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507 comments

I should have patented it... (3, Interesting)

zeux (129034) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574437)

I though about it a long time ago because I know we are using the same kind of technology in the airports.

Near the landing strips you can sometimes find some "sound reflectors" which just reflect the sound wave they receive from the planes. The sound is then cancelled by itself.

I saw it once in an airport in France and it works really well and costs next to nothing. AFAIK there's no sound wave modification in that system but I'm not sure (maybe the surface of the reflectors is made in a certain shape to change the sound wave a little).

But in this case it's different because the "box" must produce the counter sound wave. It's not just reflection, there is sound generation here. It means that the microphone and the speakers must be very precise or you just end up with more sound.

But if this guy can do it with 20 bucks it means that it's much easier than I though.

Re:I should have patented it... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574476)

What you describe is not that same thing which is mentioned in that article. You describe passive cancellation (i.e. simply reflecting and hoping it will cancel the original noise), whereas the article describes active cancellation (i.e. recording the noise, computing the negating and sending it off) of noise.

Re:I should have patented it... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574515)

Read my post carefully, I actually talk about both technology.

Re:I should have patented it... (4, Interesting)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574531)

I have a question about active cancellation, as I've heard of it being used in other places. Does the cancellation of a noise of a given frequency have any potentially harmful effects that become less obvious through cancellation? For example, does a high-pitch tone that could cause hearing loss over time become more dangerous now that there are two high-pitch tones (albeit directly off-phase) now sounding, or is the cancellation that complete?

Re:I should have patented it... (5, Informative)

fireweaver (182346) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574614)

Not to worry, the cancellation -can be- that complete. In practice, there will be some residual noise, but it will be very quiet.

Re:I should have patented it... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574497)

But if this guy can do it with 20 bucks it means that it's much easier than I though.

Either that or he's much smarter than you. Which I would imagine is the case if he's a professor at Boston...

Re:I should have patented it... (5, Funny)

zeux (129034) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574539)

Of course he is much smarter than I am, otherwise I wouldn't be posting on slashdot.

And I'm French, remember ;)

Re:I should have patented it... (2)

falconed (645790) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574508)

I've always hated the noise, but never wanted to do water cooling because of the cost (and the water). The article says this will "add only about $20 to the cost of a personal computer." IMHO that would be $20 well spent to cancel out my noisyass thermaltake fan.

Take out the fan, problem solved. (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574522)


CPUs don't get as hot as they used to; the bits move much faster through today's processors as a result of lower overhead friction. Lower friction means less heat, less heat means no need for noisy fans. The fan blade and bearing industry would have you believe that your off-the-shelf PC needs several fans to keep cool but this is simply to prop up the illusion that your system is so powerful that it needs to sound like a jet engine (pun NOT intended) to demonstrate the raw power needed to cool such a strong processor.

- eT

Re:I should have patented it... (4, Informative)

Reverberant (303566) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574627)

Near the landing strips you can sometimes find some "sound reflectors" which just reflect the sound wave they receive from the planes. The sound is then canceled by itself.

I think you're referring to a "blast fence." Those have nothing to do with active sound cancellation, they're strictly passive noise control devices that block the path between the noise source and the receiver (just like highway noise barriers). See here [blastwall.com] or here [hmmh.com] for examples (the latter is a run-up enclosure, but it's the same principle).

Wow (3, Interesting)

michaelhood (667393) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574438)

Active Noise Cancellation stuff is a really cool technology. I wonder if this could be applied to cars and other "larger louder" things in the future.

Re:Wow (5, Informative)

crackshoe (751995) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574469)

Its actually used on some heavy earthmovers and tractors simply because its actually cheaper than making a decent muffler.

Re:Wow (4, Funny)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574479)

Maybe on the inside. On the outside, they're already quiet enough that I miss when they're coming up behind me.

Damned cars always trying to stalk and eat me.

Yes, avoid performance cost of muffler! (1)

enosys (705759) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574527)

I've seen this idea someplace quite a while ago. They were talking about using noise cancellation instead of mufflers. That way you'd reduce noise without any of the flow restriction from a muffler.

Re:Wow (5, Interesting)

krosk (690269) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574630)

Most car noise these days is not from the engine running. Technology these days allows new cars to run incredibly quiet. Probably 99% of the noise you hear while traveling down the highway is road noise. Noise produced from your rubber tires against pavement. I saw a news flash a couple years ago about a new type of pavement that dramatically reduces that noise, but it's too expensive to be widely used.

Negating Sound? Its like new cars.... (5, Informative)

RobertTaylor (444958) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574439)

I have heard of something like that for cars ages ago, basically replays the engine sound over the car sound to negate it.

There were various addons with such a system so you could add a roar of a 911 or rattle of a clapped out sad wanker boy racer in the car.

Jonty! Neil! Work!!

Re:Negating Sound? Its like new cars.... (5, Funny)

electrichamster (703053) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574547)

"I have heard of something like that for cars ages ago, basically replays the engine sound over the car sound to negate it."

Alternatively instead of wasting all that money on a sound cancelling system you could just install hugeass speakers, sub and an enormous exhaust pipe, that way no-one will be able to even *hear* the engine noise over all that deafening dance music you'll be playing.
If you feel like it add undercar neons and go-faster stripes for extra style - they're guaranteed to bring the hot chicks from miles around.

Re:Negating Sound? Its like new cars.... (1)

falconed (645790) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574560)

There's a guy that lives next door to us with a "clapped out sad wanker boy racer" car. It's the most annoying thing ever to be woken up at 2am by this moron letting his car run for five minutes after he's already parked so he can listen to it. I'd love to install one of these noise cancelling systems without his knowledge so he could hear the engine from inside the car, but we couldn't hear it outside, and see how long it takes him to notice.

Re:Negating Sound? Its like new cars.... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574587)

rattle of a clapped out sad wanker boy racer in the car.

If that's the way a young guy wants his car to sound, then leave him the hell alone. You do not need to describe it as being a 'rattle' from a 'clapped out sad wanker boy racer'.

Does criticising these guys make you feel better about yourself, or the car(s) you own?

Shut the FUCK up.

(No, I don't drive a modified 'riced' car, but am tired of hearing dipshits like you)

fristing poster (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574441)

frist p0st!!!111

FP! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574442)

The sound your hearing is the mouse click of the moderator clicking the -1, troll button for this pust!

Nothing new here.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574444)

..move along. Car engineers had this for years.

5izzle (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574446)

fif post

first i hope (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574448)

yea dude quiet fans firrst post

now for the hard drives (4, Insightful)

xobes (148202) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574450)

The noisest part of all my computers i the hard drive, not the CPU fan.

Re:now for the hard drives (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574482)

I got a new samsung ultra quiet hard drive. It is a lot quieter than my older maxtor drive. By typing

hdparm -Y /dev/hda

the difference is amazing! But doing

hdparm -Y /dev/hdb

And I cant hear any difference. I will soon be getting rid of my old maxtor drive!

Re:now for the hard drives (1)

IsosAvrio (679249) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574620)

hdparm -Y juste puts it in sleep mode. However your post made me RTFM and I really have to thank you. By typing hdparm -M128 /dev/hda the difference is amazing and the performance is the same. However as the FM says, THIS FEATURE IS EXPERIMENTAL AND NOT WELL TESTED. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK Btw, I have a Maxtor. Thanks again

Re:now for the hard drives (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574496)

Get a Samsung SpinPoint. They're really really quiet and they run cool too. Ok, they're not the fastest - but you'll have to make a compromise.

Re:now for the hard drives (4, Informative)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574504)

Pick up some of the new fluid-drive-bearing units most companies are producing these days. I can hear my 60GB drives when they access, but the 250GB drive is completely without any detectable noise.

Of course, I do need one of the prof's nifty new toys for other parts of my system...

Re:now for the hard drives (2, Interesting)

WaterTroll (761727) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574530)

My western digital hard drive is completely silent unless you put your ear nearby. However, I recall that I could hear a distinct difference in volume when I was using linux or windows 98. it was much audible from a couple feet away while running linux, but completely silent under windows 98. in fact, the first time i ever actually could hear my hard drive clearly (this is all reading/writing data, not the spinning platters) was when i first installed mandrake and used the disk partitioner.

Can they cancel out processor fanboy noise? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574454)

Yeah, those G5 fanboys won't STFU about that damned VA Tech cluster. I'd love to see some active noise cancellation applied quickly. :)

Why go through all this trouble? (2, Insightful)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574457)

Why? Can't you just get a really quiet fan? My CPU fan is noisy but I don't care, if I wanted to I could build some sort of box to enclose the noise so I don't hear it. Or I could use water cooling which is much quieter. Or I could put my computer further away from where I am (like in a closet or something, like the box idea.) This just seems like a complicated solution to fix such an easy problem.

Re:Why go through all this trouble? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574516)

Because we're at slashdot. We don't need working and simple solution - we need cool gadgets, strange hacks and non-working geekythings.

Re:Why go through all this trouble? (1)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574590)

Tell that to my employer... There are some of us that are forced to sit beside a bloody loud computer at ear height, and we can't move it anywhere. I might be the minority here, but I'd kill for a quieter PC (and I don't have an employer that would pay the insane price for watercooling my PC just for a little peace and quiet...)

If it's such an easy problem to fix, Why the hell haven't manufacturers fixed it? If it costs sooo little, why wouldn't manufacturers do it, just so they can put an extra marketing bullet on their boxes?

Re:Why go through all this trouble? (4, Funny)

irokitt (663593) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574593)

I have honestly seen computers put in freezers. Keeps it cool and eliminates noise at the same time. Leaves less room for the ice cream though.

Re:Why go through all this trouble? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574604)

Can't you just get a really quiet fan?

Ever seen one that works, for a reasonable price? I haven't.

if I wanted to I could build some sort of box to enclose the noise so I don't hear it.

That'd do wonders for ventilation/heat dissipation, which is the point of having the fan in the first place.

Or I could use water cooling which is much quieter

...and about 10 times as expensive.

Or I could put my computer further away from where I am (like in a closet or something, like the box idea.)

OK, fair enough, but that makes it harder to access the drives and you might have trouble with cables reaching.

Your solutions are crap (3, Insightful)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574611)

Quiet fans tend to get noiser with age.

A box is not going to be good for heat dissipation or size constraints.

Water cooling is certainly not going to be cheaper or less complex.

If an active sound nullifier that will automatically adapt to the changing noisyness of a fan as it ages can be made for as little as $20 it is surely a more credible solution than your suggestions...

Noise and Heat (1, Insightful)

pholower (739868) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574458)

It would seem that putting more electronics in the device would only create more heat. Then you would have to increase the fan speed, and then increase the amount of sound cancelation in turn, increasing the fan speed again. An endless cycle. Why not just go with a case that acts as the heatsink?

Re:Noise and Heat (3, Insightful)

thebes (663586) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574494)

The amount of heat that a small microphone and speaker generate would be small enough that it would likely be transmitted through whatever the mounting system was made of, into the heatsink itself, and thereby take care of itselt. The heat increase would be negligible.

Re:Noise and Heat (1)

crackshoe (751995) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574500)

the speaker, at least, produces next to know heat. A small amplifier wouldn't produce a signifigant amount of heat, but the wattage needed to drive a speaker as loud as the fan (which, as far as i know, is essentially whats going on -- inverting the sound wave and playing it back at the same volume), is almost negligable (i don't feel like doing the math).

Re:Noise and Heat (1)

appleprophet (233330) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574578)

The heat generated by the tiny microchip the professor is using can't even be compared to the heat generated by the CPU, graphics card, etc. It is negligible.

Re:Noise and Heat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574581)

An endless cycle

Yay! a perpetual motion machine.

Re:Noise and Heat (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574597)

Amazing how this simplistic thinking gets modded +5 Insightful. At least explain why you group together a 1 Watt speaker with a 60W CPU. God forbid you actually think the microphone 'electronics' produces more heat since it - well it's more electronics after all.

Same tech as noise reducing headphones (4, Informative)

CormacJ (64984) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574467)

I think this is how noise cancelling headphone do it - they just feed the external noise back into the earpieces after inverting it.

Huh. (5, Funny)

dupper (470576) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574473)

When my CPU fan starts to make noise, I just whack my case until it stops.

Re:Huh. (1)

WaterTroll (761727) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574569)

it's that damn power supply fan. a nice tap to the top of the case shuts it up. i do it all the time to my friends computers and they yell at me.

My Method (-1)

illuminata (668963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574475)

Me, I just tape some cotton swabs to the top of my CPU fan.

It works like a charm. It takes that huge noise and makes it damn near inaudible.

Like the noise cancelling headphones? (1)

dealsites (746817) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574478)

I thought the noise cancelling headphones worked because they were right against your ears. I wonder how this fan mod works since the speaker is so far away rom your ears. I would suspect that you could be in the position that the fan noise and echo cancelling waves would combine phase and cause even more noise.

--
Real-time updates from multiple sources [dealsites.net]

Re:Like the noise cancelling headphones? (1)

dancedance (600701) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574577)

AFAIK you are correct. I am not a physicist, but it seems that any large scale application of active noise cancellation is not feasible because depending on where the listener was there would be no noise, or there would be more noise.

Re:Like the noise cancelling headphones? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574619)

Nope, once the waves cancle they are gone. Headphones cancel all noise because they are next to your ears. This would cancel just the fan noise. You can try this out yourself. Make a mono recording and use a wave editor to invert it. Now point two speakers at each other. First play back with only 1 channel. Then play back with both channels. You will notice it is much quieter with both channels. You still hear something beacuse the phase is imperfect and you get sound leaching from the walls of your speakers. If you were to dampen the sides of your speakers with pillows or something it would be even quieter.

No need to worry. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574481)

Of course! who wants to pay $2.00 for a fan, when you can pay $50.00 and get the noise canceling abilities! Nevermind that you could have built the thing using one of those zhalman copper flower heatsinks and not used a fan at all.

Re:No need to worry. (5, Interesting)

hampton (209113) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574510)

Installing a Zalman HSF is exactly what I did. Highly recommended. Or (and), you can just buy a fan controller for the money (or both) to really quiet down your system.

Where this would be really useful is for the whine of hard drives. It would be far better than the current system of enclosing it in some casing thus making it run even hotter.

Re:No need to worry. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574640)

It gets harder and harder the higher in frequency you go because of the decrease in wavelength. Seagate drives are pretty quiet. Also, use 5400RPM drives for data storage, 7200 to run your system. 5400 drives are cooler and fail less often.

CQ TROLL CQ TROLL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574483)

cq cq cq de troll troll troll k

Re:CQ TROLL CQ TROLL (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574543)

troll de troll2 troll2 u got modded dn ufb kn

Re:CQ TROLL CQ TROLL (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574582)

troll2 de troll mod pnts waste op finished cul 73 sk

Bose (1)

Bl33d4merican (723119) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574484)

Sounds a lot like those noise cancelling headphones that Bose originated (http://www.bose.com/). Sounds like going to an extreme for a very slight problem...but i certainly give him some Geek points for the project. Then again, I've got very fast drives and they don't make all that much noise...a decent case instead of one of those plastic crappy ones by Dell and Gateway usually helps, too.

Re:Bose (2, Informative)

automatix (664568) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574535)

Noise cancelling headphones have been around for ages in various forms. Helicopter pilots use them for communication...

The headsets also have 2 microphones in series and out of phase - 1 picks up the voice+noise and the other only the noise, so the noise cancels and you get left with the voice. This stuff is used on comms systems for concerts, etc as well.

Rob :)

FP! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574486)


Fourteenth post!

Me too! (2, Insightful)

slifox (605302) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574493)

I thought of this too, a while back.

The problem is that the fan noise isn't a constant noise and theres no way to create an inverse wave exactly when the sound happens--there will be a delay.

Good to see this concept working though.

Re:Me too! (1)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574586)

Use feedback. You can use the microphone to determine the major frequencies and then begin shifting the phase experimentally, and measure the change in amplitude. This way the delay is automatically compensated out.

As he said, it works for reducing the whine, which is primarily going to be one frequency. The whoosh is a whole different story because it's basically noise. With headphones, you can deal with it because you know where the sound is going and can do the cancellation processing in the time it takes the sound to pass the microphone and reach the ear. Doing active cancellation at the site of the noise generation is much more difficult, unless you have a ducted sound path like a car exhaust does. Then you know where the sound is going and can place your microphone up the duct to predict what's coming down the pipe, literally.

How about cancelling out the noise from Lindon? (1, Funny)

cheesedog (603990) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574512)

I'd like to place Scott Sommerfeldt next to Darl McBride.

Hey Scott, please take a stroll northword toward Lindon, find the SCO campus, and do your magic.

Real Life Example (0, Troll)

fembots (753724) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574517)

Does this method really work?

In real life, if your other half is yelling at you, you then yell back equally loudly, does it cancel the yelling altogether? :)

Having said that, this cancelling method is quite widely used in ancient China (not sure about the modern one). For instance, if you are bitten by a scorpion, just find something equally poisonous, or more, to bite at the same spot, and voila!

Re:Real Life Example (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574571)

Shut the fuck up you luddite hippie asshole

Re:Real Life Example (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574576)

My next door neighbours used to play their stereo really loud. I'd used my PC microphone and speakers and play the sound back to them (with a 1/2 second delay).

Keep everything quiet (4, Funny)

nmoog (701216) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574518)

Thats really cool. Its like those amazing bose noise cancelling headphones [bose.com].

I have wondered if it was possible to do this in my house. Where I live there is a lot of people who like to scream at each other alot, and it rather gets on the nerves. It would be cool if you could record your neighbourhood noises, and instantly replay them out of phase into your living room. Presto. The beautiful sounds of silence.

Re:Keep everything quiet (5, Funny)

electrichamster (703053) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574608)

I wonder what would happen if you placed some huge speakers in a room connected to mic's and some noise cancelling gubbins....would everything just fall silent no matter how loud you shouted?

Could be a useful mute tool for the girlfriend when she goes on too long:

GOD, you're so inconsiderate, you never take my feelings into acco
*click*..........

Re:Keep everything quiet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574624)

You could do that, but you would have to wear a tracker, which would keep track of where you were in your room at all times. Then you would need microphones all over the place, then a few speakers to cancel out the soundwaves as they reached your ears. you would need more than one speaker to take care of the reflections from the walls. It would be damn near impossible to quiet up your whole room at once, since the sound is coming from all over the place.

Why'd it take so long? (0)

tec27 (759949) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574520)

I can't see why someone hadn't put this into action sooner. Its basically a white noise generator with a more precise frequency range, and this type of thing has been used in other industries for years.

Mods... (2, Interesting)

c0dedude (587568) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574523)

Mod points to a poster who can point me to a download site for this or something like it, want to try it myself, will put a little speaker by the fan. Or is this not the way it works? Would a computer be too slow to pull something like this off sucessfully?

Re:Mods... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574540)

Mod poinst? But, um, you just posted....

Re:Mods... (1)

c0dedude (587568) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574570)

Yeah, but to provide incentives I go back and up previous posts of a poster who answers my questions. Call it mod tyranny, but it gets questions answered.

Not universal (1)

irokitt (663593) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574629)

Unfortunately, there would have to be a different frequency of noise cancellation for every different CPU fan out there. Most people run "stock" CPU fans, but even the stock fan approach gets negated because there are several different models that have been distributed over time. So it isn't just a simple download.

two things.. (1)

glenkim (412499) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574532)

first of all, where are the sound clips?



second of all, this would be interesting to mix with a car exhaust, if you can find components that wouldn't die in the heat. imagine straight-pipe exhausts that are quieter than today's systems with mufflers!

two things inRe:#2 thing.. (1)

mynameis (mother ... (745416) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574606)

second of all, this would be interesting to mix with a car exhaust, if you can find components that wouldn't die in the heat. imagine straight-pipe exhausts that are quieter than today's systems with mufflers!

First, someone was doing this years back. Can't for the life of me say who, but I saw it on TV, so ;) Seriously, someone had a prototype sonic interference type muffler system.


Secondly, someone posted about this above, adding the fun idea of additionally altering the emotional qualities of your exhaust...

Alternatives to Noice Cancellation (4, Informative)

breakinbearx (672220) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574533)

Although, it would be very very cool to get this technology to work on big loud things, and is very cost effective, for quite pc's, the Voodoo F:50 [voodoopc.com] does a very good job at keeping noise at a minimum, using no fans, only convective heat pipes, and using the entire case as a heatsink. Voodoo claims that their system operates at below 20 dBs, and cannot be measured in a room with regular ambient noise.

Re:Alternatives to Noice Cancellation (1)

irokitt (663593) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574551)

I have salivated over a Voodoo system for ages. Ditto for the equally soundproofed and outrageous Falcon Northwest systems. But you can't get around the fact that they are very expensive. Well beyond my means at least. So my computer sounds like a 747 taking off.

It never ends though (5, Funny)

irokitt (663593) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574537)

Once you silence my CPU, you'll hear my hard drive. After you silence my hard drive, contend with my video card cooler. Quiet my video card cooler, and hear all 4 of my case fans instead. Quiet those, and hear the active cooler on my northbridge. Shut that up, and I'll go mad with all the silence...

I could use this (3, Interesting)

crass751 (682736) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574545)

My laptop is so loud that if the fan(s) isn't/aren't running my roommate asks me if I turned it off. This thing generally has two fans running at times, and when it's really working hard, a third kicks in. My four year old desktop machine is much quieter than this thing.

Stupid HP. Had to go sticking a desktop chip in a laptop. Oh well, it still runs circles around my roommate's silent Centrino-based machine.

Finally... (2, Funny)

Seoulstriker (748895) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574546)

Finally I can run that 120mm x 38mm Tornado fan at full speed without going deaf! I wonder if the same device could be used to silence my computer's other 10 fans.

Maybe not for fans (2, Funny)

Daikiki (227620) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574556)

This noise reduction technology only cuts out whining, you say? Can I order one medium sized one for my wife, 3 smalls for the kids and an extra large for my mother-in-law? I'll pay extra for overnight delivery!

Absorbing technique instead (5, Interesting)

fembots (753724) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574559)

In most offices, they don't use noise generators (ie Gossip Support Group) to cancel out talking noises, instead they put in a lot of plants, cubicles, which act to absorb most of the noises.

If the noise is pointing at your directly, then you probably need a cancelling method. If it is a general-direction noise, it should be absorbed rather than trying to cancel it (where you need to find it in the first place).

Sign me up for the beta! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574596)

I want one. No two. No, 20. Imagine a Beowulf cluster running with these. Are your servers on? Yup.

Those danged mormons... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574599)

First they make electricity in fruit jars, now they done figured out how to make sound waves disappear. What will they think of next. Been thinking about joining their church just so they would let me attend BYU..... Dang..

Wind tunnels... (2, Funny)

SmackCrackandPot (641205) | more than 10 years ago | (#8574601)

We have a industrial PC that sits in a wind-tunnel. To us that's the largest cooling fan anyone would ever want.

Wrong direction (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8574642)

All this does is allow PC makers to get away with making hotter and noisier systems. We should be pressuring the industry to be cooler and more efficient.
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