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BIC-TCP 6,000 Times Quicker Than DSL

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the free-dinner-at-red-lobster dept.

The Internet 381

An anonymous reader writes "North Carolina researchers have developed an Internet protocol, subsequently tested and affirmed by Stanford, that hums along at speeds roughly 6,000 times that of DSL. The system, called BIC-TCP, beat out competing protocols from Caltech, University College London and others. The results were announced at IEEE's annual communications confab in Hong Kong." Update: 03/16 04:46 GMT by T : ScienceBlog suggests this alternate link while their site is down.

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381 comments

Time to Implimentation? (5, Interesting)

Null_Packet (15946) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573639)

It would be interesting to know how far out an implimentation of such a protocol on a large scale is.

Wow (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573640)

That's fast.

Protocol faster than DSL? (5, Insightful)

dodald (195775) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573641)

How can a protocol be rated faster than DSL? Shouldn't the rating be against another protocol? Did I miss something in the article?

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (4, Insightful)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573681)

Comparing it to DSL (and POTS) was really stupid, IMO, but they needed something that would connect with the average reader (I guess.) They don't say anything about what kind of physical/data/ layers the thing runs on. Comparing it to DSL and modems leads the novice reader to think it works on POTS lines, which I'm sure is not the case.

Neat stuff, stupid stupid article.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (5, Funny)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573686)

That was my first thought. Isn't that like saying that they've invented gasoline that goes faster than a car?

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (4, Funny)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573719)

Better yet, they've invented tires for the space shuttle that are capable of going 100k times faster than regular tires. I want some of those tires for my Pinto! They'll make it that much faster!

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (4, Insightful)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573735)

That was my first thought. Isn't that like saying that they've invented gasoline that goes faster than a car?

Or like saying they've invented a vehicle that goes faster than a NASCAR racetrack.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (5, Insightful)

jimbosworldorg (615112) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573765)

I *think* what they're trying to say is that BIC-TCP can utilize high-speed networks a lot better than plain-vanilla TCP/IP. But I don't know what the heck DSL is supposed to have to do with it; the physical *medium* consumer DSL uses (copper POTS lines) sure as hell isn't going to support a 9Gbps connection...

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (5, Funny)

Rorschach1 (174480) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573807)

But I don't know what the heck DSL is supposed to have to do with it; the physical *medium* consumer DSL uses (copper POTS lines) sure as hell isn't going to support a 9Gbps connection...


Sure it will... provided you're not more than three feet from the central office.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573687)

They are different. DSL is a Layer 5 protocol, a datagram-based
protocol, that provides for global addressing independent of ATM's
scheme, routes packets independently of ATM's routing, and is used as
the foundation for all Internet Protocol communications. IP can be used
over ATM or over virtually any other link layer.

DSL is layered on top of IP. It is a Layer 5 protocol, specifically
designed to provide for "error free" communications. TCP has built-in
error check, acknowledgment, and retry features.

BIC-TCP is another Layer 4 protocol that can be layered over IP. It
provides for error checking but not retry, so it isn't "error free" by
itself.

So IP over ATM is a more general description than TCP/IP over ATM or
DSL/IP over ATM, or FTP over TCP/IP over ATM, or HTTP over BIC-TCP/IP over
ATM, .... You get the picture.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573723)

pure bullshit. DSL is the foundation of all IP communication? hahaha

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (1)

dave3138 (528919) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573778)

Wouldn't this be down at good old layer 1? DSL is the physical medium over which the data is delivered...

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (2, Interesting)

Jayfar (630313) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573865)

Naw, physical layer (layer 1) is copper, glass and silicon.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (1)

whitelines (715819) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573695)

Yeah, wouldn't the new protocol be running on top of DSL... The comparison makes no sense.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573701)

Ya missed it 'cause it went by too fast...

This post brought to you by twoslice =)

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (1)

PepsiProgrammer (545828) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573716)

I was wondering the same thing, I go to ncsu, and I cant seem to find anything that conclusively says whether this is a hardware standard or a software protocol, as far as I can tell its a software protocol Id really like to see some more technical info about it.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (1)

brion (1316) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573717)

What the article seems to be trying to say is that this protocol works better than TCP/IP does on a heavily-used connection with bandwidth at the level of 6000 times greater than a typical DSL line.

Nothing to see here, move along... it won't get grits to your home any faster.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (5, Funny)

Cynikal (513328) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573728)

thats what i was gonna say... last i heard DSL was physical connection method..

in other news AMD has developed a new architecture 80 billion times faster than grapefruit

Warrent some (lots of) explanation (5, Informative)

lingqi (577227) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573746)

What they mean is that current TCP protocol becomes a bottleneck at high bandwidth applications, so a new protocol is designed that would be efficient up to ~6000xDSL speed (just a pot-shot guess, up to 9Gb/S?). It has nothing to do with pushing data down the POTS line, just that if one day you had a fat pipe to your house, this new protocol would make use of it properly unlike today's TCP.

It's a stupid comparison, but I guess they expect people to not have an idea what 9Gb/S is...

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (4, Insightful)

morcheeba (260908) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573773)

Yep, it looks like the article makes no sense at all.

Dr. Rhee [ncsu.edu] , who made that comparison, also made another factual error: "TCP was originally designed in the 1980s when Internet speeds were much slower and bandwidths much smaller" -- Tcp was actually invented in 1974. [about.com] Not that major, but you wouldn't expect a guy who "has been researching network congestion solutions for at least a decade" to miss the mark by so much.

Hopefully the reporter was confused, but since it was a press release, you'd think that it would have had time to go through some review.

Re:Protocol faster than DSL? (2, Interesting)

madbastd (632125) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573791)

How can a protocol be rated faster than DSL? Shouldn't the rating be against another protocol?
DSL is a layer 1 & 2 protocol. TCP and BIC-TCP are layer 4 protocols. So, you're correct that they're not comparing like with like.

Also, TCP will also reach similar speeds under the right conditions. BIC-TCP will just reach those speeds with less ramp-up time, and over a wider range of conditions. One of those conditions is that it is not running over a DSL line, or a T3 or an OC3 or OC48 or anything that the average internet user will see in the next decade or two. So, the article is wildly over-hyping a minor protocol tweak that is irrelevant to almost all internet users.

And just when was TCP invented? (2, Interesting)

The Happy Camper (750782) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573860)

"TCP was originally designed in the 1980s when Internet speeds were much slower and bandwidths much smaller,"

Is it me, or did they miss by a couple decades there?

lol omg (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573645)

lol omg bare pwnt /. what is this like 7th post? lol cool lol lol lo l lol o l loveandhope.faithweb.com -- HAS TO DO WITH THIS ARTICLE MOD ME UP !! LOLZ

fristing poster (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573647)

frist p0st!!!!!!1

Mr. Mackey Says... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573648)

BIC-TCP is bad mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmkay

Re:Mr. Mackey Says... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573664)

Whoa! when can i get that at my house?

Re:Mr. Mackey Says... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573721)

you can't get it at your house mmmmmkay? see because it's bad mmmmkay? and it will eventually kill you like the cocaine and the mari-ja-wanna mmmmmmkay?

please don't do this. (-1, Offtopic)

edrugtrader (442064) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573651)

now EVERY web site will be flash or some such variant because, hey, bandwidth is cheap.

please please, just keep the web simple.

Re:please don't do this. (2, Interesting)

apoplectic (711437) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573673)

Don't worry. It won't be long before you have to suffer through a 30 minute streaming infomercial before getting to your desired bloated web page.

Haven't you ever seen Johnny Mnemonic?? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573684)

That is tommorow's intarweb my friend.

Re:please don't do this. (5, Interesting)

fake_name (245088) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573760)

Is second this notion. Here in Australia users on broadband have volume caps beyond which they have to pay for data at rather high rates, or suffer from their connections being cut back to the equivilent of a 28.8 Modem (depending on your ISP)

The belief of USA based companies that bandwidth is "free" and that 30 second video clips are an acceptable form of advertising really hurts users in other parts of the world.

oops (4, Funny)

poot_rootbeer (188613) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573653)


Looks like the server just got Slashdotter 6,000 times faster than normal.

New Protocol???!!!! (5, Funny)

ptelligence (685287) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573656)

Use it to host your blog server..immediately? You've been slashdotted.

Propagation delays (4, Interesting)

trompete (651953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573658)

Too bad they can't change the speed of light. They can put as much data on the wire as they want, but it will still take 100 ms and 25 hops to get there.

Re:Propagation delays (5, Informative)

jimbosworldorg (615112) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573679)

An awful lot of propagation delay tends to be equipment-internal rather than wire-length. Until you start talking about REALLY long distances like using satellite-based networking, anyway.

Re:Propagation delays (1)

trompete (651953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573731)

One that pisses me off is how the networks aren't bridged well. My ping to Ohio from Minneapolis was 40 MS with Comcast, and now it is 120 MS with RoadRunner. My packets are pretty tired by the time they get to San Jose and then back to Ohio. What sort of delays are you talking about inside of the devices? Most devices can start pass-through once they have the destination address out of the header. This is not true for store-and-forward devices though :(.

Re:Propagation delays (5, Informative)

jimbosworldorg (615112) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573839)

Every hop adds several milliseconds for processing time - and considerably more if the router in question is getting hit at the upper limit of its rated throughput (and thus having to buffer-and-wait instead of immediately routing packets).

Speed-of-light is 186,000,000 meters per second - from (Cincinnatti) Ohio to Minneapolis is roughly 1600km by highway, which would leave you with a wire-speed delay of only 16ms round-trip.

The extra 34ms you get on a well routed network generally tends to be time spent getting passed through intermediate routers along the way. Each router *does* add a noticeable amount of delay all of its own, apart from wire delay.

Re:Propagation delays (1)

trompete (651953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573874)

Isn't it 186,200 MILES per second or 300,000,000 KM per second. Just checking.

Re:Propagation delays (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573813)

That's bogus. I live down here in Australia - the first country outside the US to join the 'net. Equipment delays between my home router and google.com's front end come to around 30ms. The delay going through fibre adds another 120ms to that figure. Using satellite adds another 400ms or more, again. (can't remember for sure, it's been a long time since I used a satellite link...)

Re:Propagation delays (1)

scowling (215030) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573873)

I suspect that Canada joined the Net long before Australia did.

Finally (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573660)

I can download that pron at light speed. Woot!

1,000x... 2,000x... X,000x (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573662)

Is there a point where it's just overkill?

Re:1,000x... 2,000x... X,000x (1)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573756)

Wasn't there a time when 1GB of RAM would have been overkill?

hmm (5, Interesting)

krisp (59093) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573667)

This seems misleading. The artical says:
"What takes TCP two hours to determine, BIC can do in less than one second,"

Which looks to me like it can figure out the maximum bandwidth of a channel in a fraction of the time it generally takes TCP to do it, so as soon as you start transmitting at 100mbit you are using the entire pipe. Sure, its 6000 times faster than DSL but its not when it is used over the same DSL pipe. This is for getting data accross faster when you have massive bandwidth, not for bringing broadband into homes.

ob. simpsons ref. (4, Funny)

ejaw5 (570071) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573669)

Nerd: I've developed a program that downloads porn from the interet a million times faster than normal

Marge: Who would need that much porn

Homer: [drools]...oohhh..1 million times faster..

Re:ob. simpsons ref. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573751)

Marge: Who would need that much porn

Obviously, the 5 richest kings of Europe.

CS (1)

YanceyAI (192279) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573672)

Many national and international computing labs are now involved in large-scale scientific studies of nuclear and high-energy physics, astronomy, geology and meteorology. Typically, Rhee said, "Data are collected at a remote location and need to be shipped to labs where scientists can perform analyses and create high-performance visualizations of the data."

They forgot to mention Steam.

not steam, sonique! (2, Funny)

Kiyooka (738862) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573820)

Data are collected at a remote location and need to be shipped to labs where scientists can perform analyses and create high-performance visualizations of the data.

Visualizations of the data? So what, are they gonna all smoke up and watch Rabbit-Hole or Smear while "analysing" the data?

Yikes! How can a home user tell? (2, Insightful)

BenSpinSpace (683543) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573674)

This is a very impressive development... but I have to wonder. Current home computers would have no chance of even processing fast enough to keep up with that speed. I wonder how long it would take to get to the point that they would?

However, the idea is exciting... imagine! Internet at the speed of computer.

Bottle Necks (2, Informative)

pholower (739868) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573677)

It doesn't matter what the bandwidth of your pipe coming in is. It only matters what the connection of the other servers and switches is in the "internet cloud" At a rate like that, I would also wonder if ANY of the infrastructure we have in place would be able to keep up. Seems like something that wouldn't happen for decades.

their webserver... (-1, Redundant)

edrugtrader (442064) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573680)

doesn't use BIC-TCP

Ack... (1, Redundant)

adamofgreyskull (640712) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573682)

Someone needs a clue-bashing with the OSI model. A new internet protocol that's faster than DSL?? So...it negates the use a physical transmission system..or...what?

Re:Ack... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573740)

Yes.. carrier pigeons with acme rockets on their backs.

Sorta. It's based on photo-optics. (4, Funny)

Kiyooka (738862) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573864)

To be more exact, it's the bonfire system they used in Return of the King to signal to Rohan to come to Gondor.

It's called the Bonfire-Utilizing Light System Hardware Infrastructure Technology (aka BULSHIT).

Great measurement (3, Funny)

TheOnlyCoolTim (264997) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573683)

There's 640 kbps DSL and there's 3 Mbps DSL...

I want it in LOC/sec.

Tim

Misleading & LAME! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573690)

LAME! Anyone with half a brain knows that backoff kills TCP throuput. I wanted a new high-speed alternative to DSL and all I got was another lame TCP knock-off. What is this, something like the 12th new TCP?

mirror (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573691)

Slowing down so here it is...

New protocol could speed Internet significantly
Posted on Monday, March 15 @ 14:04:08 EST by bjs

Researchers in North Carolina have developed a data transfer protocol for the Internet that makes today's high-speed Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections seem lethargic. The protocol is named BIC-TCP, which stands for Binary Increase Congestion Transmission Control Protocol. In a recent comparative study run by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), BIC consistently topped the rankings in a set of experiments that determined its stability, scalability and fairness in comparison with other protocols. The study tested six other protocols developed by researchers from schools around the world, including the California Institute of Technology and the University College of London. BIC can reportedly achieve speeds roughly 6,000 times that of DSL and 150,000 times that of current modems.

From North Carolina State University:

NC State Scientists Develop Breakthrough Internet Protocol

Researchers in North Carolina State University's Department of Computer Science have developed a new data transfer protocol for the Internet that makes today's high-speed Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections seem lethargic.

The protocol is named BIC-TCP, which stands for Binary Increase Congestion Transmission Control Protocol. In a recent comparative study run by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), BIC consistently topped the rankings in a set of experiments that determined its stability, scalability and fairness in comparison with other protocols. The study tested six other protocols developed by researchers from schools around the world, including the California Institute of Technology and the University College of London.

Dr. Injong Rhee, associate professor of computer science, said BIC can achieve speeds roughly 6,000 times that of DSL and 150,000 times that of current modems. While this might translate into music downloads in the blink of an eye, the true value of such a super-powered protocol is a real eye-opener.

Rhee and NC State colleagues Dr. Khaled Harfoush, assistant professor of computer science, and Lisong Xu, postdoctoral student, presented a paper on their findings in Hong Kong at Infocom 2004, the 23rd meeting of the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Communications Society, on Thursday, March 11.

Many national and international computing labs are now involved in large-scale scientific studies of nuclear and high-energy physics, astronomy, geology and meteorology. Typically, Rhee said, "Data are collected at a remote location and need to be shipped to labs where scientists can perform analyses and create high-performance visualizations of the data." Visualizations might include satellite images or climate models used in weather predictions. Receiving the data and sharing the results can lead to massive congestion of current networks, even on the newest wide-area high-speed networks such as ESNet (Energy Sciences Network), which was created by the U.S. Department of Energy specifically for these types of scientific collaborations.

The problem, Rhee said, is the inherent limitations of regular TCP. "TCP was originally designed in the 1980s when Internet speeds were much slower and bandwidths much smaller," he said. "Now we are trying to apply it to networks that have several orders of magnitude more available bandwidth." Essentially, we're using an eyedropper to fill a water main. BIC, on the other hand, would open the floodgate.

Along with postdoctoral student Xu, Rhee has been working on developing BIC for the past year, although Rhee said he has been researching network congestion solutions for at least a decade. The key to BIC's speed is that it uses a binary search approach - a fairly common way to search databases - that allows for rapid detection of maximum network capacities with minimal loss of information. "What takes TCP two hours to determine, BIC can do in less than one second," Rhee said. The greatest challenge for the new protocol, he added, was to fill the pipe fast without starving out other protocols. "It's a tough balance," he said.

By allowing the rapid transfer of increasingly large packets of information over long distances, the new protocol could boost the efficacy of cutting-edge applications ranging from telemedicine and real-time environmental monitoring to business operations and multi-user gaming. At NC State, researchers could more readily visualize, monitor and control real-time simulations and experiments conducted at remote computing clusters. BIC might even help avoid a national disaster: The recent blackout that affected large areas of the eastern United States and Canada underscored the need to spread data-rich backup systems across hundreds of thousands of miles.

With network speeds doubling roughly annually, Rhee said the performances demonstrated by the new protocol could become commonly available in the next few years, setting a new standard for full utilization of the Internet.

- pishney -

Note to editors: An abstract of the paper follows.

"Binary Increase Congestion Control for Fast, Long-Distance Networks"
Authors: Lisong Xu, Khaled Harfoush and Injong Rhee, North Carolina State University
Presented: March 11, 2004, at Infocom 2004

Abstract: High-speed networks with large delays present a unique environment where TCP may have a problem utilizing the full bandwidth. Several congestion control proposals have been suggested to remedy this problem. The protocols consider mainly two properties: TCP friendliness and bandwidth scalability. That is, a protocol should not take away too much bandwidth from TCP while utilizing the full bandwidth of high-speed networks. This paper presents another important constraint, namely RTT (round trip time) unfairness where competing flows with different RTTs may consume vastly unfair bandwidth shares. Existing schemes have a severe RTT unfairness problem because the window increase rate gets larger as the window grows - ironically the very reason that makes them more scalable. RTT unfairness for high-speed networks occurs distinctly with drop tail routers where packet loss can be highly synchronized. After recognizing the RTT unfairness problem of existing protocols, this paper presents a new congestion control protocol that ensures linear RTT fairness under large windows while offering both scalability and TCP-friendliness. The protocol combines two schemes called additive increase and binary search increase. When the congestion window is large, additive increase with a large increment ensures linear RTT fairness as well as good scalability. Under small congestion windows, binary search increase is designed to provide TCP friendliness. The paper presents a performance study of the new protocol.

The site is already very unhappy. (0, Redundant)

trompete (651953) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573692)

Researchers in North Carolina have developed a data transfer protocol for the Internet that makes today's high-speed Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections seem lethargic. The protocol is named BIC-TCP, which stands for Binary Increase Congestion Transmission Control Protocol. In a recent comparative study run by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), BIC consistently topped the rankings in a set of experiments that determined its stability, scalability and fairness in comparison with other protocols. The study tested six other protocols developed by researchers from schools around the world, including the California Institute of Technology and the University College of London. BIC can reportedly achieve speeds roughly 6,000 times that of DSL and 150,000 times that of current modems.

From North Carolina State University:

NC State Scientists Develop Breakthrough Internet Protocol

Researchers in North Carolina State University's Department of Computer Science have developed a new data transfer protocol for the Internet that makes today's high-speed Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections seem lethargic.

The protocol is named BIC-TCP, which stands for Binary Increase Congestion Transmission Control Protocol. In a recent comparative study run by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), BIC consistently topped the rankings in a set of experiments that determined its stability, scalability and fairness in comparison with other protocols. The study tested six other protocols developed by researchers from schools around the world, including the California Institute of Technology and the University College of London.

Dr. Injong Rhee, associate professor of computer science, said BIC can achieve speeds roughly 6,000 times that of DSL and 150,000 times that of current modems. While this might translate into music downloads in the blink of an eye, the true value of such a super-powered protocol is a real eye-opener.

Rhee and NC State colleagues Dr. Khaled Harfoush, assistant professor of computer science, and Lisong Xu, postdoctoral student, presented a paper on their findings in Hong Kong at Infocom 2004, the 23rd meeting of the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Communications Society, on Thursday, March 11.

Many national and international computing labs are now involved in large-scale scientific studies of nuclear and high-energy physics, astronomy, geology and meteorology. Typically, Rhee said, "Data are collected at a remote location and need to be shipped to labs where scientists can perform analyses and create high-performance visualizations of the data." Visualizations might include satellite images or climate models used in weather predictions. Receiving the data and sharing the results can lead to massive congestion of current networks, even on the newest wide-area high-speed networks such as ESNet (Energy Sciences Network), which was created by the U.S. Department of Energy specifically for these types of scientific collaborations.

The problem, Rhee said, is the inherent limitations of regular TCP. "TCP was originally designed in the 1980s when Internet speeds were much slower and bandwidths much smaller," he said. "Now we are trying to apply it to networks that have several orders of magnitude more available bandwidth." Essentially, we're using an eyedropper to fill a water main. BIC, on the other hand, would open the floodgate.

Along with postdoctoral student Xu, Rhee has been working on developing BIC for the past year, although Rhee said he has been researching network congestion solutions for at least a decade. The key to BIC's speed is that it uses a binary search approach - a fairly common way to search databases - that allows for rapid detection of maximum network capacities with minimal loss of information. "What takes TCP two hours to determine, BIC can do in less than one second," Rhee said. The greatest challenge for the new protocol, he added, was to fill the pipe fast without starving out other protocols. "It's a tough balance," he said.

By allowing the rapid transfer of increasingly large packets of information over long distances, the new protocol could boost the efficacy of cutting-edge applications ranging from telemedicine and real-time environmental monitoring to business operations and multi-user gaming. At NC State, researchers could more readily visualize, monitor and control real-time simulations and experiments conducted at remote computing clusters. BIC might even help avoid a national disaster: The recent blackout that affected large areas of the eastern United States and Canada underscored the need to spread data-rich backup systems across hundreds of thousands of miles.

With network speeds doubling roughly annually, Rhee said the performances demonstrated by the new protocol could become commonly available in the next few years, setting a new standard for full utilization of the Internet.

- pishney -

Note to editors: An abstract of the paper follows.

"Binary Increase Congestion Control for Fast, Long-Distance Networks"
Authors: Lisong Xu, Khaled Harfoush and Injong Rhee, North Carolina State University
Presented: March 11, 2004, at Infocom 2004

Abstract: High-speed networks with large delays present a unique environment where TCP may have a problem utilizing the full bandwidth. Several congestion control proposals have been suggested to remedy this problem. The protocols consider mainly two properties: TCP friendliness and bandwidth scalability. That is, a protocol should not take away too much bandwidth from TCP while utilizing the full bandwidth of high-speed networks. This paper presents another important constraint, namely RTT (round trip time) unfairness where competing flows with different RTTs may consume vastly unfair bandwidth shares. Existing schemes have a severe RTT unfairness problem because the window increase rate gets larger as the window grows - ironically the very reason that makes them more scalable. RTT unfairness for high-speed networks occurs distinctly with drop tail routers where packet loss can be highly synchronized. After recognizing the RTT unfairness problem of existing protocols, this paper presents a new congestion control protocol that ensures linear RTT fairness under large windows while offering both scalability and TCP-friendliness. The protocol combines two schemes called additive increase and binary search increase. When the congestion window is large, additive increase with a large increment ensures linear RTT fairness as well as good scalability. Under small congestion windows, binary search increase is designed to provide TCP friendliness. The paper presents a performance study of the new protocol.

Re:The site is already very unhappy. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573725)

KARMA WHORE ALERT - mirrored article logged in for some cheap karma... Do Not Mod Up

Re:The site is already very unhappy. (1)

The Happy Camper (750782) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573775)

They may have the ultamate bandwidth, but their pop-up provider's ad server just got /.'ed

Summary: BIC-TCP is an efficient TCP successor (4, Informative)

ClayJar (126217) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573693)

To quote the part that says what the article is actually about:

The key to BIC's speed is that it uses a binary search approach - a fairly common way to search databases - that allows for rapid detection of maximum network capacities with minimal loss of information. "What takes TCP two hours to determine, BIC can do in less than one second," Rhee said.

Re:Summary: BIC-TCP is an efficient TCP successor (5, Insightful)

zalas (682627) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573867)

I think a better summary would be that this is not entirely a new protocol. Rather, it's a variant on TCP with changes to the window increasing portion of the code. Basically, they claim that there currently exists an unfairness in allocation of bandwidth of two connections sharing a pipe. Basically that having different round trip times causes them to share the bandwidth unfairly. Their protocol supposedly alleviates this problem in high bandwidth pipes whereas TCP does not.

Fastest Slashdot (1)

ThisNukes4u (752508) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573699)

That is one of the fastest slashdottings i've seen in a while. The technology sound's good, if only they can keep it cheap and readily available.

protcol and hardware (0, Redundant)

ccozan (754085) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573703)

isn't DSL a hardware technology ( Layer 1 ) whereas a protocol ( TCP, or their invention BIC-TCP) is a layer 3???

Please compare apples with apples and oranges with oranges.

The article makes me laugh, really....

Costin

Re:protcol and hardware (1)

ccozan (754085) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573762)

correction, DSL is a Layer 2 and TCP is a Layer 4...

Re:protcol and hardware (1)

SultanCemil (722533) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573845)

TCP is actually layer 4. IP would be layer 3. And yes, the comparison is ridiculous.

Obligatory Comment (-1, Redundant)

officepotato (723274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573707)

wow, i'm trying to imagine all the porn that get pulled through a random sample of 6000 dsl lines. this is going to be the biggest boost for harddrive sales since kazaa!

Comparing apples and oranges (2, Redundant)

EatenByAGrue (210447) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573709)

A new protocol that's 150,000 times the speed of current modems? Uh...I think the reviewer got a little mixed up here. There's the max theoretical speed of the transmission line, and then there's the speed at which the protocol can transmit over that line. While I'm sure it can make modems faster by transmitting more bytes, its not going to make modems 150,000 times faster.

I created... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573711)

A protocol that hums along at 1,000,000 times DSL speed.

I took the physical spec of DSL and added 1,000,000 lines.

Apples and Oranges? (5, Insightful)

Ars-Fartsica (166957) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573712)

When did a protocol become "faster" than a transmission technology?

The article is /.'d so I can't figure out wht this means - what transmission media/hardware are they using? I can make plain old TCP/IP 600,000 times faster than "DSL speeds" if I have hardware that meets that specification.

Eh? (0, Redundant)

Jeffrey Baker (6191) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573713)

And a ferrari is larger than an orange. WTF is up with this headline? A protocol is faster than a signalling method. Great. To enhance the uselessness, the protocol's speed is measured in multiples of something vague, rather than megabits per second. Nothing turns up for "BIC-TCP" on CiteSeer, so we'll just have to guess until an actual journalist picks up the story.

Mmmmm (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573715)

That's some fast porno.

Pesky physical layer.. (1)

newnam (631332) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573726)

Sure.. if you get rid of those pesky lower layers, data just zooms along.

Mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573732)

Oh, crap! (1)

MattC413 (248620) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573736)

6,000 times the speed of DSL? Wow.. if only places came up with content 6,000 faster..

Quick! Someone alert the porn industry!

BATTLESTATIONS! :)

Cheap Bandwidth (0, Troll)

Un0r1g1nal (711750) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573741)

Bandwidth in reality is alreay cheap, there are protocols that are being used by the likes of cisco that make a 56k modem faster than broadband. Why is it not being implimented? The broadband companies need to make the money back from the investment in their infrastructure. Why upgrade to a 512k broadband connection if your modem can go faster? no need. It will be interesting to see when these actual protocols hit the market.

In answer to above the DSL protocol is the way in which your line is utalised to incorprate digital signals down a standard telephone wire. see here [broadframe.com] for more info

Whoa... (1)

officepotato (723274) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573801)

Deja vu.

Comparing an actual signalling rate to "fast"? Where have I seen this recently?

Re:Cheap Bandwidth (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573817)

Bullshit.
If such protocals existed, Someone would start up a company that used the faster protocals to take control of the market.

Provide some evidence or links about your claimed protocals, and I *might* believe you.

DSL speed vs IP speed (5, Insightful)

DaveRobb (139653) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573744)

This article somewhat erroneously compares the speed of "DSL" vs the speed of "BIC-TCP". DSL is a link-layer protocol. BIC-TCP is an network layer protocol. These are different things. See http://www.webopedia.com/quick_ref/OSI_Layers.asp [webopedia.com] for details.

The question I'd love to ask the authors would be "so, what happens when I run BIC-TCP over a DSL modem? Does it suddenly become 6000 times faster?" I don't think so.
Connections are still going to be constrained by the underlying link speed, and the internet will not become thousands of times faster overnight because of this.

Sure, BIC-TCP looks like it's more efficient than TCP and that's a good thing, but the gains this protocol provides over TCP are in scalability when using suitably big links.

That's right! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573745)

America number 1 you EU pussies and 3rd world motherfuckers!!!!!!

Yeah but... (5, Funny)

gilmet (601408) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573748)

Does it beat out AOL 9.0 Topspeed technology?

Other uses of this technology... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573752)

Some group of morons somewhere will think this is for motorcycles, and they will be badly injured because of the extra speed.

Another group of morons will compress this data and market it for ten extra bucks to other morons who will eat it up.

Another group of morons from the Washington area will write proprietary code that cannot possibly make use of this technology, thus dividing Internet access.

Some dude with a floppy and a lot of time on his hands will use this technology to destroy mankind.

What I really want to know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573753)

is how many libraries of congress [loc.gov] I can download in a minute. *sigh* there should be mod points for campiness or lameness. Hense the anonymous coward :)

And so... (4, Funny)

Tuxedo Jack (648130) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573755)

This becomes just another fast way to piss the RIAA off.

In other news.. (5, Funny)

RajivSLK (398494) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573758)

I have developed a super fast car that is 6,000 times quicker than your driveway, an delicious orange that is 6,000 times tastier than your tongue and a new form of water that is 6,000 wetter than your garden hose!

Please send lots of money in the form of grants to
super inventor guy
123 fake street
v3n3r9

mirror (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573764)

Gigabit Ethernet? (3, Funny)

Animats (122034) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573769)

They've discovered gigabit Ethernet! Wow!

They left out a word (4, Funny)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573776)

It's 6000x faster than MSN DSL, isn't it?

Let's slashdot the researchers site too (4, Informative)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573788)

Actually I'll just put the abstract below. If you want to read their paper, code, and other goodies, click here [ncsu.edu]

High-speed networks with large delays present a unique environment where TCP may have a problem utilizing the full bandwidth. Several congestion control proposals have been suggested to remedy this problem. In these protocols, mainly two properties have been considered important: TCP friendliness and bandwidth scalability. That is, a protocol should not take away too much bandwidth from TCP while fully utilizing the full bandwidth of high-speed networks. We presents another important constraint, namely, RTT (round trip time) unfairness where competing flows with different RTTs may consume vastly unfair bandwidth shares. Existing schemes have a severe RTT unfairness problem because the window increase rate gets larger as window grows - ironically the very reason that makes them more scalable. The problem occurs distinctly with drop tail routers where packet loss can be highly synchronized. Bic-TCP is a new protocol that ensures a linear RTT fairness under large windows while offering both scalability and bounded TCP-friendliness. The protocol combines two schemes called additive increase and binary search increase. When the congestion window is large, additive increase with a large increment ensures linear RTT fairness as well as good scalability. Under small congestion windows, binary search increase is designed to provide TCP friendliness.

mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573794)

WHO CARES!!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573802)

Until it's available via the power grid, who gives a shit!!!

mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573816)

MIRROR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573819)

here is a mirror since the website appears to be dead or near dead:

click here for mirror [dignityusa.org]

Wrong date? (1, Insightful)

embedded_C (653649) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573824)

The problem, Rhee said, is the inherent limitations of regular TCP. "TCP was originally designed in the 1980s when Internet speeds were much slower and bandwidths much smaller," he said.

Doesn't he mean the 1970s?

So What.... (4, Funny)

Sophrosyne (630428) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573833)

I've invented a pen that can write 6000 times faster than a pencil.
(fine print: super human strength required, in order to reach maximum speed alterations of the laws of physics may be necessary.)

mirror (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573841)

Max DSL speed ? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8573855)


i thought was about 8mbs theoretical max, which compared to ISDN is pretty hefty, but squeezing gb's down telephone cable just seems to be the realms of fantasy

This one makes more sense (4, Informative)

colman77 (689696) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573858)

This article is much clearer. http://www.csc.ncsu.edu/faculty/rhee/export/bitcp/

suck it 6000 times (0, Troll)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 10 years ago | (#8573863)

oh please, 6000 times faster might be what you say to some unknowing muppet you're trying to sell a modem to, but this is slashdot, we expect nothing more than bit rate, modulation type and SNR & bandwidth requirements without having to click on the /.'ed article.
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