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Hacker Indicted In France For Publishing Exploits

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the known-and-unknown-is-high-flimflammery dept.

The Courts 561

Guillermito writes "Hello. I'm a French scientist living in Boston. I analyse small security softwares under Windows as a hobby, for fun and curiosity. For example, I showed how to easily extract hidden information from a dozen of steganography softwares, often commercial programs claiming a very high security level. I did the same with a french generic anti-virus, showing several security flaws, and that it didn't stop '100% of known and unknown viruses' as claimed. First the company called me a 'terrorist,' than sued me. I've just been indicted last week in Paris. It seems that it's a general trend in France, and maybe in Europe, these days."

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Look on the bright side... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726491)

Now you get to search for holes in the French jail system. Find a big enough one and you're free!

Dinosaurs are dead (5, Funny)

AssProphet (757870) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726495)


What does stenography have to do with software? Didn't they become extinct millions of years ago?

And I thought the DMCA was bad ... (-1, Troll)

Ernest P Worrell (751050) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726499)

... that's crazy. Anyone think it'll stand up though? Is Europe/France just way behind technology and don't understand? Let's hope!

Re:And I thought the DMCA was bad ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726563)

Not a problem. Just stand up for yourself. You're being indicted in France. The French gov't will back down very quickly and probably blame the Americans.

Re:And I thought the DMCA was bad ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726606)

Fuck-Off you shit-monkey

Re:And I thought the DMCA was bad ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726682)

Yes, resorting to rude, foul language. The true sign of a Frenchman. No doubt smoking a cigarette and speaking while looking down your nose. Smug and stupid is no way to go through life.

France == better than America! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726503)

God Bless America

God Bless America, with the worst crime levels in the first world
God Bless America, where "democracy" means a rich, white male as President
God Bless America, the biggest consumer of the world's natural resources
God Bless America, so happy to violate international laws
God Bless America, where "freedom of speech" means race-hate groups like KKK
God Bless America, and its massive and ever-growing poverty gap
God Bless America, with barely 300 years of dire history and culture
God Bless America, all its appalling "sitcoms" with no grasp of irony
God Bless America, with the highest obesity levels in the developed world
God Bless America, because corporations should be allowed to run amok
God Bless America, wasting billions to attack foreign countries

God Bless America, and thank God I don't have to live there.

-

Mod up Trole (-1)

lemon parties (761941) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726718)

RTFA

Re:France == better than America! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726721)

God Bless America, wasting billions to attack foreign countries

Billions of barrels of free, high-quality oil and thousands of dead Muslims as a bonus? How can you possibly call that a "waste?" I'd say it was worth every penny. The only screw-up Bush made in Iraq was waiting so long to get started.

Good luck! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726508)

I wish you the best. You should be given job offers, contracts, and cash for what do you, not put on a cross to die! It's a shame, really. Hopefully your case goes public and some good lawyers will help you for cheap if they think the press for themselves is worthwhile. Good luck!

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726509)

FP

Hax0r teh planet! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726510)

Can't you just hax0r the courts computers and remove all instances of your name? Maybe replace it with bill Gates or something?

Alternatively, mail a picture of a rifle to the French government. that will make them back down.

Re:Hax0r teh planet! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726605)

Alternatively, mail a picture of a rifle to the French government. that will make them back down.

No, they won't back down due merely to a photo of a rifle. France will surrender.

Re:Hax0r teh planet! (3, Funny)

strictnein (318940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726622)

Alternatively, mail a picture of a rifle to the French government. that will make them back down.

Nah... they'll just draw a line on the ground and politely ask you not to cross it, or go around it.

Re:Hax0r teh planet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726642)

Too bad he's already in there, courtesy of the EU.

There is no faster way (5, Interesting)

ThisIsFred (705426) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726519)

There is no faster way to make enemies than to point out someone's stupidity, and then prove it publicly. But I am on your side. Companies that market security products that aren't are committing fraud, IMO. And I'd rather have you publish the vulnerability than someone else publish the automated exploit.

Re:There is no faster way (0, Troll)

Orgazmus (761208) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726635)

Try attacking every country that looks like they could become a treath, and support a terrorist nation when you're at it.
(Just an imaginary example)
That should keep you relatively friendfree.

Good Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726755)

Counter-sue them for fraud either as yourself or as part of a class action lawsuit.

Glad to see... (5, Funny)

BJZQ8 (644168) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726528)

I'm glad to see that the EU has broken the U.S. monopoly on wacky, mindless computer lawsuits!

Re:Glad to see... (4, Insightful)

Dr.Dubious DDQ (11968) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726582)

I realized France had joined the 'stupid lawsuit that wins anyway' club with the whole Mobilix/Obelix thing...

Enshrined protection of whatever (5, Funny)

The I Shing (700142) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726529)

I sure am glad I live here in the USA where my right to expose the weaknesses of corporate products is enshrined in our beloved Constitut...

Hold on, there's a SWAT team banging on my door.

I'd better go let them know that they must have the wrong house.

Re:Enshrined protection of whatever (4, Funny)

ThisIsFred (705426) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726589)

Hold on, there's a SWAT team banging on my door.

Excellent! Would it be too much trouble for you to go outside and ask the SWAT dev team why the default is to look for smb.conf inside /usr/lib instead of /etc/samba? I mean, who puts configuration files in with userland libraries?

Re:Enshrined protection of whatever (5, Insightful)

paranode (671698) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726644)

You joke as if people here do not have that right, but it has already been shown that such free speech is protected here. Not only that, but you can even distribute source code to exploit it.

Re:Enshrined protection of whatever (4, Insightful)

The I Shing (700142) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726693)

You joke as if people here do not have that right, but it has already been shown that such free speech is protected here. Not only that, but you can even distribute source code to exploit it.
And, by God, let's pray that it stays that way, brother.

Re:Enshrined protection of whatever (1)

bugnuts (94678) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726711)

No, his sarcasm is lost on you.

Why not GIS for "DMCA" and you'll see that this law DOES have a chilling effect on speech regarding security and security research.

'Bout Time (5, Funny)

LooseChanj (17865) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726531)

To move to a sane country. There any left?

Re:'Bout Time (3, Interesting)

Orgazmus (761208) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726556)

Could try Norway?
DVD-Jon got off the hook over here, why should'nt it work this time? ;)

Re:'Bout Time (2, Insightful)

lambent (234167) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726694)

DVD-Jon also got tried twice for the same crime. I'll stick in the US where double-jeopardy (and a very large back yard to hide in) affrods some sort of protection from that sort of thing.

Re:'Bout Time (1)

Orgazmus (761208) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726754)

I think he migth have been convicted and put away in the states.
The Norwegian Copyrigthlaws is a bit less fucked up ;)

Re:'Bout Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726603)

Hmmm..

Welcome to 'Linux Island'! Diversity is high, conversations are long, and coffee is always in short supply... Sure our efforts are scattered but damnit we have a good time doing it! :-)

Re:'Bout Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726616)

Plenty of them:

Mars, Venus, Saturn, Jupiter, Pluto, Neptune, Mercury, Uranus.

Take your pick. Although I'd personally stay away form Mars, de' man is already there.

Re:'Bout Time (4, Insightful)

kajoob (62237) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726714)

Instead of packing up and running every time something happens that you don't like, why not stick around here and fight for what you believe in? You can start by sending a few bucks to the EFF [eff.org] .

Re:'Bout Time (1)

necrognome (236545) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726724)

Can I get DSL in the Easter Islands?

Proposterous! (5, Insightful)

Doesn't_Comment_Code (692510) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726533)

I'll admit right away that I'm not familiar with France's free speech laws.

But from a common sense point of view, I really don't see how telling the truth about weak software can be illegal. It may lead to damage to a company, but that damage was caused by the security holes, not someone exposing them (hidden defects are a ticking timebomb anyway.)

From the common sense view point, it also seems right to inform the company first, before telling everybody. But telling the truth should not be illegal.

Re:Proposterous! (2, Interesting)

General Wesc (59919) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726619)

It's illegal to insult people [wikipedia.org] . But so long as he didn't release the vulnerabilities saying 'this moronic company. . .' :-)

(Are companies 'people' in France?)

Re:Proposterous! (1)

Doesn't_Comment_Code (692510) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726672)

That's very intersting! There are some crazy laws out there. Some local laws are just amazing.

I think so (1)

aepervius (535155) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726687)

Lately they were defined as far as I remmember as "moral" person (as opposoed to the physical one). But btter check with a french lawyer since I am too sure.

Re:Proposterous! (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726645)

well most likely they made up most of their claims(of what the poster had done) and just want to set an example or something insane like that.

just like there's jerks in usa there's jerks in europe as well.. and probably in middle-east and far -east as well. there's quite a few of totally broken 'security' products that are not even meant to work more than just give false assurance to their users, they're people selling snake oil and as far as their products go their just as good as some "miracle magnets" for fuel-lines & etc. there's no point in informing the company in such case since the fuckin company is just basically fraudsters in the first place.

Re:Proposterous! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726650)

Einstein did not believe in god you dolt.

Re:Proposterous! (2, Insightful)

Particle010 (520521) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726734)

I think you're missing the point here. Freedom in genral does have one very important price, and that's responsibility. Sure you could point out those aspects of the software to the general public, but you have to ask yourself one question: with regards to the fact that leaking this information publicly could and most likely will lead to the compromise of systems using said software, is it the responsible thing to do? The common sense answer is NO. The responsible thing to do would be to privately alert the company of the security problem and perhaps documenting such to prove you warned them in case of inaction.

Just goes to show... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726535)

...that you don't need a DMCA to have people arrested for stuff like this.

Question: (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726542)

Do they have 'Freedom Fries' in France?

Re:Question: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726740)

Yeah. They call them "Les Freedom Fries".

Why waste your time on windows apps? (0, Troll)

Yaa 101 (664725) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726543)

You better do this with Linux apps, we will thank you for it instead of sue your ass.
Leave the incompetent crap for incompetents, might be what you have learned from this.

Terrorist??? Sounds like libel to me. (5, Interesting)

JDRipper (610930) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726549)

If they publicly called you a terroist in writing without sufficient evidence, can't you sue their berets off for libel?

Re:Terrorist??? Sounds like libel to me. (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726696)

They consider what he did to be terrorist-like. Unfortunately, these days, we have little to no recourse in the Witch Hunts that have appeared...

Don't piss off those that pay more money to the "Gods" than you do.

Are you kidding? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726712)

Libel is a favorite pasttime of the French. It's their only weapon of defense.

In America it's totally different (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726551)

We sue first, and then we call you a terrorist.

Re:In America it's totally different (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726750)

But in soviet russia, terrorist calls you!

My bank robbing spree (-1, Troll)

sunking2 (521698) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726553)

I didn't do it for the money, it just seemed like something fun and I was curious if I could do it. I'm still confused as to why they put me in jail for it even though I left the money at the door.

Re:My bank robbing spree (-1, Offtopic)

jhunsake (81920) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726632)

Nice job on throwing out a quick, sarcastic response that has no relation to this guy's situation at all.

You, sir, are a jackass.

Re:My bank robbing spree (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726656)

Are you an idiot?

Please tell us what significant similarities there are between bank robbing and researching the dangerous flaws of bad proprietary "security" software.

Re:My bank robbing spree (0)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726689)

Worst analogy ever. Robbing a bank puts several people in immediate danger and has an instantaneous effect on the economy. You're actually taking something that's not yours. In this circumstance, he had the software in his possession, and could thus do what he wanted with it, depending on whether you believe that click-through licenses have any effect (and if they do, I seem to be owned by about 30 different companies right now).

I'll burn in hell for this ... (4, Insightful)

crimethinker (721591) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726554)

Well, since you are French, there is only one thing you can do:

SURRENDER to the authorities.

Seriously, though, this sucks ass.

However, I'm quite sure that you're a terrorist, because we all know that terrorists publish the exploits they find. Why, back in June of 2001, I saw an article about how to smuggle knives onto airplanes. I also remember seeing an article shortly after that about putting plastic explosive in your shoes (i.e. Richard Reid). Come on, folks, people who find and PUBLISH weaknesses in software are not the problem.

-paul

Hear about the NEW French Army Tank? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726610)

It has four reverse gears and one forward, just in case the enemy attacks from behind.

Bah-dum-ching!

Re:I'll burn in hell for this ... (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726725)

Well, since you are French, there is only one thing you can do:

SURRENDER to the authorities.

Or he can take them completely by surprise and go on the offensive. I bet he'll have Chirac begging for a peace treaty in no time...

The age old riddle.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726555)

1. Collect Underpants.
2. Countersue for defamation/slandering.
3. Profit!

Hey! I just found out nr 2!

Who was it that said... (5, Insightful)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726558)

"It's dangerous to be right when the government is wrong".

This is a case in point. The author may be in the right, but we are living in hysterical times, and woe unto the man who walks in front of the governmental steam roller with a team of jackasses and corrupt, ignorant polititians at the wheel.

Re:Who was it that said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726636)

good call. Informative AND insightful.

-------------------
Exercise your right to vote November 9, 2004.
This has been a public service announcement.

Re:Who was it that said... (5, Informative)

MarkusH (198450) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726742)

That would be Voltaire.

Another good quote: "There are some acts of justice which corrupt those who perform them." - Joubert

Re:Who was it that said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726760)

isn't
"...corrupt, ignorant politicians..."
doubly redundant?

As I tell my daughter, all politicians are either corrupt (e.g. Clinton) or retarded (e.g. Bush).

Sadly, voting often comes down to deciding which candidate will do the least harm while in office, then holding your nose and pulling the lever.

Signs of the future? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726559)

Now, if Microsoft is forced to release the windows source because of the EU, does this mean anyone who points out vulnerabilities will get sued too?

Seems like a strange way to thank someone for helping them. It's like beating someone to death with a tire-iron because they told you your tire is flat.

Re:Signs of the future? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726643)

Hah, Microsoft will never be forced to release the source of windows.

Stops 100% of unknown viruses? (5, Informative)

RubiCon (158847) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726569)

Umm, you can't do that - I think I first saw the relevant paradox in Ralf Burger's book on viruses and it goes something like this: Say you've got some blackbox routine called is_a_virus() that does just what these guys claim; all you do is build it into a virus like so:
if ( is_a_virus(me) ) { do_nothing() } else { replicate() }
So, if you're a virus, you're not a virus - but if you're not, you are. Reductio ad absurdum, anyone?

Re:Stops 100% of unknown viruses? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726695)

If is_a_virus() gives some false positives, there would be no contradiction. I don't think this is an airtight argument.

Re:Stops 100% of unknown viruses? (5, Informative)

HeghmoH (13204) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726733)

This is nicely covered by Rice's Theorem [wikipedia.org] . In short, Rice's Theorem says that it's impossible to write a program to determine with 100% accuracy any property of another program's behavior or output.

Rice's Theorem is basically a generalized version of Turing's proof that the halting problem can't be solved, and it uses exactly the argument you outline.

Re:Stops 100% of unknown viruses? (3, Interesting)

lavalyn (649886) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726757)

Catching all viruses is easy. Label all files viruses. Isn't all that helpful but absolutely "true."

Just like flagging all spam is easy, or flagging all important email important is easy.

(For those in statistics, Type I and Type II error.)

did they redefine extorion and not tell me...? (2, Interesting)

spacepimp (664856) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726573)

they sued you for experimenting and testing their claims? ie the virii statement. i cant imagine how this is any different than test environments in larg ecorporations before a deployment or rollout.. did you perhaps send them bill, demanding it be paid or you will reveal their mis statment of facts or perhaps, say you found a way around their security pay you to keep silent or ruin toir prifit model like what happened with google perhaps.. im curious to hear more about how this was taken as extortion it doesnt seem to fit with the words definition.

contact the eff (5, Informative)

gmr2048 (176781) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726574)

dunno if they can help with french courts, but it's prolly worth it to at least bring it to thier attention:

www.eff.org [eff.org]

-gary

Go home (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726578)

First the company called me a 'terrorist,' than sued me.

Why is that unreasonable? The French have a long-standing history of cooperating with terrorists, as long as the terrorists were anti-American enough.

Get the fuck out of the US and go back where you belong. You're not wanted here.

Re:Go home (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726637)

Neither are you, you filthy english type! Your father smelt of elderberries and your mother was a hamster!

Just a thought... (1)

phaetonic (621542) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726580)

Would publishing these vulnerabilities from an anonymous workstation at a public library on a new hotmail account used once posted to a mailing list be just a bit safer than saying "I, JOHN DOE, FOUND THIS PROBLEM, MOREINFO AT JOHNDOE.COM"?

Re:Just a thought... (2, Insightful)

happyfrogcow (708359) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726702)

safer, but should be completely unnecesary.

Re:Just a thought... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726720)

Only cowards post anonymously.

hmmm (2, Funny)

frode (82655) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726583)


The French courts would probably back down if you threaten to invade.

Heck I'll help. I could use a spare country.

The morale of the story is.. (3, Interesting)

Murf_E (754550) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726594)

don't go tell the company that their product is flawed but rather use your discovery to exploit people who use their product. Either way you will be sued but at least this way they have to find you

Of course (1, Insightful)

wardomon (213812) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726597)

Don't mess with Proprietary Software(tm). They'll whack ya every time. They don't take kindly to any reverse engineering, hacking or peeking under the hood. They don't want people knowing that their products are usually worthless.

How can *this* be illegal ? (5, Insightful)

lazy_arabica (750133) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726599)

Is looks like looking for security flaws is increasingly seen as an illegal action by both companies and governments.

Would I be sued if I told a company manufacturing bicycles that their products are not solid enough, and then can be dangerous ? Probably not.

It will soon be forbidden to even talk about flaws. As a french citizen I feel very sad about it...

Re:How can *this* be illegal ? (2, Insightful)

DirkDaring (91233) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726621)

"Would I be sued if I told a company manufacturing bicycles that their products are not solid enough, and then can be dangerous ? Probably not."

Probably not, no. But you could easily get a lawyer to get someone to fake an accident and sue the bicycle manufacturer for damages.

Re:How can *this* be illegal ? (1)

mooman (9434) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726699)

If we'd had this mindset a few decades ago, Ralph Nader would have gone to jail for "Unsafe at Any Speed" and we'd have Gore in the Whitehouse.

You're right, this is clearly overreaction. Identifying fraud or flaws should never be illegal.

Re:How can *this* be illegal ? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726736)

Yes (at least if you publish the info). Consumer Reports has been sued for demonstrating flaws in products .

100 Points... (1, Funny)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726600)

+100 Points to the first one to create a "Free Frenchy" sticker for this.

Bonus points if they substitute "Freedom" for French and some bad pun about not hoping he fries or whatnot.

Good or Not? (5, Interesting)

Prince Vegeta SSJ4 (718736) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726614)

I haven't brushed up on the law concerning publishing exploits in either France or the US, but it seems a little ridiculous to indict someone for pointing out a security hole.

Sure it can be said that publishing an exploit will encourage a hacker to take advantage of said exploit, but by not publishing & letting it remain a secret is no guarantee that someone is not exploiting that same exploit. In fact, I'm willing to bet that some 3v1| H4x0r would eventually find it anyway. But I would rather know that it exists so that I may act, since, in my experience software companies are slow to react and try to hide or downplay flaws.

Security solely by obscurity doesn't work.

On the flip side, if the door to my house was wide open, I wouldn't want anybody yelling hey your door is wide open (to the world) without allowing me to fix it.

IMO it boils down to common sense, and in this case I think that it is a beneficial thing to publish that sort of information. An even better route would be to alert the software makers first, and give them a 'short' time to release a patch. But only a very short time.

Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726633)

The Socialists are just as messed up as we are...sweetness!

Note to Europeans (3, Insightful)

strictnein (318940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726657)

Note to Europeans: while it is fun to point and laugh at us "stupid" Americans and our silly laws and lawsuits, you might want to take note that the same things are going on in your countries too, and will continue to get even worse.

This sucks (4, Insightful)

Nevo (690791) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726658)

Unfortunately, it appears that expertise in French law is lacking here at slashdot.

I second the suggestion above: contact eff. Now. If they can't help they probably can point you to organizations that can.

Well.... Let's be honest here... (2, Insightful)

Shirov (137794) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726660)

If you were simply using the software and found exploits through the interface, then I totally agree, this is bullshit...

HOWEVER, if you were digging through reverse engineered proprietary code, and publishing exploits at the code level... well, that is infact illegal...

Good luck either way though...

"I used to have a sig, but a cheese eating surrender monkey ate it..."

--Ryan

blech (1)

Vlion (653369) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726665)

Faceitiously, it looks like the US had the right idea when they started calling everything french "freedom". They were just trying to get a point across...

Hm.
Well mister, I'd say you should stay in the US for awhile and see how things go. Quite possibly you could work on becoming a US citizen. I think we are a little more advanced(not nessisarily lots) than France wrt these issues.

Doctors have stopped pointing out melanomas... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726690)

...because the sun might sue.

France is Stupid (3, Informative)

Omega037 (712939) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726700)

I know a guy who for his senior thesis worked with a group of people and hacked a company's network. At the end of the semester, they gave the company a 42 page document stating all the problems and exploits the company had.
He got an A for the class and a job offer from the company. Granted, he already had better offers, but it is a good example of how it should be.

French First Ammendment? (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726703)

Does the French constitution contain protection for Freedom of Speach, as the US constitution does? If so, you are probably safe. However, you may have to put up with a legal battle. Also, are there any laws protecting reverse engineering specifically as a form of Free Speach? If you were being tried in the US, it seems likely the EFF would help you with the battle. Is there such and org in France?

Viva la Blizkrieg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726707)

And we thought that WWII rid the world of all the Nazis.. The truth is we let them all out of Germany and then let them migrate to the rest of the world as corporate and government heros.

Oh dear.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726713)

First you tell snake-oil salesmen that their product is broken and next you find them calling you names. O tempora o mores, or something.

than vs then (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726731)

First the company called me a 'terrorist,' than sued me

Why do people always mix than and then together as if they are the same word. I always hear people writing stuff (with otherwise perfect grammer and spelling) like "better then" and now they are doing it in reverse? What is this world comming to?

stupid grammar nazi (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726759)

If you're going to be criticizing other people's grammar, at least get your own correct.

comming

Stupid idiot.

Please Publish Address of Officials here (2, Interesting)

randall_burns (108052) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726735)

I would like to write a letter in support of you. The people that should be legally hassled here is the software vendor whose fraud you exposed-not
you.

IMHO a pile of letters coming from all parts of the world in your support might send a signal. I also think that Amnesty International should be contacted here. This is even more sleezy than most of the stuff they take on--in this case you appear to be hassled not because of your political opinions, but because French officials are using their offices on the behest of corrupt corporate interests.

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8726745)

How will the judge look at the terms "fraud" and "deceptive business practices"?

Don't go home... (1)

RaeF (120232) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726751)

Looks like you better not go home for the holidays.

Been done in other respects (2, Insightful)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726753)

This is like a mechanical engineer publishing tips and tricks on how to break open safes that claim to be "burgler proof." Or Diebold suing someone who figured out how to rig elections. This is like the "wag the dog" scenario where you start a fight with someone to move attention to them and away from your shortcomming.

Why is software special? (1)

wbattestilli (218782) | more than 10 years ago | (#8726761)

Can anybody see this happening if Consumer Reports published a study indicating that a dishwasher wasn't as quiet as claimed or a car wasn't as safe as claimed.

Funny how proving a piece of software isn't as secure as they claimed is somehow special.
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