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Cooking with the Internet?

Cliff posted more than 10 years ago | from the your-browser-as-a-cookbook dept.

Biotech 478

VonGuard asks: "Not all of you live on ramen and coffee. At some point, you have to cook, and the Internet should be a great place to find recipes. Is there a Google for recipes. And why isn't there a larger open cookbook on the net? So, is anyone working on this, or is there something the rest of us don't know about yet?"

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478 comments

One suggestion... (4, Informative)

tabacco (145317) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486445)

I'd try Allrecipes.com [allrecipes.com]. I've gotten some good recipes from there.

Re:One suggestion... (4, Informative)

tabacco (145317) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486498)

I just remembered, there are also a ton of good vegetarian recipes at vegetariantimes.com [vegetariantimes.com]. Worth checking out if you're looking for vegetarian stuff or just a good veggie side to go with your steak :)

Re:One suggestion... (2, Informative)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486527)

allrecipes.com has a great section for vegetarian dishes too. With such a phenonemal number of pages on helping out with improving your own recipes and also new things you may never have tried there's no excuse not to go vegetarian today!

Try it. Your health will thank you you'll be building up good karma and trust me, you won't smell bad :-)

Classic Celebrities and Movie Posters [67.160.223.119]

Re:One suggestion... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486559)

The best vegetarian dish I've ever had was a soup the Hare-Krishnans were selling at a rock festival.

The experience was rather spoiled by one of the Krishna-guys who took me aside and told me that if I really liked the soup, I could pay him back by letting him blow me off.

Back then I was shocked, but then again I was only 19 years old. Today I might accept this pretty young guy's offer. Delicious soup and a blow-job to boot.

Re:One suggestion... (4, Informative)

BinLadenMyHero (688544) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486586)

I do love vegetables (and fruits), and I cook almost only with them. But that doesn't need to turn me into a vegetarian. I still like meat very much. It IS natural to eat meat.

Re:One suggestion... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486592)

You've got to be kidding. I've never known a vegetarian not to smell bad. Their acrid cheesy body odour just doesn't go away until they start eating meat again.

Re:One suggestion... (2, Informative)

xSauronx (608805) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486528)

i watch tons of foodnetwork, because i got tired of eating fast food garbage and frozen dinners.

www.foodnetwork.com has tousands of recipes you can browse as well. i watch the shows, when i see something i like, i hop online and get a list of what i need, and have it for dinner that week.

Why? (3, Funny)

garcia (6573) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486448)

Is there a Google for recipes

I like to use Food Network. I have found quite a few useful recipes there (one of my favorite was when I cooked for my gf's brother-in-law who is a vegetarian... Portabellas with spinach salad in an eggplant dressing.)

And why isn't there a larger open cookbook on the net?

I once heard a story of a woman that was eating a dessert at a restaurant and thought it was so
incredible that she just HAD to have the recipe. She asked the Chef and he at first declined but
after her continued insistance a typed sheet was delivered to the woman's table that included the
recipe and the bill. She read through the recipe and was delighted. She looked at the bill and
it was well over $500. She became infuriated and asked to see the Chef. He explained that her
bill was $100 and the cost of the receipe was $400.

Perhaps that's why,

Re:Why? (1)

spanklin (710953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486490)

I once heard a story of a woman that was eating a dessert at a restaurant and thought it was so incredible that she just HAD to have the recipe. She asked the Chef and he at first declined but after her continued insistance a typed sheet was delivered to the woman's table that included the recipe and the bill. She read through the recipe and was delighted. She looked at the bill and it was well over $500. She became infuriated and asked to see the Chef. He explained that her bill was $100 and the cost of the receipe was $400.

Ummm.... this is one of the most famous Urban Legends of all time, usually seen as the "Neiman Marcus cookie" recipe.

Re:Why? (1)

rah1420 (234198) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486513)

Ummm.... this is one of the most famous Urban Legends of all time
...and you look pretty silly with that hook dangling from your mouth. :)

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

MurrayTodd (92102) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486499)

> I once heard a story of a woman that was eating a
> dessert at a restaurant and thought it was so
> incredible that she just HAD to have the recipe.

Dude, that was a famous old urban-myth email chain letter hoaxes. Go to any "Web Hoax" site and you'll find this. I got the email back in the late 90's, and it's made the rounds again every few years. The email suggested that since the customer was so angry and the store for over-charging her that you should help her seek revenge by forwarding the recipe (oatmeal chocolate chip cookies) to to "everyone in your address book".

it's an Urban Legend (4, Informative)

mughi (32874) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486551)

I once heard a story of a woman that was eating a dessert at a restaurant and thought it was so incredible that she just HAD to have the recipe...

That's a standard Urban Legend, though it's more often a cookie recipe. Check out Snopes for the details [snopes.com].

And for those disinclined to click links, a summary:

Status: False.

From the "It's Funny, Laugh Department." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486574)

Get a life and laugh. Jesus.

Seriously? (4, Informative)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486451)

Oh, come on now. Recipes were one of the first things I ever saw posted on the Internet even back when it was Arpanet. In fact, one of the reasons Xerox PARC gave for developing the GUI was to allow everyone to interact with a computer, even "kitchen wives" could be able to easily store and retrieve recipes on a computer without having to use "arcane" symbology.

To answer your question though, I think this [altonbrown.com] link should be more than Slashdot worthy. The show is great, sufficiently geeky, and life is simply too short not to eat.....Good Eats.

There are many, many other links to recipes on the Internet. Food Network [foodtv.com] is one and Epicurious [epicurious.com] are the other principle resources I use.

Re:Seriously? (1)

spanklin (710953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486524)

Oh, come on now. Recipes were one of the first things I ever saw posted on the Internet even back when it was Arpanet.

I have a cookbook of recipes I printed out from the newsgroup rec.foods.recipes in the early 90's (I may have the exact newsgroup name slightly incorrect). It was a moderated group, and so the recipes that got posted were usually pretty high quality. I haven't googled for it, but my guess is that there is an archive somewhere of the collected USENET recipes.

Re:Seriously? (2, Informative)

jdrogers (93806) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486545)

I second this recomendation. Good Eats (Alton Brown) is a great show that teaches more than just how to follow a recipe, but also delves into the "why" certain ingredients are used and what they do chemically. High quality geek programming for food related stuff!

icbdb (2, Interesting)

Bai jie (653604) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486453)

What would really be great is an Internet Cook Book Database. Set up to model after IMDB of course.

What are you talking about? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486457)

This cookbook [fortunecity.com] has been a tecchie staple for years!

Several reasons against a central source. (3, Informative)

MurrayTodd (92102) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486460)

I'm not sure a central repository is all that necessary. It's relatively easy to find five variations on whatever I want to cook, from which I can place a pretty educated guess as to which recipe I would rather use. (Based on ingredients, obvious "convenience substitutions", etc.) It's really a fascinating practice: looking at five different recipes, seeing their similarities and differences, learning the central core theme to the composition, and seeing where different cooks have developed their own riffs.

(I guess I'm saying that if you want a large collection of standard recipes, go buy your requisite copy of the Joy of Cooking. Otherwise, embrace heterogeneity.)

I really haven't explained why a central Google/Open/Wiki cookbook would work against this. I just think that once people saw a recipe had been submitted, they would be less inclined to upload their slightly different version. Maybe such a global project would benefit by somehow encouraging the submission of many varieties, including a "moderation system" by which culinary enthusiasts might edit the variations-on-a-theme and even write editorials on how and why the variations exist, which provide useful time-saving substitutions, when a certain ingredient of method is really necessary to make the "Real McCoy", etc.

Another thing worth mentioning: there are already dozens of "cooking sites" that provide this service, most of them are very "open" allowing easy submission and access. I think a big Open Initiative is successful when there AREN'T pre-existing sites providing a service, or when the sites try to restrict access by forcing a paid subscription model. (Like Wikipedia to online Encyclopedias.) The addition of some generic Open cooking site would become "just another cooking site".

A funny side-note. I've benefitted by the LACK of such a central source. I have a website that I've been cultivating for under a year, where I've put creative (written, artistic, photographic, computing, etc.) works. I've done everything possible to cultivate this site so that visitors would come to it. The thing that brings the most visitors to my site? My "Basic Crepe Recipe". For some funny reason nobody else in the world has a higher Google-ranked Basic Crepe Recipe. (Okay, recently I got knocked down to #2.) So this little "afterthought" has become a leading constant influx of visitors.

Re:Several reasons against a central source. (1)

js7a (579872) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486557)

Yeah, I've never had any trouble finding the recipies I needed on the net.

Every time I look for food on the net... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486461)

I only ever get as far as the Nigella Lawson pictures...

*sigh*

AllRecipes.com! (1)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486465)


I love AllRecipes.com [allrecipes.com]. In fact I'm planning on putting a touch-screen flat panel in my kitchen so I can use that site from there.

Everything from vegetarian to carnivore to bread machine recipes are there.

Sounds like a job for a Wiki (2, Interesting)

Saven Marek (739395) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486470)

No such thing as too many cooks spoil the broth, I think. A wiki would be the perfect solution for this, as long as the interest is there.

I'm thankful I learned how to cook and cook well when I was younger, but there is ALWAYS something to learn from someone else. It's not some exact science or mysterious voodoo, just something anyone with a little creativity and some basic knowledge can build on.

PS. Experiment most when you're single :-). it's easier that way when you screw up, and is a whole lot easier than when you're partnered later!.

Classic Celebrity Desktops & Movie Posters [67.160.223.119]

Google is my recipe book (1)

jimhill (7277) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486471)

Whenever I'm in the mood for, say, lamb, I just hit Google and punch in "lamb" and "recipe". Poof, lots of hits. Some of them are online recipe books and some are little webpages by folks who got a few megs web space with their Internet account and couldn't think of anything else to put up.

Point being, I don't see a reason to have The Whole Internet Cookbook.

PS: recipedelights.com

Jim

The only cooking... (1)

TheLoneDanger (611268) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486474)

The only cooking I can do is to wait the 3 minutes for the boiling water to do its work. Even then, I sometimes forget all about it and end up with soggy noodles. :(

Decent Curry (2, Interesting)

Basehart (633304) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486476)

As you all know there are millions of recipes out there, but try finding one single recipe for a decent curry, the kind you can get at your favorite indian restaurant, and I bet you can't.

Sure, most come close, but even playing indian new age music while sitting down to eat your creation just doesn't cut it!

So what's the secret?

Re:Decent Curry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486529)

http://sify.com/food/ is probably one of the best places to find Indian food recipes. But you'll have better luck with cookbooks by real Indian authors (most are available in English)

Indian cooking (1)

Smergel (750661) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486477)

In the good old days (pre-www) there was one great online cookbook of indian recipes. Anyone know if that still exists? -Magnus

Re:Indian cooking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486520)

great...indian recipes. Anyone know if that still exists?

I have a hunch that such recipes never actually existed.

Why does it have to be centralised? (1)

Boss, Pointy Haired (537010) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486480)

Search Google for "recipe + whatever you fancy cooking"; skip the first couple of results (unless you like SPAM ;) and you'll find hundreds of recipes.

All somebody needs do to contribute is post their favourite recipes to their personal web and let the search engines do the rest.

Great recipes on this here Internet (2, Funny)

Deraj DeZine (726641) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486482)

the Internet should be a great place to find recipes

Anyone tried this "cream of somyungai" that I keep hearing so much about?

Hack your food (5, Funny)

stonebeat.org (562495) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486484)

I usually to reverse engineer (or hack) my food. And Just like any opensource software sometimes the hacked food is compatible with my stomach and sometimes it is not :(

My idea (1)

acidrain69 (632468) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486485)

One of my neat-ideas-I-never-got-around to was going to be a web site for cheap and easy instructions for good food. Cooking for college students. User submitted ideas.

Anything like this? I have cookbooks, but damn, that is some complicated shit. I want easy stuff. Like how to make ramen GOOD. What goes well with ramen besides the salt packet they give you? What about easy to make wraps or sandwiches?

Basic Dirty Martini (4, Funny)

appleLaserWriter (91994) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486488)

Ingredients:
Vodka (chilled)
Dry Vermouth (chilled)
Olives
Olive Juice
Martini Glass

Mixing
1. Add as much Vodka as you'd like to drink
2. Splash in some vermouth to taste
3. Splash in some olive juice, until you can't taste the vermouth anymore
4. Add an olive or two
5. Drink!

Optional Extras

1. If the ingredients are not already cold, you may pre-mix in a shaker full of ice, and then strain the liquid into your martini glass. Ice may be used directly if you don't mind diluting the vodka.
2. Vodka mixes well with everything. Try additional ingredients to make new and unique martinis.

Perfect Martini. (4, Funny)

Ieshan (409693) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486591)

Ingredients:
Vodka (chilled)
Dry Vermouth (chilled)
Flashlight.
Martini Glass.
Olive.
Toothpick or Skewer.

Step 1: Pour Vodka into Martini Glass.
Step 2: Place Bottle of Vermouth in front of Martini Glass.
Step 3: Shine flashlight through Vermouth towards Martini glass.
Step 4: Put away flashlight and Vermouth bottle.
Step 5: Skewer Olive. Place in glass.

Done! =)

Re:Basic Dirty Martini (2, Funny)

Valar (167606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486604)

2. Vodka mixes well with everything.

Yeah, especially more vodka.

For the adventurous... (2, Interesting)

mopslik (688435) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486491)

...there's always Epicurious [epicurious.com].

I've found many a tasty recipe on there, but then, I love cooking and don't mind buying some wacky ingredients or spending extra time whipping something up.

Wikibooks-cookbook (5, Informative)

jbradleymd (633884) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486493)

I'm surprised that I haven't seen the Wikibooks-Cookbook at http://wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook

we must retrain workers to cook with the internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486494)

First they sent the manufacturing jobs to the Third World

and I did nothing, because my job was not on the line.
Then they cut the management jobs
and I did nothing because I didn't like the management
Then they sent the help desk jobs overseas
and I didn't care because I'm a programmer.
So now they've come for my job, and there is no one left to fight for me because no one in the god damn company lives in the states anymore!

The google for recipes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486495)

Is http://www.foodnetwork.com [foodnetwork.com]

Re:The google for recipes (1)

troxey (195156) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486538)

How about a place that starts with letting you develop weekly menus. Then allows you to attach recipes to the menu. and Then - - generates a shopping list in your favorite store aisle format. Makes the whole weekly shopping and food prep thing a bit easier... Anyone know of such a place. Safeway has a site that gives you a shopping list in store isle format but no menus.

Thoughts?

STFW (1, Insightful)

scrytch (9198) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486501)

(Search The, ah, Freakin Web)

I mean, really ... google for "recipes". My personal favorite is epicurious, tho I often have to tone down the expensive and/or hard to get ingredients.

Lots of these places let you submit your own recipes, many let you rate and comment on them. There isn't much interest in an internet-wide p2p schema of recipes because, well, it's not really something that's needed such a trading scheme before. Use a blog, paste the recipe in, google will pick it up in a couple days.

I'm not sure what the challenge or barrier is here.

Favorite geek recipes... (2, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486506)

  • Drive to Whataburger
  • Say "#2, double cheese, for here".
  • Dip the fries in ketchup.
  • Dial up Pizza Hut.
  • Say "Large stuffed-crust super supreme".
  • Try not to eat a candy bar while awaiting delivery.

Re:Favorite geek recipes... (0, Troll)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486561)

You forgot the last 2 items in both scenarii:

Try not to puke as you eat

Remember to buy pills against stomach aches before your meal.

Recipes make money (2, Insightful)

Bitmanhome (254112) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486508)

And why isn't there a larger open cookbook on the net?
Because you don't sumbit your recipes to one. And because they're copyrighted. And because books get a wider audience and make money.

BBC Food (5, Informative)

gibbsjoh (186795) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486509)

The BBC [bbc.co.uk] has a very good food section [bbc.co.uk] that, in addition to having info on cooking shows and celebrity chefs, allows you to search its extensive collection of recipes [bbc.co.uk] - both from shows and submitted by readers. Also, they publish a magazine called Good Food from which (no doubt) many of these recipes are taken.

John

Re:BBC Food (4, Funny)

derPlau (184699) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486560)

Oh, yeah: I've got a whole world of recipes to choose from via the internet, and I'm gonna get 'em from the British

Recipesource.com (2, Informative)

M. Silver (141590) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486511)

Or, The Archive Formerly Known As SOAR.

http://www.recipesource.com/

I recommend the apple roast hadrosaur.

That's not the only food-related internet use (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486517)

At some point, you have to cook, and the Internet should be a great place to find recipes

Forget cooking.

I personally find the internet (small-I by the way) a much greater help to find restaurants of all kinds, big or small, dear or cheap.

One of my favorite past-time is to roam the countryside trying to find unknown small restaurants that serve good home-made or mom-and-pop food, or perhaps unusual food of some kind, trying to stay clear away from well-known dining places, chains, fast food joints and other roach-coaches. The net is a great tool to find target restaurants to go visit in the week-end.

Google Hack for recipes (1)

Turing Machine (144300) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486521)

Is there a Google for recipes?

Well, there's a Google hack [researchbuzz.org] for recipes that seems to work okay. You put in the ingredients that you have on hand and it tries to find recipes using those ingredients.

Oddly enough, I just saw this on someone's weblog earlier today. Synchronicity is a peculiar thing.

Uhh Google? (1)

smoondog (85133) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486525)

I use google to find recipes. Usually I generally know what to make, and use google to "guide" the details. The thing I've learned is to look at many recipes and perform a bit of informatics. Some ingredients tend to vary between recipes and others are always the same. Then you can tell which parts to change to alter the recipe in your own personal way. For example, look for waffle recipes online. Some have mostly egg whites or some have a very pancake like recipe. Also you can find out how to alter the recipe with new ingredients. Very useful, when you can immediately get 10 different recipes for the same thing!

-Sean

Epicurious (3, Informative)

mark0 (750639) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486535)

Epicurious [epicurious.com] is, by far, the best site for recipes on the web. The best feature is its archive of recipes from a variety of publications going back many years.

Best recipe (1)

addaon (41825) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486536)

The best recipe there is is your spice shelf and your tongue. Great cooking (as opposed to baking) comes from trying out new things, not being afraid to experiment, and knowing what effect your tools (ingredients) will have -- and this only comes with experience. Much like coding, actually.

Use google groups! (0)

dj1471 (531450) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486541)

A great place to find recipes is searching rec.food.recipes using Google groups. I've always been able to find what I'm looking for. Just goto the group [google.co.uk], search for what you want to make, and hey presto! Easy!

Revers cook-book (1)

NtroP (649992) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486544)

I'd like to see an online cookbook that gives me recipies based on what I have in the kitchen. Half the time I get home, look through cupboards and fridge and say "Crap! What the heck can I make out of this?".

I need RFID readers in the kitchen which tie directly into my fridge-mounted, internet-connected, touch-screen, Xterminal, cookbook! ;-)

As much as RFID's make me nervous, I can see this as an inevitable commonplace in the future.

Good Eats! (1)

BoldAC (735721) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486546)

Forget the recipes, enjoy the science behind cooking with Good Eats! [altonbrown.com]

I have yet to introduce one of my geek friends to Alton Brown and they not fall in love with his cooking techniques and lessons.

If you knowing the why, you'll love this guy. And if you understand cooking... you don't need the bloody recipes, right?

AC

How long before.... (1)

JaJ_D (652372) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486548)

.... we can select a receipt of the net, click "order", have to food delivered to us and then enjoy it

Oh wait a minute I forgot my primay source of food [pizzahut.com] and non-alcoholic [joltcola.com] and alcoholic [drinkservice.co.uk] drinks....

Must get a life....

Anyone know the relevant URL?

:-]

Jaj

RecipeSource??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486554)

What about http://www.RecipeSource.com They've got heaps!

I Google for recipes all the time (1)

mysterious_mark (577643) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486556)

Just plain old googling seems to work well for recipes, there are many, many recipe sites, many small personal sites with good recipes I just google for 'recipes for..' whatever I want to cook, and then surf through and bookmark the ones I want to use. Also its good to surf through different recipes and see which ones fit the ingredients you have. M

Cooking and the WWW (1)

CrystalCut (307381) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486558)

I took 7 years of food prep, but never got further for health reasons. Cooking full time is a very physical career. But I love to cook, and have a personal reputation to uphold. I have many cookbooks, but have found the WWW to be a great resource for tips, tricks, reciples, ethnic foods, etc. One day I WILL have a machine in my kitchen that will allow me to browse the Web, watch cooking shows, and run various food/shopping/recipe software. For giggles, I've included here a few links that I've found helpful. Yes, I'm a fan of the Food Network, and not ashamed to admit it. Alton Brown rocks!
Google Directory Links [google.com]
Meals.Com [meals.com]
Food Network [foodnetwork.com]

Top Online Cookbooks (1)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486562)

There are existing cookbooks for Java, Perl, PHP, and a slew of other programming languages. I believe O'Reily is big on stuff like that.

If you're more into spicier things, there's always the Anarchist Cookbook. Talk about retro-BBS-style cajun cuisine there, eh? Nothing like wading through txt files on good ol' "Edit" back in the DOS days.

Wait, you mean like Food-cooking? Why? Pizza hut delivers and you can order online. Don't even have to talk to anyone on the phone!!! You can even have spicy wings, bread sticks, and a caffeinated beverage to boot. BAM! Another notch!!!

Taco The Octopus (2, Informative)

cdwdwkr (742274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486567)

This site only has a few recipies, but it is great for a laugh. It is kind of like a cartoon version of Good Eats from FoodTV, but with a more warped sense of humor. It is the only cooking show hosted by an appetizer.
www.8legged.com [8legged.com]

allrecipes.com (1)

bobthemuse (574400) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486577)

Is there a Google for recipes. And why isn't there a larger open cookbook on the net?

Allrecipes.com, thousands of recipes, about 98% of them are free. Fantastic resource.

Thanks for googling first.

Outsourcing food. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8486579)

"Not all of you live on ramen and coffee."

Haven't been outsourced, have you?

VegWeb (1)

sgifford (9982) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486585)

VegWeb [vegweb.org] is a great source for vegetarian recipes. It's been around a long time, and has some useful features, like a meal planner and grocery list creator.

Also, Google works pretty well if you know what you're looking for.

Alternative student cooking (2, Informative)

fredu (603625) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486589)

A friend of mine [diskis.org] has put up a brilliant homepage about how to cook with your kitchen invaded. That is, invaded by other students who use the same kitchen. :) Great!

Also, IP doesn't protect recepies (3, Interesting)

braddock (78796) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486590)

Recipes can't be patented, and the data of a list of ingredients and a procedure can't be copyrighted.

That means that if someone wrote a proper web-crawling recipe snarfer that stored the recipes in a database (without stealing the formatting or stealing a particular collection), it should be intellectual property free and fully public domain!

Definitely a good weekend hacker challenge....

Braddock Gaskill

SOAR has 70,000 recipes (5, Informative)

bpm140 (92250) | more than 10 years ago | (#8486601)

I've used UCBerkeley's Searchable Online Archive of Recipes [recipe-source.com] for years. Its biggest shortcoming is a lack of ingredient searches, but they've integrated Google into the search for full text search, which is good enough, if a bit clumsy.

Here's the skinny from their About Us page:

While RecipeSource may be one of the newest recipe sites on the Internet, we're also one of the oldest. Our collection was started in 1993 by Jennifer Snider when she discovered the wonders of Usenet newsgroups & Internet mailing lists as a student at the University of California at Berkeley. She started saving recipes posted to those sources and soon amassed thousands of recipes. When her friends found out about the collection, we encouraged her to put them on the web, and she agreed, provided we helped her. After several months of hard work, the recipes first appeared on the web in 1995 as SOAR: The Searchable Online Archive of Recipes. From our start with around 10,000 recipes we've grown the collection to 7 times that size, and had our pages accessed millions of times from around the world. Thanks to our popularity, we've outgrown our original home, so we've moved the collection here to RecipeSource.com, where we hope it will continue to grow, while providing better response time and a better search engine than our old site.

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