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NASA Says Mars Once "Drenched With Water"

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the nice-day-for-a-swim dept.

Space 1048

NASA is currently holding a press conference (carried live on NASA TV) where they are discussing findings from the Mars rovers. They are saying that the crater that the second rover has landed in has convincing evidence that it was once drenched or covered in liquid water. They cite the tiny spherules, odd holes in the rocks, sulfur in the spectrometric analyses, and evidence of an iron sulfate hydrate (a hydrate is a chemical compound which includes water molecules in the crystal lattice). Update: 03/02 19:45 GMT by M : CNN has a story, or see the NASA press release.

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Key point (5, Interesting)

Mukaikubo (724906) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443226)

If these rocks are sedimentary, then, as Squyres said, that has to be our main target for a sample return mission. Because sedimentary rocks are going to have fossils.

Re:Key point (4, Insightful)

RLW (662014) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443240)

if there was life to swim in those seas.

Re:Key point (4, Insightful)

Mukaikubo (724906) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443269)

Very true. If there was life in this 'ocean', then it's very likely fossils are in sedimentary rocks in that region. If there are no fossils? Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, but it'll be a really curious coincidence.

Re:Key point (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443247)

> sedimentary rocks are going to have fossils. ... and fossils means fuel, which in turn means they must have WMDs.

Re:Key point (4, Funny)

mark-t (151149) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443321)

sedimentary rocks are going to have fossils. ... and fossils means fuel, which in turn means they must have WMDs.
Right... and fossil fuels mean more greenhouse gasses, which causes the temperature to rise...

Egad!!! We may have just found a way to teraform mars! ;)

Fossil fuels? (4, Funny)

MAXOMENOS (9802) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443410)

This would be great news for the space program, as Bush would make the invasion and conquest of Mars a national priority.

Warning to Mars: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443407)

(sedimentary rocks are going to have fossils. ... and fossils means fuel, which in turn means they must have WMDs.)

Warning to Mars:
Prepare for shuck and jive followed by shlock and nah.

Re:Key point (2, Insightful)

Halvard (102061) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443255)

are going to

That should read could.

Re:Key point (2, Funny)

webtre (717698) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443274)

If those rocks are sedimentary, there must have been water to carry sediment (unless some bored alien teenager did something weird).

Re:Key point (1)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443281)

ummm ... what?

for sure, you mean? like, with certainty?

thats a lot of fossils.

Re:Key point (4, Insightful)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443318)

If we brought back 10 tons of mars rocks, the chances of getting a fossil are still slim to none. Talk about needle in a haystack. Not to mention the fact that you have to land near some of it to begin with.

Fixing Opportunity after the fact (5, Interesting)

Danathar (267989) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443420)

Interesting...That means we could possibly come back with a another rover that not only could look for life, but could possibly "repair/rejuvinate" the current rover by 'sweeping" the dust off of the solar panels? I would imagine just leaving the rover would be interesting to engineers and scientists to see what happens to a man made object that sits out in the open for extended periods of time....good information if you want to build stuff on Mars.

Anybody out there like to comment? Is it a possibility? Could we come back with another rover and get Opportunity working again after it runs out of juice?

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443227)

forking fp

So much... (5, Funny)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443232)

... for CowboyNeil saving money on his auto insurance...

Re:So much... (1, Informative)

AyeFly (242460) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443313)

lol, the above comment was not offtopic, if you would read slashdot more, you would see that todays poll asked what Nasa's announcement was, and the last option was Cowboyneal saving money on his auto insurance. so, before marking things as offtopic...make sure you doing so out of ignorance.

woohoo (0, Offtopic)

greywire (78262) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443235)

Total recall was accurate!

Re:woohoo (-1, Offtopic)

TMLink (177732) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443333)

Bring on the women with three tits!!

Re:woohoo (4, Funny)

Xeed (308294) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443385)

Well, I think you were forgetting about the whole alien overtone. Also, the water isn't there anymore. They are still looking for the big alien device to bring it all back.

Also, I'm voting for Arnold when he runs for King of Mars. I'd like him to fix the drought.

Drenched??? All of Mars??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443238)

No...

Perhaps the landing site, but NASA has not concluded that Mars was drenched.

fp you motherfuckers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443241)

my first fp like a motherfucker!

and this couldn't have come sooner? (4, Funny)

chrisopherpace (756918) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443243)

I wanted my free shrimp from Long John Silvers! Damn! Info Here [longjohnsilvers.com]

Re:and this couldn't have come sooner? (3, Informative)

neight9 (542480) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443306)

two days late- for the free shrimp, nasa would have had to announce by 29-Feb.

Re:and this couldn't have come sooner? (1)

howlatthemoon (718490) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443320)

It is March 2nd, not Feb 29th. No free shrimp for you (or any of us). I bet there was some collusion between NASA and LJS to rob the country of free shrimp ;-) .

Re:and this couldn't have come sooner? (1)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443335)

I wanted my free shrimp from Long John Silvers! Damn!

Well, at least we're getting "blueberries", to go along with the rotini and brine.

Special offer expired Feb 29 (0, Redundant)

Jayfar (630313) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443372)

...according to the PR, the offer is only valid "should NASA announce the discovery of conclusive evidence of an ocean on Mars between now and February 29, 2004."

you might still get your free giant shrimp!! (4, Interesting)

7-Vodka (195504) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443400)

their offer reads "Evidence of Ocean Water on Mars; If Found by Feb. 29, America Gets Free Giant Shrimp on March 15"

Well, the news may not have been announced by feb 29, but the evidence may have been found by feb 29.

Not very surprising (5, Interesting)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443244)

That there once has been water on Mars, considering that a lot of comets contains water.

Re:Not very surprising (4, Informative)

cmowire (254489) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443309)

No, comets contain water-ice. In a vaccum, ice subliminates into water vapor without an intervining liquid step. Neither water vapor nor ice can support "life as we know it".

The big thing here is that there was a body of water for some geologically continuous amount of time, which implies that there still is the potential for "life as we know it" on Mars.

Re:Not very surprising (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443319)

I doubt that the reason the moon was covered or drenched in water was that comets containing miniscule amounts of water hit the moon and it melted.

Re:Not very surprising (1)

tallpole (723263) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443328)

Arguably, how did the earth gain water? With a relatively thin atmosphere, water is hard to come by... The real question will be how will they determine if water is present on Mars that is not related to simple collisions of asteroids...

Re:Not very surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443341)

They contain ice. What they found is that Mars had -liquid- water, in great quantities, deposited in the same place. Not as ice that gets randomly melted or evaporated as in comets.

HOLY SMOKES (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443246)

HEy that is some cool news guys!

Re:HOLY SMOKES (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443264)

Wooooo

I for one (0, Funny)

Piethon (748147) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443254)

Welcome our tiny bacterial martian overlords

gun jumping (4, Funny)

kippy (416183) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443256)

I love how this story was posted during the opening remarks of the press conference before they could go into much detail.

No, you're wrong! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443365)

RTFA! Oh, wait a minute...

So how long before... (4, Funny)

The Ancients (626689) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443259)

Some creative company wants to find, and market this 'untouched natural' water?

Finally.. an end to religion (-1, Troll)

Ckwop (707653) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443265)

This has to be it now..

Way back when, the earth was the centre of the universe.

The sun became the center of the universe.

We found out we were one star in a galaxy that was the centre of the universe..

Then we found there were countless billions of stars.

Now we find another local planet with ancient water on it.. The next find I expect is simple life living on Mars.

How can any religion survive that revelation?

Simon.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443311)

Isn't it obvious?

God created the life on the planet Mars.

People will think, believe and do anything in order to support their delusions.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443315)

Not everything a religion says has to be considered true by its believers.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443324)

Faith.

And by the way: an ellipse usually has three periods.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (3, Insightful)

dknight (202308) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443338)

Non-christian religions.

For example, as a Taoist, I fail to see how this would in any way effect my religious beliefs.

However, if I believed in a creator-god and in the uniqueness and specialness of human life in the universe, then yea, that would cause some issues. Thankfully, not all religions are like that.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443342)

> How can any religion survive that revelation?

By moving the field lines and goal posts.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443352)

Religion is all about taking advantage of the parts of our brains that are hard-wired to rationalize anything that might lend meaning to our lives.

If I already believe that daily events on planet Earth are influenced by a 2,000-year-old dead guy, it'll take more than a few microscopic bacteria on Mars to make me reconsider my stance.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443430)

If I already believe that daily events on planet Earth are influenced by a 2,000-year-old dead guy

That "2000-year-old dead guy" DOES have a major influence on daily events, and you would be a fool to say otherwise. Whether that influence is supernatural or not is another story.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (4, Insightful)

System.out.println() (755533) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443354)

The next find I expect is simple life living on Mars.

Water != life

How can any religion survive that revelation?

I don't recall the Bible saying that there was no life anywhere but Earth. I've always believed it was possible that simple life could exist elsewhere. Intelligent life would throw religion a curve, though... I haven't thought as much about that.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443376)

If you're a Christian then you probably haven't thought too much about anything.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (5, Insightful)

FreemanPatrickHenry (317847) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443356)

Well here goes my karma...

How can any religion survive that revelation? ...because no religion is dependent upon the earth being the only planet with life on it?

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443362)

>> How can any religion survive that revelation?

Unfortunately, very easily. They will make something up, and insist that it be taken "on faith". That or they will brush it under the carpet wherever they can and attack NASA as a haven of quote "pansy liberal atheist infidel heretic bastards who hate america".

That was an easy question. Next?

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1, Redundant)

Fnkmaster (89084) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443366)

I assume what you mean is "how can any literalist, fundamentalist religion survive that revelation". You do realize there are a lot of people who identify themselves as being of some religion who don't believe in the literal truth of creation myths and so forth. In fact, some religions don't really require belief or faith at all in the Christian sense.


And honestly, fundamentalist Christians have been busily rejecting the heaps and reams of evidence available to refute their beliefs here on Earth. Why do you think they'd change their minds just because evidence exists on Mars?

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (4, Insightful)

rayvd (155635) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443368)

As far as Christianity is concerned, where in the Bible does it say life only exists / was created on earth?

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443371)

What's this "religion" you talk of?

Your generalization colors you stupid, specially because most religions don't even touch the subject of extraterrestrial life.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0, Troll)

gid13 (620803) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443382)

1. If a cult can survive after the predicted date of the end of the world, I think religions are pretty much here to stay regardless of the evidence against.

2. When confronted with new evidence, you can always make a new religion or adapt an old one to maintain logical consistence. Of course, then the distinction between religion and science becomes awfully blurry.

3. Maybe logic simply doesn't work.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (2, Insightful)

Wickedtribe (719468) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443383)

I see a pattern in your post. Every time religion is shown to be wrong, they internalize the error and come up with a new story that fits the truth that their flocks believe. In answer to your question, 'How can any religion survive that revelation?' Just as long as their are sheep out there who dont want to think for themselves.

must not have hung out with enough christians.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443384)

they will claim it is an act of satan, trying to decieve us to bring us over to the dark side. duh!

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1)

Starji (578920) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443395)

It's not hard, you just have to think of god as the creator of many children and not just us.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (5, Insightful)

23skiddoo (31460) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443403)

Even though I am an atheist, I must disagree with what you say. The revelation only refutes a portion of the Judeo-Christian(-Muslim?) tradition of the creationism story (which could easily and eventually be modified and bent to the new evidence). But in terms of philosphies, especially in regards to how we treat one another and our surroundings, abundant life in the universe is a non-issue. Other religions like Buddhism aren't touched by the news either.

My $0.02...

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1)

Jonas the Bold (701271) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443409)

Well, it's been shown that religion is quite impervious to logic, but even if it weren't, your logic is broken.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1)

athorshak (652273) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443411)

Religion and extra-terrestrial life are not mutually exclusive. There is nothing fundamental about most religions that says that only earth can harbor life. I know plenty of people that are quite religious that believe it is likely that there is life elsewhere in the universe.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443412)

The catholic faith has said that God is a god of plenitude. Why would we ( the living creatures on earth ) be His only creations?

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443425)

How could this revelation get rid of any religion?

Calm down there Nietzsche (3, Insightful)

kippy (416183) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443426)

This is a troll if I ever saw one but I'll bite.

The idea that God created the universe with countless planets, stars and habitable worlds is not in conflict with at least Catholicism. I'm willing to bet that there are a lot of other religions who would have no problem with such an idea but I'm no religious scholar.

If I recall correctly, nowhere in the Bible does it say that Earth is the only world in the universe or even the only one with life, intelligent or not. It's kind of an open question.

Please give me a verse if I'm wrong.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443429)

Now we find another local planet with ancient water on it.. The next find I expect is simple life living on Mars.
How can any religion survive that revelation?


I don't see how water on another planet, or even simple life can invalidate religion. Most religions do not attribute an eternal soul to simple life.

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (2, Insightful)

mark-t (151149) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443432)

All finding simple life on mars would prove is that it's scientifically possible for life to develop independantly within the parameters and rules that this universe operates in, and does not require what might be seen as miraculous occurences. This only renders God irrellevent if you believe that God didn't actually create _everything_ that exists in the first place. Ironic, isn't it?

Re:Finally.. an end to religion (1)

a_timid_mouse (607237) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443433)

You seem to have a firm grasp of the beliefs of all religions known to man. Are you certain that all "man-made" religions believe that there is no water on other celestial bodies, or for that matter, life? I'm quite certain thatb many Christians believe without a doubt that there is intelligent life on other planets and won't be surprised at all to hear this news.

An end to religion... riiiight. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443436)

If you hadn't noticed, most fundamentalists aren't too big on the whole "evidence" thing. Religion will survive, as it always has, by ignoring any revelations contradictory to the One True Fairy Tale.

That settles it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443266)

GET YOUR ASS TO MARS [getyourasstomars.com]

Geek planet alright (5, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443270)

So Mars haven't taken a bath or shower in ages. No wonder they're finding crusty salt brine residue.

"...and then... (5, Funny)

mark0 (750639) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443273)

"... the lense on the camera got really fogged up. That's when we really got suspicious."

NASA Says Mars Once "Drenched With Water" (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443277)

There you have it folks.. proof not only that the Great Flood happened, and what's more, god made it flood all the way to Mars!

Noah's lucky he didn't get stranded! ;-)

Well naturally, (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443279)

when God flooded the Earth for 40 days and 40 nights there was some spillover on Mars, too.

There's Bud Light on Mars! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443282)

I'm heading up for happy hour.

A Unix poem:


Waka waka bang splat tick tick hash,
Caret at back-tick dollar dollar dash,
Bang splat tick dollar under-score,
Percent splat waka waka number four,
Ampersand right-paren dot dot slash,
Vertical-bar curly-bracket tilde tilde CRASH.

Link to the web case (4, Informative)

seann (307009) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443283)

Its not too late to watch: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/landing.cfm

No way! (0, Offtopic)

ro_coyote (719566) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443286)

"They are saying that the crater that the second rover has landed in has convincing evidence that it was once drenched or covered in liquid water."

Liquid water?! Holy crap!

Where did it go? (4, Interesting)

gid13 (620803) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443292)

Maybe I'm just an idiot, but where does the water go? Vapour in the atmosphere? Did the hydrogen and oxygen break apart somehow? Chemical reactions with something else? Did it just float off into space? Those all seem unlikely to me, but then, what do I know?

Re:Where did it go? (5, Informative)

MalaclypseTheYounger (726934) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443391)

Yes, floats off into space, or turns into ice. There is very little atmosphere, so there is some speculation that the water is in liquid form under the Mars surface somewhere, and it eventually gets pushed up to the surface where it instantly evaporates into water vapor. The thin atmosphere sends this water vapor off into space, or it eventually collects at the two polar ice caps.

the full article from nasa.gov (5, Informative)

therealcaf (697590) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443294)

can be found here [nasa.gov]

once "Drenched with water" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443297)

I once carried jism too.

So what? (1)

Chess_the_cat (653159) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443299)

I thought it was common knowledge that Mars had ice caps at either pole. Isn't ice made of water? And isn't it natural to assume that that ice must have been liquid water at one point in Mars' history?

Re:So what? (5, Informative)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443427)

The common knowledge was that the ice caps are carbon dioxide ice - dry ice.

Today's Poll (0, Troll)

ThisIsAnExampleAccou (718430) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443300)

So, um, anyone else read this story, and then go and vote in today's poll? [slashdot.org]

There's water, maybe there's life (4, Funny)

lavalyn (649886) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443303)

And then there are fossils. Which means the next NASA mission will be funded by Halliburton after all.

not drenched (1)

mpost4 (115369) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443305)

He said that there was once water, and that the rocks were layed down in the water.

Did God use it as a dry run? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443312)

Sure, He knew He could make everything correctly, but perhaps He wasn't sure how the whole concept of "Free Will" would work, so Mars was a dry run. It could be a wasteland now because a bunch of the Martians developed advanced weapons of mass destruction and ended up using them on each other. This could be an object lesson for us, much like Sodom and Gammorrah.

So where'd the water go? (1)

corebreech (469871) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443316)

nt

Yip (0, Redundant)

SparafucileMan (544171) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443325)

I for one welcome our new Water 0verlords.

yes, yes, but the question still remains (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443332)

CAN mars run Loonix?

Woo Hoo!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443336)

No Article to be F... Read!

Ahh! Now you've done it! (2, Funny)

BigZaphod (12942) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443339)

You're gonna slashdot NASA TV now, dammit! I fully expect my satellite feed to start stuttering and flashing to black in a few minutes...

Bunker (1)

acherrington (465776) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443349)

Hmm... So its somewhat safe to take off my tinfoil hat and comeout of my bunker? Or should I put on my life jacket now? Or maybe I should just get back to work cause this water isn't there, and was on mars.....

You spend $100 billion... (5, Funny)

Ga_101 (755815) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443353)

To equip 2 Rovers with the best water detecting equipment known to man and how do you find water?

You get mud stuck to the tyres!

But in all seriosness, Good on NASA.
But it certainly makes a more life seeking mission like beagle 2 all the more important.

Um Yeah (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443355)

Nasa: We possibly might have maybe found evidence there might have been some water on Mars. You see we found these interesting blueberry spheroids, blah.

Us: Um, yeah. Billions of dollars for what again?

I see less and less point in dumping billions into the mismanaged lap of NASA. They either cover up any interesting find (tin foil hat time, yeah, blah), or there IS NOTHING INTERESTING or relevant to find. Either way, I am sure there are some starving children around the world that would appreciate some food and can get along fine without velcro (which we all know was given to us by T'pol's great grandmother anyway).

Biggest story of all time... (2)

darkfus (177149) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443358)


It will be interesting to see how the media handles this. By scope, this is probably the biggest scientific discovery in a lifetime!

In Soviet Russia (-1, Redundant)

SparafucileMan (544171) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443369)

In Soviet Russia, liquid waters you!

Similiar Headline (-1, Troll)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443381)

Science: Em tells NASA: PROVE IT, stop sensationalizing.

Troll or not a troll?

You, with the mod points, decide.

baaaah "tabtalizing" not good enough (1)

wheatking (608436) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443396)

on the news conf (NASA TV) and the story posted on their site, they say " the clues are only tantalizing, not conclusive, about whether the environment was watery when the rocks originally formed." grrr. thats all they had to say ??? i was expecting at least a "conclusive" statement from this special/hyped news conf.

its a conspiracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443401)

here is a pic of what: conspiracy I tell you [politrix.org]

A la Steve Jobs (5, Funny)

gfilion (80497) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443415)

and at the end of the conference, they'll pretend that it's over and say:
and one more thing... we found life on Mars!

ownd (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8443421)

0wnt

Sulphates and Amino Acids (5, Informative)

aacool (700143) | more than 10 years ago | (#8443422)

Of the elements known to exist in the body, some, possibly all, are necessary to life. They are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, potassium, sodium, iron, copper, manganese, zinc, magnesium, lithium, phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, iodine, barium, silicon.

Also, Methionine is an essential amino acid that is not synthesized by the body and must be obtained from food. It is one of the "sulphur-containing" amino acids and is important in many body functions.

It is likely that sulphur, coupled with the different ferrous hydrides can produce viable conditions for life.

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