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Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the twisty-little-passages dept.

Operating Systems 284

Spencerian writes "Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther is a good tool for those who are experienced with the original Mac OS or Mac OS X, but not the Unix command line. Most of the content would not interest the traditional programmer, Linux, BSD, or other UNIX jockey, however." For Spencerian's take on why, read on for the rest of his review.

This book focuses on those of us in the Mac OS professional world who have become Unix system admins by default with the introduction of OS X, and could stand to have a handy UNIX reference nearby, particularly if the Finder freezes in Apple's latest version of their BSD/OpenStep blend of a UNIX operating system.

As the authors explain in the book, the best justification for understanding and using the UNIX components present is Mac OS X is the same as in any other UNIX-family operating system: power and control. The Finder (Mac OS X's graphical desktop manager) can't do everything, so this book provides information to help power users and technicians resolve issues, install software, or create an optimized experience, all through the Terminal.

Chapters 1 and 2 provide a very helpful tutorial on the Mac OS X Terminal application, from showing the benefits of customizing the Terminal, the concept of shells, UNIX command syntax, and other obscure but useful settings that strengthen the power of the application when accessing the BSD innards of Mac OS X. Arguably, these two chapters are the strongest guide on Mac OS X's Terminal application (as it relates to its UNIX roots) that I have seen in any Mac OS X book to date.

Chapters 3 and 4 handle understanding of the UNIX filesystem, administration and superuser access, privileges, handling external volumes, file and directory names and the like. Mac OS X, while a BSD at heart, doesn't map out everything in a traditional UNIX-style directory format--at least, not from the Finder's view. Through the Terminal, a user can see the underlying, otherwise-hidden UNIX directories. The authors go through some basic but very helpful situations such as changing file and owner permissions, which can be changed from the Finder with greater ease in Panther, but not with the same finesse as done from a command line.

The file management chapter moves readers through the classic commands for moving, editing, and copying files from the command line, which can be very helpful for administrators of Mac OS X systems who must attempt repairs by SSH, for instance, and don't have access to the usual graphical elements that generally make Mac OS usage so easy. The authors don't pick sides in the vi vs. pico debate, and just offer the basic instructions on how to use either for your editing.

The book continues with the same level of complexity that local system admins or power users require in issues such as printing via CUPS, handling processes that the Finder doesn't show, using the X11 application, using Fink (a Debian-style installation application) installing OpenOffice and GIMP, using FTP and secure shell, using Pine and Lynx, and more.

For a book of just 168 pages, the authors pack quite a bit on making a Mac OS X system work from its Terminal roots. New Mac OS X system administrators will find this book most useful, particularly if their UNIX experience is lacking or radically different from what Mac OS X presents. Experienced *NIX users who bought a new Mac may find the book a good intermediary to demonstrate how Mac OS X Panther differs from the *NIX boxen they've used in the past.



You can purchase Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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284 comments

Pour me a fr0sty one (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365580)

Fr0st hawt gr1ts covered in Natalie Pr0tman's Ackbar trap ps1t!

Thanks Eliot Spitzer! (-1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365913)

Today I received my payment for my claim in the settlement of the Compact Disc Minimum Advertised Price Antitrust Litigation!

It is a pleasure that this matter has been brought to a satisfactory conclusion!

-FTM(now $13.86 richer)

Don't forget your $699 SCO License Fee (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365581)

If you can't use their online form, call them!
Their phone number is 1-888-GOLINUX or 1-801-765-4888


Have fun and happy trolling!

MOD DOWN! NUMBERS ARE FOR GAY SEX HOTLINES! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365795)

Re:MOD DOWN! NUMBERS ARE FOR GAY SEX HOTLINES! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366007)

Did you have them memorized or did you actually call the numbers in a /. post?

Re:MOD DOWN! NUMBERS ARE FOR GAY SEX HOTLINES! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366073)

Actually, I have them on speed dial. After looking at goatse.cx [goat.cx] all day, it's nice to unwind to some faggot phone sex.

I'VE GOT A FP IN MY PANTS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365582)

FLACCID PENIS

FFF
FfFff
Fff
ffFSegmentation fault. core dumped.

Re:I'VE GOT A FP IN MY PANTS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365724)

A Failure Haiku For You

Hardly an eff pee
You can't hit first with a stick
You fucking fail it

Re:I'VE GOT A FP IN MY PANTS (-1)

Luke727 (547923) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365811)

I like mine better:

Your first post attempt
Is utterly pathetic
You fucking fail it

OR:

You fucking fail it
First post is just not for you
Death is the answer

fucking AC post limited to 10 times/day...

Do something about it (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365776)

Hey, don't tell us. Do something about it.

If you're too lazy, I'm sure there are plenty of Mac fags here ready to blow you.

Flaccid Penis is just not right.

Linus on conference call next week (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365604)

Subject: Linux on Mac

Wednesday, March 3, 11:00 AM EST

1.800.818.5264 conf code 141144

The Finder (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365609)

The Finder (Mac OS X's graphical desktop manager) can't do everything...

"Yes it can."
-Steve Jobs

Re:The Finder (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365980)

Maybe the Finder can, and maybe it can't, but Emacs can...

Re:The Finder (5, Informative)

Frymaster (171343) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366135)

The Finder (Mac OS X's graphical desktop manager) can't do everything...

and neither can terminal.app! lord, it's the worst terminal program i've ever used. there are, however, some good replacements.

  • iterm [sourceforge.net] - fast and light with tabs and other neat things. my current favourite.
  • glterm [pollet.net] - it uses opengl to render fonts. no, really. results in way better performance (although at some window sizes the text is fuzzy)

Info on vi and pico..... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365612)

For people used to a one button mouse? Puuuh-leeez. ;)

Re:Info on vi and pico..... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365781)

Recommended new moderation categories:

-1, Mac users have no sense of humor
-1, Joke at the expnense of someone other than M$ - note 1337 M155P3||1N6!

Apple already provides an excellent tool (3, Informative)

toupsie (88295) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365616)

Apple provides an excellent tool for learning UNIX in Mac OS X, free of charge!!!

If you don't know what a command does, type "man [command]" (without the quotes, of course).

+5 insightful (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365639)

also try rm -rf /

Re:+5 insightful (2, Insightful)

dewhite (412211) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365674)

Anybody who knows enough about panther to enable the root account and login to a shell with that user, will know better than to enter that command line.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (4, Insightful)

edalytical (671270) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365647)

How does that help you if you don't know what command you need to use.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (-1, Troll)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365671)

man mount
man finger
man touch
man slurp
man unzip

Yeah, I see that coming really natural to Apple users.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (5, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365755)

man mount
man finger
man touch
man slurp
man unzip

I find it best to unzip first.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366009)

I find it best to unzip first.

I disagree. With the high prevalence of homos among the Mac population, its probably safer to do a "dry hump".

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (3, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365677)


One could use the apropos command for a start.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (2, Interesting)

edalytical (671270) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365899)

Duly noted. Still not much help if you don't already know the command.

Re:Apple already provides an excellent tool (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365810)

Surely they meant to mod this "Funny" rather than "Informative"?

Debian (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365627)


I think OS X rocks. Steve Jobs has done an excellent job of bringing Unix to the desktop. I also love Linux, so long as it is a useful distro like Fedora or Suse. But for heaven's sake don't waste your time learning Debian Linux. All other distros are moving to the 2.6 kernel, but Debian is just now getting ready to release Sarge with the 2.4 kernel. Talk about a day late and a dollar short.

MNU (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365631)

MacOS is not UNIX! so don't bother...

very useful (2, Informative)

millahtime (710421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365637)

I am a *nix admin and I have several friends that are OS X users that want to take advantage of the terminal/BSD side of the operating system. I am going to recommend this to all of them.

Re:very useful (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365673)

Well. Well done you then. Seriously, was there a point to your post?

Re:very useful (-1, Troll)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365748)

Personally I'd recomment that a mac user NEVER touch terminal. Almost every other computer system has a large background culture of good terminal use (Windows, Linux, BSD, AmigaOS, BeOS etc) and there's the support and documentation around to keep correct usage of a tool like that under control.

I've seen mac users make the most inane scripts to do jobs they could easily put in cron jobs, and run them with infinite loops of sleeping. How much time and processor is that taking up in the end? And with nobody around to say how to really do it properly, it's just going to make a mess.

The mac has it's place certainly but GUI users raised and born and bred on a GUI shouldn't be mucking about in a terminal

Re:very useful (2, Insightful)

GizmoToy (450886) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365804)

Wait, so you advocate Mac users create cron jobs instead of using scripting... and at the same time tell them to stay away from the terminal? Is it even possible to set cron jobs without that terminal? Not that I've seen...

Re:very useful (0)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365842)

Yes. It's an example of WHY they should stay away from the terminal. I've seen far too many silly mistakes done by mac users because of the lack of a commandline culture among the users.

Anyone who has come through Linux will have no problem with using a command line, and should do so.

Maybe in 10 years there will be enough experienced mac command line people to help educate the rest but until then there's going to be some awfully bad use made of terminal apps. Thankfully apple's project builder don't provide as much support for creating command line tools as gui ones, or heaven knows what kind of stuff they would be churning out

Re:very useful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366171)

What would be cool would be to take all the fucking Amiga freaks and send them somewhere, anywhere, else than Earth.

Re:very useful (4, Informative)

Graff (532189) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366187)

Thankfully apple's project builder don't provide as much support for creating command line tools as gui ones

Uh, sure it does. Go to File->New Project then scroll down and choose Standard Tool. Boom, a project is all set up for you to build a basic C-based command-line tool. You can also choose C++ Tool, CoreFoundation Tool, CoreServices Tool, or Foundation Tool for different libraries and programming languages.

Re:very useful (4, Insightful)

Graff (532189) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365831)

Personally I'd recomment that a mac user NEVER touch terminal.

In the end, the terminal is just another tool on your system. Just because someone works mainly with a GUI doesn't mean that they are not able to comprehend the command-line. Yes, the first couple of times that someone uses the command-line they are going to make some dumb mistakes but if they have a decent guide then those mistakes can be kept to a minimum and have minimal negative impact.

You might as well say that it's not worth if for a person who has never programmed to learn BASIC or C. If they don't take the first steps then how do they learn in the first place? If you are going to do anything on a computer you have to start somewhere, no matter if you are used to a GUI or not.

Re:very useful (1)

taybin (622573) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366023)

This is very true. I went straight from the Mac to Linux 5 years ago. I've never looked back. It probably helped that I'm a very knowledgable computer guy though (majored in CS).

Re:very useful (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366167)

> In the end, the terminal is just another tool on your system.
> Just because someone works mainly with a GUI doesn't mean
> that they are not able to comprehend the command-line.

How true!. I've been a mac girl for 15 years or more, a choice I made from the sheer superiority of the mac gui when I started in prepress, in the 1980s. Nothing touched it then, though many other OSs have caught up and are just as usable today. It's experience that kept me employed, well paid and doing what I love. I got hold of OS X and nutted through cli stuff for a few years now, and use it sometimes and the gui sometimes. You're right, they're both tools that do a job, some can be done best in one, some best in either, and some don't matter one way or the other.

I hadn't touched a cli since DOS days, and even then I knew little more than dir, copy, cd and format. Now I co-admin my employer's non-X crippled linux servers. Most people are intelligent enough, and to me what counts more than experience is interest. I think if someone's interested enough to open terminal.app and poke around then it's just a matter of learning.

That's what brains are for, and we all have them!

Re:very useful (5, Insightful)

Dark Paladin (116525) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365858)

Then how are they suppose to learn if we don't teach them?

Re:very useful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366036)

I think a more appropriate question might be "do you really want a mac user using a CLI?" :)

Re:very useful (1)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365958)

Don't you find it hypocritical after 20 years of trying to tell us all that a computer doesn't need a CLI that mac user's are trying to use one now?

Kind of put's it all in perspective doesn't it *:o)

Re:very useful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366093)

I've seen mac users make the most inane scripts to do jobs they could easily put in cron jobs, and run them with infinite loops of sleeping. How much time and processor is that taking up in the end?
Sleeping consumes little or no CPU time. Except perhaps for you on your Etch-a-Sketch.

Re:very useful (2, Funny)

merphle (744723) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366116)

Personally I'd recomment that a mac user NEVER touch terminal.
I'd suggest that both Mac and PC users touch two terminals: positive and negative. ;)

Too bad (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365642)

Too bad most of the BSD and GNU tools are broken under Darwin.

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365994)

so is NFS...

Re:Too bad (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366028)

Troll? The funny thing is, this is actually true! If you've used OS X, and tried to do some fun CLI stuff like yr used to, you'll realize it. Sure, it can be fixed, but it should all work; it would if Appl would have stuck with convention instead of /Applications /Users and so on...

For your records. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365649)


Please note: the updated title of this book is "Learning SCO-UNIX for Mac GNU/BSD GNU/OS-X SCO-Panther"

Please update your databases accordingly.

Darl McBride
President of Everything

In Soviet Russia (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365667)

In Soviet Russia, panther LINUXES YOU!!!

Here, for free (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365668)

man man
man cd
man pwd
man ls
man cp
man mv
man rm
man chmod
man more
man ps
man rm
man chmod
man more
man head
man tail
man grep
man passwd

Knock yourself out.

Re:Here, for free (0)

Lord Graga (696091) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365876)

Yeah, they will need to read the man pages about chmod and rm twice... they are a bit slowwitted ;)

Re:Here, for free (0, Flamebait)

kfg (145172) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365886)

Ok, I typed "man man".

Can you recommend a good book that explains its contents to me?

KFG

Re:Here, for free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365917)

Jeez, what part of:

NAME
man format and display the online manual pages
manpath determine user's search path for man pages

SYNOPSIS
man [acdfFhkKtwW] [path] [m system] [p string] [C config_file]
[M pathlist] [P pager] [S section_list] [section] name ...

DESCRIPTION
man formats and displays the online manual pages. If you specify sec
tion, man only looks in that section of the manual. name is normally
the name of the manual page, which is typically the name of a command,
function, or file. However, if name contains a slash (/) then man
interprets it as a file specification, so that you can do man ./foo.5
or even man /cd/foo/bar.1.gz.

See below for a description of where man looks for the manual page
files.

Don't you understand?

Re:Here, for free (1)

kwerle (39371) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366130)

Can you recommend a good book that explains its contents to me?

Man formats and displays the on-line manual pages.

If that looks familiar, it's because it's the first line of the man page.

If you're still lost, I recommend you avoid the commanline :-)

Re:Here, for free (4, Funny)

kurosawdust (654754) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366006)

I personally like the ones with homoerotic overtones: man touch man perl man unzip man units man curl man flex man tcl man gawk man paste man mount Why do I have the sudden urge to write a program called "chowder"?

Or better yet, enter these commands for fun... (1)

bennomatic (691188) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366020)

man woman
got a light?
how would you describe George W. Bush's idiocy?
Make sure to type them verbatim, including all punctuation, hitting return after each one.

"vi vs pico" debate... (5, Funny)

Anonymovs Coward (724746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365689)

That's a new one to me. I must find some pico users to have flamewars with over that one...

I can be more piddly than you! (1)

AvantLegion (595806) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365739)

That's a new one to me. I must find some pico users to have flamewars with over that one...

I use nano, and I flame the pico users!

Re:I can be more piddly than you! (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365793)


I use nano, and I flame the pico users!

Pfff. Real men cat > filename and do it right the first time.

Re:I can be more piddly than you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365966)

Hem!

In our time we only had cat > filename.tar.gz and we were happy, mind you!

Re:I can be more piddly than you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366055)

don't you mean...

cat | uuencode > filename.tar.gz

I highly doubt you could type a valid gzip file...

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365756)

They're too busy with the "pico vs nano" debate right now.

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (5, Insightful)

Graff (532189) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365768)

I must find some pico users to have flamewars with over that one...

Heh, I'm a pico user but I'm not a zealot over it. I use pico when I want to do some simple, quick editing in the command-line environment. For anything more complex I use BBEdit [barebones.com], which does pretty much everything that vi or emacs does except with a nice GUI.

But hey, use whatever works for you. Vi is certainly powerful enough. I just can't be bothered to take the time to learn all the commands, vi has a pretty high learning curve.

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365859)

vi has a pretty high learning curve
  1. Install Vim [sourceforge.net].
  2. Click the vimtutor script
  3. Spend about 30 minutes
  4. You're up and running

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (1)

Anonymovs Coward (724746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365910)

With me it's the opposite: I use emacs for complex work, and vi for quick and dirty stuff (mainly because I'm used to vi, switched to emacs relatively late...)

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (1)

millahtime (710421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365838)

i use pico when i am tired cause i don't have to remember any of those pesky vi commands. plus, all that drinking in college kinda killed my memory so pico is easier to remember. wait, what was i talking about.

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (3, Interesting)

strictnein (318940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365845)

pico rules...

there you go

Although I use nano [nano-editor.org] now since it is available seperately from Pine and is released under the GPL.

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365847)

Bah. I enter things manually in hex.

Re:"vi vs pico" debate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366169)

You had hex?

In my day it was binary. Uphill in the snow. Both ways.

what about Mac OS for *nix geeks? (5, Interesting)

Stanza (35421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365716)


I've gotten a shiny new iMac with OS X.3 on it, and I'm still learning the ropes. I'm slightly amazed at all the wierdnesses I can do with it, you can script almost anything with Applescript, and there's a million little details that do wierd shit, or behave as I'm not used to. So where is the Learning Mac OS X for the unix geek? The unix and mac world is so divided on the machine, yet works together seemlessly.

I haven't had my coffee yet, I'll ramble on about my experiences with Mac OS X elsewhere. But my question remains: what are good books/resources for the person who is already a unix geek?

Re:what about Mac OS for *nix geeks? (5, Informative)

mblase (200735) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365767)

So where is the Learning Mac OS X for the unix geek?

It just so happens it's available from O'Reilly as well [oreilly.com]. The Panther edition [oreilly.com] is due out in June.

Re:what about Mac OS for *nix geeks? (1, Insightful)

thehosh (755582) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365983)

yeah ... maybe i should buy this. can't get familiar with macosx - it's so f***cking diffrent from linux (and from bsd as well).
therefore still using linux on my ibook...

Re:what about Mac OS for *nix geeks? (2, Informative)

Luckboy (152985) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365797)

That would be Mac OS X Panther for UNIX Geeks, listed here: http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/mpantherunix/

Incidentally, I had the Jaguar versions of both of these books, and found them very helpful. They're very useful, even for cross-checking each other.

Oh, and Pico rules! vi drools!

Mac users from way back (-1, Troll)

morelife (213920) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365732)

don't bother getting this book. You'll neither understand or like anything Unix-like, and you'll just be making your lives more miserable.

Re:Mac users from way back (0)

pdpTrojan (454023) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365798)

Are you saying that Mac users can't learn like PC owners? That they are stuck in their ways and cannot expand their horizons?

I am sorry, but I find this is not the case.

Re:Mac users from way back (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365969)

Right on! Now, why are there two buttons on my mouse? I don't know which one to click!!!!

Re:Mac users from way back (-1, Flamebait)

morelife (213920) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366079)


Mac users can't learn like PC owners?


PC? Huh?

Unix.

Correct: The average Mac user is not yet ready for the level of complexity they will encounter when they start looking at the Unix OS under their hood. This is a fact, not a troll. On the whole, Mac users are not exactly technical. On the other hand those of us who understand computing from a starting point other than Apple, tend to have, aside from just plain better technique, a keener understanding as to how things are working in every avenue.

If this wasn't true, why would Michael and Timothy get their panties all so in a knot and start modding troll troll troll??

I am sorry, but I find this is not the case.
OK... whatever....

Re:Mac users from way back (0)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365946)

My fondness for 4-alarm chili and stout doesn't prevent me from also enjoying a carrot and watercress salad with white wine.

Anybody seen a hardcore unix book for Mac admins? (4, Interesting)

DrewBeavis (686624) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365770)

I've seen a few of these introductory unix books for Mac admins, but what if you need something more? If you have trouble configuring Apache, the Apache website doesn't help much because OS X has files in different locations. I know how to use ls... does this or any other book get into a deeper level?

Useful information, but to whom? (5, Interesting)

32bitwonder (684603) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365786)

I recall being at an Apple seminar once where they had demo of a then preproduction version of MacOS X. The audience consisted of local Mac support techies as well as casual users. There were many glitches throughout the demo, and many explanations from the presenter as to why MacOS loaded so slowly etc etc. He used this time to explain to the audience that the MacOS kernel is based on Unix. I wasn't sure at the time how many people in the audience would grasp that concept, but it became painfully clear near the end of the presentation when he finished things off by opening up a terminal window. I looked around and saw nothing but stunned, confused looks on people's faces. The presenter followed by explaining how you could now use familiar unix applications like telnet and vi all within MacOS X. After then explaining to someones question regarding just what telnet and vi were, someone else followed with the question, "So...if someone on the Internet wanted to hack my computer, could they open up one of these 'terminals' and use 'telnet' to hack into my Mac?". Needless to say the presentation ended late that day, and I got the impression most of the audience left feeling rather uncertain about what just happened.

I think a Unix for MacOS publication would be useful for those migrating to Apple from some (any) other platform. For casual Mac users? No way is this going to be of any use to them. If they were so inclined, they'd already have some experience on another OS by now.

Re:Useful information, but to whom? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365943)

You have to remember that it used to be a standard part of Apple's advertising that "Windows Sucks. It has a command line. Ha Ha. Boy they really do suck."

So it's shouldn't be a shock that longtime Mac users have a gross adversion to commandline features.

That being said, OS X has some borderline suck, not because it has a commandline, but because there's there's a lot of tools that ship with the system (Apache, Samba, etc) that don't have a configuration GUI and must be configured "the Unix way" (which Mac users will instinctively hate).

So...if someone on the Internet wanted to hack my computer, could they open up one of these 'terminals' and use 'telnet' to hack into my Mac

This is worded stupidly, but the US Army chose MacOS for their webservers partially because it does not even have the possibility of a remote shell, which makes it much more difficult to penetrate.

Re:Useful information, but to whom? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366124)

You are a moron.

Why the hell did you bother typing all that drivel?

Re:Useful information, but to whom? (2, Informative)

p4ul13 (560810) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366182)

" You have to remember that it used to be a standard part of Apple's advertising that "Windows Sucks. It has a command line. Ha Ha. Boy they really do suck.""

I think the taunt was moreso that win95 was just DOS with a GUI running on top of it. The fact that it had an *additional* feature in the form of a command-line wasn't the target there if I recall correctly.

Forgive Me Father, For I Am A Karma Whore... (3, Informative)

bfg9000 (726447) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365833)

... Macolytes who have a use for the command-line can really use GeekTool [versiontracker.com] to improve their quality of life. See this picture [spymac.com] for an example of its GUI goodness.

Okay, okay, so it's sitting there just churning the CPU. But it looks cool enough to get me chicks, so I figured you guys could use it too.

Re:Forgive Me Father, For I Am A Karma Whore... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365942)

But it looks cool enough to get me chicks, so I figured you guys could use it too.

Wrong website, dude. We're flaming faggots.

Re:Forgive Me Father, For I Am A Karma Whore... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366156)

nice screenshot -- change the background, and with all the data flashing and shit it looks like something off a sci-fi flick. very cool...

YoU fail it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365872)

serves to rEinforce for the project. Talk to one of 7he the political mess

The BSD Command Line (2, Insightful)

SphericalCrusher (739397) | more than 10 years ago | (#8365880)

I think it's important that MAC OS X users learn to use the UNIX command line. Even if they don't like it, they need to respect it. If it wasn't for OS X being powered by UNIX, it would not be anywhere near as stable as it is right now. I'm not "dissing" OS X, because I use it and love it, but any user shouldn't be without the knowledge required to run the UNIX command line.

Essentially, anyone that uses MAC OS X (if they don't already) will see the power of BSD and UNIX and general.. and will maybe move their PCs (unless they have MAC only) from Windows to a variation of UNIX, such as BSD or Linux.

Argh! It's "Mac," NOT "MAC" (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366113)

This is one of my pet peeves. "Mac" is not an acronym, people! It's short for "Macintosh."

My book (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8365896)

Hi, I am Brian Jepson, the author (the clever one) of the book. Please take a minute to read a sample chapter [oreilly.com].

I hope you will like it, dumbasses.

vice versa? (3, Interesting)

akad0nric0 (398141) | more than 10 years ago | (#8366014)

I'm an experienced *NIX admin who just got his first Mac (a Powerbook, and I'm hooked), and I'm struggling through what exactly *does* and *doesn't* translate from BSD to OS-X 10.3. I'd love to see a book that covers - to some degree - the differences. Anyone have a recommendation? Perhaps this book will be a close fit...

A computer for the rest of us? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8366155)

Now all those users who switched from the PC to the Mac because it was easier to use can have the one thing that the original Mac OS couldn't deliver: a DOS-like command line interface!
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