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Embedded Ethernet and Internet Complete

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the tininess dept.

The Internet 105

tdrury writes " Embedded Ethernet and Internet Complete , by Jan Axelson, is targeted towards the professional as well as the hobbyist embedded system designer who wants to further extend his communication options from traditional serial (RS-232, RS-455) communications to Ethernet. Axelson had been an author for Circuit Cellar magazine, and I have always enjoyed her articles, which tend to cover embedded communications of one type or another. (Axelson authors a set of Complete books including ones covering serial, parallel, and USB communication.)" Read on for the rest of tdrury's review.

Axelson's writing style is a little difficult to describe. At times you feel you could be reading a "For Dummies" (TM, Patent Pending, Please Don't Sue Me) book since her writing style is so easy to digest, but simultaneously, she's covering quite a bit of depth and breadth which you expect from a more advanced volume. This seems paradoxical yet the point stands: you will retain what you read from Axelson.

Contents

The networking basics sections describes the network protocol stack (Ethernet, TCP, UDP, and IP frames), collision mediation, and how to use a sniffer (Ethereal in her case). It's of moderate detail suitable for an introduction. Much more detail is provided in later sections. Axelson also uses this section to describe, in good detail, the Ethernet media access control scheme that arbitrates which device talks when and how to handle packet collisions.

These network hardware sections are an in-depth description of cabling (Cat-5, fiber, wireless, etc.) which includes bit rate, max lengths, encoding types, etc. She also includes a small section on building your own Cat-5 for you really cheap Joes. There is a cursory review of hubs, switches, and routers and the network architecture limitations imposed by each for each type of network cabling.

Axelson goes on to describe some common embedded systems including TINI (Java-based) and Rabbit (C-based), which are the two systems she uses and provides examples for. Thankfully, keeping with her Circuit Cellar hobbyist tradition, both of these systems are very affordable to the casual hobbyist. She also provides detailed descriptions of some common Ethernet chipsets down to the registers (at least for the ubiquitous NE2000 registers). Also included are schematics for typical interfaces to these chipsets for the reader who wishes to build his own Ethernet-aware embedded system.

The Internet basics sections describe the various connection solutions such as dial-up, DSL, and satellite and the benefits and limitations of each. Axelson provides a cursory discussion of firewalls, domain naming and DNS, URL dissection, DHCP, NAT, ARP, and ICMP. These sections, I believe, are suitably informational for the embedded system designer, but not exhaustive. She then launches into an in-depth discussion of IP addressing and the IPv4 header which, in my opinion, is required for anyone working at the packet level. Axelson uses some data from Ethereal to support her discussion of IPv4. She also reminds us that Ethernet communications need not use the full TCP or UDP stack but can, if desired, use only IP-wrapped packets or even just Ethernet frames to communicate.

We finally get to some real code in the TCP/UDP socket communication sections. Axelson begins with samples of UDP, then TCP, socket communications. She bounces back and forth between Rabbit C code and TINI Java code. Both sets of examples are properly threaded so as to be more than just academic-example hogwash. Then she delves into the details of UDP and TCP, beginning with descriptions of the frame headers, then concludes with handshaking/flow-control (SYN-ACK and so forth). She includes suggestions for other books that continue even deeper into socket communications which is very nice especially since they aren't gratuitous promotions from the same publisher. (They are, in fact, from two different publishers.) By the way, Lakeview Research is her own company, so Axelson self-publishes. Nice.

Fully half of the book is dedicated to describing the top layer of the protocol stack: applications. Specifically, HTTP client and server, receiving and sending email, and FTP client and server. The HTTP samples leverage the bundled TINI and Rabbit libraries to serve web pages. Axelson also includes examples of running a third-party servlet engine (Tynamo) on the TINI system. Similarly, the sections for sending and receiving email and the FTP client/server leverage the bundled libraries of Rabbit and TINI. I find this appropriate -- why write low-level socket code when there are available libraries that perform all the grunge work for you? If you do need to modify the support libraries, the Rabbit Dynamic C source code is available, but the TINI Java library source code is not.

The last few sections of the book discuss security. Axelson doesn't leave security as a footnote, as she does include sample code for basic authentication, but she also doesn't give security the depth she provided the other topics. Sure, security is a huge topic which would take numerous volumes to cover, but I thought this section could use a little more detail. I would like to have seen example code in the sections on encryption (both symmetric and asymmetric). I would like to have seen what is required to enable SSL in the web server examples. If these were not to be provided, I would have like to have her cite other books which would have completed her discussion as she did in the raw socket communications sections.

What Could Be Improved

I don't really like the large font and spacing used in this book; I prefer a more condensed text which probably would have reduced the book size some 20% or so. But as I think about it, perhaps this is one characteristic that make Axelson's books so easy to read: there is little eye-strain.

In the hardware sections, I would like to have seen even a trivial example of an NE2000 device driver. It wouldn't even have to be an Ethernet-compliant driver, just something that demonstrates sending and receiving with flow and error control. This would be useful if you were building your own device which didn't include a protocol stack.

In the low-level socket communications sections, I would have preferred to see two things. First, I would have liked to see a test program that communicated between the C-based Rabbit and the Java-based TINI to demonstrate a heterogeneous distributed embedded system. Second, I would have like to seen an echo test program. When prototyping communications to any embedded system I always write an echo test program which begins by transmitting a small message with a numeric value, then listens for messages, increments their value, and sends them back out. Validation testing is performed during this process. This program is easy to write and a great diagnostic tool.

Conclusion

Since this is my first book review I can't objectively give it an absolute rating like 4 stars or 8/10 since you have nothing to compare my judgment to. However, I can say that this book is well worth the money spent which, all too often, isn't the case anymore these days. I think Axelson has struck an ideal blend of detail where needed and summary when detail is not required. The book is organized well and should satisfy both the casual bathroom reader and the rigorous, horribly-cracked-binding, lab-bench-reference reader.

I like Axelson's writing style; it's an ideal blend of assume I'm an idiot-style when you need it and in-depth when you want to dig. Another great point: she doesn't stuff the appendices with data sheets, API documentation, or command syntax references. All those can be found on-line and have no place in a book, where they quickly become dated. If you absolutely must have a definite rating, then I'd give it an 8 or 9 out of 10. I would place books like Stevens' Unix Network Programming at a solid 10 and about 99% of the other books out there around a 5.


You can purchase Embedded Ethernet and Internet Complete from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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105 comments

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180545)

Oops, didn't really make it.

Re:FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180587)

hey that was a really good first post! congrats on getting it!

Re:FP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180922)

You did get first post, but you state in your post that you didn't. So did you fail it or not? I'd say you half failed it.

Life is like a box of chocolates! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180557)


Get it?

Forrest Post.

Heh.

Re:Life is like a box of chocolates! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180692)

When your only tool is a hammer,
every problem looks like a nigger.

Re:Life is like a box of chocolates! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180726)


God -damn- I miss Peter, Paul and Mary.

fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180562)

mmmmm, frosty pist!

Re:fp! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180957)

We really need a "-1, You Failed It" moderation option.

Michael Jackson Haikus (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180567)

Michael Jackson's bed
Stained with semen, spots of blood
Tiny fingerprints

Thriller, Off The Wall
History, Bad, Dangerous
Titles say it all

Is he black or white?
He was black when he was born
Now he's sort of grey

Visit Neverland
See the monkeys in their cage
You'd be safer there

Re:Michael Jackson Haikus (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180604)

i absolutely love:

Thriller, Off The Wall
History, Bad, Dangerous
Titles say it all

You've got some flare. keep up the good work. (if it's not a paste)

hehe (3, Funny)

fjordboy (169716) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180569)

The book is organized well and should satisfy both the casual bathroom reader and the rigorous, horribly-cracked-binding, lab-bench-reference reader.
And sometimes, those two types are the exact same reader...

In loving memory ..... juses (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180728)

To Whom It May Concern (other than myself):

Hi. I have been a huge fan of cereals of all kinds for my whole life. Sometimes I eat it for all three meals of the day, or live on it exclusively for weeks, or put it in my underpants to keep me feeling fresh (and also as an emergency back-up snack). I cereasly love it.

I am especially fond of a lot of your cereals like Boo Berry and Trix and Chex and Lucky Charms and Cookie Crisp. My absolute favorite is Fruity Pebbles though, which I believe is a Post cereal. Maybe you guys should make something that tastes like Fruity Pebbles except manages not to have Fred Flintstone's ugly mug all over the box. Yabba Dabba Eww. Anyway, my point is that I like a lot of your cereals and so I am personally concerned with their condition. And, quite frankly, lately I've been a bit worried.

Let's start with my favorite cereal of yours - Boo Berry. I love Boo Berry... at least I think I do... actually, I know it used to be my favorite cereal but I haven't had any in years so I've kind of forgotten what it tastes like - because it's not in any stores! No stores in my area carry it. I checked on your website and apparently you still make it; you even offer it for sale. Unfortunately I can't justify buying it for the $6.74 for a twelve ounce box price. You do offer buying it in a case instead of a four pack, which would drop the price to $4.71 a box, but that is still unreasonable and would also require me to spend an entire week's pay on a large shipment of haunted cereal. My girlfriend would kill me (if I didn't overdose on blue food coloring first).

I think I have a solution to this dilemma. I know you can't force any businesses to carry your cereals and I know that you can't afford to sell them direct for less than $4.71 and still have money left over to pay for upkeep on Count Chocula's castle, hiring someone to build 400 mind-numbing advertisements disguised as crappy kids games for youruleschool.com, and keep your CEOs rolling in golden Kix. So here's what you should do - open up your own stores all across the country. You've already got one in Mall-of-America, now put one in every mall in America. Even if you don't sell much cereal (and you'd sell a lot, trust me) it would be great advertising. You can sell t-shirts with nifty slogans like "Frosted Wheaties: When You're Too Damn Lazy To Put Sugar On Your Own Wheaties!" or "Honey Nut Chex: It Rhymes With 'Funny Butt Sex' For A Reason!" and other stuff which is even more great advertising plus it makes money up front. I can see it now, picture a young child in the mall with its mother...

YOUNG CHILD: Mommy! Mommy! Look at all the pretty colored cereal!

MOTHER: Oh Honey, you know cereals like that are just a result of the global dentist/cereal/porn conspiracy, we've been through this a million times...

YOUNG CHILD: Awww...

MAN IN TRIX RABBIT SUIT comes out of the store.

MAN IN TRIX RABBIT SUIT: You know Ms. Averagemother, all of our cereals are fortified with titanium plating and deflector shi... er, essential vitamins and minerals; and they are a part of this complete breakfast.

MAN IN TRIX RABBIT SUIT whips out a complete breakfast on a tray.

MOTHER: Well... I guess a few minutes couldn't hurt...

YOUNG CHILD: Gee, thanks mom!

YOUNG CHILD runs in followed slowly by MOTHER. Group of scantily clad dentists appears and drags MOTHER into back room. YOUNG CHILD transforms into a cartoon and spends eternity trying to steal Lucky's Charms and torturing the Trix Rabbit by hogging the cereal.

Now, on to my next suggestion. You need to do something about Cheerios. Really, they're awful. Yes they are good for my heart, but this is overshadowed by the fact that they taste like my butt.

On the other hand, a cereal that already tastes great is Lucky Charms. I would like you to address some concerns I have about the marshmallows, though. I remember that when I was a lad, there were only five different marshmallows in Lucky Charms: pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, green clovers, and blue diamonds. I could find at least a tenuous reason for all those symbols to be 'lucky charms' other than the pink hearts. What is so lucky about a pink heart? And by messing with the marshmallows you've only made the cereal even more unlucky overall. Purple horseshoes were a really great addition, good color choice and they are lucky, but red balloons? Anyway, rather than discuss each marshmallow change in the cereal's history individually, let's look at the marshmallow situation currently:

1. Shooting star. You've modified the orange stars and changed them into shooting stars. I can get into this. Shooting stars are way lucky. Good move.

2 and 3. Pot o' gold and rainbow. It seems redundant to me to have a raindow and the pot o' gold which one finds at the end of it. One of these should be dismissed with prejudice.

4. Red balloon. Ugh. Sad movie, sadder marshmallow. Please explain to me why a red balloon is lucky. You can't - because they aren't. Remove this shit from my cereal and fire the jackass who thought it was a good idea.

5. Lucky's hat. You changed the four-leaf clover into some midget's out of fashion hat. I realize how cool it is that you guys have the technology now to make two-tone marshmallows, but just because you can doesn't mean you should. Change this back to the clover.

6. Pink heart. This one is hard to call. I guess it should stay given that it's the only one of the original four marshmallows left, and I guess it's lucky to have a heart because otherwise you'd need to pump your blood manually which would be awfully dull and very time consuming.

7. Purple horseshoe. The best one in the box.

8. Blue moon. Not bad in and of itself, but there was no need to combine the blue diamond and yellow moon into this single marshmallow. Why did you bother? To make room in the marshmallow factory for the 'red balloon' machine? Come on.

So, for maximum luckiness, this is how Lucky Charms should be. Shooting stars, rainbows (or pots o' gold, but I like rainbows better because they remind me of homos), green clovers, pink hearts, purple horseshoes, yellow moons, and blue diamonds. This would also reduce the total number of different marshmallow types from eight to seven - which is a far luckier number.

Hey, Trix is too sweet and pointy now. I remember it being tasty and pleasantly round at one point. Fix my Trix you dix.

And lastly, I feel I have to bring up a subject that may be hard for you to discuss. We need to talk about what happened to some of your spokespeople.

For instance, the current spokesman for Cinnamon Toast Crunch is Wendell the baker (why making cinnamon toast requires a baker is a question I won't even bring up right now). I clearly remember two other bakers, Bob and a chap with the unfortunate name of Quello, helping Wendell out (why making cinnamon toast required three bakers is another question I won't even bring up right now). Now they are gone. What happened to them? My theory is that Wendell collaborated with someone in your company to have them rubbed out so he could get a large raise and be given the chance to market his inferior French Toast Crunch. But maybe it's something more innocent than that, like they were run over by an out of control cookie cop truck, ground up, and made into delicious cinnamon-sugary sprinkles.

Speaking of cookie cop trucks, Cookie Crisp was once sold by a crafty crook, his canine companion, and a cookie cop who never failed to capture the chocolate chip crazed criminals. Now only Chip the cookie dog remains, and he has apparently given up his life of crime and become a big silly wussbag. I am disturbed by the lack of information about what happened to the other two. Was the crook arrested? If so, why is the dog still free? If he was let off on the basis of being a dog, why did the cop throw him in jail with his master in the commercials? What happened to the cop? Is he still on the force? Why isn't he after snickerdoodle thieves or something?

Those are the ones I've personally noticed go missing, but I've talked to some people inside your organization and they had disturbing news. A lot of names were mentioned: Cheeri O'Leary, Ice Cream Jones, Mr. Wonderfull, Waldo the wizard, Major Jet... the list goes on and on.

Please explain these disappearances or I may be forced to contact the authorities.

Your biggest fan,

Johnathan Feruken

P.S. Hey, whatthefuck is up with Kaboom, anyway? That's some scary crap!

Re:In loving memory ..... juses (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180867)

i commend you

A woman wrote this? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180578)

What kind of woman writes stuff like this.

Women should be on the street puttin duckets in my pocket.

She sure did... (-1, Troll)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180599)

And she still had time to go to the kitchen and bring me pie.

I thought Jan was a guy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180665)

I said to myself Jan pronounced Yaan, but it's Jan short for Janet.

IT-ZA KREY-ZEE VORRL-DA VEE LEE-VA IN-A

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180606)

Women should be on the street puttin duckets in my pocket.

I like to keep my women serving me in the kitchen during the day and in my bed at night. It's hard to find women, who understand this god-given role of theirs. I blame it on the liberals and "sensitive males" who have voluntarily given women this power.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Flamebait)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180638)


What kind of woman writes stuff like this.

Hey man, don't sell the women short. Lots of women have smart DNA in them, unfortunately most of them spit it out.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180724)


"-1, Flamebait": due to female slashdotters that don't swallow.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180764)

Nah... women don't read slashdot.

The grandparent was modded down by the "sensitive geek types" who're willing to put up with any tantrums and whims ("I'm saving myself for the special one until I get married") of women.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180799)

Yup. There comes a time in a geek's life where you must ask yourself if having a gf is worth becoming a submissive pool of slime.

My answer: No fucking way.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181594)

Loser.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181688)

Don't look now, but you are being cheated on.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181117)

BWAHAHAHAHA!!!! Even my wife thought this one was funny. Gawd the mods are really puritanical now, aren't they? Get a clue and a sense of humor you dilholes.

Re:A woman wrote this? (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180747)

And so many people at /. wonder why they don't have a girlfriend...

The smartest person I know is female.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180767)

The smartest person I know is female.

Then you don't seem to know many smart people indeed.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180794)

The smartest person I know is a guy.

Re:A woman wrote this? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180828)

The smartest person I know is female.

Do you think that someone is gonna award you a PC prize or women will get the hots for you just because of bullshit statements like that?

Re:A woman wrote this? (1, Informative)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181000)

Not at all.

The fact that I'm as ugly as a smacked arse would put women off.

I was just pointing out that not all women are stupid.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183595)

The fact that I'm as ugly as a smacked arse would put women off.

I was just pointing out that not all women are stupid.

Somebody modded this as "Informative". Precisely what didn't they know?

  1. The poster is as ugly as a smacked arse?
  2. A smacked arse is ugly?
  3. Being as ugly as a smacked arse would put women off?
  4. Not all women are stupid?
  5. That he was pointing out that not all women are stupid?

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181490)

And so many people at /. wonder why they don't have a girlfriend... The smartest person I know is female.

Mac OS X: A server strength operating system that your granny could install and use.

I like the way you think on two counts.

malia8888, OS X user & female

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181068)

No, the reviewer made a mistake. Jan is a man. It is not Jan as in, "Marsha, Marsha, Marsha!" Jan is prounced like "yawn" and is a male's name that is germanic (scandinavian? something in that general vicinity) in origin.

Re:A woman wrote this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181155)

Correct. In fact, I'm a German and my name's Jan (pronounced "Jun").

Can you do it or can't you? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180584)

That's what my boss asked me.

"If we have a Windows 2000 Server as our domain server (no way to get rid of it) with Kerberos authentication, can Samba clients live in the same network so that the users are authenticated from the server?"

Re:Can you do it or can't you? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180611)

Hi, I represent Indian computer services company. It sounds like we could talk to your boss about replacing you with two smart ambitious goal-oriented individuals that I have in my office right here.

Re:Can you do it or can't you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180672)

Ok, you can call him [proactive-it.com]. I'm quitting tomorrow. I can't work in a company that has even one computer Micro$oft malware.

-Jim

Re:Can you do it or can't you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180849)

Good luck in that. You pretty much narrowed your choices down to Sun, Apple, and Redhat. And I am not even sure that they don't have at least one machine around just to compare to.

You'll get as much parity as we let you have. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180684)

Used to be that San Francisco sent it's laundry by ship to be done in China. That was a temporary situation, too.

Thanks for the review (4, Interesting)

prostoalex (308614) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180588)

It sounds like a good title to have around, I will probably buy it just for that reason.

However, if the device or embedded system you're working on is already designed and your goal is to network-enable it, what do you guys turn to? From what I've seen around, Lantronix XPort [lantronix.com] is a good option for cheap embedded device servers, but what else is available?

Re:Thanks for the review (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180706)

If you're not advertising, then I don't know what an advertisement is...

Jakcin' fool (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180918)

Do you normally _jack off_ while reading Slashdot? Or do you _jack off_ thinking about your cube-mates' wife? You are a very sorry person.

Re:Thanks for the review (2, Informative)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181354)

Most small PIC/AVR projects that I have seen use these: http://edtp.com [edtp.com] The only problem is it's a SW solution so don't expect them to outlast even the saddest DoS attack :)

Re:Thanks for the review (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181798)

Check out solutions from www.multitech.com . They build or design modules for numerous applications.

dcs

Re:Thanks for the review (1, Informative)

daehrednud (627171) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181732)

Digi has an embedded IP device called Connect ME [digi.com].
You can get it with GNU tools which is nice if you are used to gcc and gdb.

Re:Thanks for the review (2, Informative)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182479)

There are a LOT of ways to do it these days. As with any CPU, you have to very carefully consider your volume expectations, r&d budget, and performance/feature requirements. The most MIPS for the dollar is probably the Ubicom [ubicom.com] ip2022 processor (120 or 160 MIPS for $10-$15 ea). This chip is used in the Squeezebox [slimdevices.com] as well as some wireless access points and birdges. The ip2k is interesting because of its very fast interrupt latency which enables it do the ethernet MAC in software.

However there are other products such as the Rabbit [rabiitsemi.com] platform which have royalty free software and cheaper development kits, so they're more suitable for small volume or lower speed applications such as control systems. It is a multi-chip design with external ethernet and memory though, so not cheap per-unit.

Re:Thanks for the review (2, Insightful)

DezMo (155417) | more than 10 years ago | (#8186405)

So apparently someone with a Lantronix bias, or an anti-Digi bias, has moderated the reply mentioning the Digi Connect ME [digi.com] out of sight, which is a direct competitor to the Lantronix XPort [lantronix.com].

Now why would anyone do that? Maybe it's time for me to finally check out this meta-moderation thingy... yeah, I'm a lazy lurker.

urrrgh (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180621)

Ethernet, TCP, UDP, and IP frames

Uhh.. Ethernet uses frames, IP uses packets.

Re:urrrgh (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180710)

don't be stupid, be a smartie come and join the nazi party

But the most important question is ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180622)

... is the author a hot chick?

Re:But the most important question is ... (-1, Offtopic)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180689)

She's in IT so, only when she takes off her glasses. (Or has TV been lying to me again?)

Is there a reason? I hope not! (-1, Troll)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180630)

Listen you, there is nothing *wrong* with sucking cock. *Cock* is good. A large part of my diet comes from *cock*, and quite frankly, sucking *cock* is easier than eating pussy, and the feedback is 100% better. So I say to all you cute guys, shave your pubes and get some *cock* action. In fact, sucking *cock* is quite tasty indeed, sperm is mostly albumen protein which is the same as egg whites. So, if you want to learn to eat cum, try egg whites with a little salt. The trick to sucking a good *cock* is to run your mouth around the base of the head. Drive a guy *crazy* that way, you will. Than, lick the underside of his shaft as you fool with his balls, oh my God. The real joy for a trouser snake monster is sucking up a cute teenage boy who has never had *cock* or pussy. Let me tell you, they moan and thrust like your first fuck every time.

Written by Jason Alexander! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180682)

Hey that's George from Seinfeld! And the guy who married Britney Spears

Re:Written by Jason Alexander! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180743)

He has two first names?!!! Inconcievable!

Errr... I meant to ask "Britney Spears married George from Seinfeld"?!!!

FUCKING FAGS!!!!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180748)

FUCK YOU

Re:FUCKING FAGS!!!!!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180930)

Hey, don't knock it until you try it.

I used to be like you. Then one night I fucking drunk and just couldn't score with the ladies at the club. Yet, I had a serious case of blue balls and fully expected to have a late-night date with Mary Palm and her five sisters.

Then I totally hit it off with this young guy... the blowjob he gave me just blew my mind and now I consider myself lucky for being able to enjoy both men and women. Steve really freed my mind and body.

Mr first review of a review (2, Funny)

lonb (716586) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180757)

...let me suggest not starting your list improvements talking about fonts ;-)

Rubbish (-1, Offtopic)

Samuel Duncan (737527) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180762)

Anyone propagating ethernet, IP and TCP for real time systems should be hit with a stick. Hard.
Babbling hyped protocol PR is regretable, utter nonsense not.

Free clue for Sam Duncan... (2, Insightful)

rewt66 (738525) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180811)

Embedded and real-time are not equivalent.

Re:Free clue for Sam Duncan... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181003)

Given the realities of the Slashdot moderation system, although you are correct and Sam's knee-jerk reaction demonstrates his need to be hit with a clue-stick, I predict that:

Your comment will stay at (Score:1) or sink, but Sam's will rise to the (Score:6, "Utterly Misinformed Dolt in a no WMD's But Still We Can Justify It After The Fact By Finding Something Wrong That We Must Have Fixed") kind of way.

Re:Rubbish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180822)

And Java, too.

Juses Juses Juses (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180776)

he is god
he is god

Code samples for the book.... (4, Informative)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180778)

...in Java and C are here [lvr.com].

And the usual code quality report courtesy PMD [sf.net]:
$ java net.sourceforge.pmd.PMD ~/tmp/eec/embedded_ethernet_complete_code/ text rulesets/unusedcode.xml -shortnames

Tini/RealTimeWebPage/RealTimeWebPag e.java 42 Avoid unused local variables such as 'server'
Tini/SendEmailMailto/SendEmail.java&nbsp ; 106 Avoid unused local variables such as 'mySendEmail'
Tini/TcpServer/TcpServer.java 35 Avoid unused local variables such as 'myTcpServer'
Tini/UdpReceive/UdpReceive.java 31 Avoid unused local variables such as 'myUdpReceive'
Tini/UdpSend/UdpSend.java 43 Avoid unused local variables such as 'myUdpSend'

Re:Code samples for the book.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180880)

whatever the hell that gibberish is, the trolls have conquered this story. cease and desist, you ontopic bitch

You want Britney!!!! here ya go!!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180857)

For whatever reason
I feel like I've been wanting you all my life
But you don't understand
I'm so glad we're at the same place at the same time
Its over now

I spotted you dancin'
You made all the CowboyNeals stare
Those lips and your brown eyes
And the sexy hair
I shake shake my thing
I make the world want you
Tell your Trolls you'll be back
I wanna see what you can do.

What would it take for you to just leave with me
Not trying to sound conceited but me and you were meant to be
You're a sexy troll, I'm a nice girl
Lets turn this dance floor into our own little nasty world

Trolls
Sometimes a girl just needs one
Trolls
To love her and to hold
Trolls
When a girl is with one
Trolls
Then she's in control

Pick a troll off the dance floor. (Make him say duh-huh)
Screamin in his ear
Must of said somethin' bout me (what you said?)
Cuz he's loookin over here
You looking at me
With that sexy attitude
But the way you troll's movin in
It puts me in the mood

What would it take for you to just leave with me
Not trying to sound conceited but me and you were meant to be
You're a sexy troll, I'm a nice girl
Lets turn this dance floor into our own little nasty world

Trolls
Sometimes a girl just needs one
Trolls
To love her and to hold
Trolls
When a girl is with one
Trolls
Then she's in control

tha'ts a ;ptta noise to signal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180923)

just making slashdot a better place. mod down. teabaggers.

WTF? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180927)

I read the title and thought: "They finished embedding the Internet?"...

How about a USB starter kit? (1)

evilad (87480) | more than 10 years ago | (#8180933)

Anybody seen something similar, but for USB? I.e., if you want to build an embedded USB slave device?

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (0, Troll)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181015)

Axelson authors a set of Complete books including ones covering serial, parallel, and USB communication

I recommend "RTFA for dummies."

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (2, Informative)

ATucker (200614) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181016)

You can answer this question in 5 seconds on Amazon or Google... Axelson wrote a book on USB development as well. Check it out here [lvr.com]

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (3, Informative)

kvigor (66615) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181032)

As it happens, Jan Axelson has written this exact book, USB Complete. I am in the process of implementing a USB device and I give it a hearty recommend. The "standard" work is USB Design By Example by John Hyde; it's nice to have, but if you have to pick one, the Axelson is both more readable and more complete.

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181533)

I would like to second the recommendation, the book was quite useful to me as well.

For a simple USB device, nothing beats the HID drivers. Much of the time, what you want to do is already built into the driver; joysticks, mice, keyboards, volume controls, etc. For other things, you can use control transfers to send data packets to the device. Faster stuff is more difficult, but a lot of example code is building up, much more than when I was working on USB.

If you make your device emulate a standard HID, the added benefit is that it will work on most operating systems with little or no work developing host-side drivers.

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181589)

One other thing: Jan often haunts the comp.arch.embedded newsgroup, so sometimes you can ask about things in the books there and get answers straight from the horse's mouth. This is why I love Usenet...Gordon McComb of "Robot Builder's Bonanza" is also a heavily involved regular at comp.robotics.misc.

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181050)

scroll down the page....

http://www.beyondlogic.org/usb/usbhard2.htm

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181078)

and here is the page with embedded ethernet kits .....

http://www.beyondlogic.org/etherip/ip.htm

Re:How about a USB starter kit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181512)

the new mouser catalog has some REALLY slick usb stuff in the microprocessor section. you can get all the usb circutry, and a "B" connector on a nice 20 pin DIP package. also comes with freely redistributable driver software.

they have some boards now with ethernet AND USB on them. they come with open freely redistributable tcp/ip code. with sample webservers/ftp/email code included.

i really need to play with some of teese things :)

I can recommend the Rabbit processor (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8180970)

fwiw, I've been using a Rabbit (RCM2200) for almost a year now on a personal project. It's connected to my house network, which is connected to the internet via the normal methods (Linksys hardware). The supplied libraries that come with the Rabbit are very capable as-is, but you can expand them if need be since you get the source (as the reviewer mentioned). I added code to be able to do authenticated smtp logins, for example. Getting code up and running to be able to do a telnet login to check on its status, and change settings was dead easy. It runs 24/7 and has been very reliable... the uptime hasn't exceeded a few months simply because I usually don't go that long without performing a code update of some kind, or otherwise powering down for a hardware reconfig, etc. Someday I may document the project and submit it to /. .... those who have seen it thus far think it's pretty kewl.

w

Re:I can recommend the Rabbit processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181438)

So what's your house project all about? In a few words.

Re:I can recommend the Rabbit processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181992)

1) Checks my email at a configurable rate
1.1) if so directed, emails me at work with a list of all current emails (firewall from hell at work) whenever the status of my pop3 acct changes.

2) It's also connected to a custom made back-illuminated world map (think James Bond). Each continent can be driven to 1 of 3 colors. This is done with a serial link, the world map contain a BASICX processor. The map resides in my living room - looks nice, very aesthetic.

For instance, email from someone on a white list, North America turns red. Email from the gf, South America turns red. Unknown email, Europe. Below freezing outside, Antarctica turns blue. Over 80F, turns red. Quiescent state is yellow for the whole map. Soft errors turn Australia green... hard (voltage problems, etc) errors turn Australia red.

and so forth. It's not done yet.

w

Re:I can recommend the Rabbit processor (1)

Mr2cents (323101) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181715)

I've also done multiple projects with Rabbit. It is a cool product, but the software environment is crappy. There have been many discussions about it on their forum, my main problem with it has always been the lack of a linker and #include is replaced by #use.. In these "used" libraries, you have to define external symbols in specially crafted comments.. basically the system is hacked together imho.
They created a new IDE by the time I stopped using it, so that invalidates some other remarks I had, the older one was simply unusable.
Also the compiler only runs on windows, I asked if they could bring out a command-line version for linux but they said it used the win32 api (a compiler using the Win32 API???). Together with the fact that shortly before that they didn't even have a command-line version for windows, suggested to me that the compiler was woven into the GUI. Again and again, bad design decisions boiled up in their software.
But still, together with their TCP/IP stack, you can develop network-enabled embedded devices much faster and cheaper than whatever I've seen, if you can cope with some frustration.

PS: If you plan to use the rabbit, here's a free advice: there is no such thing as a signed char in DynamycC. char == unsigned char. It cost me a couple of days to realize.

Re:I can recommend the Rabbit processor (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182106)

Yes, the general observation that the development platform is not as extended and mature as we'd all like it to be is correct. I think benchmarking a product like this against a high volume production environment (Windows, *nix) is a bit unfair. I bet the quality of this product vs the number of man-hours spent on it is as high or higher than if you spotlighted a similar time in the development of Windows or *nix programming environments.

btw, the current IDE is totally usable for me (v8.01 I think? or is that 8.10... 8.2?) and while some of their design decisions about the language implementation are questionable as you've mentioned, I think the value for the $$ is still a high ratio.

all imo

w

Re:I can recommend the Rabbit processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182752)

Another Rabbit user here. I agree that Dynamic C v8.x is better, but it still sucks. It is reasonable to expect ANSI C. Dynamic C isn't ANSI. They could be a poster child for OSS and help themselves out a lot if they would just dump the compiler and get GCC working on it. They make there money on hardware anyway. Why not embrace OSS for their software tools? The only drawback I can think of is for the current developers employed to write this software. I know this is AC and few will read it, but can someone, anyone explain why ZWorld/RabbitSemi isn't doing this?

Is the author a fat chick? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181103)

If so, then this article is not worth looking at.

Much like michael's fat bitch.

Bigger Is Sometimes Better (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181237)

By the way, Lakeview Research is her own company, so Axelson self-publishes. Nice.

While I admire Jan for making a viable business out of something she obviously loves, she seems to have bitten off a lot for herself. After building some prototype hardware based on Parallel Port Complete, I found the book had an error making my hardware quite crippled (a software workaround was possible, but inefficient and ugly). I pointed it out to her via e-mail, but it was never resolved to my satisfaction. AFAIK, to this day that error still exists.

I began to wonder what it must be like to self-publish and then deal with an error report when you are author, editor, publisher and tech support all rolled into one. A bigger company may not have handled my issue any better, but certainly it would have the resources do so easier than a small self-publisher. My two cents are: Jan's stuff is great for hobbyists, but beware of accuracy.

Donald Duck (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181256)

Donald Duck is going to have a SCREAMING ORGASM when he orders this from Amazon along with their 1 click patent.

other good embedded IP resources (3, Informative)

SleezyG (466461) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181585)

TCP/IP Lean by Jeremy Bentham, ISBN: 1-929629-11-7

Cirrus Logic CS8900a Ethernet module [cirrus.com], it works in 8-bit mode

Buy a CS8900 [embeddedethernet.com] module.

** Shameless plug **
Read my thesis [lehigh.edu] about how to put it all together.

Re:other good embedded IP resources (1)

certsoft (442059) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182200)

TCP/IP Lean

Yes, an interesting book. I haven't actually used any code out of it for any of my CS8900 projects (used with ZF486, ADSP2189, and PIC18F252) but has some good ideas.

Buy a CS8900 [embeddedethernet.com] module.

At $70, a bit high, the edtp board is $50 and can be used in either 8bit or 16bit mode.

Another book (2, Interesting)

scrotch (605605) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181602)

I just got sent an announcement for O'Reilly's Hardware Hacking Projects [oreilly.com] book.

It may be a better fit for those of us with absolutely no background, really short attention spans and very strange ideas about what might be cool to do to a toilet...

Re:Another book (1)

Mr2cents (323101) | more than 10 years ago | (#8181781)

..and very strange ideas about what might be cool to do to a toilet...

Don't forget to flush your buffers afterwards!

TINI Java Library Source Code (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8181913)

If you do need to modify the support libraries, the Rabbit Dynamic C source code is available, but the TINI Java library source code is not.
I'm assuming you mean that the TINI Java library source code is not available as .java files? I've occassionally used JAD [tripod.com] to decompile .class files in order to examine and/or fix broken vendor implementations.

The author is not a woman (1)

LeftOfCentre (539344) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183296)

You refer to Jan as "her" and "she". Jan is a (Swedish) male name, however.

Her publisher certainly thinks she is (1)

Delf (1807) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183510)

Jan is also a woman's name in English (the language the book is written in.)

The publisher's bio shown at the linked Barnes and Noble site for the book says, "She".

Re:Her publisher certainly thinks she is (1)

LeftOfCentre (539344) | more than 10 years ago | (#8184008)

Ok, thanks for pointing that out -- it looks like I missed it. However, considering Jan's second name (Axelsson) is also clearly Swedish, and both are very common (in Sweden), I'd say it's beyond doubt that this person is a male, and most probably a Swede. Barnes and Noble must have made a mistake. As for the book being written in English, that's usually what technical books destined for an international audience are written in regardless of the author's nationality.

Re:Her publisher certainly thinks she is (1)

tdrury (49462) | more than 10 years ago | (#8186572)

Seeing as how her picture used to be printed along with her articles in Circuit Cellar, I'm 100% positive she is a she.

Cat-5? (1)

iantri (687643) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183395)

She also includes a small section on building your own Cat-5 for you really cheap Joes.

Assuming they mean making up network cable and not actually fabricating CAT-5 wire, why on Earth would you NOT make your own cables?

CDN$.30/foot + connectors is a hell of a lot cheaper than the precut lengths that are only available in standard sizes (25ft, 50ft), and it's very easy..

Other work by Jan Axelson (2, Informative)

DanDanknick (749220) | more than 10 years ago | (#8184532)

We routinely publish her work in Nuts & Volts (hobby electronics) as well as SERVO Magazine (personal robotics).

Dan Danknick
Technical Editor (of both)
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