this one shit on the news a couple weeks ago that made me sick
Some dude was drunk and switched his router for a bridge
and his packets were blackholed, and his DNS couldn't get digged
and in the colo they found a tape, but they didn't say who it was to
Come to think about, his name was.. it was you
Damn!

Re:The brilliant rendition of Stan - MOD IT UP ASH (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101308)

hehe iz funay! i mean realay funay!!!!

Some corrections and suggestions (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101476)

I had a friend lose his Palm over at the airport in Maradonna

Maradonna is legendary soccer player from Argentina, and even though he grew fat during past few years, it's highly unlikely they managed to place an airport on his body.

I wrote it on the Starter cap

If Rob were to provide his autograph, he'd probably choose a ThinkGeek cap or something, why would he go with the Starter cap?

I seen this one shit on the news a couple weeks ago that made me sick

The repercussions with the DNS server are highly unlikely to be publicized on major networks such as CNN or Fox News, as DNS server failure is quite common (unless it's root DNS server). Perhaps a better line would say "I seen this one shit on the Web..."

Perhaps someone can answer this... (3, Interesting)

10101001011 (744876) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101258)

I am looking at this story and thinking: "they never learn".

While I understand Microsoft is a well known brand name that people trust, I must ask the inevitable question: "Why do they trust Microsoft?"

Surely the people ordering these products must know the poor reputation MS has for quality control. Think back to Windows 95 Revision A. Type a password that is 99 characters or more and it skips the authentication. Or perhaps the numerous bugs that fill Outlook, MS IE and so many of their other vital products. Yes they can make computing easier and I wouldn't hesitate to point someone who is new to computers to Windows due to the simplicity you must also ask yourself if it is that simple then it probably shouldn't be used on critical systems and frankly ordering is fairly critical.

I remember when a bank used MS software on some of their ATMS and the machine began shooting out money. I am not sure what was the root cause but surely it is tied to the fact that MS's OS was installed.

There is also the question of interoperability. If you have a computer that runs Windows XP, a bank machine, a cash regsiter, an ordering system and a security system that run Windows .Net architecture and a virus is released it means that while they aren't all the same, the virus can be easily altered to fit that system, especially with the number of systems that are being networked.

On a similar note some of you may have seen the newer cash registers that use some very simple operating system I have noticed a significant number of lockups on these machines whereas when I used to work at a coffee store we used a simple electronic cash with LED number display and I think we had a total of two lockups, one was caused by a paper jam.

It was that diversity of operating systems and the lack of availability of some of the more commercial ones that gave them a sense of security. Not to mention most of the "OSes" were so simple (because they needn't be any more complex than a calculator to work) that it was very hard to cause problems save for a few isolated cases.

Do we really need this many systems running computer software when a calculator can work just as efficiently? I have no problem with people who want to put an OS on something to say "we can!" but perhaps we ought to ask ourselves: "should we? Do we really need it?" before touting the benefits of something like this.

I don't want this to sound like I am just bashing MS, quite the opposite, I praise them on their marketing ability and their general ingenuity but perhaps we ought to think:

Do we really need Norton AntiVirus on our cash regiters?

Re:Perhaps someone can answer this... (2, Interesting)

/Wegge (2960) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101350)


While I understand Microsoft is a well known brand name that people trust, I must ask the inevitable question: "Why do they trust Microsoft?"


A good guess is that this pilot project was started between Kim's and Navision (also a Danish company). Navision was the biggest (European) provider of ERP systems for midsize enterprises. Microsoft aquired Navision a few years back, so now of course the pilot project gets slapped the MS label all over it.

Besides that, this project is aimed at Supply-chain managment, where each pallet in the warehouse is tagged. Not the individual products, so you can, for the time being at least, forget your worries about exploding cach registers.

Re:Perhaps someone can answer this... (2, Insightful)

gregarican (694358) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101390)

I'm not sure about the ATM urban legend. But I have seen a few BSOD's on Windows-based ATM's posted on Internet sites. What Microsoft provides on the server level, the desktop level, the embedded device level, etc. is **hopefully** different versions of what has been so maligned. I thought I read somewhere that Windows versions that run on ATM's are stripped down and minus some of the more exploit-riddled components. Same with Windows-based equipment used at hospitals, utility companies, etc.

Of course some folks make the argument that the very foundation of all Windows software is flawed and the security model it employs is poor from the get-go. If that's the case then we shall see what ill becomes of the RFID pilot project. But if ATM's have run Windows software for years now I would think any major exploits or outages would have certainly been cannon fodder by now. Most exploits are due to Outlook mail clients, Inter Explorer scripting/redirects, and open Internet-facing ports. That **shouldn't** come into play for an ATM connected to a clearinghouse via modem. Right?

Re:Perhaps someone can answer this... (1)

DarksideDaveOR (557444) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101395)

It's simple. It's the concept of the Big Lie, which I was reminded of lately by something I heard or read. I don't remember the exact quote or who came up with it, but it goes something like this:

If you tell a big enough lie, loudly enough, and long enough, people will start to accept it as true, no matter how unlikely it is.

This has been Microsoft's primary defense of itself in every unethical and illegal action it has ever committed, and it has been largely successful.

Blue screen of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101270)

...missing inventory.

Web site terms of use (2)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101325)

I just have to link to these RFID boneheads [smartcodecorp.com] because their web site's terms of use contain the following absurd little nugget:
You may not link this site with any other site without the prior written consent of SMARTCODE Corp.

Amazing technology! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101347)

How will they make such a teeny-tiny blue screen?

At the peril of sounding moderate... (3, Insightful)

peacefinder (469349) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101398)

Publishing warehouse management software with support for RFID is not exactly a big deal. The software presumably had a barcode module before, and now they've added an RFID module. So what? It's just another way to do the same thing. Warehousing is where RFID makes sense. The trouble with RFID has never been in the supply-chain side.

RFID only becomes a problem when active tags escape the market and remain with the end user. Escaped tags are a hardware problem, not a software problem, and trying to bash Microsoft for supporting RFID in warehousing software is just silly.

There are so many good reasons ro bash Microsoft that there exists no need to conjure up bad ones.

MS is just playing catch-up (2, Insightful)

Gumber (17306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101411)

Microsoft is doing this because there is already a Java based implementation of many of the key infrastructure services needed to create a large-scale RFID-based supply-chain management system. As a result, all the early trials are going to Sun/IBM.

This isn't something MS would want to loose out on. RFID-enabled supply chains are expected to generate 4-10x more tracking data. That could be a lot of SQL-Enterprise licenses, for just one example.

SCO slapped like a redheaded step child... (3, Interesting)

stephenisu (580105) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101428)

Well it seems that one of SCO's only decent markets (Retail POS systems) is going down the pooper. If Microsoft convinces the large retail chains that having a Microsoft managed inventory and POS system will be benificial, SCO is further screwed (but who do I root for?) My apologies to any red headed step-children.

User "grub" is a piece of shit karma whore (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8101453)

Deal with him accordingly editors!

Big Brother is Watching your snack food (2, Funny)

graniteMonkey (87619) | more than 10 years ago | (#8101495)

Jenny Craig cheaters, beware!
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