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Linux 2.6.5 is Released

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the get-your-diff-on dept.

Linux 315

lamont116 writes "Featuring a 367.6 KB changelog, the next Linux kernel is now ready for action. As always, enjoy!"

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315 comments

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I'd like to be first to say... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761112)

Yay!

Wow! (-1)

Jim Florentine (586871) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761115)

What a worthless story.

Re:Wow! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761125)

+1 :p

First post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761117)

first post!!!

Linux Changelog Email Publishing (2, Interesting)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761119)

With all the Spam problems going on these days, you would think that the Linux changelog would not publish email addys. Why should someone have to display their email addy to work on Linux? To me it seems very counter-productive, and it may shed light as to why Linux users wish to stop Spam, instead of simply becoming inaccessible to it. I've thought about working on Linux before, but this is the only thing stopping me as it stands.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761126)

You sad bastard

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (2, Insightful)

awx (169546) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761135)

Er... so you can be contacted if there is a problem with your code? Don't use your primary email address, dumbass.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (4, Insightful)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761146)

> Er... so you can be contacted if there is a problem with your code? Don't use your primary email address, dumbass.

You would think that the people developing the best project in the world would at least have the knowledge of how to become inaccessible to spam. There are billions of other ways to be contacted. How about a form that lets you email each user on the project? That would only take about a day to code and a few to perfect. So I'm not a dumbass (thank you very much) You, however, might be.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1, Flamebait)

awx (169546) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761159)

That would only take about a day to code and a few to perfect.

Go on then, scratch your own itch.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1, Interesting)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761178)

> Go on then, scratch your own itch.

Okay! I'll write something to handle this, and post the source code at my site next week when I can free up some time. Maybe I'll write a changelog writing app and put in some extra features so the Linux team uses it (and anyone else)...

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (2, Insightful)

robbyjo (315601) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761213)

Time to burn some karma....

For Moderator: They are on crack and did terrible injustice for dolo666. awx should be modded as flamebait, not dolo666 as offtopic because he has a good point.

These stupid act of random injustice seems to be rampant in Slashdot nowadays.

Okay, so go ahead and mod this down. For I have spoken.

A day? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761163)

Uhm, a day? I'd say about 20 minutes + adding the various email addresses to a db...

Re:A day? (1, Informative)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761171)

> Uhm, a day? I'd say about 20 minutes + adding the various email addresses to a db...

Yes, but creating code to allow users to add themselves and perform email redirects using the form might take longer than 20minutes. For real shit-stick code, how about 4min? For industry ready code, I never take less than a day on any app (just my ethics, sirrah).

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (0, Offtopic)

Phekko (619272) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761173)

Ah yes, so in order to be contacted in case there's a problem with your code you will give out an address you don't primarily use? I think this is what Micro$oft troubleshooting team has done. But this is already way off topic so I'll stop now.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

dustmite (667870) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761234)

E-mail addresses can easily be masked so as to be human-readable but not readable to most spambots, dumbass. Many popular sites with e-mail address publishing requirements (e.g. freshmeat) do this, and it's easy to do, so there is no real reason not to do it.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761161)

oh yeah, that and the fact that you're a talentless script kiddie.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (2, Informative)

Kourino (206616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761168)

It's only a problem because people post the damn thing to Slashdot, really. I mean, all these people already get spam because they post to LKML, so having the slight added exposure in the Changelog probably really isn't a big deal compared to that.

(Actually, the last time I posted to LKML, I didn't get spam, so the stated problem may be even less than you might think.)

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (5, Insightful)

Temporal (96070) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761169)

I've had my e-mail address listed all over the place for several years (Google [google.com] ), and my mail server performs absolutely no filtering.

I spend about 30 seconds a day deleting my spam.

If this is stopping you from working on Linux, you must not be very interested.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761189)

> If this is stopping you from working on Linux, you must not be very interested.

Any argument that lessens the horrible impact of spam, is an argument against moral computing (and therefore moot, imho).

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

dustmite (667870) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761247)

I don't understand your comment, are you saying that it is immoral to try to prevent spam?

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761285)

His comment isn't meant to be understood dustmite... Take a look at his post history. Trooooll...

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (0, Redundant)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761296)

It's immoral not to fight spam because it doesn't have a bad impact on oneself's mail system. I, for one, get more than 300 spam mails per day, and more than 2000 bounces of undeliverable mails because some spammers use my domain for generating fake from-headers.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

cortana (588495) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761347)

May I suggest you check out the Sender Policy Framework [pobox.com] website? It could help you by cutting down on the amount of bounces you recieve when you are "Joe-jobbed".

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761359)

Nope. I'm saying it's immoral to shrug spam off in public forums, because it's the act of shrugging off spam that has made spam so prevalent today. Spam is serious and Linux devs should be fully protected from it from a systemic level; online publication of email addresses encourages spam and this practice is archaic and must be stopped, regardless of how much karma I lose today. :-)

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (0, Offtopic)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761181)

Probably because spam is no longer a problem it's only common

I have one email address that gets hundreds a day. All but about 5 are filtered out. I don't see that as a problem any more.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1, Troll)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761314)

Where do you filter the emails? After downloading, I guess. And downloading mails, since it's traffic, usually costs money. And even if you have a flat-rate, your provider still has to pay for the traffic, and at some point, the traffic caused by spam is higher than what the provider earns from the customers. And at that point, the costs for the traffic have to be passed to the customer. IMHO, that is a _big_ problem.

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (1)

dustmite (667870) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761225)

So as your first contribution, submit a patch for the changelog publishing system that masks the e-mail addresses from bots :)

Re:Linux Changelog Email Publishing (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761280)

To me it seems very counter-productive, and it may shed light as to why Linux users wish to stop Spam, instead of simply becoming inaccessible to it.

How does one become inaccessible to spam you ask? Simple, don't have an email address. That's really the only way if you actually happen to USE your email for anything.

We sane people use spamfilters and work to eliminate spammers. Bayes and a .45 works great. :P

Get a grip.

Mooo (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761120)

Yes

Re:Mooo (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761133)

Well said

pop this! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761121)

freshest kernel yet.. eat your heart out, orville redenbacker!

first post!!!

witty first reply? or not (-1, Troll)

foshzor (681769) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761124)

so linux comes with kernels now?

Performance... (5, Informative)

Denny (2963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761134)

I saw a fairly good set of benchmarks a couple of days ago showing that the 2.6.x series is doing a lot better than 2.4.x as a SQL server and as a fileserver, with minimal losses in some other areas. It looked pretty impressive for something that's still on fairly early versions, so I was planning on swapping over this weekend... although I guess I'll wait for the Debian package to update to .5 now.

Re:Performance... (5, Informative)

Denny (2963) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761141)

Here's the article [2cpu.com]

Wahoo (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761136)

Add support for scroll wheel on MS Office and similar keyboards.
This is excellent news... I've been hoping for this for a while.

Same as rc3? (1)

taree (675736) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761140)

Is format of changelog changed? I'm just wondering is this same as rc3 .. Tarmo

Not the same as -rc3 (4, Informative)

Kourino (206616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761179)

Linus' announcement on LKML has a "Summary of changes from v2.6.5-rc3 to v2.6.5", so no, this is not the same as -rc3.

Cut and Paste (-1, Troll)

-kertrats- (718219) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761145)

[Insert Generic Joke about compiling gentoo here]

Re:Cut and Paste (2, Interesting)

roror (767312) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761255)

I doubt anyone understands that generic joke. Aside, it probably the first distro which will "support" the kernel.

the PPC64 work is looking real nice (4, Interesting)

phoxix (161744) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761147)

40+ patches, ouch :)

One day PPC64 will be just as common as AMD64 in the server room ...

Sunny Dubey

I'm sporting wood (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761148)

go linux

New Kernel (4, Funny)

The_Ace666 (755363) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761151)

I love the smell of a new kernel in the morning.

Will it help with this problem? (-1, Troll)

Sla$hd0tSux0r (762264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761156)

Wow, so I was going to try to learn Linux and I found this on page THREE of the tutorial:

There have been cases where I have frantically tried to stop a runaway program and repeatedly pressed Ctrl-C. The result is that the terminal gets into an undefined state whereby it does not react properly to any input, that is when you press the various keys. For example, pressing the enter key may not bring you to a new line (which it normally should do). If you try executing a command, it's possible to command is not executed properly, because the system has not identified the enter key correctly. You can return your terminal to a "sane" condition by inputting:

stty sane Ctrl-J

The Ctrl-J character is the line feed character and is necessary as the system does not recognize the enter key.

Is this a joke? Please tell me Linux does not randomly have "runaway programs" going into "undefined states" whereby I have to type the "sane" command to get programs to "execute correctly".

THIS is the Great Linux Hype I have been hearing about? You have to be kidding me... this is pathetic... truly sad. Linux appears to be a joke of a toy OS, only - with no toys (games) and the joke just isn't funny. Well, maybe a little. If you work at Microsoft.

Alsa with Intel8x0 ? (2, Interesting)

Ploum (632141) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761157)

I've seen a lot of Intel8x0 fixes in the changelog.

Am I the only one with a Nforce2/Intel8x0 soundcar who cannot change the volume and must use OSS emulation for all applications since direct alsa doesn't work ? (2.6.3 kernel)

Does the 2.6.5 fix those problems (I don't understand fully the changelog).

Re:Alsa with Intel8x0 ? (3, Informative)

cheesybagel (670288) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761219)

NForce card here, using the 2.6.3 kernel from Fedora 2 test 2. I do get freaky sample rates from the drivers ocasionally and everything plays speeded up or down, but "Sound & Video -> Volume Control" works well. The problem is the PCM volume by default is 0 and if that is 0, the master volume control doesn't do anything.

Re:Alsa with Intel8x0 ? (4, Informative)

FyRE666 (263011) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761241)

I've seen a lot of Intel8x0 fixes in the changelog...

You don't have to upgrade your kernel to install the latest ALSA drivers. Just download the source from the ALSA site [alsa-project.org] , build and install it. I never use the ALSA drivers in the 2.6.x kernels (they never seem to work correctly for me, if at all). I never have problems with the official source versions though.

BTW, if your card is working ok with OSS emulation, what's the problem?

Re:Alsa with Intel8x0 ? (1)

Ploum (632141) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761288)

1) my card is not working perfectly : I cannot change the volume 2) somes applications use ALSA and crash with OSS (totem for example)

Re:Alsa with Intel8x0 ? (1)

blixel (158224) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761264)

Am I the only one with a Nforce2/Intel8x0 soundcar who cannot change the volume and must use OSS emulation for all applications since direct alsa doesn't work ? (2.6.3 kernel)

I have to use OSS instead of ALSA because my Line-In quits working with ALSA.

Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddites? (3, Interesting)

JessLeah (625838) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761160)

Luddites like me might like to try 2.6, if only we had some guidance. I still run Debian Stable (yes, Stable) since I don't trust Unstable or Testing not to muck up my system.

Anyone got upgrade instructions for Debian 3.0, or other 'old' distros? Believe it or not, not everyone wants to be on the 'bleeding edge' in all areas. Nevertheless, to be able to try new kernels would be nice.

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (1)

Kourino (206616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761187)

I see you, sir-or-madam, haven't read any of the previous 2.6 stories :3

davej has a nice list of big changes in the 2.6 series that's commonly referred to as the post Halloween document [codemonkey.org.uk] that you may be interested in looking at.

The big change for users is to install module-init-tools, which is packaged in debian. (I don't recall if it's made its way to stable, though.) In any case, have a read through that document.

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761188)

debian stable (woody) isn't 2.6 ready, since it lacks the package module-init-tools in its sources, you should try sarge, it's fairly stable and fairly up to date

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (4, Informative)

mick29 (615466) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761193)

Not that hard, actually.

Just get the packet "module-init-tools" from www.backports.org installed, if you plan to use modules.

The configuration dialogs are heavily restructured, but you'll find your stuff I guess. "make-kpkg" works fine.

If you have some rather peculiar stuff running, like LVM, there are some undocumented pitfalls, though.

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (2, Informative)

neodymium (411811) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761198)

With debian and apt-get, thats easy. Just choose from one of the many sites offering testing or unstable backports for the stable distribution (I recommend www.backports.org), add their site to /etc/apt/sources.list, do apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade, and you are finished...

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (1)

mick29 (615466) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761350)

[...](I recommend www.backports.org), add their site to /etc/apt/sources.list [...]

Well, don't. Inserting the entire backports packet archive is a perfect way to ruin your system. Instead, browse their website, read the documentation, and manually install the packets you need.

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761202)

You don't trust Debian Testing, but you want to run the latest 2.6 kernel?

Look, the stuff in Testing is all at least a year old anyway. The Testing kernel is still 2.4. Earth to JessLeah: Testing is stable, Stable is overkill. Testing is safe. You are far more likely to have problems with Linux 2.6 than with any of the packages in Testing. Is the message getting through yet?

Re:Instructions for 2.4 to 2.6 upgrades for Luddit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761233)

Testing might run stably, but the packages that make it up change regularly. This *package* instability is what Stable is lacking. Hence the name.

Also, Testing is not safe because Testing is generally the last to get security updates. It's not officially supported like Stable, and it doesn't have immediate access to upstream bugfixes like Unstable.

So.... what were you saying again?

Yeah !!! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761165)

Will this fix bugs in KDE?

Re:Yeah !!! (3, Informative)

rastakid (648791) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761252)

Will this fix bugs in KDE?

No, since this is only the Linux kernel, it only fixes kernel bugs. However, if KDE didn't function properly because of bugs in the kernel, this could be solved by this new kernel release.

Re:Yeah !!! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761273)

Will this fix bugs in KDE?

No. The KDE bugs will be fixed in the next Gnome release.

Where can i browse online through the source? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761167)

Probably a stupid question as everyone except me knows where this is possible, well nevertheless...

is there a site where i can just browse through the sources without downloading them?

Re:Where can i browse online through the source? (2, Informative)

SkiddyRowe (692144) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761180)

You can browse the 'old' source Here [linux.no] but it doesn't have up to the 2.6.5.

The highest it goes is 2.6.1. But it has all the architectures.

Re:Where can i browse online through the source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761192)

tnx

Stable? (3, Informative)

hanssprudel (323035) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761175)

I love the speed increases that the 2.6 kernel has achieved on the desktop (and for things like media: mplayer never bugs out with that charming "YOUR COMPUTER IS TOO SLOW" message anymore). However, I don't know if it can be considered even remotely stable. Since switching, my uptime has been a Windows like joke.

For example:

- The conversion to ALSA works great, but the modules for OSS compatibility segfault whenever an app tries to use them. Segfaults in the kernel are fun! There is pretty much nothing to do but reboot after that.

- Firewire and sbp2 support is completely broken. Ironically this has, I believe, more from "experimental" in 2.4 to a normal feature, yet it worked fine before and now doesn't work at all (the linux1394 forums forums reflect that I am not alone in this). Trying to copy data to sbp2 drives segfaults, hangs, and worse. Beware of connecting to 2.6 if you have a firewire drive with data you hold dear...

I'm sure there is more, but I am forced to return to the land of 2.4 most of the time. Now, I'm not complaining about the quality: if I want working 1394 drivers I ought to write some or shut up about it, but I am questioning to what extent 2.6 should have been released, if even after four releases basic things are completely broken...

Re:Stable? (-1, Troll)

Sla$hd0tSux0r (762264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761184)

Looks like 2004 wont be the year of the Linux after all. Hey, go get 'em next year tiger!

Re:Stable? (4, Insightful)

Kourino (206616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761200)

If you're having problems, please read capture any oops output the kernel gives and submit a bug report. Kernel developers won't know about problems you have on your hardware if you don't tell them :3 Reporting bugs is as important as actually writing the drivers.

(I, for one, use snd-pcm-oss with gstreamer all the time without issues, so the ALSA people would definitely be interested in a bug report from you. No clue about the ieee1394 issues; obviously it works for someone, though, or it wouldn't have been released without being marked EXPERIMENTAL.)

Re:Stable? (1)

davidkv (302725) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761238)

I noticed a couple of days ago that Fedora Core 2 Test 2 have disabled the ieee1394 and sbp2 modules in their kernel now.

I'm having the same problems with sbp2-drives as you (although no OSS/ALSA problems, yet). Using a sbp2-drive in read-only mode works fine, but if I try some writing to the drives the machines hangs completely within a minute or two.

Apart from the above issue, 2.6.4 works excellent on my machines.

Re:Stable? (1, Informative)

rudmer (253952) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761262)

- The conversion to ALSA works great, but the modules for OSS compatibility segfault whenever an app tries to use them. Segfaults in the kernel are fun! There is pretty much nothing to do but reboot after that.

Well OSS (Open Sound System) is flagged depricated, so it is going to fade out. As you seem to have problems with it why just not do it completely and also drop the OSS compatability.
I have dropped it months ago and never had problems!

Re:Stable? (1)

TenPin22 (213106) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761281)

ALSA-OSS, SBP2, IEEE 1394 all work perfectly for me in 2.6.4.

Re:Stable? (5, Informative)

l-ascorbic (200822) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761299)

Funny, I never managed to get 1394 working until I did move to 2.6. It didn't work at first, but disabling eth1394 got sbp2 working. I can now use my Mac, HFS+ formatted iPod with gtkpod. I never got HFS+ working with 2.4. On the other hand, I haven't managed to get ALSA working at all yet. The biggest problem I had with the upgrade was with USB (for my mouse). In the end I dumped uhci in favour of usbmouse. This is all with a VIA Epia-M Mini-ITX board.

Firewire problems. (2, Informative)

ijuma82 (224636) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761358)

I had some issues with firewire in kernel 2.6 (getting total lockups when under heavy activity). I solved them by using the latest code in the subversion tree of http://www.linux1394.org/ with kernel 2.6.5-rc2. Since then I have upgraded to 2.6.5-rc3 and now 2.6.5 without any problems.

So, my advice is, try the latest kernel with the latest subversion tree from the linux1394.org website. Hopefully, that will solve your problems. 8)

802.11g support (5, Informative)

egrinake (308662) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761190)

Drivers for the prism54 [prism54.org] chipset have finally been merged, which means that the vanilla kernel now has support for 802.11g (54 mbit) wireless lan. The prism54 chipset is used in whole bunch [prism54.org] of 802.11g cards.

Yes! Finally! (1)

toupsie (88295) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761191)

[alansmithee@deke.at]
[PATCH] fix the disgronification build again after subarch memory breakage
The patch to check "disgronif=N" early broke by putting memdef (a variable which is only exported by subparse.c) into parse_memory_region_early().

Finally! I have been having so much trouble with the MIPS port because of a memory leak from the improper disgronification check since 2.6.3. This is a very crucial patch. Way to go!

Re:Yes! Finally! (-1)

Sla$hd0tSux0r (762264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761230)

Why didnt you fix it yourself, you clod?

Installation? (2, Interesting)

black mariah (654971) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761195)

Does anyone have links to some articles that details kernel upgrades that aren't written by and for programmers? I really want to update my Fedora box to 2.6, but the documentation I've seen for installing a new kernel pretty much assumes it's something you've done before.

Re:Installation? (3, Informative)

Pros_n_Cons (535669) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761231)

http://fedora.artoo.net/faq/#Kernel26 Or upgrade to FC2 test 2 like I did to help squash out bugs.

Re:Installation? (1)

black mariah (654971) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761257)

Thank you! Cheers! Generic comment of gratitude! I'm going to wait for the next stable release of FC before I upgrade. I had some problems moving from Redhat 8 to FC1, and if I run into those again I want to be prepared... so there's a lot of backing up coming my way in the next month or so.

Re:Installation? (4, Informative)

qtp (461286) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761344)

I'm not a RedHat user, but I did find this document [redhat.com] for building a custom kernel on RH9.
It's not specific to Ferdora, but it should be enough to get you through it. It looks pretty generic and is very similar to what I did before I began using Debian's kernel-package [sourceforge.net] system to manage my custom kernels (which BTW, is one of the best things about using Debian, especially if you are using more than one box).

You may want to familiarize your self with the
lspci
command, and possible with the
/proc/pci
file (use
cat /proc/pci
in an xterm to read it) in order to be sure that you're not leaving out support for some of your hardware. Read the help file for anything you don't know about, and don't hesitate to read the device specific files for items that you might need (if they have them).

Be sure to use the Fedora users list [redhat.com] for questions that you can't figure out from the docs. I'm sure there's lots of helpful folk there. If it's anything like debian-user [debian.org] you'll have no problems getting prompt and helpful answers. (If anyone gives you an RTFM, follow the provided link if there is one, if they did not provide one, then list the docs you've already consulted and ask if there's something you've missed and where it might be). Using the lists is not scary and, despite the *ss-hats who think otherwise, RTFM is not an insult. You'll learn much faster if you read the material yourself and ask questions afterward.

Be sure to set up your
/etc/lilo.conf
to boot from more to one kernel (if you're using grub you'll need help from sonmeone else for this). Move your old kernel into the new place (usually, I use
/boot/vmlinuz.old
for this) so you'll have a working alternative if you screw things up.

Be patient, take your time, check everything twice. It take's quite a bit of time to do this the first few times, but once you know your way aroiund the kernel config you realize that it's realy not all that difficult.

Question... (-1)

j0nkatz (315168) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761196)

How can Linux 2.6.5 just have been released when I just installed Linux 9 at home?

DMA API changes? (4, Interesting)

Mithrandir_The_Wise (765275) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761199)

According to this article [lwn.net] on LWN.net there was a patch by Dave Miller that changed the DMA API (see the Changelog for 2.6.5, from Dave Miller submitted through Andrew Morton) which *might* break binary drivers. All the in-kernel drivers are fixed, but the out-of-tree stuff might screw up. Just a heads up.

Scheduler? (3, Interesting)

moxruby (152805) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761203)

After reading the hype regarding the new kernel, I installed mandrake 10.0 (k2.6.3 I believe) to check it out. I was disapointed; mp3s skip under light loads even after I raised the priority of the player to maximum. I've got a 1.3ghz duron w/ 256mb ram so the machine should be able to cope.
I googled for a mandrake-specific bug but found nothing... Anyone else had the same problem?

Re:Scheduler? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761236)

I had this kind of problem with the kernel 2.6.3-3mdk. I update recently to the kernel 2.6.3-7mdk and the problem went away.

Re:Scheduler? (1)

Tagren (715283) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761244)

I have heard that if you nice up things you loose the *nice* thing with the new shed. Things like X should not even be niced up.
I have no problems with soundskip etc.
---

Re:Scheduler? (1)

Welsh Dwarf (743630) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761254)

I don't know about 10.0, but I've put 9.2s on a lot of machines (including Duron 900s, 128MB of ram, and never had a hitch, hell, even my PII 450 doesn't jump mp3s). Have you checked that there isn't something else hogging the soundcard (like a modem for example), and that you are using the right drivers? HTH David

Re:Scheduler? (1)

TenPin22 (213106) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761309)

I think when people have problems with skipping music they have either pants sound cards or the driver is pants or a combination of both. I have an Audigy on a Duron 900 and I've not had xmms skip in the 3 (just count them !) years I've been using linux.

For the price an Audigy is an excellent sound card for linux because everything "Just Works" TM. An important part of this is that it does hardware channel mixing as any half decent soundcard should. Most sound cards that come built onto motherboards require software mixing or you're limited to playing 1 channel at once.

Where's the Microsoft bashing? Where is michael? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761214)

I am sorry but I don't see any microsoft bashing in this news. I thought slashdot is about microsoft bashing, kissing apple's ass. Looks like we started to see more and more real news for nerds, I started to get scared here.

It has to be said.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761217)

Is this yet another late April Fool?

Nyah, nyah, nyah... (0, Offtopic)

koali (175176) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761229)

Beat you to it :)

alex@wintermute:~$ uname -a
Linux wintermute 2.6.5 #1 Sun Apr 4 12:48:02 CEST 2004 i686 GNU/Linux

But the touchpad on my Dell Inspiron 2650 is still not working properly :(

version.h (3, Interesting)

jmoen (169557) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761235)

Seems like version.h is missing from include/linux in this release (I patched from 2.6.4).
Made my ATI binary driver fail the compile, though by copying my 2.6.3 version.h file fixed it.
I thought the version.h file where used by several other prgograms that compiles against the kernel.
Am I missing something obvious here ?

Re:version.h (5, Informative)

Kourino (206616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761253)

Uhh, version.h is a generated file. It'll get rebuilt if you (e.g.) make menuconfig. (Actually, 'make prepare0' will work, as will ... well, 'make include/linux/version.h' ^_^ )

Re:version.h (1)

jmoen (169557) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761342)

Well thanks, that sorted it out :)
The file was missing after menuconfig and a kernel compile though. But when thinking of it I'm using make-kpkg (debianism), been using that since I started with debian so I don't really think about it anymore. Could be that kpkg is messing up or that it is just my source tree.

Be still my ... (-1, Flamebait)

jamesl (106902) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761243)

This news is so exciting ... well, I don't know what I'll do.

The world is passing by folks. If this qualifies as newsworthy, you need to get out more.

Is Slashdot a kernel.org announcement board? (-1, Flamebait)

rastakid (648791) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761269)

"Featuring a 367.6 KB changelog, the next Linux kernel is now ready for action. As always, enjoy!"

Why is it that Slashdot features *every* Linux kernel release? Every n-weeks a new Linux kernel is released, is it really necessary to post each release? At least don't post it to the frontpage. If you are a good admin, you should check out kernel.org every once in a while yourself.

Re:Is Slashdot a kernel.org announcement board? (-1, Flamebait)

walter_kovacs (763951) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761289)

I'd say that a lot of Slashdot users are linux desktop users, I feel it's a valuable service. Normally I hear about the latest and greatest kernel releases through /. first.

Re:Is Slashdot a kernel.org announcement board? (1)

EvilTwinSkippy (112490) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761321)

They don't call it the "kernel of the month" club for nothing.

MOD PARENT UP! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761331)

WTF?! Score -1, Flamebait?! The OP asked a serious question, where I agree to. Damn moderators must be one crack.

Re:Is Slashdot a kernel.org announcement board? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761337)

because people want to discuss the new kernel silly

Re:Is Slashdot a kernel.org announcement board? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761339)

Hey man,

This is part of the /. culture that just isn't going to change on the account of new jacks like you complaining that /. isn't freshmeat.net or kernel.org or (insert any other linux-centric announcement site).

slashdot.org has changed in the last couple of years and not necessarily for the better*, but I doubt it's going to be completely watered down to mainstream tech news.

* - I'm I the only one that thinks the old vibe of slashdot officially died when the games section was introduced.

Reiserfs (3, Interesting)

EvilTwinSkippy (112490) | more than 10 years ago | (#8761336)

Have they fixed the goofiness with reiserfs and 2.6. On my RAID array I get random oddities, like a user who owns a file but can't access it. And our Veritas Backup Exec client won't decend down to a reiserfs mounted volume.

Sure I could wipe and reformat the array, but the bugger is 100GB and my last restore took 48 hours.

Do not forget to check .sign (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8761355)

On kernel.org and mirrors, there is a .sign-file for each patch (or source tarball). It is a gpg-signature to prevent tampering the kernel on its way from the master site to you.
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