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Canadian Recording Industry Goes After P2P Users

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the america-in-miniature dept.

Music 481

Txiasaeia writes "Taking its cue from its American counterpart, the CRIA (Canadian Recording Industry Association) has begun the hunt for music file swappers. Unlike the RIAA, the CRIA are trying to find 29 (!) swappers only who use either Shaw, Telus, Rogers Cable, Bell Sympatico or Quebec's Videotron. Some companies like Shaw are openly opposing the request, whereas others, like Videotron, are pretty much planning on rolling over once the paperwork is done. Videotron customers beware: they say that they're 'actually delighted that the CRIA is doing what it's doing.' Arguments in the case begin on Monday in Toronto."

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481 comments

But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (5, Interesting)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271146)

Article sez:
For example, it has been legal in Canada since 1998 to make a single copy of a recording for personal use, such as copying a CD onto your hard drive or MP3 player. But the practice is illegal in the U.S.

Uh. Did I miss something? Did MP3 ripping from CD get banned in the USA while we weren't looking?

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (2, Insightful)

Deliveranc3 (629997) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271188)

Looks like you slept throught the DMCA. Um I dunno what to tell you, American's got screwed? Know your rights? Don't live under an evil oppresive government? Words fail me.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271220)

CD Ripping does not violate the DMCA (most of the time) as there is no encryption to circumvent.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (5, Informative)

operagost (62405) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271456)

There is no bypassing of encryption or other protections here (unless you count the idiot bit that's ignored by everything), so the DMCA doesn't apply. Also, ANALOG and digital copies to DAT (perhaps also MD, not sure) are explicity permitted by the home recording act.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (5, Interesting)

garcia (6573) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271234)

the longer something is reported incorrectly the more people believe it to be true.

Just ask the Slashbots.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (5, Informative)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271247)

"Uh. Did I miss something? Did MP3 ripping from CD get banned in the USA while we weren't looking?"

It's more of a grey area in the US, especially since the DMCA. While it has historically been viewed as 'fair use' to create a backup copy of a copyrighted work, circumvention of a copy protection scheme (no matter how pathetic and ineffective it may be) was made illegal by the DMCA. Also, many CDs ship with a EULA of some sort, which often prohibits creating even a single copy of the works contained within.

Essentially, it's something for which arguments could be made either way based on previous rulings and copyright laws, but it's something which would probably never actually be prosecuted.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271269)

For example, it has been legal in Canada since 1998 to make a single copy of a recording for personal use, such as copying a CD onto your hard drive or MP3 player. But the practice is illegal in the U.S.


Hmm, I thought this was covered on ./ before. IANAL, but you are allowed to make copies of CD's for personal use in the US.

The difference in Canada is that anyone can make a copy from an original CD for personal use. For example, I could buy a new CD and lend it to all my friends, they could each make their own copy, and that would be perfectly legal. But if they lent that copied CD to one of their friends, and that person made a copy from the copy, that would be a problem.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (5, Informative)

503 (236565) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271271)

As far as I know, making a personal copy of your own CD is still legal in the US. In Canada, however, you are allowed to make a personal copy of an album that you don't own.

In other words, I can borrow a friend's new CD and make a copy with no laws being broken.

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (3, Informative)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271395)

"Uh. Did I miss something? Did MP3 ripping from CD get banned in the USA while we weren't looking?"

Sort of. Some CDs have a form of copy restriction on them. Bypassing them == automatic DMCA violation. Stupid, iddnt it?

Re:But the practice is illegal in the U.S.?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271413)

Canada. What is it all about... is it good, or is it whack?

aw crap (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271148)

i hope i can still get more celine dion mp3s

Not surprising... (-1, Flamebait)

xNoLaNx (653172) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271152)

canadians being pushovers.

Videotron (-1, Flamebait)

Deltan (217782) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271159)

Why doesn't it surprise me that videotron is willing to roll over? Videotron is a Quebec based company.

Typical French, "We surrender!"

Re:Videotron (0)

cgranade (702534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271179)

Yes, and the Americans have set a stellar example in this case, haven't they?

Re:Videotron (1)

jmv (93421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271212)

Actually, Bell Canada, while not Quebec only is still very present here. I think I'll consider to switch...

Re:Videotron (3, Insightful)

Tester (591) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271241)

Why doesn't it surprise me that videotron is willing to roll over? Videotron is a Quebec based company.

Typical French, "We surrender!"/

Maybe its because they are owned by a huge media conglomerate that's also has music label?

Re:Videotron (1)

DRUNK_BEAR (645868) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271246)

correction : we want to keep on making money...

Videotron is in a unique position because its parent company, Quebecor, also sells music, Videotron says it is concerned about copyright protection and considers file sharing to be "theft."

Re:Videotron (1)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271302)

" correction : we want to keep on making money...

Videotron is in a unique position because its parent company, Quebecor, also sells music, Videotron says it is concerned about copyright protection and considers file sharing to be "theft." "


It may consider file sharing theft, robbery, murder, rape, or operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated if it likes - it doesn't make it so. The day that it does, the CIA's world factbook needs to change the type of government in Canada to "Corporatist".

Re:Videotron (4, Informative)

leerpm (570963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271319)

Actually quite the opposite. Here in Canada, Quebec is famous for refusing to go along with anything that the Federal government or other provincial governments want to do. Unless it somehow results in them getting more money or more rights. Subject of course to them being able to use the funds however they wish.

Re:Videotron (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271365)

Feeding the trolls but here goes anyway...

It as nothing to do with being french-speaking.... and actually a lot of french-canadian fought in WWII to help the real "French from France" pussies...

Videotron is happy to roll over for 2 simple facts... it's a totally unethical company... always has been... but also.. if those heavy bandwidth using MP3 traders aren't there anymore: more money for videotron.. more "email checkers and light browsing" users and less so called "hogs"

Re:Videotron (2, Funny)

democracy (662446) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271428)

Don't start saying "We love you Quebec!" because we're different. Are you Don Cherry's brother?

You might remember me (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271160)

Hi. I'm Troy McClure. You might remember me from such popular Canadian albums as "Nothing But Rush: A History of Canadian Popular Music".

Re:You might remember me (1, Offtopic)

doktor-hladnjak (650513) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271299)

"Nothing But Rush: A History of Canadian Popular Music"

Hey, don't forget Anne Murray, Alanis Morissette, and Celine Dion.

Actually, the world would probably be a better place, if we all could forget them...

It's not so bad (5, Funny)

sdcharle (631718) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271168)

Turns out they're only prosecuting if less than 80% of your pirated mp3s are not by Canadian artists.

Oh wait a minute, that is pretty bad.

the last laugh (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271169)

I will have the last laugh when my leeching brother with his damn bittorrents gets busted ! Finally I will get greater than 5Ks on my DSL link :-)


Oh happy, happy days :p

Re:the last laugh (1)

wo1verin3 (473094) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271426)

Until you find out that the internet connection is in your name and you're getting your ass dragged in to court.

Re:the last laugh (5, Informative)

Dashing Leech (688077) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271443)

Actually, that's quite ironic. Leeching is pretty much the only legal way to do it in Canada. You can download from P2P legally [com.com] , but not distribute (share).

(If anybody is going to contest this, at least do a search first on previous Slashdot stories. This has been covered many times and even the Copyright Board of Canada has ruled that downloading is legal [cb-cda.gc.ca] , but distributing is not.)

You have to laugh (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271171)


when you see an industry suing their customers, i can't wait till this spreads to other industries

if this is the direction for capitalism then i give society another 20years max before very bad things start to happen

Re:You have to laugh (5, Funny)

tundog (445786) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271316)

when you see an industry suing their customers, i can't wait till this spreads to other industries

You must be new here. You can pay your $699 on your way out.

Vertical integration sucks... (4, Insightful)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271174)

Article sez:
Videotron is in a unique position because its parent company, Quebecor, also sells music, Videotron says it is concerned about copyright protection and considers file sharing to be "theft."

Well, there we have it. ISP attitudes on copyright and privacy issues are completely tied to how much content the ISP's parent company owns. Road Runner customers beware, and Comcast customers better hope the Disney deal doesn't go through.

And guess who's selling digital music downloads? (1)

vicparedes (701354) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271308)

Fellow Quebecor (Videotron's parent company) sibling Archambault has recently opened a digital music download service predictably-named Archambaultzik.com.

Re:Vertical integration sucks... (1)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271331)

"Well, there we have it. ISP attitudes on copyright and privacy issues are completely tied to how much content the ISP's parent company owns. Road Runner customers beware, and Comcast customers better hope the Disney deal doesn't go through."

Just working our way towards the reality of the 'Alien' series of films. What The Corporation wants, The Corporation gets. Human beings are expendable - profits are not.

huh? (-1, Troll)

decsnake (6658) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271177)

Canada has a recording industry?

Who knew?

Re:huh? (1)

cozziewozzie (344246) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271262)

Seems like they're trying to 'protect' Canadian artists. I don't know much about Canadian record labels, but there are some big music names coming from Canada, like Bryan Adams, Shania Twain, Alanis Morisette, Nelly Furtado, Celine Dion...

It's not all bad though, they also have some good bands, like Godspeed You Black Emperor! :-)

Re:huh? (1)

LittleLebowskiUrbanA (619114) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271345)

Thought you guys apologized aboot Bryan Adams?

Re:huh? (1)

cozziewozzie (344246) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271436)

There are some evils for which no apology is adequate :-)

Levies already! (5, Informative)

morcheeba (260908) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271180)

This is the country that already has some pretty high media levies [neil.eton.ca] based on the assumption that illegal copies are being made [neil.eton.ca] . It's currently $0.21 (data CD) and $0.77 (audio CD), but there are proposed increases, including an $840 levy on each 40GB iPod! ($0.021/MB)

Re:Levies already! (4, Interesting)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271224)

This is the country that already has some pretty high media levies based on the assumption that illegal copies are being made. It's currently $0.21 (data CD) and $0.77 (audio CD), but there are proposed increases, including an $840 levy on each 40GB iPod! ($0.021/MB)

I am confused. Am I getting fined in advance, so that I can download or does the industry want it all ways?

Re:Levies already! (2, Interesting)

PunchMonkey (261983) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271341)

I am confused. Am I getting fined in advance, so that I can download or does the industry want it all ways?

Guess what! The "Music Industry" isn't a single entity, there's plenty of different players each with their own viewpoint, everyone from the Artists to the Labels to the Publishers to the Retailers have their own views and opinions.

mp3 levy backed off (1)

morcheeba (260908) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271255)

Whoops. They backed off the MP3 levy [neil.eton.ca] down to $25/40GB, but I didn't see that in the main chart. I'm not Canadian, so I haven't followed this too closely.

Re:Levies already! (1)

Neurotoxic666 (679255) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271324)

Indeed, we've all already paid our due (in theory) for copying music (whether we do it or not) when we buy blank medias. Can this argument reach the courts or is it just plain stupid to think that you've been judged and fined without any lawsuit when you are forced to pay levies?

Re:Levies already! (4, Insightful)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271374)

"This is the country that already has some pretty high media levies based on the assumption that illegal copies are being made. It's currently $0.21 (data CD) and $0.77 (audio CD), but there are proposed increases, including an $840 levy on each 40GB iPod! ($0.021/MB)"

The beauty of this levy is that it doesn't matter whether you're backing up Quickbooks or sending grandma some jpegs of your trip to Disneyworld - you're paying the music industry money for each CD-r. That's one of the best laws the entertainment industry ever bought.

Good. (2, Flamebait)

ProtonMotiveForce (267027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271183)

I don't understand why nerds get so up in arms when people defend their intellectual property.

If people are breaking the law and sharing music then they deserve what happens. Yeah yeah yeah, they should make sure the person they're suing is the right one and they should be reasonable about the penalties. But they certainly don't have to just stand by and bend themselves over a barrel.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271230)

um, the law might be wrong.

just because something is a law, doesnt mean its wrong to break the law.

Re:Good. (0, Flamebait)

ProtonMotiveForce (267027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271256)

Agreed in the abstract.

This law, however, is right. Here in these non-communist..well, I guess that doesn't apply to Canada. But still - when an artist and a studio puts time and effort into making art, they are the ones who decide what happens to it.

Damn moochers.

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

jghiloni (697980) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271318)

Why would it be wrong to want to protect something into which you've invested a lot of money, in the case of the label, and in the case of the artist, emotion, hard work, and time?

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271393)

they can want to protect it all they want.

i can want to protect my property too.

doesnt mean i have the right to defend it ANY way i please.

i cant shoot the teens that cut through the back yard with a sniper rifle.

it might be time to accept that copyrights are not "right"

Re:Good. (2, Interesting)

fair_n_hite_451 (712393) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271252)

Canadians can damn well get upset about this .... if it turns out they are going after people who are only engaged in "leeching", which has been ruled legal in Canada.

Personally, as a SHAW customer, I say "bring it on". Since I can honestly say I've never shared one bit of mp3, but have downloaded many, I almost hope that I get one. Of course, legal fees would break me, but I'm pretty sure I can find a lawyer looking to make a name for himself to work pro bono

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

ProtonMotiveForce (267027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271298)

I'd be interested to see how exactly Canada has defied international copyright conventions.

Please refer me to this mythical "leeching" ruling.

Re:Good. (1)

DashEvil (645963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271384)

I don't have a link, but you should look it up. We pay a leeve on almost any medium that could HOLD music, and that all goes to the music industry. So yes, it is legal. No, seriously, it is.

Re:Good. (1)

jghiloni (697980) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271290)

I couldn't agree more with this sentiment. It is irrelevant whether or not you think CDs cost too much--if you pirate music, you're breaking the law, and it doesn't matter whether or not you knew that. Ignorance isn't an excuse. If you break the law, don't get pissed if you get caught.

Re:Good. (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271321)

the problem isn't with the people protecting their interests... The problem is that large conglomorates own portions of everything and have a direct influence on the business practices and politics involved.

That's called a monopoly and is generally frowned upon...

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

ProtonMotiveForce (267027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271420)

This sentiment I can actually agree with. It irritates me to no end when e.g. cable companies pay off some politician to make cable theft a felony, or when music companies unduly influence laws.

I do think, however, that the companies are justified in defending their property even if they are big evil corporations representing talentless pop pansies.

The real issue is that the government needs to reign in maximum penalties and stop selling out.

Re:Good. (1, Insightful)

asuffield (111848) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271409)

Not everybody agrees that "Intellectual Property" is a good thing.

The only thing being defended here is a profit margin.

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

Neurotoxic666 (679255) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271421)

I don't understand why nerds get so up in arms when people defend their intellectual property

And I certainly don't understand why people should be glad that their privacy on the internet will stop to exist because some companie think it's ok to spy on you and analyse what files you share.

The CRIA is not the Secret Services. It is okay for them to protect their IP, but knowing that Videotron is so inclined to associate people's indentity with their IP adress is kinda scary. If there's a lawsuit filed against me for doing something criminal, then fine, they must have reasons to think that I'm doing something wrong. But if they start looking at what ports you use to upload you files, and then suspect you of sharing music, and then give your personal info to some private corporation without your consent, and then, they sue you -- that's just plain wrong.

Re:Good. (2, Interesting)

Loki_1929 (550940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271429)

"they should make sure the person they're suing is the right one and they should be reasonable about the penalties. But they certainly don't have to just stand by and bend themselves over a barrel."

This is certainly reasonable, but it does not make for a sustainable business model. What would you have the recording industry do once it has alienated so many customers that it starts bleeding money profusely? Shall we subsidize the entertainment industry like we subsidize the airline industry? Or shall we let the old companies with failing business models die out and be replaced by newer, smarter companies willing to sell a product that consumers like, packaged how they want, and at a price they can afford?

Not surprised by Videotron (5, Informative)

Tester (591) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271184)

I'm not surprised at all that Videotron would support that. They are owned by Quebec's biggest (only big) media conglomerate, Quebecor.. Which is also the world's largest printer (Quebecor World), but that's pretty separate from Quebecor Media...

So Quebecor media also owns, appart from Videotron (cable), the biggest TV network (TVA), the most read newspapers (Le journal de Montreal and Le journal de Quebec), quite a few magasines and more importantly in this case, Musicor.. a record label.. They are not well known outside Quebec though, because all of their media are in French... but they are THE dominant player in Quebec...

Re:Not surprised by Videotron (4, Insightful)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271289)

This is a bit scary for a province that values its independence in culture and language so much to have just one major media owner.

Re:Not surprised by Videotron (1)

FiDooDa (23111) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271379)

you forgot to add that they also own Archambault Musique (Music store retailer). Archambault recently opened their online music store too.

/me looking for a new isp

P2P prosecution worldwide (1, Interesting)

Jotaigna (749859) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271186)

this reminds me of an article posted on slashdot not a while ago, regarding Free trade between US and Australia, involving Australia with the same copyright laws the US has. Supposedly each country that faces this (Chile is on the verge of Free trade with the US) will begin the "hunt". I wonder if legal rulings on countries that "hunt" some p2p company will serve as a precedent in other trials to other countries.

Now where am I supposed to get ... (-1, Troll)

burgburgburg (574866) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271189)

my P2P copies of Rush, and .. Celine Dion and ...Anne Murray, and ...umm,...Barenaked Ladies ...and ...oh, never mind.

International Pileup (2, Informative)

erick99 (743982) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271196)

I don't know why, but I am surprised that other countries are doing what the RIAA has done. I thought that perhaps Australia and Canada would have a more laisse fair (spelling?) approach to this or a more measured response. And, the Canadian approach may,indeed, be a bit softer though I am not sure. I still do not understand how the recording folks seemingly blow right past the option to price their products more reasonably. Would they really lose money at $10 - $13 per CD? If so, then I don't know what options remain. However, I do believe that there is an economic max/min equation that would show that there is some point at which a lower price brings in enough of an increase in sales to maintain profitability. Then, perhaps, everybody wins.

Happy Trails!

Erick

Why I love Canada (2, Informative)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271207)

>For example, it has been legal in Canada since 1998 to make a single copy of a recording for personal use, such as copying a CD onto your hard drive or MP3 player.

>But under the Copyright Act, it remains illegal to give or sell a CD copy to a friend, since it's not for personal use. In the same vein, distributing copies to friends online is prohibited.

I have a solid legal footing why I am a Kazza-leach.

Re:Why I love Canada (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271280)

what, being a pussy?

Huh? (1)

andih8u (639841) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271208)

How is this unlike the RIAA? They started off small, hitting users of the major US ISPs like Verizon, Comcast, etc. I don't know all of the Canadian ISPs, but those sound like all of the big ones to me.

Only a matter of time .... (5, Insightful)

IamGarageGuy 2 (687655) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271209)

Why does Canada have to imitate the U.S. in all things? It would be nice to have our government to take a stand against the oppressive RIAA and stop this litigation before it gets going too far. The Canadian people do not want Big Brother to be accusing and convicting the 12 year old swappers like the U.S.

CANADA (2, Interesting)

Killjoy_NL (719667) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271229)

I guess in this case you CAN really blame canada :)

I'm glad this crap isn't taking place in the Netherlands. For now downloading is legal here, uploading isn't.
Some dutch artists are trying to influence the government into changing the law here to go after the downloaders as well.

If cds were cheap here, I would say "all power to them" but right now they cost about $30,- each.
What is the approx. price of cd's in the US? a somewhat empty mind wants to know.

Re:CANADA (2, Informative)

leerpm (570963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271383)

I'm glad this crap isn't taking place in the Netherlands. For now downloading is legal here, uploading isn't. Some dutch artists are trying to influence the government into changing the law here to go after the downloaders as well.

According to some interpretations, the law is the same here in Canada too. Downloading is apparently legal, while uploading is not. That's why if you read the article you will see they are seeking uploaders only.

Re:CANADA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271402)

Approximately $18. Still highway robbery, but not as bad as you have it.

Re:CANADA (1)

kannibal_klown (531544) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271406)

It varies between $12 and $20. However, I don't know the exchange rates, so I don't know if that is in fact more or less what you pay.

Lately, I turn to iTunes for my music needs. I rarely download music anymore anyway. But every now and then there is a song I have an itch to listen to.

To me, Kazaa was an outlet to download TV episodes like "Dead Like Me" or "Stargate SG-1" (while it was owned by Showtime).

Re:CANADA (2, Insightful)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271411)

Some dutch artists are trying to influence the government into changing the law here to go after the downloaders as well.
Actually they weren't that specific, they just wanted their interests looked after, and saw downloading and CD swapping as a threat.

But it's the right direction to take: go ahead and make downloading and distribution of copyrighted material illegal... but don't ban P2P, don't mandate DRM, and don't take away our rights in the process, the rights to make backups, to convert digital content to the medium of our choice (Ripping Cd's for playing on an Ipod for example), and don't mess with our privacy either. The goal does not justify the means.

Re:CANADA (1)

PunchMonkey (261983) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271423)

I'm glad this crap isn't taking place in the Netherlands. For now downloading is legal here, uploading isn't. .... you mean just like it is in Canada? RTFA :-)

Re:CANADA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271457)

from what i gather, it's the same in Canada!
D/L ok, U/L bad.

OH NO!!! (1)

serfx (655219) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271233)

i'd a bit more scared buit 29 people and all of them are sharing the same crap i hear on canadian radio.. wheee, if they get them, or me for that matter (not that i use a p2p program *nudge wink*).
will it mean less nickleback and crap such as that being distributed to the rest of the world?

Videotron (3, Interesting)

addie (470476) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271238)

Not entirely on-topic, but I'd like this to be heard...

I've never had more trouble with any internet/TV company in my life. Horrible customer service, no explanations for outages, outrageous rates. I had to hire a lawyer to get out of a $900 cable TV bill. Not only did I never sign up for cable TV, I don't even own a TV!

But with the way the market works here in Canada (I don't know about the states or elsewhere) there is only one cable provider in each of the major urban centers. So, so much for healthy competition. I'm not at all surprised that Videotron will simply hand over IPs/names to the CRIA, it saves them paperwork and hassles, and fits in with their total disregard for customer service and respect that they've made themselves known for in Montreal.

Cable in the US (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271447)

Its a 'area monopoly' here too..

Your choices are the local cable company, or you go dish.. ( or rabbit ears )

At least with the phone company you can choose to use the local carrier, or have a 3rd party use the local carriers line for a reduced rate ( due to that stupid ATT breakup ) and get your phone service from them.

*Yawn* (5, Funny)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271242)

Taking its cue from its American counterpart, the CRIA (Canadian Recording Industry Association) has begun the hunt for music file swappers.

Next up: Sun rises, sun sets.

Anyone else getting really tired of reading about *IAA? We're all well aware of the issues involved, I don't really see the need for this to be front page material nearly every day.

Let's have some priorities, please. Like our daily SCO story...siiigh. It's times like these that I wish we had voting rights like Kuro5hin, because every morning I load slashdot, I have trouble telling whether it's actually new news, or the same 2-3 topics over and over.

29 Canadians (2, Funny)

laurent420 (711504) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271243)

"Working on behalf of major record labels, the CRIA is reportedly hunting for 29 Canadian customers from at least five different ISPs"

Damn! they're on to me and my 28 cohorts!

Re:29 Canadians (1)

serfx (655219) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271270)

shhhhh, no one said that there was 28 of us, its just 28 systems....

ISPs are in a sticky position (3, Interesting)

Spyder (15137) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271245)

Peer to peer sucks bandwidth, a direct cost to any service provider. The only reason any ISP is going to stick up for users is for the PR, Fact-o'-life.

What exactly is illegal? (0)

jvervloet (532924) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271264)

I am asking myself what exactly about music file swapping is illegal. Is it downloading the music, posessing the music, listening to the music or sharing the music?

Suppose my computer has a ram-disk, and I download music onto this ram-disk. Suppose also that I don't allow uploading these music files. If I am only downloading and listening to the music (I'm not keeping it on my hard disk), is this illegal?

Re:What exactly is illegal? (1)

fair_n_hite_451 (712393) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271352)

In Canada, the answer is "no".

Re:What exactly is illegal? (5, Informative)

CaptIronfist (457257) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271400)

In Canada downloading music from the net is legal. Owning music on your hard drive for which you do not have the original CD is also legal.

What is illegal is uploading (sharing) songs which you do not have distribution permission from the copyright holder to the general public. For example, if i open a private FTP site and i prove that only my friends have access to it, then it falls neatly under 'fair use' clause. More concretly if i go to my friends house and rip all my music on his computer, this falls under 'fair use' also.

The Canadian copyright act is also a reason why the CRIA gets a levy on blank medias and hard drives and can't sue file swappers as efficiently as the RIAA. Hence the 29(!). lol.

Don't take this as a legal advice though i could be wrong, or it could cost you a lot to defend this position. ;-)

White flag (-1, Troll)

supertbone (624441) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271265)

No wonder Videotron will give up users! They are from Quebec, which means they are French! Bunch of pussies!

My only concern (1)

xNoLaNx (653172) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271268)

Is that they stay within their boundry of control. I'm not really concerned with prosecution over the mp3s with Canadian-bound ownership which I don't have.

Celine Dion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271313)

Does this mean I'll get in trouble for my MP3's from that Celine album "Four Typos in My File" or whatever it is called?

Bandwidth hogs beware! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271322)

Videotron secretly wants your hides, so sure they're going to give them the information they want, because right now you're costing them more money.

At least that's their excuse.

Wonderful !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271326)

Hats down to Shaw Cable, I just know Rog(u)ers is going to rat out on their customers, since their policies were never to protect customers, even if the privacy law was on the customer side. As any corporate bottom dwelling scum sucking algae, the spinless machinery at Rog(u)ers will probably even offer the CRIA direct access to their networks, records and what not, in hope to cash on it even more (as if cutting the bandwidth of all users and doubling the price wasn't enough).

Sadly, if we didn't have a spineless government up here that wasn't puppeteered from down there by large corporations, our government might actually tell the CRIA to f-off because they are violating privacy laws and dismiss their case. But that happens only in democractic republics where laws are obeyed by all sides (and not just the citizenry like it's the case in the Corporate North America) and where governments work for the people's interest not against it...

Media Levies (5, Insightful)

AttillaTheNun (618721) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271342)

Does this mean the CRIA is going to rebate or cancel the levies I pay on every CD-R I buy so that I can presumably burn CRIA content?

here we go again... (4, Interesting)

TR0GD0RtheBURNiNAT0R (734295) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271360)

Something tells me we'll be hearing from Canadian music-swappers about how "the record companies only put one or two good songs on a CD...". If they, and all their U.S. counterparts, vote with their money (i.e. don't buy CD's, or iTunes songs, etc) and stop downloading music, the *IAA will have nothing to explain away lost profits, and the record companies will be forced to produce decent music to survive.

Another article (1, Informative)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271364)

In the Toronto Star [thestar.com] CRIA, what a perfect acronym: CRY EH!

videotron delighted (3, Insightful)

sewagemaster (466124) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271366)

Videotron customers beware: they say that they're 'actually delighted that the CRIA is doing what it's doing.

they're delighted because that would reduce users bandwidth usage. in videotron's POV, they only care about the company saving money. i dont think they really care about the "non-ethical" aspects of music sharing. they're one of the first ISPs in quebec (quebequeers) that started the monthly download quota limit. and of course by saying they're delighted, it just makes themselves look "ethical".

i used to use bell canada, and all of a sudden in a month they charged me $100 because of going over the bandwidth download limit. i didnt get any sort of notification. about 12 months later, many people started to complain and they took off the cap. it's all about ISPs making and saving money.

Time for the slashdot two-step (5, Funny)

mumblestheclown (569987) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271372)

Scenario 1A: Copyright holder uses police to go after copyright infringers.

Slashdot Response: "Why do the police have to do the **AA's dirtywork! This is blah blah blah corporate shills blah blah blah."

Scenario 1B: Copyright holder privately goes after copyright infringers.

Slashdot response: "Can you believe the nerve of these people. This is what the police are for! blah blah blah nazi stormtroopers blah blah blah."


Scenario 2A: New, obviously-designed-primarily-for-warez-pr0n-and-mp 3z-technology emerges.

Slashdot Response: "Technology is blameless! Go after the infringers, but leave technology alone!"

Scenario 2B: Infringers gone after.

Slashdot Response: "Can you believe the nerve of those people shaking down college students!"


Scenario 3A: Copyright is used to protect somebody else's intellectual property

Slashdot Response: Copyright has outlived its usefulness! Viva la revolucion!

Scenario 3B: the GPL is violated.

Slashdot Response: Hang em high!

...because Canadian music needs saving (snicker) (3, Insightful)

fingerfarm (656131) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271386)

Hasn't the CRIA hurt us enough with CanCon [craptastic.com] ?

personal freedom? (0)

kyshtock (608605) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271391)

Now, what if they find out that the 29 users' mean age is 13, with a wide distribution?

Will they settle for about 15000$? And, for /.'s sake, 29 sharers? Do they profile? How? How much of your privacy is lost during profiling?

I know that this is /. and filesharing is not necesarily considered a crime... However, morality problems aside, does profiling erode personal privacy? I just wonder... when will your IP be logged just because you fired up Kazaa/eDonkey/BitTorrent? When will that be acceptable proof that you were going to do something illegal?

Well, show must go on... Did I just say that???

> rm /share/Queen/* -R

Life in a mirror (2, Funny)

Srividya (746733) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271416)

In India, Bollywood makes P2P servers for us.
In America, Hollywood attacks P2P servers for you.

I have doubts.

Arghh! No more Strange Brew? (2, Funny)

scumbucket (680352) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271441)

Damn! This means I can't download the movie Strange Brew along with Bryan Adams songs anymore!

XBox rules!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271442)

first post!!! you lame assholes... I can post first because my XBox is a american product and my pride in my great country and my great XBox accelerate everything...

If only they would make games for that bitch... IAve played Metroid Prime and it ruled... I hope M$ will buy those japanese bastards and port Metroid to my great american console system!!!

Join the fun!!! [slashdot.org]

In Canada? Like P2P, try Mute (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8271461)

Check out Mute 2.2. You need to patch it to make it work, but the source and the robust retry patch are at sourceforge. Just a click away.

Only P2P? How about Google and FTP? (2, Informative)

axxackall (579006) | more than 10 years ago | (#8271463)

They go only for P2P users, right? So if I use Google to give me a list of FTP sites in which directories there are files with MP3 in the name, and then I donwload those files (without knowing what's inside the file), then I am supposingly OK and did not violate any Canadian laws, right?

Thanks God, today you can download tons of various (good and bad) music files using just Google. I don't even know, why people use P2P? Using a simple script you can have easily few gigabytes of music just in few days.

But is it safe?

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