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Ars Technica Looks At GNOME 2.6 [updated]

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the standing-in-the-garden-with-a-gun dept.

GNOME 336

The Original Yama writes "Ars Technica takes a look inside the GNOME 2.6 Desktop & Developer Platform, due for release any minute now. It builds upon an earlier review of the GNOME 2.5 development series and their own examination of GNOME 2.4." darthcamaro writes "internetnews.com is running a story about the release of GNOME 2.6 today. They actually got a hold of Miguel de Icaza who had some real interesting stuff to say about it and the Linux Desktop in general. 'de Icaza told internetnews.com that a simpler interface has been the goal of GNOME since at least version 2.0.'" Update: 03/31 21:59 GMT by T : sn0wman3030 was one of many submitters to link to the GNOME 2.6 start page, including links to screenshots, documentation, and source downloads.

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Someone explain this to me, please. (-1, Offtopic)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725571)

What's the relationship between Ars Technica and Slashdot? I have the Ars Technica RSS feed on the rightmost column for my customized Slashdot homepage and I visit that site regularly. Hence, I knew about this article for a while. Doing a search for technica [slashdot.org] reveals that slashdot links to that site frequently, yet in terms of content they deliver the same kind of news. It'd be like the New York Times having an article saying "Washington Post Reviews Gnome 2.6!"... Something doesn't add up.

Re:Someone explain this to me, please. (5, Insightful)

Rick Zeman (15628) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725623)

Doing a search for technica reveals that slashdot links to that site frequently, yet in terms of content they deliver the same kind of news

Slashdot doesn't create content, but just links to articles. Slashdot is a portal; its only content are the user comments. Ars does great work and their articles are their content. Their stuff is definitely "News For Nerds. Stuff That Matters."

Hey Rick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725638)

...are you still shilling for the Macinotsh on Netware?

Re:Hey Rick (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725739)

Naw, I gave that up to work selling small boys into white slavery. You'd be amazed at how much my macintosh experience helps with my new line of work!

Re:Hey Rick (0, Offtopic)

Rick Zeman (15628) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725787)

...are you still shilling for the Macinotsh on Netware?

LMAO! That's been known to happen. :) And behind the AC curtain you are....?

Re:Someone explain this to me, please. (1, Insightful)

dealsites (746817) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725694)

Yes, your statement is true. While I could go to all the different sites to find my daily news, I try to save time by going to Slashdot. They link to different news articles that II may interested in. They've recently linked to techjapan, ars technia, and toms hardware. I'm sure those site publish great articles that Slashdot doesn't always pick up on, but Slashdot does provide a general overview.

On a similar note, I used to visit all the deal websites each day to make sure I don't miss out on a hot sale. To save time, I started this page [dealsites.net] to collect them all in real time. Anyone can use it and search deals from multiple websites. Clicking a link takes you to the orginating web page. So I guess I'm running a portal like Slashdot by merely linking to other sites.

Re:Someone explain this to me, please. (2, Insightful)

use_compress (627082) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725891)

The difference between ./ and Technica is that slashdot can bring down Technica whenever it wants.

The Infantryman (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725633)

The average age of the Infantryman is 19 years.
He is a short-haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country.
He never really cared for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his fathers, but he has never collected unemployment, either.
He's a recent high school graduate, he was probably an average student, pursued some form of sport activity, drives a ten year old car and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away.
He listens to rock and roll, or hip hop, or jazz or rap and 155 mm Howitzers.
He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working and fighting from before dawn to well after dusk.
He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the dark.
He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively of he must.
He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.
He can march until he is told to stop or stop until he is told to march.
He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity.
He is self-sufficient. He has two sets of fatigues; he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry.
He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle.
He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes and fix his own hurts. If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food. He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.
He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands. He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job.
He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay and still find ironic humor in it all. He has seen more suffering and death then he should have in his short lifetime.
He has stood atop mountains of dead bodies, and helped to creat them.
He feels every note of the National athem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to 'square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their hat, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.
Just as his father did, grandfather and great-grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom.
Beardless or not, he is not a boy.
He is the American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.
He has asked nothing in return except our friendship and understanding.
Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood.

Re:Someone explain this to me, please. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725903)

When was the last time a release of Windows was delayed by a security intrusion?

Will Slashdotters continue to make fun of Microsoft security when GNOME, Debian, Gentoo, GNU/FSF, and more have all been hacked in the span of the last six months?

USB (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725574)

It would help if it had USB support.

Re:USB (3, Insightful)

altp (108775) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725598)

USB support is done via the drivers and kernel not Gnome, GTK, KDE, QT or any other Desktop environment ortoolkit .

Re:USB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725635)

OK, but I can't seem to be able to use my digital camera with Linux and it is driving me nuts.

Re:USB (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725642)

use a real OS like Windows XP

or you can listen to the Linux zealots explain in about 60 steps how to recompile your kernel and configure the USB drivers

Re:USB (1)

andy666 (666062) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725655)

I am not sure if you are trollin' me, but it is true that multimedia is a challenging area for open software development. Standards and hardware change and there are a lot of products out there to contend with writing drivers for.

Re:USB (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725675)

and yet Windows and Mac OS seem not to have the same problems.

always willing to blame everyone but yourselves

Re:USB (4, Interesting)

functor (31042) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725704)

Look for things like hotplug, HAL Project, the D-BUS Project, the kernel events layer and other components of Project Utopia to get you things like automagic USB device identification, driver loading and GUI events.

Hopefully we'll see something in GNOME 2.8/2.10/3.0 that'll use this stuff.

(See http://www.freedesktop.org; lots of cool stuff going on behind the scenes.)

See http://tech9.net/rml/talks/rml_fosdem_2004.sxi for more info.

Re:USB (1)

alex_tibbles (754541) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725803)

not to mention udev
(now in unstable debian).

Re:USB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725955)

So you are saying early 2005 we finally get our usb keys to "just work".

Default installs of the rpm "hand holding" distros still can't get mounting and unmounting CDROMs right... it is fustrating. I swap CDs in and out like a devil when I am working on stuff that I have archived ages ago, mp3s off various CDs etc. It just sucks when you put in a new CD and it takes over 30 seconds (fairly old comp athlon 1800XP, CDR and DVD on ata) to do the most simple task of reading a new removable media... DOS with floppys was better than this.

Seriously, I don't want to troll but I have to here. From 1991 to 2004 you would think that some of the bigger linux distros (mandrake and fedora) could get CDROMs working at optimal speed. Is it something to do with windows have assembly (I am ignorant of programming) and linux being available for multiple arches that makes linux so slow to do this? Or is linux (the kernel) fast and some bloated automount script isn't waking up to the fact that a new CD is in the drive fast enough?

There is no way I can get my parents or other family to switch if I go red faced in front of them when changing CDs doesn't work and have to drop into the console to mount them manually.

IS IT CHILLY IN HERE, OR IS IT JUST ME?? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725578)

cause this post is FROSTY!!

or as Dean would say:

*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_
d_______________________________________________d_ _
e_/_____\_____________\____________/____\_______e_ _
a|_______|_____________\__________|______|______a_ _
n|_______`._____________|_________|_______:_____n_ _
s`________|_____________|________\|_______|_____s_ _
e_\_______|_/_______/__\\\___--___\\_______:____e_ _
x__\______\/____--~~__________~--__|_\_____|____x_ _
*___\______\_-~____________________~-_\____|____*_ _
d____\______\_________.--------.______\|___|____d_ _
e______\_____\______//_________(_(__>__\___|____e_ _
a_______\___.__C____)_________(_(____>__|__/____a_ _
n_______/\_|___C_____)/YAARRR\_(_____>__|_/_____n_ _
s______/_/\|___C_____)RRRRRRR|__(___>___/__\____s_ _
e_____|___(____C_____)\RRRGGH/__//__/_/_____\___e_ _
x_____|____\__|_____\\_________//_(__/_______|__x_ _
*____|_\____\____)___`----___--'_____________|__*_ _
d____|__\______________\_______/____________/_|_d_ _
e___|______________/____|_____|__\____________|_e_ _
a___|_____________|____/_______\__\___________|_a_ _
n___|__________/_/____|_________|__\___________|n_ _
s___|_________/_/______\__/\___/____|__________|s_ _
e__|_________/_/________|____|_______|_________|e_ _
x__|__________|_________|____|_______|_________|x_ _
*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_d_e_a_n_s_e_x_*_


Impotent Stuff: Please try to to avoid looking like a complete buffoon and ignoramous to the entire country you jackass. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

Impotent Stuff: Please try to keep campaign on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

Impotent Stuff: Please try to keep posts on topic. Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads. Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said. Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about. Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moderated posts, by adjusting your threshold on the User Preferences Page) If you want replies to your comments sent to you, consider logging in or creating an account.

THE INFANTRYMAN (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725674)

The average age of the Infantryman is 19 years.
He is a short-haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country.
He never really cared for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his fathers, but he has never collected unemployment, either.
He's a recent high school graduate, he was probably an average student, pursued some form of sport activity, drives a ten year old car and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away.
He listens to rock and roll, or hip hop, or jazz or rap and 155 mm Howitzers.
He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working and fighting from before dawn to well after dusk.
He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the dark.
He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively of he must.
He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.
He can march until he is told to stop or stop until he is told to march.
He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity.
He is self-sufficient. He has two sets of fatigues; he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry.
He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle.
He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes and fix his own hurts. If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food. He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.
He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands. He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job.
He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay and still find ironic humor in it all. He has seen more suffering and death then he should have in his short lifetime.
He has stood atop mountains of dead bodies, and helped to create them.
He feels every note of the National athem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to 'square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their hat, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.
Just as his father did, grandfather and great-grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom.
Beardless or not, he is not a boy.
He is the American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.
He has asked nothing in return except our friendship and understanding.
Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood.

Spatial Nautilus (3, Interesting)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725597)

Incidentally, I'm testing it out as we speak. The Spatial Nautilus is very very annoying - it's much like the default Windows behaviour of popping up zillions of windows that you always have to turn off every time you reinstall Windows.

Yes, I'm going to go back to kde 3.2.1 Not because of the spatial nautilus that I can disable, but because of the missing "column list" viewing mode in Nautilus. I'm the kind of guy that wants to see as much stuff as possible w/ one glance, without needing to focus my eyes too much.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (4, Informative)

functor (31042) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725636)

O_o

View menu -> View as List.

Resize window as needed.

Oh, look, it's a detailed columnized view.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (4, Interesting)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725664)

Oh, look, it's a detailed columnized view.

It's not the same thing. I don't want to see the details, I want to see lots of items in a small space.

Zooming out doesn't do the trick either, because then the file names are under the icons, not right of the icons like in KDE column list mode. If the icon is just left of the file name, you can cram more objects in the same space.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (5, Informative)

Figaro (20471) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725812)

Oh...for that you go to the "File Management" preferences and set "Text Beside Icons".

You could also turn on "Compact Layout", but that's pretty ugly.

+1, informative (2, Interesting)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725921)

Oh...for that you go to the "File Management" preferences and set "Text Beside Icons".

You could also turn on "Compact Layout", but that's pretty ugly.


Thanks for the tip, I feel much more at home already :-). Another view mode would have been more intuitive, but what the heck.

Now, I might even be giving that spatial thing another shot...

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1)

afd8856 (700296) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725829)

let's not forget that konqueror already "kinda" support the "spatial navigation" - right click, open in new tab. That is, if you realy care to see all the directories in separate windows. This feature is really handy, especially if one of the tabs is an FTP or whatever conection...

I wonder why don't they (GNOME people) work on integrating their existing infrastructure - like VFS support in any app, embedable apps like KParts in KDE, etc, there are too many issues - and only work to transform their desktop into a clone of MacOSX. I think that KDE is more suited to me as a simple user than GNOME, whose target is enterprise.

Disclaimer: I'm a KDE fan and user.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (4, Informative)

horza (87255) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725869)

Why not use ROX [sourceforge.net] ? It works equally well under KDE and Gnome, maximises use of screen estate, automatically switches to small icons at a configurable point, and one click switches between icon and detailed list view. It's also blindingly fast. Seriously, try it.

Phillip.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1)

superjaded (617714) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725902)

I want to see lots of items in a small space

You mean enabling "Use compact layout" and "Text beside icons" doesn't suffice it for you? I can see ~15 items in the default-sized spatial window at 100% (or ~35 at 50%), which is quite a bit, IMO.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725643)

Three things:

1) Spatial nautilus is disablable.
2) Even in spatial nautilus, you can close parent windows as you browse by middleclicking (that might require a pref change - not sure).
3) The "column list" viewing mode is called 'list mode'.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (2, Funny)

linolium (713219) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725648)

I've never tried it, but I can't see why they would do it... I really hated it when Windows used that spatial thing. But, you know, I think the Gnome team would have done a bunch of research before they changed something as significant as this, so I don't think I have to worry about it being unefficient or anything. It's just getting used to it that will be a problem. ;)

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1, Funny)

pldms (136522) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725653)

I'm the kind of guy that wants to see as much stuff as possible w/ one glance, without needing to focus my eyes too much.
What, the partially sighted kind of guy?

Have we become so lazy that flexing a lens sounds tiring?

Re:Spatial Nautilus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725718)

The Spatial Nautilus is very very annoying - it's much like the default Windows behaviour of popping up zillions of windows that you always have to turn off every time you reinstall Windows.

What the hell is that supposed to mean exactly? You can set explorer to open each folder in the same window? Is that it? I am confused. Everytime you reinstall windows? Huh?

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725764)

You can set explorer to open each folder in the same window? Is that it? I am confused. Everytime you reinstall windows? Huh?

I apologize the confusing wording I used. I meant that Windows explorer/file manager opens new windows by default, and you have to turn off that feature every time you reinstall windows.

Everybody I know turns it off, and I wonder why Microsoft chose the wrong behaviour as the default.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725800)

Ah, yes now I gotcha. That is obnoxious, whenever I install a fresh copy of win2k I have this set of a gazillions options that I instinctively set including personalized menus (god i hate those), displaying known file extensions, all that crapola, tweaking the toolbar so the address bar, essential buttons, and menus are all on one single top row, etc.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (1)

DCMonkey (615) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726025)

It hasn't done that by default since Windows 95 (ie: almost 9 YEARS AGO!). Maybe NT 4.0 did it too, but still...

Re:Spatial Nautilus (4, Informative)

Shillo (64681) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725794)

> The Spatial Nautilus is very very annoying - it's much like the default Windows behaviour of popping up zillions of windows that you always have to turn off every time you reinstall Windows.

Double-middle-click (or double-right-click, I'm not sure) on a directory closes the current window and pops the new one. This de-annoyifies Nautilus quite a bit. :)

--

Re:Spatial Nautilus (3, Insightful)

drivers (45076) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725881)

Double-middle-click (or double-right-click, I'm not sure) on a directory closes the current window and pops the new one. This de-annoyifies Nautilus quite a bit. :)

I was disgusted when I read that in the article. That is rediculous. Expecting users to get used to using an alternate button just for their app... and if you happen to be thinking about the task at hand instead of the UI you'll end up making mode mistakes. Who let this through? Aren't there UI standards in projects like these?

Oh yea. (1, Flamebait)

FreeLinux (555387) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725960)

I totally agree! But, I expect some moron to start yabbering on about how great Gnome is because they concentrate on a quality UI and have a HIG.

It's great to have a standard and to require your apps to follow that standard but, when the standard is bizarre, counter intuitive, or just stinks that makes you UI and apps....

Re:Spatial Nautilus (2, Interesting)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725970)

Double-middle-click (or double-right-click, I'm not sure) on a directory closes the current window and pops the new one. This de-annoyifies Nautilus quite a bit. :)

Sounds reasonable if you are using a mouse. I like to navigate w/ keyboard - what's the tactic there?

Re:Spatial Nautilus (2, Informative)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725997)

Sounds reasonable if you are using a mouse. I like to navigate w/ keyboard - what's the tactic there?

Whoops, apparently there is C-S-w to do this. Not the easiest possible combo.

Too bad it only seems to kill parent folders, not all the folders.

Re:Spatial Nautilus (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726009)

run:
gconf-editor

goto /apps/nautilus/preferences/always_use_browser

enable this option

"If set to true, then all Nautilus windows will be browser windows. This is how Nautilus used to behave before version 2.6, and some people prefer this behavior. "

you get the old nautilus back by default :)

A simpler interface... (0, Troll)

Derek Mason (767027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725604)

Geez I wish those GNOME developers would spare a thought for us Mac-heads - it's bad enough getting used to control-clicking but trying to work out what three different mouse buttons do makes my head spin. Preferably: remove the command line too.

The Infantryman (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725605)

The average age of the Infantryman is 19 years.
He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered
by society as half man,half boy.
Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country.
He never really cared much for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his father's
but he has never collected unemployment either.

He's a recent High School graduate
He was probably an average student,pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy,and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away.
He listens to rock and roll or hip hop or rap or jazz or swing and 155mm Howitzers.
He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or fighting from before dawn to well after dusk.

He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less-in the dark.
He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenadelauncher and use either one effectively if he must.
He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.
He can march until he is told to stop or stop until he is told to march.
He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity.

He is self-sufficient.
He has two sets of fatigues
He washes one and wears the other.
He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry.
He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle.
He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own hurts.
If you're thirsty, he'll share his water with you
If you are hungry, his food.
He'll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.
He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands.
He can save your life - or take it, because that is his job.

He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay and still find ironic humor in it all.
He has seen more suffering and death then he should have in his short lifetime.
He has stood atop mountains of dead bodies, and helped to create them.
He has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and is unashamed.
He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to 'square-away' those around him who haven't bothered to stand, remove their hat, or even stop talking.
In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.

Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-grandfather,
He is paying the price for our freedom.
Beardless or not, he is not a boy.

He is the American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.
He has asked nothing in return, except our friendship and understanding.

Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood.

Re:The Infantryman (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725696)

-1 Offtopic? HOW ABOUT +1, PATRIOTIC YOU HALF ASSED SHAME OF AN AMERICAN PIECE OF SHIT

Lameness filter encountered. Post aborted!
Reason: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING.

Iraqi Freedom Fighters just blew up 5 of those! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725773)

Haw, Haw.

Iraqi Freedom Fighters just blew 5 imperialists into tiny peices of meat!

Those one's won't be able to come home in a box, perhaps a plastic sack will hold what's left them though.

Re:Iraqi Freedom Fighters just blew up 5 of those! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725887)

YHBT, idiot.

I Like Gnome (5, Interesting)

Goo.cc (687626) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725608)

I am a Mac OS X user and I have to say that I think that the UI of Gnome is appealing. If I was still using NetBSD, I would probably run it. (Hell, maybe I'll install YellowDog Linux and give it a try.)

Re:I Like Gnome (2, Insightful)

bsharitt (580506) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725740)

I've always found tthe Gnome UI(in the 2.x series) to be quite clean and professional, and it happens that I'm a Mac user too. KDE just seems to be trying to be Windows way too much, although it is improving too.

(btw- why is the parent a troll? He's just complementing to DE the article is about)

Re:I Like Gnome (2, Insightful)

the_2nd_coming (444906) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725848)

to me...KDE while having a lot of features and tweeakables...is way to messy. Gnome on the other hand has decided to go down the road of OS X with an HIG and simpler is better and integration is paramount(and by integration I mean the tools as part of the Desktop environment, not necessarily a modular design like Kparts)

Looks like a Mac (2, Informative)

bwindle2 (519558) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725631)

Does abody else think the screen shots look an aweful lot like Classic Mac OS?

Re:Looks like a Mac (1)

pyros (61399) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725807)

GNOME has been looking like Mac since Ximian GNOME 1.4 (not sure what pure GNOME 1.4 looked like, but I'm guessing not much different)

Re:Looks like a Mac (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725857)

Yes. Nautilus and the old Finder are both spatial.

Re:Looks like a Mac (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725895)

Yes. Nautilus and the old Finder are both spatial. um, that doesn't show up in screenshots, genius.

that's like looking at a screenshot of an OS and saying "It looks fast!"

Will 2.6 make Sarge? (2, Interesting)

bjarvis354 (319402) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725644)

I am excited about the prospect of GNOME 2.6 making its way into Debian Sarge. with gnome 2.6 could be a really powerful desktop for more than a few years...Which is probably how long it will take Debian to release again...And I am sure if 2.6 made it to testing, it would push back Sarge's release date.

Re:Will 2.6 make Sarge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725757)

not a chance. We'll be lucky if kde 3.2.1 makes it.

Re:Will 2.6 make Sarge? (2, Informative)

gid (5195) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725821)

It's already been said that 2.6 will likely not make it into Sarge.

Personally I hate it when Debian prepares for releases, it means I have to wait until the release is made until I get new software in sid again. :(

Re:Will 2.6 make Sarge? (1)

bjarvis354 (319402) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725940)

I hear you there. Why I would love for 2.6 to make Sarge, what I really want is 2.6 in unstable.

I am watching the status of the packages in experemental [debian.org] hoping the packages may go into unstable soon...

Re:Will 2.6 make Sarge? (1)

alex_tibbles (754541) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725836)

GNOME 2.6 going into experimental [debian.org] . If it is stable (unlike GIMP 2.0, in my experience, and KDE 3.2.0, by report of the debian maintainer).

When will 2.6 make Gentoo? (1)

mcc (14761) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725856)

A related question. I have been of late working with a Gentoo install. Once GNOME 2.6 is released, on what timescale will the 2.6 packages (and the new Epiphany, yum) show up in a normal emerge -u world? Like, are we talking minutes? Days? Weeks? Months?

When does the Gentoo community/coderbase tend to consider such things reading for unmasking?

As a KDE user.... (3, Interesting)

armando_wall (714879) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725645)

I'll give Gnome 2.6 a try. I find it more appealing as its team releases more versions. Its GTK library is one of my favorites to develop with. But I always got a "something is missing" impression with it (the desktop).

Besides, I know KDE is free software, but I think Gnome is "more free" for all platforms to use (ducks).

Re:As a KDE user.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725737)

if "more free" was an issue anyone cared about, Windows and MacOS wouldn't be so popular. Nobody gives a shit.

Re:As a KDE user.... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725756)

Freedom doesn't count if you can't use it ... neither GNOME or KDE work on non-Unix/Linux platforms, but KDE is a lot closer than GNOME to that possibility.

Re:As a KDE user.... (-1, Flamebait)

rmull (26174) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726004)

Its GTK library is one of my favorites to develop with.
Are you mad? I suggest you take a serious look at the development options for your desktop environ of choice.

Re:F[irst (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725734)

Please, tell us more. I like big boobs and wet pussy.

New stuff (-1, Flamebait)

Espectr0 (577637) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725665)

File selector, after 4 years, finally it doesn't suck (and it's even a gnome thing but a gtk one)
Spatial nautilus, annoying to me. Good thing i can disable it.
Better performance in gnome-vfs. Not more the horrid performance of 2.4.
Improved epiphany. Bah. Back to firefox

Not much else. Back to kde for me

A question? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725666)

Isn't Miguel De Icaza gay???

and Ximian is far better than gnome. It has much more of a queer eye apearance. if you know what I mean *wink wink*

Re:A question? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725765)

yes he is gay, but does it matter?

Slashdot readers like to claim to use software based on technical correctness, equality (anyone can contribute), etc. Sure, he likes to suck dick, but the code he writes is high quality.

Mod parent up! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725925)

Hahahaha! Die cocksuckers, die!

Re:A question? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726007)

He uses Linux, doesn't he?

Linux Predictions. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725678)

I have a prediction:

20% of posts will be about random crap about linux moving into the future.

30% of the posts will be about why KDE and/or Windows has such a superior interface and how they can't understand why people care about Gnome and why gnome sucks in general.

10% Of posts will be people disecting and ridiculing a minor feature that they may potentially find unpleasent or a feature that is lacking.

15% Of posts will be comments on how Linux has lots of work to get into the desktop market and they have to do so and so just to be a acceptable desktop OS for people who don't give a f*ck in the first place about what sort of OS they use.

5% Of posts will be about how cool 2.6 Gnome is and how cool Linux is in general

2% Of posts will contain critisms and information that will be remotely usefull to anybody.

The rest are trolls.

What about (3, Insightful)

big_groo (237634) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725684)

Dropline [dropline.net] ?

Does anyone have any news on this?

spatial metaphor? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725710)

The "spatial metaphor" sounds pretty lame.

Looks like someone was trying too hard to do something "revolutionary".

Wow, it remembers the last folder you where in! So does the file browser on freaking xmms.

Everytime you click a folder it opens a new window? That sucks! Ya it can be avoided with a middle click but why do that in the first place, since everyone is obviously just going to use middle click. I wouldn't say that's a bug but it certainly isn't a "feature" either.

Re:spatial metaphor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725839)

Looks like someone was trying too hard to do something "revolutionary".

Or trying too hard to be circa 1980s apple...

I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725720)

until gnome comes up with an integrated all-in-one development IDE ala' kdevelop, I'm not using it.

Well, that, and because gnome is slow as ass compared to kde.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725762)

until gnome comes up with an integrated all-in-one development IDE ala' kdevelop, I'm not using it.

Nothing stopping you from using KDevelop in GNOME. I do every day.

Well, that, and because gnome is slow as ass compared to kde.

Riiiight... sounds like you've never actually used both. KDE used to be damn slow until they started pre-linking and stuff which helped a bit but it's still slower than GNOME.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (1)

bjarvis354 (319402) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725783)

Gnome slower than KDE...Well that's a first.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725847)

I am not really sure what your point is? I try ALL the releases of KDE and GNOME, to be fair, and as of its 3.2 release KDE is significantly faster than GNOME. But don't take my word for it. Do check for yourself.

Maybe "that's a first" to you, but not to the rest of us, you know.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725923)

GNOME is horrendously slow. Try KDE 3.2.1 with pre-linking -- it may just make you switch.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (4, Informative)

Deusy (455433) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725888)

until gnome comes up with an integrated all-in-one development IDE ala' kdevelop, I'm not using it.

You haven't looked hard.

What about Anjuta [sourceforge.net] , or MonoDevelop [monodevelop.com] , combined with Glade [gnome.org] ?

Well, that, and because gnome is slow as ass compared to kde.

Unqualified, unsubstantiated, stupid as ass FUD.

Re:I'm sticking with KDE, thanks (2, Interesting)

bonch (38532) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725927)

KDevelop runs on either.

KDE is much more lagged than GNOME. Personally I don't like the fact that it takes seconds to open a Home folder. Remind me again why they integrated the Internet and file browsers into one program? Is it because Windows 98 did it?

I'm sticking with my uncircumsized penis up... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725952)

my moaning professor's wet, moist pussy.

Thanks.

Speed of 2.6??? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725777)

I wish he would have commented on the speed of 2.6, rather than just talked about what looked pretty or not.

newb gnome upgrade question (1)

cyranoVR (518628) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725795)

I have a linux RH 9 install on a i386 box. I recently upgraded to gtk+2.4 (in a futile attempt to get rhythmbox working).

My question is: should I bother upgrading to Gnome 2.6 or just stay with the 2.x installation that came with RH9? I fear that attempting the upgrade will ruin my existing gnome installation. Or, at least, all the RedHat specific stuff will stop working.

If it ain't broke don't fix it?

You're right. (4, Informative)

FreeLinux (555387) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725904)

Installing Gnome 2.6 on your Red Hat 9.0 will "ruin" all the Red Hat stuff, in the sense of setting everything to Gnome defaults rather than Red Hat modified defaults. A better option for you would likely be to wait a couple of months for Gnome 2.6 to be integrated into Fedora and then upgrade your installation to Fedora.

If however you are really keen you could try the Fedora Core 2 RC2 release. Though it is only a relase candidate (RC) it does ocntain Gnome 2.5 which is the beta version for the pending release of Gnome 2.6

Followup question (1)

cyranoVR (518628) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726020)

How much of a pain is it to change distributions?

I.e. if I upgrade to Fedora Core, will I have to backup all my data, reformat my hard drive, and then copy all the data back?

I keep hearing that I should switch from RH to Slack | Gentoo | SuSE - so I guess this question applies for them as well.

Of course, I have a spare 40 gb drive...so maybe I could just install one or more distributions onto that HD and configure GRUB accordingly?

Oh god... (3, Interesting)

bicho (144895) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725854)

... I don like Gnome that much anymore.
Besides the panel and the fact it uses gtk, I disagree with a lot of things, like absurdly minimalist configuration options AND documentation AND a regedit-like nightmerish hell with also minimalist documentation.

Anybody has successfully compiled e17 ? (yes. I am aware its not supposed to be usable/compilable yet)
I have been waiting for it a looong time, and it seems there is always wan problem or another.

I remember I compiled once its file system when in e15 or e16 something, and It was really nice.... but haven been able to compile e17 ever.
Now, that is something I really want to see...

"simpler interface" but at what cost ? (2, Insightful)

phoxix (161744) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725855)

I could to totally wrong on this, but from what I've seen great features are being removed from really cool apps in this absurd strive for a "simpler interface"

Case in point:

Xchat used to have this GUI option called "Old Nick Completion" (Its like zsh's tab completion, but for IRC) But now it doesn't. The code for the function is still there, but the GUI option is not. No offense to the xchat guys, but this easily robs people of a great IRC great experience.

For proof of what I'm talking about:

a) look at this patch: Xchat Old Nick Completion Patch [opencurve.org]

B) the Mandrake Xchat package ships with the above patch

C) download the Xchat source code, and take a gander. Then notice how your own Xchat installation is missing this great feature

Lets not dumb down GREAT SOFTWARE like Xchat!

Sunny Dubey

Since you seem "in the know" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725882)

I don't suppose there's a Xchat patch floating around somewhere that makes Xchat-2, have, you know, normal copy and paste, like the other GNOME apps, is there? You know, so those of us familiar with other OSes who like linux but think auto-copy-on-text-select is stupid can feel at home.

Re:"simpler interface" but at what cost ? (1)

Fujamabob (668802) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726048)

Not everything has such a cost. Epiphany, for instance, makes for an extremely easy browsing experience that doesn't have the "everything including the kitchen sink" feel of Mozilla.

Arguably, this is a bad thing as it doesn't have some of the cool features of such browsers, but I for one appreciate having a choice. So would my mom, who simply wants to browse the internet.

Gnome needs an install program (1, Interesting)

cubicledrone (681598) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725879)

I've been working with Linux for over five years. It is too difficult and too buggy to upgrade or install something like Gnome or Gimp or KDE.

Gnome (and GIMP and KDE) needs a "double-click to install" program. I spent large portions of three days last week trying to compile and install GIMP 2.0. The dependencies were impossible. It still doesn't work.

Re:Gnome needs an install program (2, Informative)

matqua (670407) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725897)

Thats why you use Gentoo, 9/10's of the time you can simply go "emerge gnome" and it will take care of everything.

Re:Gnome needs an install program (4, Insightful)

StoneTable (145114) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725917)

or Debian, and apt-get update. Whatever your distribution of choice is, there is likely an easy way to upgrade. emerge, apt-get, yum, up2date, red-carpet, etc, etc, etc.

Performance? (4, Interesting)

Moderation abuser (184013) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725932)

No mention?

Not important?

Preliminary (and subjective) testing indicates that it isn't good when compared to the competition; CDE, GnuStep and having just loaded the current KDE, it looks like that is faster as well. Testing commonly used stuff; Menu operations and such over a LAN.

Bugger... Anyone know of a platform I can build an objective test suite on, for the various competing GUIs rather than relying on a stopwatch? I've found lots of Java specific and Web specific stuff...

One of the benefits of Unix I suppose. On Windows you get Windows and so have nothing to compare with.

why (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8725968)

why epiphany, and not galeon?

Nautilus (4, Insightful)

iantri (687643) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725975)

Excellent.. I firmly believe that the Mac OS 9 Finder is the best file manager in existance.. nothing else even comes close. The speed and ease with which you can organize files is amazing.

Nice to see this interface ("spatial whatever") being put to proper use outside of the Mac.

Miguel de Icaza (1)

slickbob13 (663609) | more than 10 years ago | (#8725984)

I was at a lug event at Novell Brainshare where he basically said the same things. He focused more on the Mono project and really extolled its cross platform abilities. He also showed some of the new features of 2.6 it really does simplify some things.

This highlights a problem with GNOME/KDE (1)

blueworm (425290) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726043)

Why do simple things like the file selector dialog box take FOREVER to get implemented anywhere near decently in GNOME/KDE? Simple things that really should be fixed almost immediately go on forever having horrendous interfaces.

At some point I'm going to get so pissed and just take up the code axe to them both.

OT: Bloody Blooming Hell! (0, Offtopic)

iainl (136759) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726049)

Right, there's me thinking that for once a /. banner advert is useful - its got info on a new Sigur Ros and Radiohead thing. So I click on it, only to find out that the bloody thing is iTunes exclusive! Fecking bastages! Some of us are outside the US, and so can't get stuff from there.

If this is the future of music distribution, I'm going back to vinyl.

I love GNOME's timed releases (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726065)

Having a new version of GNOME every 6 months strikes me a perfect compromise between adding new features and improving exisitng architecture. The bottom line is that these last few releases of GNOME have felt consistently polished.

So far, I love using the latest 2.6 (ok, strictly speaking: 2.5) version. Even sweeter, the 2.8 version is already promising to be a significant improvement with new applications and better infrastructure!

Thanks and great job GNOME developers and testers!
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