Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ten Technologies That Refuse to Die

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the toilets-shouldn't-have-visible-electrical-wires dept.

Technology 1381

kudyadi writes "Technology Review has an interesting article on, as the title suggests, ten technologies that we continue using despite advances made in the same. The best example is that of analog watches, "Compared to today's digital timepieces, old-fashioned, sweep-hand watches are pathetic one-trick ponies. Digital-watch wearers can check temperature, altitude, and the time in Tokyo, play tunes and games, and send messages. Can wristwatch videoconferencing, Web surfing, and tarot readings be far off? But what digital watches can't do, according to sweep-hand proponents, is display the time and context as elegantly and intuitively as an analog model."" Interesting counterpoint to this post from a few years back about technologies that didn't manage to hang on. And Bruce Sterling has a short list of ones he'd like to see go away, too ;)

cancel ×

1381 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

#1 : Slashdot (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182961)

An outdated piece of crap, yet this technology refuses to die!

Macintosh (refuses to die) (4, Insightful)

callipygian-showsyst (631222) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182962)

You have to admit, no matter what side you're on...it's amazing the Mac has lasted this long after being pronounced dead several times.

Re:Macintosh (refuses to die) (1, Flamebait)

Jonas the Bold (701271) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183103)

Not really. Microsoft has always sucked, Macs have always been the best alternative for the desktop, so no, not really.

It being "pronounced dead" doesn't mean a whole lot, just that people are wrong, which really isn't all that suprising.

Re:Macintosh (refuses to die) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183128)

Sorry Mac fanboy, your OS is teh suck.

Re:Macintosh (refuses to die) (2, Insightful)

leifm (641850) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183143)

I'd agree if you are referring to = OS9 (the 'minority' 60% Mac market). OS X and the current crop of Apple machines are hardly dated technology.

Tech #11 That Refuses To Die (5, Funny)

sulli (195030) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182964)

*BSD

But... (1)

nefele (654499) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182981)

BSD is dead! ;-)

frists post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182968)

gimme some of that

With respect to dot matrix printers... (4, Interesting)

digitalvengeance (722523) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182970)

They still serve a very important purpose for many businesses: Multipart form printing.

One company I work with prints 4 part invoices for in-home services. We've tested alternatives, but have yet to find a non-impact printer capable of getting the job done.

I think its unfair to call the technology outdated when it still performs some tasks better than its modern counterparts.

Re:With respect to dot matrix printers... (5, Insightful)

schoolsucks (570755) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183048)

I agree. At work we use a dot matrix printer to print shipping forms that have to be signed. It just prints on one, and using carbon paper, it makes 2 other copies. The benefit of this comes when you sign the top copy and all 3 have the signature on them. With laser printer and making seperate copies, we had to sign 3 papers. So signing 100 copies would become signing 300 copies.

Re:With respect to dot matrix printers... (1)

JKR (198165) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183110)

Exactly that point was made in the article, you karma whore!

Jon.

Multipart Impacts (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183141)

OK, educate us. Why can't you just print the same form multiple times? Googling gives me lots of references to tamper-proofing, but not enough context to understand what this means.

One thing I found really irritating about the MIT article: the author's assumption that "impact" is just a fancy name for "dot matrix". Apparently it's never occured to him that printers can use type elements, just like typewriters.

EffPeeee (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182971)

Fizzirst pizzost beezatch.

ana-log (3, Insightful)

pinchhazard (728983) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182974)

Guess what? I just want a watch that tells time. I don't want that's tacky, but most digital watches come with this ungainly feature.

Re:ana-log (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183097)

Which is why I wear a Casio that has digital "hands".

I don't know if they make them anymore -- I saw one a few years ago at Fry's.

Re:ana-log (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183098)

And you can 'read' an analog watch faster than you can read a digital one.

Re:ana-log (1)

happyfrogcow (708359) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183137)

Compared to today's digital timepieces, old-fashioned, sweep-hand watches are pathetic one-trick ponies. Digital-watch wearers can check temperature, altitude, and the time in Tokyo, play tunes and games, and send messages. Can wristwatch videoconferencing, Web surfing, and tarot readings be far off?

I agree with what you said. The authors should be carefull what they wish for. Videoconferencing on a tiny 1 inch display, networked, tarot readings? come on. One day you'll be wondering what time it is and the Tarot Wench will come up on the videoconference display and predict your watch is about to be hacked. Next, you don't know what elevation your at, and have no idea why your watch is displaying tokyo's time when you've never left your nice metro lifestyle this side of the pacific.

digital watches have their place.. diving, climbing, maybe a few other places where those bells and whistles aren't just bells and whistles but needed functionality. walking around the same city 95% of my time, with clocks everywhere, i'll take an analog watch if any. none, however, has been my preference for 4 years. It's somewhat liberating not having a perpetual reminder of nagging Time on my wrist.

Re:ana-log (4, Insightful)

nycsubway (79012) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183138)

I think this applies to almost all of the technologies on that list. I think it boils down to one thing that people think, "I like this technology, it works for me, so i'll keep using it."

Fortran is # 10 (5, Interesting)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182977)


Forty-seven years after IBM unleashed it, Fortran (formula translation), the original "high-level" programming language, would seem to be the infotech equivalent of cuneiform. But it's still widely used, especially in scientific computing.


No need to throw the Fortran libraries away, though, just wrap them [gfd-dennou.org] in a higher level language [ruby-lang.org] . Chances are it'll be fast enough, and it'll almost certainly be a lot easier to use.

fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182980)

digtbk!

Windows NT (2, Interesting)

Sonic McTails (700139) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182982)

Over half of my school still uses Windows NT, even though they did het hacked a few times. They finnally got a XP site license for the student computers, but the staff ones still use NT

Re:Windows NT (3, Informative)

Reverend528 (585549) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183123)

A lot of public schools are still using 95.

#1 Technology that refuses to die (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182986)

Slashdot Dupes!

Bruce Sterling link (1)

Reducer2001 (197985) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182988)

It would have been nice if the author of the article had pointed his Bruce Sterling link to Bruce Sterling's article, instead of Google search results.

Or maybe he's trying to avoid Slashdotting something?

Re:Bruce Sterling link (1)

johndiii (229824) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183027)

The article requires you to log in as a Technology Review subscriber.

I'll tell you why (-1, Flamebait)

doofus1 (466720) | more than 10 years ago | (#8182989)

Digital watches are g a y - GAY. When's the last time you saw a pimp with a digital watch ?

Re:I'll tell you why (1, Funny)

FunkSoulBrother (140893) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183020)

And when was the last time YOU saw a pimp who dressed like a straight man?

Re:I'll tell you why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183064)

When you own that much pussy, you don't have to wear levi's.

Re:I'll tell you why (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183084)

some people are just spending way too much time around pimps...

Re:I'll tell you why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183091)

i've seen several pimps with digital watches. They like the built in timer and calculator type.

#10 Cremation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8182993)

bitter when burnt, I remember betamax.

Cars... Buildings.... (3, Funny)

flewp (458359) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183002)

Cars with wheels.

Buildings that need ground to support them.

So, where are the flying cars and cities on clouds damnit?!

And #11 is a tie between.. (4, Funny)

Awptimus Prime (695459) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183005)

SMTP and identd

Re:And #11 is a tie between.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183099)

No identd is the clear winner. Interesting you compare a server and a protocol! BTW SMTP is no more outdated than people who can't differentiate between social problems and technological ones.

Re:And #11 is a tie between.. (2, Insightful)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183130)

Yeah, SMTP is the first thing that came to my mind, too. I wish we could just get rid of it (and replace it).

As for identd.. people still use that?

quote (5, Funny)

trickycamel (696375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183009)

My favorite quote from the article:

"And you needn't worry about your system going obsolete if it already is."

How true...

Re:quote (4, Funny)

swordboy (472941) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183139)

Yeah... here's an example:

I'm required to carry my pager for work. I get pages maybe between once and three times a year. I've offered to give up the pager and take calls on my personal cell phone because of this. The pager is freaking old so it eats one AA battery per month. Because I got sick of throwing batteries away (*), I just decided to change the message on my pager.

If you would like to page me, please call me on my cell phone and let me know so that I can install a new battery in my pager. Thank you.

(*) I tried to create a battery recycling deal at work but people kept taking the box, thinking that these were good batteries (apparently, people don't know what "recycling" means). I'll probably try again with a better, more idiot-proof wording.

Old-fashioned watches (0)

KewlPC (245768) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183010)

The great thing about analog watches is that if you're ever lost in the wilderness, but your watch still works, you can use it like a compass.

I don't remember exactly how, but assuming that your watch is set to the correct local time, it'll work. It has something to do with the angle of the hour and minutes hand compared to the sun's distance over the horizon.

Re:Old-fashioned watches (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183035)

Yes but analog watches don't come with internet access so you can google on how to switch to compass mode.

Re:Old-fashioned watches (5, Informative)

Country_hacker (639557) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183112)

Point the hour hand in the direction of the sun (Keeping it horizontal of course), and the point between the hour hand and 12 will be South. For you "Below the belt" /.rs (South of the equator ;-) it'll be pointing North.

Cheers!
--RjS

Re:Old-fashioned watches (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183117)

as cool as that may sound, anyone savvy enough to know how to do this is a) not very likely to get lost in the wilderness and b) even less likely to do so without a real compass...

Re:Old-fashioned watches (1)

Bob(TM) (104510) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183118)

A quick google session shows how:

Using a watch as a compass. [time4watches.com]

the 11th (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183012)

floppy drive

Bruce's list? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183013)

And Bruce Sterling has a short list of one's he'd like to see go away, too ;)


Is one of them forced subscriptions to read a single lightweight online article?

Some are, some aren't (5, Insightful)

plover (150551) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183014)

His list has one point I'd argue: typewriters. They'll die with the current crop of older adults that still use them. (I'm 42 and haven't touched one in probably 17 years.) Offices used to keep them around, even after entering "the computer age", but if you walk into any small business now, you'll find the token typewriter stuffed in a closet, no longer even usable.

Yes, there are some people who use them, but there are fewer and fewer forms to fill out these days that aren't automated.

Re:Some are, some aren't (1)

mlong (160620) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183068)

Yes, there are some people who use them, but there are fewer and fewer forms to fill out these days that aren't automated.

And for the few forms you do encounter, its not a big deal to hand write them.

Re:Some are, some aren't (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183100)

I worked next to the office for the liquor director for Safeway in AZ. He had a typerwriter in his office because he had to have it for the state forms involved in getting/keeping liquor licenses. It was a trip.

The other place you may see lots of typerwriters is in a high school- where many typing classes still use them.

Snob (4, Insightful)

moehoward (668736) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183017)

Watches are jewelry, you techno-elitist snob. That's why people don't "upgrade".

What next. I should get my wife cubic zirconium because it looks the same as a diamond but is much cheaper because it was made with "technology". I'm just soooo old fashioned.

Re:Snob (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183090)

[Insert inevitable slashdot thread about diamonds, africa, DeBeers and Blood Money here]

Re:Snob (1, Insightful)

Awptimus Prime (695459) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183106)

I concur. The fact that analog watches "won't die" is just ignorant of the article's author.

A good Citizen is ~$1100. Buy it, it will appreciate over time. Thus you own something that you keep for the rest of your life and hand down to your kids. If it breaks, it can be repaired. You can get it appraised and get an insurance policy on it, etc. Many benefits.

GPS, cell, PDA, and other fancy electronic watches are gadgets more than anything. The quality of materials they are made with make them throw-away items in a few years. Thus, the reason I will not own one. I've got pockets for such devices.

Geeks, keep this in mind: Women are more likely to notice your watch and your shoes. If you are saying cheap or nerd with these items, it will not matter if you have $500 glasses and a nice jacket. :)

Re:Snob (2, Informative)

KanshuShintai (694567) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183126)

Well, you likely shouldn't buy her diamonds [slashdot.org] in the first place. No?

foxpro (3, Funny)

inf0c0m (83209) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183019)

the company i work for uses foxpro. might as well be writing code in sanskrit

One word (3, Funny)

Kizzle (555439) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183021)

Clippy

What about the other values of a tech? (4, Interesting)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183022)

As the owner of a Bulova timepiece, I am insulted that the other values of older technology like a watch are not considered. For example, the artistic merit and fine craftsmanship of my watch are enjoyable to me every time I use the watch. On a shallower note, it's dead sexy. The same conundrum was brought up about photos vs. oil paintings at the beginning of the 20th century -- sure, photos represent a "clear" picture of something, but they in no way diminish the quality and value of an original Rembrandt painting.

Obligatory Adams (5, Funny)

Mateito (746185) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183024)

"Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun.

Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.

This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

And so the problem remained; lots of the people were mean, and most of them were miserable, even the ones with digital watches."

Kind of obvious but... (5, Insightful)

nil5 (538942) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183025)

Some of us forget that "new" is not necessarily "better".

analog watches (1, Redundant)

ragnar (3268) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183028)

I own a decent Hamilton watch and feel a little sheepish that it is powered by a battery since the classic Hamilton watches are known for their wind-up machinery. I'm often on the lookout for a good deal on a wind-up because they are works of art. I use a digital watch for some athletic stuff, but aside from that you can't touch the class of "classic" watch machinery.

Re:analog watches (1)

Noofus (114264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183146)

I have a basic Seiko analog watch that I replaced my Digital with a few years ago. I got fed up with digital things in general. My 'athletic' watch is a cheap analog timex thats waterproof, I also take this one with me on vacations so I wont be upset to lose it. And I am looking for a decent 'high end' watch to wear when I need to get dressed up.

Its functional jewlery really. And in my opinion, the most beautiful things in the world are those that are function, yet look nice at the same time (think Ferrari, Lamborghini, etc or in some ways and to a much lesser extent, Apple products)

Analog Watches (2, Funny)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183030)

Analog watches will stay around for exactly the reason mentioned -- they are elegant and intuitive. Sure digital watches can do a lot more, but nobody cares because they look like ass. Wearing a digital watch with teleconferencing and web browsing is one of the surest ways to not get laid that I've heard of in a long time.

KISS - keep it simple stupid (5, Insightful)

Dethboy (136650) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183031)

It is just like over complicated phones. All I need it to do is keep time. Why does every device have to do 11,274 different things?

I've had countless digital watches, most are in the garbage. I also have one or two 'analog' watches that I simply wind up and they work. No batteries, no looking for the manual to figure out how to set the time in Tokyo, no calibrating altitude and temp.

Perl? (1, Insightful)

Mr. Neutron (3115) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183036)

Look at all of the newer technologies today that are:

1. Easier to read
2. Easier to code
3. Object-oriented
4. Facilitate MVC-type architecture

With Python, PHP, J2EE, and so forth, why is Perl still around?

Analog watches obsolete? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183037)

Digital watches are dead as... dead. I can't recall seeing one for sale for ages (I live in Finland)
I use my cellphone as timepiece. Occasionally i use a ten year old analog wristwatch (OK, I've got a digital one as well, got that one twenty one years ago)

analog is our friend. (1)

JohnLi (85427) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183038)

As a musician I believe that tubes will never die. The only thing that solid state and digital amps do well is suck. I use a Marshall JCM2000 DSL100, and i wouldnt have it any other way.

Along the same lines is 2 inch tape. The article touches on the fact that studios love it, but the reason is the same as why I and lots of others like tubes. They sound alive. You can run a million filters to emulate speakers and amps, but it never has the flaws that make a good natural recording. You need subtle faults or everything sounds sterile. I like pro-tools, but it's way better as an editing platform than a recording platform. Plus, Disk drives have a mean time to failure of what???...18 months or so? We can now remaster analog tapes from the 50s with no problem. Try to get the original tracks for a linkin park session in 50 or 60 years..good luck.

I also followed the "technologies that didn't manage to hang on" link only to find a highly ranked post speaking negativly of ribbon mics. I just used 2 awesome ribbon mics for a drum session and they sounded so incredible that they are at the top of my list of pro audio gear.

Don't confuse "Wouldn't live without" with "won't die"... Please.

THE POCKET PUSSY WILL NEVER DIE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183040)



Just ask my Designing Compilers classmates, sheesh.

Analog watches are better when you're counting... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183043)

My mother's a nurse, and she told me once that she MUST have an analog watch with a second hand when counting somebody's pulse. I tried it once, and she's right - you just can't count both pulses and seconds if you're looking at a digital display.

I think what's happening here is that with the analog watch, you use the "number" part of your brain to count the pulses, while you use the visual part of your brain to see when your 60 seconds is up (by looking for the position of the second hand).

With a digital seconds readout, you end up using the "number" part of your brain for both tasks, and you get screwed up.

Wires (1)

EyeSavedLatin (591555) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183044)

Wires... when can I have wireless everything? Yes, that's right, I would like wireless electricity too!

Working link for the Sterling Article? (0)

Filmwatcher888 (595369) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183046)

The one listed is Pay for Play...

Arn't we over this? (1)

TheCarp (96830) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183049)

Are we still so unevolved that we still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea?

Come on people.

Under reel-to-reel tape (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183052)

The article mentions laser turntables for vinyl discs.

Imagine if big companies decided to mass-market those laser turntables and bring the price down to a more manageable level...

Now THAT would be a good thing for both audiophiles and the RIAA. I think.

The one time... (1)

LinuxOnHal (315199) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183053)

Man, the one time I actually try and read the articles, one costs money and the other is a dead link from another Slashdot article!

Analog display on a digital watch (1)

crow (16139) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183055)

Digital watches were really trendy when they first appeared, but when you could get one for $5, analog watches came back into fashion. At about that time, I was given a watch that was a digital watch internally, but instead of an lcd, it had motors that moved the arms. It was rather funny changing modes and watching all the hands spin to their new locations.

The real point here, though, is that form is more important than function when it comes to fashion. Hence, analog watches (and SUVs, and...).

How primitive! (1)

Toutatis (652446) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183056)

Do you think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.

What about chemical photography? (2, Interesting)

The I Shing (700142) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183058)

For ten years, now, the media have been saying that any day now chemical photography will just go away. Bloom County, back in the early nineties, had Opus and Milo flushing a 35mm SLR down the toilet lamenting, "Oh, little Nikon, we hardly knew ye." And that was back when you couldn't touch a decent digital camera for under a grand.

And yet people are still buying 35mm film, shooting pics on it, and having it processed. Those single-use cameras (manufacturers bristle at the word "disposable") are still quite popular.

I do see more and more people with digital cameras nowadays, naturally, but rumors of the death of chemical photography are greatly exaggerated. University art departments still teach the old-fashioned methods.

I could go on and on about this forever, but there are other and better posts to read below.

"Sweep Hand" Watches Rule (5, Insightful)

JohnGrahamCumming (684871) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183060)

As Douglas Adams pointed out:
Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun.

Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.

The reason watches with moving hands are so successful is that same reason that even in modern glass cockpit aircraft the "old style" mechanical displays are rendered on screen: they are extremely fast and easy to read. The actual guts of the watch are irrelevant (purely mechanical all the way to purely electronic), but the display is the thing you are going to interact with every day.

And an important aspect of moving hands is that they convey information in their movement: in a cockpit the altimeter can be "read" very quickly to show whether the aircraft is ascending or descending. On a watch I can get an approximate time (it's almost 4:30pm) in a glance. Yet another example is a digital vs. analog scuba diving pressure gauge: the position of the mechanical arm can be understood very fast without worrying about the exact number of PSI left.

John.

Toilet Paper (5, Funny)

spun (1352) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183063)

Bidets are a 19th century innovation, and here we are (in America at least) cleaning our nether regions with paper. How barbaric!

watches... (1)

YllabianBitPipe (647462) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183065)

Someone should make a digital watch where the face is a little color LCD ... that displays the face of an analog watch. Make it have several different variations that change with a press of a button.

I just to want to have a watch.... (1)

Homology (639438) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183067)

"Compared to today's digital timepieces, old-fashioned, sweep-hand watches are pathetic one-trick ponies. Digital-watch wearers can check temperature, altitude, and the time in Tokyo, play tunes and games, and send messages. Can wristwatch videoconferencing, Web surfing, and tarot readings be far off? But what digital watches can't do, according to sweep-hand proponents, is display the time and context as elegantly and intuitively as an analog model."

I just to have watch so that I can see the time. Is that too little to ask for?

Analogue Watches? (1)

Czernobog (588687) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183069)

This guy needs to pull his head out of his arse...
The digital watch wishes it were as useful or stylish as the analogue.

Some people prefer their watches to tell the time and the time only you know. Maybe the date too.

Digital Watch (2, Insightful)

savagedome (742194) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183073)

The article makes it sound like analog watch is a bad thing. However, when I look at my watch (analog, of course) I am not really putting any effort to read time. I sort of know that its like 4:20 as I am writing this. It makes it easier too for e.g when I am driving as it doesn't really take my concentration away from the most important thing at that time which is driving.

However, I've owned a digital watch and it takes *some* effort to *read* the actual time. And even after doing that, I form a mental image of what time it is in terms of analog look.

Digital watch? No, thanks. I'ma keep my analog. IMHO

Telling time (1)

ChiralSoftware (743411) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183078)

Analog watches are not about telling time. We all have cellphones, VCRs, microwave ovens, car dashboards and little clocks on our computer screens that tell us the exact time wherever we look. Analog watches are worn for for many reasons, one of which is that a little wheel that oscilates back and fourth five times a second, is powered by wrist movements (in automatic watches) and somehow manages to keep time accurately to within a few seconds per day is an awesome triumph of engineering, something to be admired on its own.

Create a WAP wireless server [chiralsoftware.net] now

Money concerns and oddities (1)

Luther Pain (747907) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183079)

Most of the mentioned bits of technology continue to be in usage because most people don't have the money for the more advanced versions. Radios and pagers are excellent examples of these.

The more interesting bits are the items that are, in many cases, cheaper in their newer versions. Specifially mainframe computers. I've read report after report citing these as quick targets of replacement by distrubuted networks et al. Yet they keep being both made and purchased.

Fax continues because people are lazy. Come on! Learn to print out an email and stop expecting your printer to do it for you!

Small benefits (3, Informative)

SimplyCosmic (15296) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183081)

Two things I like about analog timepieces:

The first is that you can usually make out the time further away, and in poorer lighting conditions, from an analog clock versus a digital.

The second is that you can use your analog watch as an impromptu compass. In the northern hemisphere, hold the watch flat and point the hour hand towards the sun. Now bisect the angle between the hour hand and the figure 12 (ie. noon) on your watch to give you a North-South line. In the southern hemisphere, hold the watch dial and point the figure 12 (ie. noon) towards the sun. The line that bisects the angle between the hour hand and the figure 12 is the North-South line.

first post !!!!!!!!! (1)

TTL0 (546351) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183082)

Sco Unixware

(although i think thier web server already died)

For Those Who Won't Read The Article... (2, Informative)

reallocate (142797) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183085)

...it actually points out why these "old-fashioned" technologies continue to be popular. You wouldn't know that from the /. intro.

pagers? (1)

ElGnomo (612336) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183093)

pagers are refusing to die?
riiiiight....

A re-enactment of a gleam in their eyes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183094)

a Ad revenue is down, we've
a got nothing to write about, uuuh.. well we acould could
a / and it's a slow news day! / post a fluff top 10 list
a O Ideas, everyone, NOW! o to Slashdot a again..
a <|> /|\
a | \ |
a /| Anderson, GENIUS! /|

Cathod Ray Tubes should die (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183102)

Putting a fifty pound, 21-inch cube of leaded glass and plastic on my desk is ridiculous. Flat, thin, flexible big-screen monitors would be the way to go, so you researchers and engineers better get to work.

Digital Watches (1)

Ed Almos (584864) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183104)

Douglas Adams refererences aside I used to wear a digital watch and thought that it was cool, until someone pointed out that whenever we see a digital time display we always visualize the hour and minute hands in our minds before we can read the time.

I now wear an analogue watch and avoid conversion losses.

So what... (1)

Mainframer (530235) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183108)

Not everybody wants to have the latest gizmo wrapped on his wrist. Simplicity has its virtues in this era where almost everything tends to become superlative. I've had my Seiko Divers watch for over 15 years. Solid as a rock. As long as it'll work and be serviceable, I'll keep it.

Slow adoption of technology (1)

shawkin (165588) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183113)

The western diet has yet to reflect the use of refrigeration.

One country, one tube. (1)

Epyn (589398) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183116)

Yeah I have to agree, sound is much better, off of a record, using tubes etc.
Regardless, am I just crazy or do most high energy applications still use vacuum tubes primarily because it takes and act of god to malfunction a tube. Those things can overheat until they melt and they'll still run. I think they still use them in the airline industry for the ground-based communication etc. for such a reason.

Some of this is arguable (1)

Usagi_yo (648836) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183121)

Mainframe computer technology dead because of advances in Windows technology? I don't think so. Distrubuted computing just has not fufilled it promises or lived up to expectations.

Mainframes have adapted and are now partionable and domainable such that one mainframe can be partitioned into many sub-mainframes for different departments or divisions.

Hardly a dieing technology. Been kinda of robust for the last 40 years or so.

Paper SPAM! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8183122)

Think about it, before computers, we have spam in paper form. Despite telemarketing efforts in telephone calls, email, web site, even games, I still receive unrequested mail catalogues in my physical mail boxes.

Some examples:ss (1)

lake2112 (748837) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183127)

1. Gameboy Advance - Built on older hardware, from technology that was available almost 10 years ago. 2. VCRs - Who still actively uses one? 3. PS2 ports

dot matrix printers? (2, Interesting)

Pzykotic (72530) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183131)

Oh man, those are still in fashion! Just look, you can be a full-fledged MUSICIAN with these things!

symphony for dot matrix printers [sat.qc.ca]

Mainframes... (2, Insightful)

CaVp (746780) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183132)

Those big old machines keep the world running (I mean, if we agree that money moves this fscking world... :P)... I cannot imagine a bank trusting all its data to a cheap PC running XP or whatever... not even a Sun SPARC could handle that volume of data processing....

One trick ponies (1)

FattMattP (86246) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183133)

Compared to today's digital timepieces, old-fashioned, sweep-hand watches are pathetic one-trick ponies.
If all you need your pony to do is one trick (provide accurate time) then what good are all of watches that can check temperature, altitude, and the time in Tokyo, play tunes and games, and send messages to that person who doesn't need them? The answer is nothing. Obviously there's enough people that buy analogue watches for people to keep making them.

Also a well crafted analogue watch can look far more sophisticated than a glowing piece of plastic jammed with buttons.

Paper! (1)

Mr. Neutron (3115) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183134)

Remember when tech experts said that paper was going to disappear, and everything was going to be electronic? With notebooks and PDAs and TabletPCs and so forth, why would we want anything on paper?

And yet, still, most people will print out and keep a hard copy of anything of length that they want to read or hold on to.

Windows (1)

CaptScarlet22 (585291) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183135)

How about M$ Windows!?!?!?!?


No wait, windows is not a technology, it's a cheap nockoff!!!

Oh (1)

cubicledrone (681598) | more than 10 years ago | (#8183144)

They just had to add one computer language, didn't they? Why not add a couple of text editors too?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>