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Cobind Desktop Reviewed, With Interview

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the low-barriers-to-entry dept.

Books 151

An anonymous reader writes "Cobind Desktop takes a remarkable turn from other Linux distributions by being one of the first to include Mozilla Firefox 0.8 and Mozilla Thunderbird in their first release. Though Cobind Desktop only uses XFce and not the more popular KDE, its entire design is based on a clutter-free workspace. Flexbeta.net took the time to write up a review and conduct an interview with David Watson, Co-Founder and President of Cobind Desktop. He mentions how the entire design concept of Cobind Desktop is based on a book called the Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz, who is a professor at Swarthmore. David Watson believes that this concept can be applied to software design, and produce more usable products as a result." (We mentioned Schwartz's book earlier today.)

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Okay, all we need now is... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709484)

A third article on Paradox of Choice, and this is officially Google/Paradox of Choice Day on Slashdot. Perhaps an article on BOTH Google and Paradox of Choice would be a good one.

Re:Okay, all we need now is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709621)

Googled paradox [google.com] ?

Re:Okay, all we need now is... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709676)

>>by Barry Schwartz, who is a professor at

may the schwartz be with you.

Re:Okay, all we need now is... (2, Funny)

optikSmoke (264261) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709697)

For user simplicity, all search engines should now become Google.

(Except in Soviet Russia, Google becomes all search engines.

Oh dear.)

Re:Okay, all we need now is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709950)

Ahh, the paradox of choice. Like having to choose between yet another Linux distro.

THINK ABOUT YOUR BREATHING ! (-1)

ThinkAboutYourBreath (735770) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709485)

Hello, and THINK ABOUT YOUR BREATHING

Yes that's right, THINK ABOUT YOUR BREATHING. Why you might ask? Well it's simple!

Your brain usually takes care of breathing FOR you, but whenever you remember this, YOU MUST MANUALLY BREATH! If you don't you will DIE.

There are also MANY variations of this. For example, think about:

  1. BLINKING!

  1. SWALLOWING SALIVA!

  1. HOW YOUR FEET FEEL IN YOUR SOCKS!



In conclusion, the THINK ABOUT YOUR BREATHING troll is simply unbeatable. These 4 words can be thrown randomly into article text trolls, into sigs, into anything, and once seen, WILL FORCE THE VICTIM TO TAKE CARE OF HIS BREATHING MANUALLY! This goes far beyond the simple annoying or insulting trolls of yesteryear.

In fact, by EVEN RESPONDING to this troll, you are proving that IT HAS CLAIMED ANOTHER VICTIM -- YOU!

I RESPOND TO THIS TROLL... (0)

Stupid American (766263) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709613)

because I am Stupid American

I'm George W. Bush and I approved this message (-1, Offtopic)

John 'Eff-ing' Kerry (764117) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709666)

John "Eff-ing" Kerry: A tax-and-spend liberal and anti-war communist

Since quitting the Navy six months early at age 27 so he could run for Congress on an antiwar platform, John Kerry has built a political career on his service in Vietnam. His unsuccessful 1970 congressional bid lasted only a month, during which it proved impossible for even he to get to the left of the winner, Robert Drinan, but it forged a conflicting political persona - one hammered out between his combat medals earned in the Mekong delta and the common cause he made with the enemy upon his return home.

Now, at age 60, the junior Democratic senator from Massachusetts is milking his veteran status once again in an effort to show that he's tougher and more patriotic than the man he seeks to replace, President George W. Bush. And, as unrepentant as ever for his pro-Hanoi activism, he is just as conflicted in 2004 as he was in the 1960s.

If there is any consistency in Kerry's political career, it is his in-your-face use of that four-month stint in Vietnam. He enlisted like many other young men of privilege, trying to serve without going to the front lines. When in 1966 it looked like his draft number was coming up during his senior year at Yale University, and already having spoken out in public against the war, Kerry signed up with the Navy under the conscious inspiration of his hero, the late President John F. Kennedy. As a lieutenant junior grade, Kerry skippered a CTF-115 swift boat, a light, aluminum patrol vessel that bore a passing resemblance to PT-109. He thought he'd arranged to avoid combat. "I didn't really want to get involved in the war," he later would tell the Boston Globe. "When I signed up for the swift boats, they had very little to do with the war. They were engaged in coastal patrolling, and that's what I thought I was going to do."

Soon, however, Kerry was reassigned to patrol the Mekong River in South Vietnam, a formative experience for his political odyssey. The official record shows that he rose to the occasion. It was along the Mekong where he first killed a man, aggressively fighting the enemy Viet Cong and reportedly saving the lives of his own men, earning a Bronze Star, a Silver Star for valor, and three Purple Hearts in the process.

Kerry opted for reassignment to New York City, where - as a uniformed, active-duty officer - he reportedly began acting out the antiwar feelings he had expressed before enlisting. Press reports from the time say that he marched in the October 1969 Moratorium protests - a mass demonstration by a quarter-million people that had been orchestrated the previous summer by North Vietnamese officials and American antiwar leaders in Cuba (see sidebar, p. 27). Kerry had found his purpose in life. The New York Times reported on April 23, 1971, that at about the time of the Moratorium march, Lt. Kerry had "asked for, and was given, an early release from the Navy so he could run for Congress on an antiwar platform from his home district in Waltham, Mass."

For Kerry, politicizing the nation's war effort for partisan purposes was the right thing to do, in contrast to the violent revolutionary designs of colleagues who were out to destroy the system. Kerry didn't want to take down the establishment. He wanted to take it over. His aborted, monthlong 1970 congressional campaign was a victory for him politically, as it landed him on television's popular Dick Cavett Show, where he came to the attention of some of the central organizers of the antiwar/pro-Hanoi group known as Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW).

VVAW was a numerically small part of the protest movement, but it was extremely influential through skillful political theater, the novelty of uniformed combat veterans joining the Vietniks, and a ruthless coalition-building strategy that forged partnerships with the Communist Party USA (CPUSA), its Trotskyite rival, the Socialist Workers Party, and a broad front that ranged from pacifists to supporters of the Black Panthers and other domestic terrorist groups.

Kerry signed on as a full-time organizer and member of the VVAW's six-member executive committee. By early 1971 he had become one of the antiwar movement's principal figureheads, lending a moderate face to a movement that championed, and was championed by, imprisoned murder conspirator Angela Davis and actress Jane Fonda.

The young former and future political candidate acted as one of the main leaders of a massive, five-day April protest in Washington and other cities. Kerry's partner, Jan Crumb, read a list of 15 demands. According to the CPUSA paper Daily World, the VVAW demands were, "Immediate, unilateral, unconditional withdrawal of all U.S. armed forces and Central Intelligence Agency personnel from Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Thailand," plus "full amnesty" to all "war resisters" and draft dodgers, and "withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Latin America, Africa, Asia and elsewhere in the world."

Kerry was the star of the political theater that historic week, angry that the law forbade political protests at veterans' graves in Arlington National Cemetery and angrier that President Richard Nixon enforced the law and that the Supreme Court upheld it. He led an illegal encampment of veterans and people who dressed as veterans on the Mall in downtown Washington and used the services of Ramsey Clark - a former Johnson administration attorney general who by that time openly was supporting the enemy in Hanoi - to fight a federal order to disperse. According to the Daily World, which published a page-one photo of Kerry passing Clark a note during the march, the protesters converged on the White House chanting, "One, Two, Three, Four - We Don't Want Your F- - - - - - War."

Kerry's establishment model was working where the home-baked revolutionaries were failing. The activist bumped into William Fulbright, then chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, at a party and landed himself in the spotlight as a witness in a hearing held the last day of the weeklong march. There, he made his infamous exaggerated and untruthful allegations that his fellow servicemen, not merely the commanders, deliberately were committing widespread atrocities against innocent Vietnamese civilians (see sidebar, p. 26). Afterward, he joined a dramatic political-theater display at the Capitol steps, where hundreds of vets took a microphone and, one by one, stated their name, identified their combat medals and flung them over a police fence on the steps. Kerry renounced his Bronze Star, his Silver Star and his three Purple Hearts. (Later, as a politician, he would give ever-changing versions of the story.)

He seemed to want it both ways in the protest movement. While claiming to "hate" the communists, he decried any attempt to marginalize them within the movement. Once, when questioned about his political alliance with supporters of the enemy, Kerry said that any attempts to push out Hanoi supporters might result "in seriously dividing and weakening the movement, and making it less effective."

That didn't sit well with some VVAW members beyond the Washington Beltway. Back in Massachusetts, VVAW state coordinator Walker "Monty" Montgomery, a Tennessee native, publicly differed with Kerry. The Boston Herald-Traveler reported that Montgomery "was considerably more candid than Kerry about the problems posed by revolutionary communists inside an antiwar organization."

"You can quote me," said Montgomery, "as one who believes that the revolutionary communists in our organization are detrimental to the organization."

Kerry had trouble discerning the line between legitimate dissent and collaboration with the enemy. In the summer of 1971, he spoke at a VVAW news conference in Washington, assailing President Nixon for not accepting an enemy propaganda initiative - a Viet Cong statement in Paris that Hanoi would guarantee the release of American prisoners of war once the last U.S. troops left Vietnam. Featuring a photo of Kerry in the July 24 Daily World, the CPUSA said Kerry "asked President Nixon to accept [a] seven-point peace proposal of Vietnamese patriots."

Kerry traveled the country that fall, trying to breathe new life into a sagging college antiwar movement. The protest spirit was coming alive, he said. "It isn't withering," he told a reporter at Fort Hays State University in Kansas. "The feeling is there. I do seriously believe there's beginning to be a turning away from the tear-it-down mentality. The movement is turning toward electoral politics again."

Covering his antiwar campaign, the National Observer reported at the time, "He wants the Vietnam Veterans [Against the War] to move quickly and strongly into grass-roots electoral politics." He sought to organize like-minded veterans to become delegates at the upcoming 1972 presidential conventions. "Though the veterans are, for the record, nonpartisan," the Observer said, "what this really means is whether the [George] McGovern Commission reforms for the Democratic Convention are implemented and enforced. Most antiwar veterans laugh at the idea of getting anything started in the Republican Convention."

Yet for all his want of the spotlight, Kerry avoided public debates with other veterans. On seven occasions, by July 1971, he had refused to allow other veterans to challenge him publicly on television, even when CBS and NBC offered to host formal debates. He relented only when Dick Cavett, who had made him a national figure not long before, agreed to terms Kerry found advantageous. Even then, with Kerry holding all the advantages, Boston Globe political columnist David Nyhan observed, his "scrappy little" opponent, John O'Neill, "was all over Kerry like a terrier, keeping the star of the Foreign Relations Committee hearings ... off balance."

Kerry couldn't hope to take over the political establishment without the political organization skills, mobilization abilities and support networks of those radical groups that supported the enemy against U.S. troops. He needed to latch on to those in the establishment who funded them.

The New York Times reported on a millionaire's gathering in East Hampton, Long Island, in August 1971. Many of the attendees had participated in "fund-raising affairs for the Black Panthers" and other extremist causes. With fellow VVAW leader Al Hubbard, Kerry sought a less radical position, but he showed parts of a full-length film containing testimony of 125 alleged veterans who said they had witnessed U.S. atrocities in Vietnam, "before a request for funds sent everyone scrambling for pens and checkbooks."

As with Kerry's Senate testimony, which contained wild and unsubstantiated allegations of deliberate U.S. atrocities throughout the ranks, many of them disproved, the mission outweighed the truth. His VVAW sidekick Hubbard identified himself as an Air Force captain, a pilot, when in reality he was an ex-sergeant who had never served in Vietnam. Kerry was content to stand by VVAW's claims that it had 12,000 members in 1971. Massachusetts VVAW coordinator Montgomery was more open about the figures. He said that only 50 to 75 members in the entire state were really active and that the official statewide membership of 1,500 Vietnam vets was just a "paper membership."

The angry young veteran's political ambition shone through his public earnestness. The 1970 congressional race that had propelled him into national politics also undercut his credibility, exacerbated by his drive to run for office again. Many saw him as exploiting the war for political gain. "Angry wives of American prisoners of war [POWs] lashed out yesterday at peace advocate John Kerry of Waltham, Mass., accusing him of using the POW issue as a springboard to political office," the Associated Press (AP) reported on July 22, 1971. "One of the women accused Kerry of 'constantly using their own suffering and grief' for purely political reasons."

Patricia Hardy of Los Angeles, whose husband had been killed in 1967, told reporters, "I think he couldn't care less about these men or these families." Cathi and Janice Ray, whose stepbrother was a POW, accompanied her. (Official records show that only one U.S. serviceman named Hardy was killed in the war, Marine Lance Cpl. Frank Earle Hardy, whose platoon was ambushed in Quang Tri on May 29, 1967. His name appears on panel 21E, row D14, of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington.)

The wife of Air Force Col. Arthur Mearns, a pilot missing since he was shot down in 1966, protested Kerry with them. Her husband later was declared killed in action. His name appears on panel 12E, row 055, of the wall.

"Mr. Kerry, when asked if he planned to run again for political office, said only that he was committed to political change and that he would use whatever forum seemed best at the time," according to AP. "He did not rule out mounting another political campaign." At the time, "I was totally consumed with the notion of going to Congress," Kerry later told the Washington Post. AP hinted that Kerry already held presidential ambitions. A Boston newspaper agreed: "The gentle cloak of idealism and dignity which Kerry had worn during his televised testimony in Washington now appeared to be stitched together with threads of personal ambition and political expediency. Was this to be the payoff for one of the finest and most moving chapters of the counterculture antiwar movement? Just another slick Ivy League phrasemaker ego-freak political hustler with a hunger to see his name on campaign posters and his face on national television?"

By 1972, Massachusetts' third congressional seat was firmly held by radical Robert Drinan. Kerry, now 28, left Waltham and bought a house in Worcester, anticipating a run for Congress from the 4th District. But when President Nixon picked the congressman representing the 5th District for an ambassador's post, Kerry leased out his house and moved to the dying old mill city of Lowell to run for the soon-to-be-vacated seat there. The Boston Phoenix, an alternative newspaper whose reporter traveled with Kerry on the 1972 campaign, profiled the candidate in a story headlined, "Cruising with a Carpetbagger."

"Kerry, media superstar, suddenly found himself having to deny that he had political plans lest he be accused of ripping off the veterans by using them as a bow for the arrow of his ambition," the Phoenix reported. "John Kerry is burning with desire to be a congressman, but he has to keep paying off that loan from the Vietnam Veterans [VVAW] by seeming to be cool and indifferent to personal gain, and this underlying dilemma produces an uncomfortable tension around him."

The candidate had trouble balancing himself between Kerry the patriot and Kerry the minion of Hanoi's agitprop apparatus. He tried to distance himself from his brand-new book, The New Soldier. According to a major newspaper in the district, the Lowell Sun, the book cover "carried a picture of three or four bearded youths of the hippie type carrying the American flag in a photo resembling remarkably the immortal photo by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal of U.S. Marines raising the flag on Iwo Jima after its capture from the Japanese during World War II. The big difference between the two pictures, however, is that the photo on John Kerry's book shows the flag being carried upside down in a gesture of contempt."

The book was hard to come by at the time, according to the newspaper, but a rival in the Democratic primary found one in Greenwich Village and tried to publish the cover as an advertisement in the Sun. Kerry tried to cover it up. "Things began to get hot as the old pressure went on to prevent publication of the advertisement showing the cover of the book," the Sun's editors wrote on Oct. 18, 1972. "Permission from the publisher of the book, Macmillan Co. of New York, to reproduce the cover, granted by Macmillan in a telegram on the day publication of the ad was scheduled, was quickly withdrawn hours later by Macmillan with the explanation that the approval of the author, John Kerry, would be required before the cover could be reproduced in a political advertisement. So that killed the ad."

Kerry said it wasn't he who blocked publication. According to the Sun, "Subsequently, efforts were made to obtain Mr. Kerry's okay to reproduce the famous book cover, but Mr. Kerry now says he doesn't have the right to give this permission because the copyright on the book cover belongs to a coeditor of the book, one George Butler." The Sun couldn't locate Butler.

When the book had come out the year before, Macmillan sent a review copy to Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), requesting an endorsement. Byrd wrote back, "I say most respectfully to you, I threw it in the wastebasket after leafing through it."

Having lost the primary in humiliation - his brother had been caught trying to wiretap an opponent's office - Kerry went to Boston College Law School. Later, he was appointed assistant district attorney, then was elected lieutenant governor under Mike Dukakis in 1982. Two years later, he ran for the U.S. Senate - dusting off his veteran's credentials by standing in front of the black Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington to shoot a TV campaign ad, defying regulations that the memorial not be used for political purposes. The ad "was filmed illegally against the wishes of the National Park Service," according to the Boston Globe. Kerry authorized its broadcast anyway.

Kerry's campaign only stirred up long-smoldering embers from the war. Retired Maj. Gen. George S. Patton III, who had commanded combat troops in Vietnam, said that, medals or no medals, by the nature of his wartime protests Kerry gave "aid and comfort to the enemy" in the style of Ramsey Clark and Jane Fonda. "Mr. Kerry probably caused some of my guys to get killed," Patton said, even as he self-deprecatingly acknowledged shortcomings of his own as a commander. "And I don't like that. There is no soap ever invented that can wash that blood off his hands."

Responding to controversy over his remarks, Patton wrote in the Worcester Evening Gazette, "The dissent against our efforts in that unhappy war, as exemplified by Mr. Kerry, and of course others, made the soldier's duties even more difficult. ... These incidents caused our opponent, already highly motivated, to fight harder against us and our Vietnamese allies. Hence the comment made by me which included the provision of 'aid and comfort to the enemy' by Mr. Kerry."

Under relentless attack from the pro-Kerry Boston press, Patton received strong veteran support. Robert Hagopian, past commander of the Massachusetts division of the Disabled American Veterans, spoke for many about the general's views, telling reporters, "I agree with everything he said."

The Lowell Sun ran a cartoon of Kerry trying fruitlessly to wash his blood-covered hands. An accompanying editorial said, "During his antiwar years, John Kerry was about the closest thing to a male Jane Fonda in the U.S. anybody could find - and Ms. Fonda came as close to treason to her country as anybody ever could without being convicted of it."

To no avail. Massachusetts voters elected Kerry that year to join Ted Kennedy in the United States Senate.

Re:I RESPOND TO THIS TROLL... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709723)

^s0!
U R n0t teh st00p3d li|3 m3.

Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709486)

Seriously... So they included some new software. If you are into this, just run Debian Unstable.

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709510)

I do run Debian Unstable. And I'm really hating Sneakernet right now...

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709559)

"Sneakernet" is an old term referring to running data between locations on floppy disks, for anyone who didn't know.

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709614)

"Sneakernet" is an old term referring to running data between locations on floppy disks, for anyone who didn't know.

What is this 'floppy disk' of which you speak?

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709642)

it's this thing in my pants that hasn't seen or touched a women since i started using computers.

hell i can't even _see_ my floppy any more.

too many spicy hot cheetos and mountaindew

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709695)

wo-men?

Re:Umm, how is this 'remarkable'? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709804)

w00t-men

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709487)

w00tness
go azn pplz

YOU FUCKING FAIL IT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709512)

KEKEKEKKEE YOU'RE A FUCKING FAILURE, GO SLIT YOUR WRISTS IN REPENTANCE.

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hrmmm (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709488)

COULD IT BE A FRIST POST?

Re:hrmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709738)

see first reply to previous thread, goober.

First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709492)

I've nailed it this time!

FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709494)

Really, who cares?

Changing Browsers (-1, Redundant)

Bs15 (762456) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709497)

Hopefully this will encourage more people to move away from IE.

If they've already switched to a Unix variant... (2, Insightful)

b00m3rang (682108) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709555)

...chances are they're not going to be using IE anyway.

Re:If they've already switched to a Unix variant.. (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709584)

XFce does look remarkably like XP, so a public computer running the software could certainly expose more people to alternative browsers without the fear of an unfamiliar operating system.

(They'll think they're in XP, so they probably won't panic.)

Re:If they've already switched to a Unix variant.. (2, Informative)

The Irish Jew (690798) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709653)

Umm, are you sure yuo're not thinking of XPde. XFCE is nothing like windows XP. XPde however is.

Re:If they've already switched to a Unix variant.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709665)

Doh! You're right.

Re:If they've already switched to a Unix variant.. (1)

Mose250 (724946) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709602)

It does look like it'd be a pretty slick Live CD distro (although I admit that I haven't tried it yet), so maybe that'll get some exposure. I know that a bunch of people here at my school have been exposed to linux via the liveCD idea (some of the helpdesk guys carry around knoppix or the like for quick diagnostics and file recovery). So maybe it'll get people to use firebird in that way - live CDs let people who don't use linux use linux. For about 2 months this year, i fooled around with knoppix and PCLinuxOS before finally installing a full HD-based distro.

Re:Changing Browsers (1)

fembots (753724) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709560)

Hopefully this will encourage more people to move away from IE.

Only if these people were running IE on this Linux distribution. I don't think there are many people who will download and install a new distro because it has the latest, bestest browser.

Re:Changing Browsers (1)

Jim Starx (752545) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709569)

Why would it? It's a linux distro. Most linux users already don't use IE.

Re:Changing Browsers (1)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709624)

Most linux users already don't use IE.

I always never use IE.

Re:Changing Browsers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709709)

Do you sometimes just not use IE, as a break from always never using it? Merely curious.

Re:Changing Browsers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709779)

Do you sometimes just not use IE, as a break from always never using it? Merely curious.

Yes, I never don't do that.

Re:Changing Browsers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8710075)


Yes, I never don't do that.


wait, does that mean you always do that, and not just sometimes? so did you just reply yes, and then answer in the negative?

He must hate linux (1, Funny)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709507)

To many choices make it harder to choose. So, introduce another choice.

Re:He must hate linux (4, Interesting)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709731)

No, he's doing the right thing... I dunno if I completely agree with his choice of packages, but it does mesh well with the aims of a basic but complete package. With a little polish applied to the installation, I'd imagine it would work just fine for a lot of people, and they wouldn't have to fret over which word processor they want to use today.

Fedora and Mandrake et al couldn't get away with dropping half of their packages - the user outcry would be enormous. But a new distro can. Whether many people will actually use it is something else however. Personally, I think the real solution is not rolling a new distro, but providing a reworked installer script that uses an existing distro, like say Mandrake 10. You get the clean interface and small footprint, but you also get the installation base and user support.

Reviewer missed the point (2, Insightful)

The Monster (227884) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709885)

aims of a basic but complete package
The reviewer didn't get this at all. He complained about how inconvenient it would be to have to use yum to get OO.o or, a RH disk to install a package not on the Cobind CD. Let me repeat those last three words:
the Cobind CD
That's one CD, folks. Uno. Eins. Distros like Cobind, Knoppix, etc. have as a design constraint that they must be able to install (or run) a functioning system from a single CD, rather than RH's 3, or SuSE's you-might-as-well-just-go-with-the-DVD ensemble. The idea here is to show that you can get a fronking lot of software on just one CD, when it's written right.

VICTORY TO THE WORKING CLASS (-1)

cmdr_shithead (527909) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709522)

down with capitalism! smash racism and imperialism!

What compiler gives the fastest Linux kernel? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709542)

It would be interesting to know which compiler would give the best kernel. Has anyone done such a test? Or do the Zealots not dare compare gcc's output to a commercial compiler? I'm guessing MS Visual C++ would kick gcc when it comes to compiling a Linux kernel.

Re:What compiler gives the fastest Linux kernel? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709554)

There was a competition a year or so ago. Emacs won.

Mods on crack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709663)

How is this interesting?

Re:Mods on crack (4, Funny)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709682)

How is this interesting?

It's interesting much in the way a ball or block is interesting to a 8 month old baby. They don't really understand it, but they play with it anyway.

Re:What compiler gives the fastest Linux kernel? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709638)

I've heard that, other than GCC, only Intel packs the required heat to forge the mighty kernel.
GCC hasn't had pre-compiled headers, which might or might not have any effect on kernel compilation, and also targets more platforms than one could shake a small forest at.
I wouldn't expect it to beat Visual C++ in a race, but that's like saying an M1 Abrams can't beat a Ford Escort in a drag race. If the idea of a cross-compiling suite of portable tools that you can crack open and freely do what you want with, and not have to pay the tax to the Malicious Satrap fails to grab you by the naughty bits, then, please, take the Ford.

But isn't paying for stuff sometimes worth it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709690)

Surely you would want the best tool for the job, eh? If (and I said if) a commercial app gave you a superior result, wouldn't you go with that? Or would the OSS jihad insist that you work with an inferior tool?

It's like growing ALL your food instead of buying from a store.

Re:But isn't paying for stuff sometimes worth it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709778)

Well, you can certainly balance the tactical verses the strategic objectives.
We live in the now, and no one, except this twit at the FSF who bought some Redmond when he thought he was buying RedMan(1), ever got fired for buying Microsoft.
I would like to see a graph of pricing for Microsoft Visual Studio over time. Without bothering my pretty head with actual research, I bet it's got a nice exponential decay to it. :)


(1) I made that up.

that rocks (-1)

W32.Klez.A (656478) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709550)

O_o http://www.rockstaragent.com/p/1460/2.html

Popularity contests and the peanut gallery. (1)

Rahga (13479) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709561)

Wonderful. Another /. headline: "Combinddesktop uses XFce rather than the more popular KDE". Yet, of course, XFce uses gtk+, the screenshots ( http://cobind.com/desktop.html ) show firebird and GNOME/gtk+ apps.

Re:Popularity contests and the peanut gallery. (1)

BiggyP (466507) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710017)

yes, so very helpful, i never like the wording people use when moaning that something isn't KDE.

the reviewer could've done with learning how to use PNG instead of GIF, and possibly installed on real hardware, i get the impression(of course i may well be wrong in making the assumption) that this review was conducted through virtual machine/emulation of some sort.

So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709576)

Isn't this ILLEGAL? The EU thinks so. If this upstart distro maker want to bundle Mozilla, they must also bundle the other competing browsers, or leave out.

To not do so would be hypocritical.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709658)

Since they are not a monopoly, their bundling is not illegal. It amazes me that people have problems with simple statements like "if you are a monopoly then ...".

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709674)

Certianly Mozilla has a huge monopoly in open source browsers.

Why aren't they including Links, w3m, Konquerer, and others?

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709830)

let's see, links is a text mode browser, suitable for use in a terminal, which Mozilla is not.
w3m runs embedded in emacs, which also can run sans GUI.
Konqueror and Mozilla share the gecko rendering engine, which is a desperately needed step in the direction of the open source community focusing on depth, not breadth, in choices (applause).
Oh, and 'monopoly' implies a captive audience, as in when your OS vendor is using its browser technology on you in the canine fashion. Perhaps you have been so tooled for so long that the last shred of a clue has been bludgeoned out of your head.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (2, Informative)

Zardus (464755) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709871)

Konqueror and Mozilla share the gecko rendering engine, which is a desperately needed step in the direction of the open source community focusing on depth, not breadth, in choices (applause).

They don't actually. Konqueror uses KHTML [kde.org] , which is a pretty nice HTML engine (Apple chose it over gecko for Safari). As both engines are very nice, I guess either the OSS community isn't taking desperately needed steps or we got enough people to work on a few implementations of things at the same time and make them good.

Having used both browsers extensively, I think the latter is true.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709686)

What an uncreative troll.

Cobind doesn't own Mozilla, whereas Microsoft owns Internet Explorer and uses their desktop dominance to force the browser onto the ignorant masses.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709698)

OK, I'll respond to this outpouring of cranial rectalitis.
Bundling isn't the issue; it's the use of monopoly status to crush competition in the market that is the issue, booty-bowler.
Given your non-command of economics, recent history, and common sense, you probably thing BeelzeBill is your friend, asshat. To really just splice the living piss out of an infinitive, you, sir, are a moron.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709704)

Except the company/organization behind this isn't a monopoly. Monopolies are treated differently for good reasons. With the power of monopolies also comes the responsibility not to stifle competition.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709712)

Dude, you have no clue. It is not illegal for any company to provide a complete browser/os/etc solution unless they are a monopoly and including a browser undercuts competition in a significant way because of the monopoly status of the company including the software (microsoft).

Before you start throwing around accusations of people being hypocrites, you should a least have some understanding of what you are talking about. Since MS does have a monopoly on the desktop, they are treated differently because they are in a position to entirely wipe out competition just by including a browser (or media player) even if their competition is better. There is no level playing field for browsers when ms is involved because their os is the playing field. That is why they must be artificially constrained in ways the other companies are not.

Get a clue, please.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (3, Interesting)

ewhac (5844) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709745)

Two factors invalidate your claim:

  1. Cobind and other Linux distros are not a monopoly. Thus, exclusive bundling, though perhaps short-sighted, is not illegal. Once you're a monopoly, the rules change.
  2. Microsoft has made much hash of the claim that their browser is "integrated" with the OS and cannot be removed, and that if you try to remove it the system will fall over dead. Linux does not suffer from such a design handicap. Mozilla is not "integrated" into Linux. You can swap out the browser freely and the rest of the system will not care. Thus, forced bundling is not taking place as it is with Windows -- no one is forced to keep Mozilla around if they don't want it.

Schwab
Blithely ignoring the Do Not Feed The Trolls sign

Integration is superior. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709817)

Ask any structural or mechanical engineer. A unit is strongest when it composed of as little separate bolt-on items as possible.

Same goes with OSes. When an item is part and parcel with the whole, the entire product is stronger, and resists snapping. It can flex, and spring back.

Bolt-on methodology in software writing is flawed. The tenets apply, just like in metallurgy.

Re:Integration is superior. (1)

ewhac (5844) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710188)

That has got to be one of the stupidest damn things I've ever read.

The hallmark of superior software design is flexibility, not rigidity. Rigid systems keel over at the slightest provocation, unanticipated conditions being the most typical (out of disk, out of RAM, bad input from operator, dropped connection, power fluctuation, installed new mouse driver, etc.) If your system cannot tolerate substitution of a component with a compatible alternative, then your system is, by definition, fragile, and sooner or later is going to go toes-up on you.

Your thesis is also manifestly disproved by the very thing you hope to defend. By (pretending to) integrate the browser with Windows, they massively destabilized the system.

Schwab

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709786)

If you feel the evil Cobind is trying to commit acts of outgagious anti-competive acts in order to maintain their monopoly... then might I sugest you try a little known product from Microsoft called Windows.

Re:So they illegally BUNDLED Mozilla? (-1)

Vint Cerf (713706) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710288)

hul'l auuh lauuahh? lll ul ahluaa lh. ua ughl gllhuaa agllug hhuga lguu au haghul gaagulu, uuug huha ugha haaglh hag uuuhl lggluaglg ulullaaa, gh hhula ulh.

hu lla uh uu hgllh ll lghlgghgulgh.

Why cobind, and not news on one of the other... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709592)

thousand of distro that have been around for a while. So much fanfare for a distro that was not even available for download yesterday, and SRPMS not available due to bandwidth limitations. (I wanted to test drive it after reading about it on distrowatch 03.26)

Suspicious, but then again, I might be paranoid.

IE is ILLEGALLY locked out. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709629)

I hope the EU and the DoJ prosecute this distro for using a monopolistic practice.

Screenshots (1, Insightful)

startxxx (733595) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709635)

What's the deal with the screenshots show off, where they show you how nice is gnome, gaim, firefox and openoffice? Shouldn't they show off what they actually wrote?

Re:Screenshots (2, Informative)

BiggyP (466507) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709942)

that'd be XFCE and Abiword, they don't include Openoffice.org

slashdotted already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709640)

here's a mirror: http://lm.pleaseeat.us/cobind_desktop_x86_0.1/iso/ desktop-0.1-disc1.iso

WARNING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709689)

Not a pretty site there. Something about the GNAA.

Re:WARNING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709744)

uh, what? mod grandparent up, parent is a troll.

Re:WARNING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709806)

Is it just me or is does the text

GNAA > j00

fristage postage is mine


suggest that its not a legit mirror?

Re:WARNING (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709932)

i think you're a fucking idiot and you should go back to modding up trolls in the microsoft PR story.

Oh, well that's alright then (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709660)

The log in screen is somewhat confusing. You are asked to double click on the username, though when doing so, it results in clearing the log in box instead of placing your name. I had to actually click on the username several times before being prompted for what I believe was a password. Though I believe this is actually just a bug.

Well, if it's just a bug that must be OK, at least its not a feature.

reviewer doesn't know what a gui is... (2, Insightful)

Drantin (569921) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709670)

an ncurses interface *is* a GUI, it's got buttons, windows, etc. What he seems to mean is that it doesn't have gpm running during the install, nor does it use an X-window, directfb or similar program with the installer.

a non-gui interface would be one in which you use a command line and have to type all the arguements and paths there...

Re:reviewer doesn't know what a gui is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709953)

No, you don't know what a GUI is. Text Mode != GUI by definition.

I don't think this should be on slashdot (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709672)

Cobind Desktop takes a remarkable turn from other Linux distributions by being one of the first to include Mozilla Firefox 0.8 and Mozilla Thunderbird in their first release.

How is that remarkable? I'm sure if Firefox and Thunderbird were around when Slackware or Debian 1.0 were created they would have included them.

He mentions how the entire design concept of Cobind Desktop is based on a book called the Paradox of Choice

So this distro set's itself apart by including less packages, then allowing users to download any more that they want.

As far as i can tell from reading the article, it's based on fedora, but has less packages, and a few more bugs. It fits on one cd, and doesn't ask you to select packages.

I really don't see a niche for this distro. It seems like the bastard child of a Live CD and a full distro, not really doing either well.

Re:I don't think this should be on slashdot (1)

Orien (720204) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709856)

As much as I hate responding to an AC, I have to agree with you. My first thought was "great, just what the OSS community needs, ANOTHER Linux startup". Seriously, call me a cynic but I can't see how this can possibly help an already fragmented community. It seems to me like this is just some people who wanted to start a consulting business so they make thier own distro and get a /. story about it. Instant publicity. If they REALLY wanted to help the community they would put thier skills to good use helping an existing distro. There are plenty of them already that focus on a 'lightweight' feel. Did you see that PayPal donate button on thier site? Does anyone else have a problem with that? Hey, I made my own customized Knoppix CD, maybe I should put a donation button on my homepage.

Re:I don't think this should be on slashdot (2, Interesting)

DarkSarin (651985) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709954)

having looked at the article, I don't know where this distro fits in:

its not as whiz-bang good as Xandros/Mandrake/etc.
it isn't as easy to install as lindows.
it isn't as customizeable as gentoo/debian/etc.
Lacks the choices of packages/desktops/etc of all of the above.

Maybe it has perfect printer/sound/video support out of the box? That would, at least, be something.

Personally, I think that so many distros is cool, but guys, try to at least come up with a cool name/theme for your distro. I bet most people would love a fire linux (all fire themes, etc) (I can think of a few others too, but hey, so can you...).

Re:I don't think this should be on slashdot (2, Insightful)

petabyte (238821) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710172)

Did you see that PayPal donate button on thier site? Does anyone else have a problem with that? Hey, I made my own customized Knoppix CD, maybe I should put a donation button on my homepage.

Well there's nothing stopping you. Why are you complaining about this? If you don't like Distro X, don't run Distro X. If you don't like (Gnome || KDE || XFCE || Window Manger X) don't run it. And if you don't think the guy deserves money for this distro then don't give it to him.

If they REALLY wanted to help the community they would put thier skills to good use helping an existing distro. There are plenty of them already that focus on a 'lightweight' feel.

Did it ever occur to you that perhaps he didn't want to contribute to another distro. He made his own to fit what he wanted. People in OSS generally do what they want to or what they're paid to do. If he wants to build his own distro that's his option.

Re:I don't think this should be on slashdot (2, Insightful)

Brandybuck (704397) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710121)

So this distro set's itself apart by including less packages, then allowing users to download any more that they want.

Excellent idea! I've seen more than a few newbies frustrated by the myriad choices that SuSE (as just one example) threw at them. If you can't fit the full distro with packages on a single CD, you're doing something wrong.

XFCE? What the fuck? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709730)

KDE 3.2 is the only way to go for serious desktop use. Seriously, what kind of person is attracted to this sort of rubbish?

Oh well, at least they didn't use GNOME. Don't get me started on that bloated piece of shit.

Concerned about Alphas (4, Insightful)

Ridgelift (228977) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709736)

This 0.1 version of the Cobind Desktop is an alpha release. That means that it has only been tested on a limited number of different hardware platforms and peripherals.

It seems there's a lot of "news" lately around software that's alpha and even pre-alpha. Maybe folks should remember that Linus never pushed Linux, it grew as small, incremental improvements were made.

It's easy to make a lot of noise about software you're going to write. It's a lot harder to be quiet and write software that will someday make a lot of noise.

Re:Concerned about Alphas (2, Interesting)

robbyjo (315601) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709826)

It's easy to make a lot of noise about software you're going to write. It's a lot harder to be quiet and write software that will someday make a lot of noise.

That's right... It would come out worse if the users caught the fanfare but later be disappointed for the lack of features / stability / what have you... IMHO, it's harder to regain someone's trust than to obtain it in the first place.

President and Founder, no less (2, Funny)

melted (227442) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709739)

Who is this guy and why does he capitalize these words? Can I become President and Founder, too, just because I know how to recompile linux kernel and install KDE on top of it?

offtopic - dreamhost (-1, Offtopic)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709760)

Does anyone know what the FUCK is going on with Dreamhost web hosting?

I have a number of client's sites hosted with them and none of their servers are responding to pinging or visible on tracert.

Anyone know what is happening? I have been scouring the web for info to no avail.

Funny that... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709762)

Funny that I'm a member of the Western-Pennsylvania Linux Users Group [wplug.org] (which serves Pittsburgh, PA... the home town of this distro), and this is the first I've heard of it.

Too bad they haven't been involved in the local *nix community so far as I can tell.

Re:Funny that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709796)

Sorry, we forgot to email the hixnix community.

XFCE vs. KDE (4, Insightful)

hak1du (761835) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709763)

Though Cobind Desktop only uses XFce and not the more popular KDE, it's entire design is based on a clutter free workspace.

That should be:

Because Cobind Desktop only uses XFce and not the more popular KDE, it's entire design is based on a clutter free workspace.


Among the different desktops, KDE has to be the most cluttered ("featureful"), by design and by choice. Some people like that, I suppose, but XFCE is a reaction against that kind of approach to building desktop environments.

Re:XFCE vs. KDE (2, Funny)

7-Vodka (195504) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709983)

Features?
We ain't got no features.
We don't need no features!
We don't need to show you no stinkin features!!

Tell ya what man. Why don't you do a console log in, then type "XFree86". Biiiingo :)

Re:XFCE vs. KDE (2, Insightful)

Brandybuck (704397) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710098)

I haven't used XFCE, but last time I looked at it, it was a CDE clone. To me that says "clutter". A busy control panel and icons that minimize to the desktop is visual clutter.

Hopefully they haven't cloned too many of CDE's mistakes...

Re:XFCE vs. KDE (1)

Homology (639438) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710278)

I haven't used XFCE, but last time I looked at it, it was a CDE clone. To me that says "clutter". A busy control panel and icons that minimize to the desktop is visual clutter.

Hopefully they haven't cloned too many of CDE's mistakes...

Just give it a try. It's a nice desktop that works well on older hardware, like my PII laptop. However, the panel and taskbar is not integrated, which is a shame since I'm wasting some screen real estate.....

Re:XFCE vs. KDE (2, Insightful)

Erwos (553607) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710301)

I totally agree. XFCE is pretty much the ONLY choice for a computer 200mhz 128mb RAM. GNOME and KDE absolutely crawl, and just TRY opening Mozilla with them. You'll be lucky if you don't overflow your swap space and crash X.

-Erwos

Re:XFCE vs. KDE (1)

destiney (149922) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710318)


XFCE is pretty much the ONLY choice for a computer 200mhz 128mb RAM.

I have 10 words for you:

black box

choice? (1)

my sig is bigger tha (682562) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709766)

from the USA today piece, the thing that strikes me is that there's all these choices but none of them mean much - with 80 different pain killers, at some point it becomes about packaging.

which means that some of us spend a lot of time figuring out what is meaningful difference and what isn't.

why does this make me think of the 2 party system?

Off topic -- 2-party system (1, Offtopic)

Latent Heat (558884) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710205)

The 2-party system isn't really written into the U.S. Constitution -- I guess it is something that has evolved over the years. The 2-party system seems limiting in choice (hence the Green Party, the Libertarians, and others who complain about the two main parties), but it has some merits when you consider the alternatives.

One alternative is a one-party system -- we all learned in school in the U.S. on how terrible the Soviet system was that they had only one party, and I grew up in Chicago, which with many other big cities really only had one party. Apart from the anti-Communist propaganda telling us how bad it is, what is does a political party even do when there is only one party? In Chicago, the one party was both a political party as well as a kind of social welfare system: kind of like Hamas.

In Soviet Russia (please, no "in Soviet Russia" jokes), I don't have any direct experience, but as far as I can tell it worked like some kinds of committee structures in an American university. The Party was not the government, it was not the military, it was not industry nor agriculture, and it was not a labor union, but it supervised all of those institutions to make sure that they were run according to "scientific socialist" principles. I imagine the Party was resented by people in government, military, industry, and other places just trying to do their jobs because it was a kind of oversight that a lot of people dedicated to their jobs could do without -- a lot like what takes place in universities.

The multi-party system, however, would have a Liberal Party, a Conservative Party, a Green Party, a Libertarian Party, a Labor Party, a Civil Rights Party, and so on. The problem with a multi-party system is forming a majority government -- think Israel where they have two major parties but they have to suck up to religious parties to form a government.

The two party system means that you stack the deck against minority parties to narrow it down to just two parties so one or other party is sure of having a governing majority. The two parties don't really offer much in the way of choice unless you think Coke and Pepsi represents choice. But on the other hand, the two parties compete for the center of the voting electorate, and the two parties act as critics of each other to expose gross wrong doing. Kerry and Bush are not really that different because they are all part of the same political culture, but they represent themselves as polar opposites to rally their respective core supporters, but they are careful to position themselves for the middle when they govern so having Kerry in office or Bush in office is not going to change all of that much. But that is the goal, to have a stable equalibrium of two parties competing for the center rather than the anarchy and travails of a multi-party democracy.

Hey! Guess what? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8709776)

I just got raped by a goat! I thought it was supposed to be the other way around!

Landmark in Distro Releases (1)

Tokerat (150341) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709859)


Cobind Desktop takes a remarkable turn from other Linux distributions by being one of the first to include Mozilla Firefox 0.8 and Mozilla Thunderbird in their first release.
...other distro leaders and organizers complained "Well, we couldn't exactly include them in our first release because they wern't out yet!" to which the Slashdot community replied "Excuses, excuses."

(This has been a Daily Show moment with your buddy, Tokerat)

Vector Linux and FireBird (1)

GrassMunk (677765) | more than 10 years ago | (#8709935)

uh Vector linux has been out much longer than this and its had Firebird AND its minimalist. Just cause the guys who made the distro didnt mention that damn book they dont get on the main ./ page. How moronic

Wow! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8710132)

by being one of the first to include Mozilla Firefox 0.8 and Mozilla Thunderbird in their first release.

Holy Fucking Shit! That's remarkable!

high-performance and Nautilus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8710177)

high-performance Linux platform designed with the average user in mind. Using XFce and Nautilus...

Nautilus being combined with the term "high-performance"? Are they on crack?! My experience with Nautilus is that it is anything but a performance application. I thought it performed worse than konqueror which is a beast as well. Both look great and are very versatile and useful. But they're pretty slow and unresponsive in general. Even if I call Nautilus with --nodesktop or whatever that switch was.

Now when choosing a Linux distro (2, Funny)

danharan (714822) | more than 10 years ago | (#8710216)

...you have one more choice: a distro with less choices.

And you wonder why sticking with XP for now seems like a sensible solution?
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