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Upgrading Your Current System To Kernel 2.6

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the share-and-enjoy dept.

Operating Systems 442

An anonymous reader writes "This white paper provides an overview of the process of moving an existing desktop system to the 2.6 kernel. It will highlight other software requirements imposed by the new kernel and administrative changes that you must make when migrating an existing system to the 2.6 kernel. It supplements previous whitepapers in the same series about Customizing the 2.6 kernel [Slashdot discussion here(1)] and porting drivers to the 2.6 kernel [Slashdot discussion here(2)] to the 2.6 kernel."

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Reading Harry Potter caused me to murder a child. (-1)

(TK)Max (668795) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386934)

______
.-" "-.
/ \
| | < FROM THIS DISEASED MOUTH
|, .-. .-. ,| SPREADS THE WORD OF TROLLKORE.
| )(__/ \__)( | AWRY BE THE WORDS AND OPINIONS
|/ /\ \| OF THOSE WHO POST HERE. TAKE
(_ ^^ _) NO HEED OF THEM.>
\__|IIIIII|__/
|-\IIIIII/-|
\ /
`--------`
.::::TROLL-KORE FOREVER!!!
.::::I hate you, I hate your country, and I hate your face.

Fist Psot!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386951)

Wooooooooooooooooohoo!

YUO FAIL IT! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386959)

suckah

help needed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386952)

Myself [stallman.org] and my partner [catb.org] have for the last 13 years been doing our best to raise our adopted son in the fine traditions [lemonparty.org] of GNU/Linux and free software. Imagine my horror when, upon arriving home early from work yesterday, I caught my boy touching himself while looking at pictures [freebsd.org] like this [imagewhore.com] !

Further examination of his hard drive (made easy by the numerous exploits [www.isec.pl] possible with the Linux kernel) we discovered references to a despicable non-GNU OS [freebsd.org] and other subversive material [slashdot.org] .

What should we do? How can we guide our boy away from filth like this [electricrain.com] and back to the true GNU way [gay-sex-access.com] ?

-- Richard

Re:help needed (-1)

srichand (750139) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387040)

for one, give him a microsoft os to use. the shock and disgust might just put him in the right direction ! ;) i call THIS shock therapy !

I can't find it anywhere.... (5, Funny)

MeanE (469971) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386964)

on Windows update?!? Where the heck is it?

Re:I can't find it anywhere.... (1)

ArmenTanzarian (210418) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386994)

I know, I keep getting this blue screen and rebooting every time I look for it.

Re:I can't find it anywhere.... (2, Funny)

DarkHelmet (120004) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387122)

Check the ports directory, dumbass. ;)

Re:I can't find it anywhere.... (1, Funny)

xargoon (741605) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387202)

It's not on windows update.

http://www.microsoft.com/win2k-kernel-2.6.zip

You probably need GCC to compile it:P

I wish I had this two months ago (5, Informative)

$calar (590356) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386968)

I had all kinds of trouble upgrading to 2.6. Sound and networking didn't work, as well as some of my filesystems. Luckily, I'm smart enough to setup lilo to run multiple kernels, so going back to 2.4 was no trouble to tweak my config file and recompile and try again. I never got everything totally working right. I was going to just wait until the next series of distro releases solved these problems for me, but maybe I should give it another shot.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (0, Flamebait)

goldspider (445116) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387048)

Stories like this do nothing to help build a convincing argument to Windows users that Linux is in fact the better OS. If even seasoned Linux users have problems upgrading their kernel, think of how frustrating it would be for someone less technically-inclined.

This is one of many issues that Linux has to work out before it can become a true mainstream OS.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387110)

" Stories like this do nothing to help build a convincing argument to Windows users that Linux is in fact the better OS. If even seasoned Linux users have problems upgrading their kernel, think of how frustrating it would be for someone less technically-inclined."

"This is one of many issues that Linux has to work out before it can become a true mainstream OS."

It's really only a PR issue... the equivalent of the Windows world way of doing this is to just wait for the next RedHat, Mandrake, or whatever.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387133)

I don't think a recently converted Windows user is likely to be compiling their own kernel! That's why we have distributions so that ordinary users don't have to worry about such things.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (4, Insightful)

alienw (585907) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387134)

How many times have you manually upgraded the kernel in Windows? This is not something that should be done by normal users, period. If you need a newer kernel, install a newer distribution.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (5, Informative)

El Cubano (631386) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387295)

If you need a newer kernel, install a newer distribution.

Really? apt-get install kernel-image-2.6.3-1-686, followed by a reboot didn't seem too overly difficult for my little brother (very much a non-techie).

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (0)

alienw (585907) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387387)

First, it's not exactly a manual upgrade. Second, if you use debian, you have no right to bitch about Linux being difficult to use. It's not exactly the most user-friendly system around.

ObOldSaw (5, Funny)

sharkey (16670) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387481)

It's not exactly the most user-friendly system around.

Sure it is. It's just picky about who its friends are.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387477)

Constantly. Every stupid service pack and security fix for IE upgrades the kernel of WinXP, since the HTML rendering code is IN THE FSCKING kernel. Hence, the numerous lawsuits.
Kernel != distribution
How many revisions of RedHat were on 2.4?

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (5, Funny)

scrytch (9198) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387151)

Stories like this do nothing to help build a convincing argument to Windows users that Linux is in fact the better OS. If even seasoned Linux users have problems upgrading their kernel, think of how frustrating it would be for someone less technically-inclined.

Tell me about it, the other day I just slapped the Win2k kernel into my win98 box and it just sailed right through, no problems at all...

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (0)

goldspider (445116) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387209)

"Tell me about it, the other day I just slapped the Win2k kernel into my win98 box and it just sailed right through, no problems at all..."

Cute, but show me a "Mandrake Upgrade Edition" or "Slackware Upgrade Edition" and maybe you'd have a case.

Granted, the Windows upgrade packages weren't exactly perfect either, but it gives users a much less complicated upgrade path than formatting/reinstalling the entire OS or manually recompiling/integrating a new kernel.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (2, Informative)

alienw (585907) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387244)

Have you ever even installed Mandrake? The first thing it asks is if you want to install or upgrade the system.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

rokzy (687636) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387247)

er, are you retarded?

I can't speak for Mandrake or Slackware but SUSE has had update versions for ages.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

Rooktoven (263454) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387353)

ummm--

go to an ftp mirror of slackware-current, download packages you want, upgradepkg *.tgz.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

Abreu (173023) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387401)

Cute, but show me a "Mandrake Upgrade Edition" or "Slackware Upgrade Edition" and maybe you'd have a case.

There is a severe price difference between Windows and desktop Linux distros... Therefore, there's no market demand for a "Mandrake upgrade edition"

I bought my first Mandrake distro as a closed box, because I wanted the manuals (and contribute with some money to their development), but all of my upgrades have been purchased here [cheapbytes.com]

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

BenjyD (316700) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387487)

Most Linux distributions will upgrade automatically. If anything the automatic upgrading in the linux world is a strong point and better implemented than in Windows - many times I've upgraded systems using windows update and broken something.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

Utter (4264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387177)

The thing is that a mainstream user (and most Linux users nowadays) do not upgrade the kernel by themselves. They use RedHats Up2date or similar tools which is the equivalent of "Windows Update".

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (2, Insightful)

bsdparasite (569618) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387185)

Why would unseasoned users want to Upgrade their Kernel?? I don't understand. RedHat has up2date which also updates the kernel (mini updates only). There is absolutely no reason to get the new kernel unless there is a box on a shop shelf saying "new kernel 2.6 Libranet 3.0".

my 2c

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387192)

Non techies are not suppose to upgrade the kernel to a new major release number, it's probably comparable to replacing by hand some very importants DLLs in windows. this is for the users who wants to be ahead of the pack. The option is there if you are skilled enough.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387195)

Someone less technically-inclined wouldn't want or need to be updating their kernal by hand. They would simply wait for their distro to get it packaged and tested and then upgrade that way. When was the last time you updated your windows kernal by hand?

That's the long term point... (4, Insightful)

aug24 (38229) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387206)

The purpose of Linus et al is not to beat Microsoft. That's statedly incidental. The ultimate purpose is to make a free (as in both) OS which 'just works'.

To that end, sometimes things will have to be broken to improve. The alternative is to support legacy code till the end of days and end up with MS-like bloatware.

Jo(e) average user doesn't want, need, or expect to upgrade their running kernel. So who cares how hard it is?

Justin.
Built my 2.6 kernel, won't run (kpanic), don't care, waiting for Red Hat or whoever to do it for me.

Re:That's the long term point... (1)

Rick and Roll (672077) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387443)

Ah man, don't wait for redhat. Go on IRC, they'll help you out.

Give It Time. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387251)

Circa 1985...

Stories like this do nothing to help build a convincing argument to Stove users that Microwaves are in fact the better oven. If even seasoned Microwave users have problems popping popcorn, think of how frustrating it would be for someone less technically-inclined.

This is one of many issues that Microwave users have to work out before it can become a true mainstream oven.

Circa 2000...

Does anybody still use a stove to pop popcorn? Just asking.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (4, Insightful)

HoldmyCauls (239328) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387298)

Stories like this are aimed at people who *might* build a kernel anyway. A person who wants to know *if* Linux is useful shouldn't be going near the kernel to begin with. That person should be reading articles on installing/test-driving Linux. That's why those of us in the know discuss the problems we have, which discussions can be made to improve the workings of the kernel, and the distro-makers will configure their own damned kernels.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (1)

TheLinuxSRC (683475) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387482)

Someone please mod parent up.

The average user should not ever have to update a kernel. Simply wait for a boxed set of your favorite distro and upgrade.

This article is aimed at those of us that have the experience and desire to run a custom kernel. I have been running the 2.6 series kernels since 2.6.0 with virtually no problems. Admittedly, there were some growing pains learning the nuances of the new kernel. Not to mention, I am using a lot of hardware that only has beta and alpha drivers (NVidia ti-4600 on an Apollo Pro chipset - Win2K won't even see the card and XP only has uptimes of about 5 minutes, Hauppage PVR-250 video capture, Atheros based wireless pci card, etc...). Still no kernel panics or stability issues. Then again, I am not a newbie. If I were, I would wait for a distro to release a 2.6 version.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (4, Insightful)

petabyte (238821) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387375)

Frankly, I wouldn't describe the parent as a seasoned Linux user. I upgraded 4 distros - Slackware, Gentoo, Debian, and a friends Fedora to 2.6 - probably not spending more than 30 minutes on any machine. Most of that was the new config file.

"Less technically inclined" has nothing to do with it. Computer skills are largely a matter of experience. I've used linux as my desktop for roughly 6 years. I can do most day to day system's administration things much faster than other people. Does this mean I'm more skilled? Probably not. I can also do most systems' administration tasks in Windows much faster than other people. Why? Because I've already addressed the issues or fixed the problems before. 2.6 is a new experience for most people and until they gain experience building it, its going to be hard. The same if you've never built a kernel before. So practice. And, uh, keep a boot disk around :).

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (3, Informative)

Bender Unit 22 (216955) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387093)

Ditto, I guess if you only run it on the most common hardware, it might be easier.
I played around with it also and found it to cause many problems.
If you run Red Hat, check out this webcast 2.6 Linux Kernel in Red Hat Enterprise Linux v.3: A Technology Overview [redhat.com] about them backporting features to 2.4.
I run a great deal of IBM servers and I can see their ties with IBM. I hope this webcast will enlighten me to how they make sure that Red Hat gets the most of the IBM servers, since we have a company decision to run Red Hat.

Re:I wish I had this two months ago (0, Flamebait)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387162)

But how uncommon is my hardware? 1st gen Radeon card, SB Live, linksys net card (tulip.o), HP printer, USB mouse..

I keep hearing about how linux is fussy with obscure or "non-standard" hardware, but how much more fucking standard does it get than that, for a relatively modern computer?

Do I really have to roll back to my old Cirrus Logic 5434 1 meg video card, adlib sound, dot matrix (ascii only) printer on a 486sx to experience an effortless linux install?

Hopefully IBM fixes this bullshit. Or some other big software corp. Only a cadre of managers, testers, usability consultants and marketers can pull linux from the muck its in. It's a fact, like it or not.

That's almost the same as my hardware (1)

roystgnr (4015) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387264)

Except I'm using a Lexmark printer; everything else isn't the same model you described but close enough to use the exact same driver. The only problem I had with 2.6 is that the ivtv driver (for a Hauppauge PVR-250 TV tuner) needed to be patched built by hand; everything else seems to be caught by Red Hat's autoconfiguration tools now.

What trouble did you have installing?

FIRST BLOCK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386971)

begin 755 payload
M_]C_X``02D9)1@`!`0$`>`!X``#_VP!#``@&!@<& !0@'!P<)"0@*#!0-#`L+
next block [slashdot.org]

remove also the semicolon and the space from this block but leave all semicolons in the other blocks

What I'd like to see... (5, Insightful)

ageoffri (723674) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386976)

I'd like to see a nice up to date list distributions that are built around the 2.6 kernel. Trying to update a Mandrake system to 2.6 didn't work for me and these days I don't have the time to track down errors.

Re:What I'd like to see... (1)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387288)

I know this is slashdot and I'm not suppose to give a Gentoo advice, but this times Gentoo makes the 2.6 transition a breeze. Took a couple of hours first try.

howto upgrade to 2.6 [gentoo.org]

Of course make sure hardware and features is supported first.

Re:What I'd like to see... (1)

Erratio (570164) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387486)

I'm a proponent of Gentoo but "a breeze" and a "a couple of horus first try" don't exactly fit together for a kernel upgrade. It took me about an hour without a distrubution, about a half an hour to setup the kernel and a half an hour to iron out issues.

Do it! (-1, Troll)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8386988)


Actually Step 1 is to: pay your $699 licensing fee you cock-smoking teabaggers. [slashdot.org] A caveat: SCO's license doesn't seem to differentiate between cock-smoking and non-cock-smoking teabaggers.

MOD PARENT UP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387028)

Amen, brother

Re:Do it! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387176)

Here's your justification, you lousy piece of troll shit. My DSL connection at home sucks, and that's where the beta server is running. I gave out the site to 125 people who emailed me asked me for the site, so that it didn't die.
Now you've decided to be a fucking flaming asshole and post the site everywhere, causing signifacnt problems with my DSL at home because you're a piece of shit with nothing better to do.

I've wasted 5 hours this morning deleting your trolls and in the meantime have gotten NO other work done because of you. I'm trying to do something nice for MacSlash community and upgrade our server so it's better. You insist on wasting my time with this shit, and keeping me from being able to work on the new server.

I've worked on this site for over 3 years without every making a penny off of it because I like the interaction with other Mac users. You've just spoiled that. I now dread loading the site every morning because of trolls like you. I spend most of my time now dealing with your petty bullshit instead making this a better place. And I'm about ready to just shut the whole damn thing down instead of dealing with you anymore.

So there's you're fucking justification. Now stop posting the address of the new site.
-- Ben Stanfield
Executive Editor @ MacSlash

so much for Linux usability (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386995)

what? no automatic upgrade feature?

so much for Linux being ready for the masses.

booooooooooooooo

How to Remove Linux and Install Windows XP (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8386997)

SUMMARY
This article explains how to remove the Linux operating system from your computer and install Windows XP. This article assumes that Linux is already installed on your computer's hard disk, that Linux native and Linux swap partitions are in use (which are incompatible with Windows XP), and that there is no free space left on the hard disk.

NOTE: Windows XP and Linux can coexist on the same computer. For additional information, refer to your Linux documentation.
MORE INFORMATION
To install Windows XP on a computer on which Linux is currently installed (and assuming that you want to remove Linux), you must manually delete the partitions used by the Linux operating system. The Windows-compatible partition can be created automatically during the installation of Windows XP.

IMPORTANT: Before you follow the steps in this article, verify that you have a bootable disk or bootable CD-ROM for the Linux operating system, because these steps completely remove the Linux operating system from your computer. If you intend to restore the Linux operating system at a later date, verify that you also have a functional backup of all the information stored on your computer. Additionally, you must have a full release version of Windows XP to use during this installation. If you intend to use a Windows XP upgrade CD-ROM, a CD-ROM of a qualifying Windows product must be available. Setup from the Windows XP upgrade CD-ROM will prompt you for this CD-ROM.

Linux file systems use a superblock at the beginning of a disk partition to identify the basic size, shape, and condition of the file system.

The Linux operating system is generally installed on partition type 83 (Linux native) or 82 (Linux swap). The Linux boot manager (LILO) can be configured to start from either of the following locations:

* The hard disk Master Boot Record (MBR)

-or-
* The root folder of the Linux partition

The Fdisk tool included with Linux can be used to delete the partitions. (There are other utilities that work just as well, such as Fdisk from MS-DOS 5.0 and later, or you can delete the partitions during the installation process.)

To remove Linux from your computer and install Windows XP, follow these steps:

1. Remove the native, swap, and boot partitions used by Linux:
1. Start your computer with the Linux Setup floppy disk, type fdisk at the command prompt, and then press ENTER.

NOTE: For help with using the Fdisk tool, type m at the command prompt, and then press ENTER.
2. Type p at the command prompt, and then press ENTER to display partition information. The first item listed is hard disk 1, partition 1 information, and the second item listed is hard disk 1, partition 2 information.
3. Type d at the command prompt, and then press ENTER. You are then prompted for the partition number that you want to delete. Type 1, and then press ENTER to delete partition number 1. Repeat this step until all the partitions have been deleted.
4. Type w, and then press ENTER to write this information to the partition table. Some error messages may be generated (because information is written to the partition table), but they should not be significant at this point because the next step is to restart the computer and then install the new operating system.
5. Type q at the command prompt, and then press ENTER to quit the Fdisk tool.
6. Insert either a bootable floppy disk or the bootable Windows XP CD-ROM, and then press CTRL+ALT+DELETE to restart your computer.
2. Follow the instructions on the screen to install Windows XP.

The installation process assists you in creating the appropriate partitions on your computer.

Sample Linux Partition Tables
Single SCSI Drive

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (SCSI hard drive 1, partition 1) /dev/sda2 501 522 176715 82 Linux swap (SCSI hard drive 1, partition 2)

Multiple SCSI Drives

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (SCSI hard drive 1, partition 1) /dev/sda2 501 522 176715 82 Linux swap (SCSI hard drive 1, partition 2) /dev/sdb1 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (SCSI hard drive 2, partition 1)

Single IDE Drive

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 * 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (IDE hard drive 1, partition 1) /dev/hda2 501 522 176715 82 Linux swap (IDE hard drive 1, partition 2)

Multiple IDE Drives

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/hda1 * 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (IDE hard drive 1, partition 1) /dev/hda2 501 522 176715 82 Linux swap (IDE hard drive 1, partition 2) /dev/hdb1 1 500 4016218 83 Linux native (IDE hard drive 2, partition 1)

Additionally, Linux recognizes more than 40 different partition types, including the following:

* FAT 12 (Type 01)
* FAT 16 > 32 M Primary (Type 06)
* FAT 16 Extended (Type 05)
* FAT 32 w/o LBA Primary (Type 0b)
* FAT 32 w/LBA Primary (Type 0c)
* FAT 16 w/LBA (Type 0e)
* FAT 16 w/LBA Extended (Type 0f)

Note that there are other ways to remove the Linux operating system and install Windows XP. The preceding method is included in this article because of the assumptions that the Linux operating system is already functioning and there is no more room on the hard disk. There are methods for changing partition sizes with software designed for managing partitions. Disk partitioning software may cause instability with the Windows XP installation. Microsoft does not support the installation of Windows XP on partitions manipulated in this manner.

You can also use an MS-DOS version 5.0-or-later boot disk, a Microsoft Windows 95 Startup disk, or a Microsoft Windows 98 Startup disk that contains the Fdisk utility to remove an operating system from the hard disk and install a different operating system. When you start Fdisk and multiple drives are installed on your computer, you are presented with five choices; use option 5 to select the hard disk that has the partition to be deleted. After that (or if you have only one hard disk), select option 3 (Delete partition or logical DOS drive), and then select option 4 (Delete non-DOS partition). You should then see the non-MS-DOS partitions that you want to delete. Typically, the Linux operating system has two non-MS-DOS partitions, but there may be more. After you delete one partition, use the same steps to delete any other appropriate non-MS-DOS partitions.

For additional information about how to use the Fdisk utility, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

255867 How to Use the Fdisk Tool and the Format Tool to Partition or Repartition a Hard Disk
After you delete the partitions, you can create partitions and install the operating system that you want. You can create only one primary partition and an extended partition with multiple logical drives by using Fdisk from MS-DOS version 5.0-and-later, Windows 95, and Windows 98. The maximum FAT16 primary partition size is 2 gigabytes (GB). The largest FAT16 logical drive size is 2 GB.

For additional information, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

105074 MS-DOS 6.2 Partitioning Questions and Answers
When you install Windows XP, the Linux partitions can be removed and new partitions created and formatted with the appropriate file system type during the installation process. Windows XP allows you to create more than one primary partition. Windows XP does recognize the FAT32 file system. During the installation of Windows XP, you can create a very large FAT32 drive. The FAT32 drive can be converted to NTFS after the installation has completed, if appropriate.

For additional information about how to multiboot with Windows XP, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

306559 HOW TO: Create a Multiple-Boot System with Windows XP
For more information, browse to the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/techinfo/ad mi nistration/management/mltiboot.asp
Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

The third-party products that are discussed in this article are manufactured by companies that are independent of Microsoft. Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding the performance or reliability of these products.

What system? (2, Insightful)

ageitgey (216346) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387018)

Although it is obvious to many slashdot readers, the summary doesn't even mention the word "Linux".

So maybe we should point out that this is a whitepaper on upgrading Linux systems to kernel 2.6. (And no, I don't think the icon is enough - not everyone has a stuffed Tux on their desk).

Re:What system? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387137)

You're kidding me right? You do realize that if you don't know what the "2.6 kernel" is this white paper ins't for you. That applies to those running linux and still have no clue what it is. If you (anyone) bother to RTFM then you would know it was about linux. Why am I even responding to this? Why were you modded up? Sometimes I just don't understand the mods, or soe of the users.

Re:What system? (2, Funny)

pavon (30274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387304)

What is slashdot? Although it is obvious to you, I think it would be worth pointing out in your post that it is a website covering "News for Nerds. Stuff that matters."

Or we could just use the grade school skill of reading in context.

Still conveniently igoring (4, Informative)

Enry (630) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387039)

The painful process of upgrading LVM1 to LVM2. Little documentation on the process, and installing Fedora Core 2 test 1 over an existing Fedora Core 1 gives all sorts of fun. Much hand-holding of your system and other hand-waving is required.

This settles it. (3, Funny)

revolvement (742502) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387050)

BSD^H^H^H2.4 kernel is dying.

Re:This settles it. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387095)

We really have to admit that the 2.4 kernel is in decline. In all likelihood, there may be only one more (or possibly two) releases before the 2.4 kernel goes away forever.

I know it is now almost a mantra set in stone that "The Linux 2.4 kernel is dying". Unfortunately, the abuse of that fact by trolls has obscured the truth, that truth being that the kernel really is dying.

My main reason for moving away from the 2.4 kernel has been twofold. First, to avoid the poor maintainership of Anal Cocks. And secondly, to investigate more promising and viable entries in the Linux kernel sweepstakes. The 2.4 kernel is no longer a legitimate player, I'm sorry to say.

Which system? (-1, Redundant)

alanoneil (749691) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387056)

Is this kernel 2.6 compiled from the Windows source code? I keep getting a general protection fault when loading explorer.exe

Yow. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387059)

Oh, a white paper! It all sounds so distinctive, academic, and authoritative!

Re:Yow. (4, Interesting)

eln (21727) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387208)

The term "white paper" is meaningless these days. Now that the marketing departments have gotten ahold of it, "white papers" are usually nothing more than the same information included in the colored brochures, only on a white piece of paper in black text.

The days of "white paper" meaning a strictly technical or educational document are gone. These days, "white papers" are just another form of advertising.

I wipe me butt.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387306)

with white paper....

Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, comment posting has temporarily been disabled. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in the timeout corner. If it's someone else, this is a chance to hunt them down. If you think this is unfair, please email moderation@slashdot.org with your MD5'd IPID and SubnetIDDue to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, comment posting has temporarily been disabled. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in the timeout corner. If it's someone else, this is a chance to hunt them down. If you think this is unfair, please email moderation@slashdot.org with your MD5'd IPID and SubnetIDDue to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, comment posting has temporarily been disabled. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in the timeout corner. If it's someone else, this is a chance to hunt them down. If you think this is unfair, please email moderation@slashdot.org with your MD5'd IPID and SubnetIDDue to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, comment posting has temporarily been disabled. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in the timeout corner. If it's someone else, this is a chance to hunt them down. If you think this is unfair, please email moderation@slashdot.org with your MD5'd IPID and SubnetID

sound (4, Interesting)

spoonyfork (23307) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387081)

I've been using Linux as a hobbyist since 1995. The one consistent thing over the releases that has always been a issue, at least for me, is getting sound to work. Various hardware, various distros, almost all require tweaking.

Does anyone else have the same observation?

Re:sound (1)

dan2550 (663103) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387128)

i found on my HP that the sound was extremely tempormental, and would only work as a module. i cant figure out the reasoning behind it, but now that i have a new non-generic card, i'm having no trouble

Re:sound (1)

MeBadMagic (619592) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387230)

I did until I started using SuSE! hehehehe B-)

Re:sound (1)

peter_gzowski (465076) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387383)

For me it's USB devices, like my printer (HP PSC 2210, I know, pos), that give me trouble. Even since I upgraded to 2.6.X, I haven't gotten my printer to work... I am using the Mandrake cooker rpms to do the upgrading (it's up to 2.6.3 now).

2.6's shortcomings (1, Insightful)

dan2550 (663103) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387085)

i tried both 2.6 and 2.6.2 and i must say i wasn't really impressed with either. besides the fact that alot less stuff was echo'ed, the new make xconfig was annoying to work with, and it was actually nicer to just use menuconfig. also, i had a lot of trouble getting the framebuffer to work. right now, i have a dual boot with 2.4.22, 2.6.2, and windows (in order of preference)

Re:2.6's shortcomings (1)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387364)

the new make xconfig was annoying to work with

Really? I thought the new xconfig was one of the thing that was really nice about the new kernel. If you don't like it, you could always do make gconfig, to get the gtk version.

I was running 2.4.x with the Con Kolivas patches, so I didn't notice the speed difference between the two kernels, but still preferred the 2.6 one because I like to test out the udev stuff.

why did slashdot even post this article? (-1, Offtopic)

Squeezer (132342) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387105)

not to flame, but why is slashdot posting an article from feb 24, 2004 on how to upgrade to linux 2.6?

this article i have bookmarked tells you how to upgrade to 2.6 and its from august 29, 2003.

http://kerneltrap.org/node/view/799 [kerneltrap.org]

Re:why did slashdot even post this article? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387123)

because slashdot sucks donkey dick and never has anything interesting to say.

face it, slashdot is for the idiots out there.

It's worth it (4, Informative)

MC68040 (462186) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387106)

With the preemptive kernel option enabled and the kernel module autoloader in 2.6 it does all you would ever need:
Loads any modules you need
Lets you do tasks preemtpively
Boots in a much shorter time (from 2.4.23's 35 sec to ~14 sec in my case)

It's also rock solid in my experience now, a good sound kernel choice that will fit virtually all workstations =)

Re:It's worth it (1)

scosol (127202) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387318)

> Lets you do tasks preemtpively

I'm sorry ahahhah- do you even know what that means?

Re:It's worth it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387494)

You can get your work done before you even know you wanted to start!

blah (2, Informative)

oohp (657224) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387114)

Matroxfb ain't working. I'm not going to switch until they fix it.

Module loading (2, Interesting)

Flaming_Monkey (344281) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387116)

The biggest issue I'm facing with 2.6 is getting module loading to work correctly. Seems that Debian/Knoppix isn't reading through the correct config file at bootup, even with the correct version of module-init-tools running. SpeedStep seems a bit sketchy too, but it's Centrino, so it could just be a matter of time.

Has anyone else had this problem? I've read that it may be a symptom of running a mixed stable/testing system, but I have yet to see a solution for the problem.

Re:Module loading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387479)

No problems running 2.6.x on Deb, morphix and knoppix here. I had to use asla instead of oss, and a number of modules have been renamed from 2.4.x. Other than that, rock solid, and I'm please that I have been able to dump that ide-scsi crap!

Bill von Hagen? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387142)

Hey, I known that guy.

If you've got a... (5, Informative)

cs02rm0 (654673) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387149)

...laptop touchpad don't bother going near 2.6 if you don't know exactly what you're doing. I still haven't got the mouse working. I can't even find anyone who can tell me how to confirm if the touchpad is a synaptic.

I'm not the only one suffering this.

Works great on my slackware desktop.

Re:If you've got a... (3, Informative)

BenjyD (316700) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387379)

The touchpad on the laptop in front of me works fine - Linux 2.6.3(Gentoo) and a Synaptics Touchpad on a Compaq Armada M300. I didn't have to fiddle around with anything - I just put my mouse device as /dev/psaux in XF86config and it works fine. I can post my .config if you need it.

There's are problems upgrading? (5, Insightful)

H0ek (86256) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387170)

If there are, I didn't see them. All I did was:

apt-get install kernel-image-2.6.2-1-686
update-grub

Two lines on the command line and a reboot and I've been happy ever since.

Oh, wait, we're talking outside Debian. Nevermind.

Running smooth (5, Interesting)

Geccoman (18319) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387172)

I upgraded to the 2.6 kernel about a month ago, and have been nothing but impressed. I got increased speed, my sound works great (ALSA) and with 1280x1024 Framebuffer and Bootsplash (85Hz refresh no-less) even my console is nice to look at.

My NVidia drivers worked flawlessly with the new kernel, as well as my wireless network.

I get oooh's and ahhh's from the co-workers with 3DDesk, and my boss is impressed with my setup, even though he's got a shiny new G5 under his desk.

That's just my experience, though... YMMV

Fast mouse? Check your XF86Config (5, Informative)

Alan (347) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387214)

One thing that was a blocker for me to move to 2.6 was my mouse would go a lot faster while in X. I finally found that it was the new input system. Under 2.4 the default XF86Config file would have two mouse input settings, one for ps/2 and one for USB. Under 2.6 both of these were picked up regardless of the mouse being ps/2 or usb so all mouse events, clicks, etc were picked up twice. Removing one of the mouse entries made everything work as normal.

Probably everyone but me knew this, but thought I'd throw it out in case anyone else is in the same boat.

Re:Fast mouse? Check your XF86Config (1)

Derek Pomery (2028) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387412)

Just one mouse in my config. But I *did* find that mouse was moving a lot faster in X. But then, *everything* was more responsive with 2.6.

Re:Fast mouse? Check your XF86Config (2, Informative)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387441)

Another possible reason for your mouse speeding up is the 2.6 kernel actually initializing the mouse and setting the precision, etc. You can disable this, and return to "almost 2.4"-like behaviour by adding the following kernel parameter to your boot config:

psmouse_noext=1

Butt Beating ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387218)

Butt beating, all night in the dry river!!!

-random thought of the day!

fanks

My experiences with 2.6 (5, Informative)

Cytlid (95255) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387221)

Here's my experience with 2.6 kernel (been running it since 2.6.0 was released).

DVDs look awesome. I had to tweak the hdparms for DMA, but they work great.

Ever since NVidia came out with the latest drivers, things like the UT2k4 Demo fun fantastic.

I was a little hung up on modules... seeing as I rarely use them, it wasn't a show-stopper. The conversion from modutils to module-init-tools was mostly painless.

Recently, I've been playing with MTD, and trying to get a test machine to use 12 out of the 16 megs of an AGP Voodoo3 3000 card's memory as a device I can format or use as swap. I have been unsuccessful. (2.6.3). This is also on a testing machine, not my "main" machine.

On a slightly OT note, planning on building a Mini ITX system with a Via Epia board (one of the 800 mhz ones). Should have the case this week, jury's still out on the mb.

Other than that, no complaints, it's been fantastic. I'm running 2.6.3 on 3 different machines (with different responsibilies) and it feels like there's no going back now!

Re:My experiences with 2.6 (1)

Cytlid (95255) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387305)

Oh, I should also probably note... I have a Yamaha DS-XG (YMF744) with ALSA and OSS emulation support, but sometimes if I boot up, and run the UT2k4 demo, the sound seems to be "turned down" all the way. Od d behavior. But then again, my system is a Slackware 9.0 upgraded to most of the parts of 9.1, including Gnome 2.4. I'm probably missing something ...

jesus may have been gay? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387239)

he probably would at least recommend against fear based persecution of those who may seem to be different than you, having been through all that himself.

I have a question for seasonned linux users (1)

xutopia (469129) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387282)

I have a live CD sitting around. I'd like to know if there is a way to backup my kernel (in some other folder or something) and if attempting to install the 2.6 kernel doesn't work I'd just copy everything back. Is there a way to do this? Where do I start?

Re:I have a question for seasonned linux users (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387416)

It's easier than that. You can have multiple kernels on your system all at the same time and boot whichever you want whenever you want.

The kernel code and modules for particular kernel versions are kept separate to allow this.

Recyled news for the kiddies... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8387310)

Getting tired of /.'s stories. Anybody can recommend some non-recycled-non-corporate-geeky-news-worthy sites.

TIA

Reiserfs issues (2, Interesting)

Riskable (19437) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387325)

Anyone else had this problem when upgrading to 2.6? I previously tried upgrading my Mandrake 9.2 install to 2.6 and failed (on boot, no init found, no matter what I tried).

So I tried Mandrake 10 RC1 (which uses 2.6.2 by default). It booted and runs wonderfully. However, yesterday I tried to upgrade the kernel to 2.6.3 from kernel.org. Using "make oldconfig" (and following the rest of the compiliation procedures) on my Mandrake-supplied .config file, the system would not boot. For some reason it can't mount the root filesystem even though I have both ext2 and reiserfs support compiled into the kernel. Anyone else experience this? My only guess at this point is that I'm missing some sort of customization that Mandrake did to their version of the kernel.

Note: Abit IC7-G motherobard (not sure if that makes a difference).

Re:Reiserfs issues (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387460)

Is the root= bit in your boot loader config right?

Is filesystem support for / compiled into the kernel? ( not a module. )

Are all the drivers for the hardware needed to see the disks in the kernel? ( again, not as modules )

Re:Reiserfs issues (1)

petabyte (238821) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387474)

Could be a bunch of things actually. You have support for your drive controller compiled in right? And support for the IDE drive? And you are passing the right "root=/dev/hda(blah)"? Mandrake uses devfs if I recall correctly. You'll probably need to have that enabled in 2.6. Maybe they're doing something else.

I run reiser on my laptop and before going XFS, ran it with 2.6 on my Abit KD7 which isn't a far cry from your IC.

What about grub? (1)

afabbro (33948) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387329)

I was under the impression that the old syntax of "root=/dev/hda3" didn't work any more and one needed to specify integer numbers for root=...?

Re:What about grub? (1)

1s44c (552956) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387409)

AFAIK nothing has changed between 2.4 and 2.6 in that regard.

I use lilo on a laptop and grub on my workstation to load 2.6 kernels and they both work fine.

You still need to pass 'root=/dev/hda3' or whatever to the kernel at boot with either of the bootloaders. I believe you can still set the root partition directly in the kernel just the same a 2.2 and 2.4 but it isn't the recommended way to do it.

Re:What about grub? (2, Funny)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387462)

Well, it works just fine for me...

easier than 2.4 (5, Informative)

rudog (98586) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387356)

I run gentoo on a dual pIII-600 with an ATI radeon7000 / SBlive / intelpro100. Kernels 2.4.18 through 2.4.22 took several hours of tweaking before I could even get the thing to boot correctly. ( 2.2 never had this problem )

Last week I took about 30 minutes and grabbed 2.6.3 did a clean/config/make, which took about the majority of that time, and booted into the fastest Linux box I have ever had.

2.6 booted with OpenGL without any tweaks pushing glgears to 1600fps and ALSA kicked in without errors on the emu10k1. Device drivers posed no issues for either the USB keyboard/mouse or hardrive or nework card.

No 'migration' was necessary for either windowmaker / enlightenment / blender / JACK or any of my other 100 some odd apps.

Debina and 2.6 Kernel module loading at boot (3, Interesting)

chivo (20329) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387362)

The one problem I can't seem to find the answer to is how Debian tells the kernel which modules to autoload at boot. I know that for 2.4 kernels, there is a list in /etc/modules. However, with my 2.6 kernel. that file is ignored and I have to manually load all the modules I need after boot. A pain in the ass since I try to keep most of my device drivers as modules, like for my NICs, video card, USB, sound card, etc. Has anyone using Debian and 2.6 kernel found a solution to this?

Re:Debina and 2.6 Kernel module loading at boot (3, Informative)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387435)

Did you install modules-init-tool? My /etc/modules get read at bootup (running 2.6.3).

My only real complaint. (1)

dinivin (444905) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387399)


My Firewire storage devices stopped working and my posts to LKM about it (once when 2.6.0 was released and one just yesterday concerning 2.6.3) have gone unanswered :-(

Dinivin

Fedora Core 1 (4, Informative)

SimplexO (537908) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387419)

Fedora Core 1 [artoo.net] forum posting with people who have already done it. It seems pretty easy from the looks of it. I'm going to do it just as soon as I get some free time...

And for the love of god, please read the whole thread. Don't ever install a kernel with rpm -Uvh. Leave yourself a backup (rpm -ivh).

gentoo (1)

gyratedotorg (545872) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387426)

i didnt know there was anything special i needed to do to upgrade. with gentoo, all i did was type 'emerge development sources' and recompile as usual.

Re:gentoo (1)

gyratedotorg (545872) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387451)

oops, that should be 'emerge development-sources'

New version installation a better choice (1)

pt99par (588458) | more than 10 years ago | (#8387456)

I find it easier to just wait for the latest version of my distribution and the install it. When i do that i get the (almost) latest software and kernel versions and it will hopefully be more stable than if i try to upgrade the kernel or libs. I have all my user configurations on a separate paritition so i can just create symlinks from my home dir which makes re isntallation really quick. i use mdk btw.. :)
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