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Japan, China, S Korea Agree To Standardize Linux

Hemos posted more than 10 years ago | from the moving-towards-it dept.

Linux Business 270

Ooi writes "Japan Today News reports: 'The governments of Japan, China and South Korea have agreed to work together to come up with an alternative computer operating system to reduce reliance on Microsoft's Windows, the Yomiuri and Nihon Keizai newspapers reported Sunday. According to the reports, the three countries will help their private sectors develop Linux, an open-source OS that can be copied and modified freely. The agreement was signed in Beijing on Saturday by senior government officials from the three countries.' Australian IT has an article on the issue prior to the meeting." A few weeks ago, I spoke at the Asia OSS meeting in Hanoi of which the three gov'ts above are also members. There's a very serious commitment to OSS especially among the governments represented there.

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270 comments

Linux sucks donkey balls but its far better than w (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767793)

FP

Re:Linux sucks donkey balls but its far better tha (-1, Offtopic)

Phidoux (705500) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767801)

Says *THE* donkey!

Re:Linux sucks donkey balls but its far better tha (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767941)

US special forces in action in Iraq [yimg.com] .

Pretty cool. Is the guy on the left about to lob a grenade from his M203?

first merde ! (-1)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767796)

fuck you, nerdz.

Re:first merde ! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767807)

God, you are such a fucking idiot.

For the quest in improving the gene pool, please shoot yourself. Immediately.

Re:first merde ! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767815)

YOU FAIL IT SUX0R

It really says something (-1, Flamebait)

Travoltus (110240) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767798)

when Americans cheer foreign nations' efforts to free themselves from America's quest for digital hegemony.

Re:It really says something (1, Insightful)

ms_drives_me_mad (766056) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767818)

a govt should remain neutral to any particular business - ofcourse if there is a monopoly there can be a monopoly suit - but as far as encouraging or shielding linux goes - that's totally wrong.

Re:It really says something (1)

spafbnerf (749681) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767987)

Call me a religious zealot but I think it's great for governments to encourage use & development of free software.. ;D And can you really blame them for it, when such a tiny percentage of their population can actualy afford to buy a commercial OS like Windows (most of them pirate it). And then those few Windoze boxen would naturally just be a thorn in everyone's side in terms of interoperability, etc.

Yay OSS! :D Windows, fft!... ;o

Re:It really says something (2, Insightful)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767995)

A government should aso not allow it's entire IT infrastructure to be remote controlled from a foreign nation. A state monopoly is good when it achieves something private companies can not handle, or when you talk about critical things with few/no alternatives(e.g. water supply). (Replacing)Windows comes pretty close to both descriptions.

Re:It really says something (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768045)

a govt should remain neutral to any particular business

And what particular business do you feel that the government involved are not being neutral towards? Any business can distribute free software, so using it seems infinitely more "neutral" than using a system that only one business can distribute.

Re:It really says something (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768051)

Why? No government is neutral. Look at the US in relation to free trade. The ultimate fallback - "in the National Interest". If my IT sector was largely reliant on software from a perceived unfriendly power I'd be worried.

Re:It really says something (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767846)

Enquiring minds want to know how you reached that conclusion.

AFAIK, most of the windows copies in china are pirated.

They use MS, but don't support them.

Re:It really says something (2, Interesting)

DaHat (247651) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767974)

True, but even using windows and not paying for it puts the country effectively at the mercy of Microsoft. Should they no longer support local languages or worse, break existing installs during an update/service pack, suddenly you've got a country full of users who are SOL and quite unproductive.

As the old line says, "Don't put all your eggs in one basket"

*looking around my house* Windows 2k, XP, 2k, 98, 2k... yea... I'm screwed.

Re: George Walker Bush Is a GODLY man (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767942)

It really doesnt say as much as the global piracy ring says to them.

Think about it. [Eastern]Foreign nations tend to use pirated copies of software instead of legal copies.

THIS IS A FIRST POST! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767800)

bikause i don't fuking RTFA!

Re:THIS IS A FIRST POST! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767825)

FIrst post, no way, I got that! ayway you are a slow piece of shit!
go take some speed!

YOU FAILED (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767838)

BIGTIME!
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Yay! (-1, Offtopic)

Zero_K (606548) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767802)

This makes me a very happy person. With Western eurpean cities (Munich...) and now the easter countries (japan, Korea...) Linux is starting to get serious government atterion that it deserves here in the US.

Re:Yay! (5, Funny)

TwistedSquare (650445) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767823)

now the easter countries

I'm just hoping Christmas Island joins in too.

Re:Yay! (1)

tindur (658483) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767871)

For goatse.cx?

need to control the export of this advanced tech. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767985)

hmm. wonder if anti-teror government agenices is worried about this

Re:Yay! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767836)

Why ?

These 3 countries are out to save a buck and at the same time try to get a bit of traditional American IT industry, OS making.

I think Americans in generally should be less worried over telemarketing jobs going to India, this is the real threat, the risk that high tech IT jobs moves east, far east.

Re:Yay! (4, Insightful)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767909)

These 3 countries are out to save a buck ...

Nothing wrong with that.

and at the same time try to get a bit of traditional American IT industry, OS making.


Since Linux is not traditional American IT industry software, there is no technological drain happening here. This decision does however have the potential to shrink the market share of a certain technologically stagnated and sloppy American OS vendor but that is only to be expected when this American OS vendor's product sucks bigtime. Another factor is the simple fact that given the USA's obsession with intelligence gathering nobody trusts this American OS vendor not to cave into the pressure to spike its product with backdoors

Re:Yay! (2, Funny)

nomadic (141991) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767999)

This decision does however have the potential to shrink the market share of a certain technologically stagnated and sloppy American OS vendor but that is only to be expected when this American OS vendor's product sucks bigtime.

Aww. Red Hat's not THAT bad...

Re:Yay! (4, Funny)

AKnightCowboy (608632) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767858)

Linux is starting to get serious government atterion that it deserves here in the US.

This is horrible news! With Sweden claiming the world's richest business man owning IKEA here [cnn.com] , Bill Gates needs all the support he can get to jump back on top. If we all work together and pledge to purchase a copy of Windows XP Pro and Office 2003 Pro we can make the dream happen... we can put Bill back on top and win one for America!! Down with crappy swedish furniture manufacturers and up with global monopolistic software giants! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA!

Re:Yay! (2, Interesting)

AdamTheBastard (532937) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767976)

could this set the precident for the future? think about it, IKEA primarily makes products with "some asemberly required" now is there anything out there that you can think of that might "require some building" that could topple Bill Gates off his perch?

Slashdot icon for Ingvar Kamprad of IKEA (2, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8768011)

Here is my suggestion for an icon for the head of IKEA, since Gates is no longer Top Borg:

click here [thetick.nl]

Re:Yay! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768017)

subversive cretian!

everyone in bill's club knows that the real supporters buy Windows 2003 server, office 2003 server for their workstations..

sheesh... you kids thinking your os has to cost less than $500.00...

Earpian? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767870)

"With Western eurpean cities "

What of the Wyatt Earpean cities?

Alliances... (5, Funny)

MrRTFM (740877) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767803)

so here are 3 countries which have tradionally been 'not too friendly' with each other that can agree to standardise on a single installation of Linux...

This is cool, but the $24,000 dollar question is - will they go with KDE or Gnome as the default ??

Surely this should be a slashdot poll!

Asian distro defaults...
(o) Vi and Gnome
(o) Vi and KDE
(o) Emacs and Gnome
(o) Emacs and KDE
(o) Cowboy Neal is my interface and text editor, you insensitive clod!

Re:Alliances... (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767834)

(o) Nano and XFCE

Nicer than any of the above :-P

Re:Alliances... (0, Flamebait)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767840)

Nano is a sorry excuse of an editor...

Nano (0, Offtopic)

Gleef (86) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767886)

Nano is great, whenever I'm training a Windows-trained sysadmin for a Linux system, that's the first editor I throw at them. It's easy to use, and doesn't confuse the issue with either inscrutable modes or forgettable key combinations. In its default mode it even tells you the most important control keys on screen.

These people don't need much in an editor, just editing a few config files and maybe writing a short script. Nano does it easily.

Of course, I don't know how well it works with CJK scripts, I suspect badly, so it won't work well for this group.

GNAA Announces acquisition of SCO (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767842)

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Re:Alliances... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767875)

(o) XPde

Re:Alliances... (1, Funny)

ndogg (158021) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767892)

You can run Gnome and KDE on top of Emacs?!!! Is there anything Emacs can't do these days?

(disclaimer: I happen to love Emacs, but I can't resist a good joke)

Re:Alliances... (2, Funny)

prash_n_rao (465747) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767896)

On RMS's behalf I would like inform you that Emacs is the perfect option for both text editor and user interface. KDE and Gnome WIMPs are for wimps.

Not Emacs, but Mule (1)

News for nerds (448130) | more than 10 years ago | (#8768003)

Not Emacs, but Mule [m17n.org]

But will it be OS (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767810)

It's all well and good these countries developing Linux, but will it remain open source?

Can open source be inforced with these governmental development?

Re:But will it be OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767882)

" It's all well and good these countries developing Linux, but will it remain open source?"

Short Answer : No

Long Answer: Everyone is afraid of pissing off the chinese. Hence, they can do whatever they want, with little or no repecussions. Even Bush, the great war-time leader is sitting on the fence with that one, even when he loves to jump down everyone else's throats.

Re:But will it be OS (3, Informative)

spafbnerf (749681) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767919)

Short Answer : No

Not true.
Quoted from the peopledaily.com.cn article [peopledaily.com.cn] :

Sources concerned said that as the three nations were heading for the same goal of promoting the cooperation on and development of open source software and pushing forward the campaign of opening source code in the northeast Asia, they agreed to exchange information on open source software, share research results, and make joint efforts on developing open source software of next generation based on the software with freely available source code represented by Linux.
..
The three parties vowed to adhere to the principle of opening source code and make joint efforts to give contribution to the global open source software community.

Re:But will it be OS (5, Insightful)

spectrokid (660550) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767938)

They can tell the FSF to go **** itself, but they would shoot themselves in the foot. Keeping their source closed would lead to a fork, meaning they would gradually start losing compatibility. All those free and fresh updates available at SF and kernel.org would gradually grow more and more incompatible.

Re:But will it be OS (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767946)

And with more coders in China than the rest of the world, the current version of Linux would end up being the incompatible one.

Governments don't write code (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767811)

Governments can sign what they like; they don't write code, so I fail to see exactly what it is supposed to achieve to sign a document? Can someone please explain?

Re:Governments don't write code (2, Insightful)

spafbnerf (749681) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767948)

The development will be done by the private sector, but will be funded and co-ordinated by representatives from the member states.

China as a Linux maker (4, Interesting)

Michalson (638911) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767812)

So how much can we expect Linux and OSS to be exploited for oppression and control of the population? China already takes a lot of measures to control the internet (students get arrested just for entering key phrases like "taiwan", "human rights" and "democracy" into google), if they can control the OS too what is to stop them from using that to further control (and while the GPL forces it to be open source, they can easily make it a political crime to use any clean/lite version of their distro)

Mainland China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767835)

Remember, Mainland China is a place where women are sentenced to rape camps for having the wrong religion. What punishment is in store for those who use the wrong Linux distro?

Re:Mainland China (3, Funny)

Ronan_The_Barbarian (766623) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767884)

These govts. are known for their thight-handedness and disregard for world law. Once the OS is ready they will ditch GPL and use the OS as they fit. Will SCO sue them? Will Linus Torvalds travel to Beijin to "implement" GPL and "force" them to comply? I seriously doubt it. He "may" have an unfortunate "accident" which leaves him brain-dead. Darl McBride would be declared "enemy of state" and incarcerated and spiked in a Bamboo shoot -:)) I for one think it is dangerous

Re:Mainland China (1)

shadowcabbit (466253) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767885)

The sad part is, I'm not sure whether you're joking or not.

While I applaud the 'official' adoption of Linux by these countries, I have to wonder just how much commonality there will be among them, aside from the kernel and a few other tools. The Chinese "Asianux" might have libraries to strictly control what can be looked at/used with it, while the Korean distribution might not have these controls.

Moreover, I'm not all that familiar with the GPL, so could someone explain to me in simple 5-year-old terms what would stop China from releasing its extensions to the distro as binary-only? Or Japan from doing the same?

Re:China as a Linux maker (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767837)

"and while the GPL forces it to be open source

What's to stop them disobeying (in particular, their Government) the GPL and doing what they like with the code?

Who would be able to prosecute them? Who would care enough?

The chinese government will do with linux what they want. And no-one wants to stop them, because you can't piss of the Chinese Government, as its too big a market for imports and exports.

Re:China as a Linux maker (2, Interesting)

untermensch (227534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767851)

if they can control the OS too what is to stop them from using that to further control (and while the GPL forces it to be open source, they can easily make it a political crime to use any clean/lite version of their distro)

True enough, but if they're going to settle on an official OS this seems like a best-case scenario. Imagine how much more control they would have if the Chinese government were to write their own, closed-source OS. Even if it is a crime to modify the OS, I wonder how easy that would be to enforce.

Re:China as a Linux maker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767854)

students get arrested just for entering key phrases like "taiwan", "human rights" and "democracy" into google

And how is this different from the modern "Everybody is a terrorist until proven otherwise" USA.

In the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767927)

"And how is this different from the modern "Everybody is a terrorist until proven otherwise" USA."

No, under current US doctrine, you are only a terrorist if you have been proven to be one.

Re:In the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767964)

No, under current US doctrine, you are only a terrorist if you have been proven to be one.

Sure, and being incarcerated at Guantanamo constitutes proof. I expect the Chinese can match safeguards like that without blinking.

Result of proof (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767978)

"Sure, and being incarcerated at Guantanamo constitutes proof"

No, it is a result of proof (such as being caught red-handed fighting in a terrorist army such as Taleban or AQ).

Re:China as a Linux maker (4, Insightful)

gus goose (306978) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767867)

The parent is such an absurd remark. Firstly, they can not control the OS. They can Contribute, but that is it. They can legislate, enforce, or whatever. The only thing Linux is going to do is possibly make the governments more efficient at being oppressive.

You will find that all governments (especially the US government) feel "pissed" when they are not "in control", and will use whatever tools at their disposal to gain as much control as possible. The US Govt is a prime example. Look at how they have used tech to gain control of their environment.

So, The advancements that China/etc can make to Linux to make it a better tool for them are going to be used to the collective benefit of ALL linux users, (and I imagine that the BOFH Firewall admins will be especially happy). As for how the tech is used in China as opposed to the rest of the world, well, that is for the Chinese to determine.

So, a government, whether Chinese or not, will always want control... it is their job. Linux, whether modified by the Chinese/etc or not, will be better for the experience.

As for human rights, etc. Well, first you have to ask yourself ... who knows most about human rights?

gus

Re:China as a Linux maker (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767898)

As for human rights, etc. Well, first you have to ask yourself ... who knows most about human rights?

People that took mainly them for granted, and then lost them.

See -
Germans under Hitler
Hong Kong Citizens after the turnover.

Re:China as a Linux maker (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767998)

Americans under Bush

Re:China as a Linux maker (2, Insightful)

basingwerk (521105) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767872)

Because Linux is more effective than Windows, China will be more effective at oppressing and controlling the population? Hm.. perhaps China will buy Volvos instead of Volkswagens because you can fit more arrested students in them!

But can it cook my TV dinner, too? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767816)

micheal wonders.

Re:But can it cook my TV dinner, too? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767839)

NO
BUT it will cook your nuts!

Expected (5, Interesting)

Peter_Pork (627313) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767821)

It has been clear for some years that most countries are very unhappy with the existing OS monopoly. Given how critical IT has become, it is simply unacceptable to rely on a single, foreign vendor like Microsoft. Linux (in some evolved or forked form) will be the standard OS everywhere, at least outside the US. Other open source projects, like FreeBSD, may also conquer quite a few markets. Paradoxically, the only solution is an free, open source Windows, but I doubt Microsoft is so brave!

Try reactos. (3, Interesting)

Krik Johnson (764568) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767848)

Its a free open source operating system that is a clone of Windows NT. Reactos website [reactos.com]

Re:Try reactos. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767918)

Sucker. That's not a real project.

Who the hell would be stupid enough to try to clone NT, let alone find people who would care.

Re:Expected (4, Interesting)

weave (48069) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767864)

I do believe you're right. One could say "duh, obvious" even, but I've been surprised it hasn't happened before now. With growing mistrust of the U.S. around the world, why would a foreign nation trust a closed source piece of software from a U.S. company?

On another angle, why did the U.S. and Europe bother suing Microsoft? If they didn't like Microsoft's monopoly abuses, all each of these governments had to do is leverage their buying power. "We demand you unbunndle, stop, etc, or we will take our business elsewhere." That would have been far more effective and quicker than the courts.

Once governments switch, their contractors and vendors and others who communicate with them may switch too -- to be compatible. The same domino effect that help Microsoft be where they are today.

What are you talking about? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768048)

> On another angle, why did the U.S. and Europe bother suing Microsoft?

It was Sun that sued Microsoft in Europe.

Can we please stop saying MS has a monopoly? (-1, Flamebait)

realmolo (574068) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767883)

Because it doesn't.

No one *has* to use Windows. There are many other operating systems, running on many different kinds of hardware.

Simply being the market leader because doesn't make you a monopolizer.

Mod insighftul (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767913)

Microsoft does have a majority share, but total control, on the platform it co-invented with IBM (the PC).

In the PDA, Palm is quite big (no Microsoft dominance). Microsoft is no-where when it comes to the OS of the Mac platform.

Re:Can we please stop saying MS has a monopoly? (2, Informative)

MrMr (219533) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767935)

Some judges may beg to differ.

http://news.com.com/2100-1040-232565.html?legacy =c net&tag=st.ne.1002.tgif%3fst.ne.fd.gif.b

Some judges lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767960)

Some judges may beg to differ

Some judges lie.

Re:Expected (1)

vandenh (224583) | more than 10 years ago | (#8768050)

Of course for China this is a very good way to evade some of the "capitalist" rules, like actually paying a US company for an OS. If you where a big Cummunist country... wouldn't you want something like Linux as well? It frees you from IP-mad capitalist pigs ;)

Looks like Linux is really becoming the anti-us/communist/free-trade choice of the planet.

Good? Bad? Time will tell...

Look out, Far East (3, Funny)

KidCeltic (130804) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767843)

SCO will have you in its sights now!

Re:Look out, Far East (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767852)

SCO better watch out, I here the east has nukes in development...

Re:Look out, Far East (1)

CdBee (742846) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767859)

I can just feel an "in Communist China"... gag brewing....

Re:Look out, Far East (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767912)

In Soviet Russia, China jokes about YOU!

Buy those licenses now! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767844)

Japan, China and S Korea: that's a combined population of over 1.5 billion, multiplied by $699 equals BUY SCOX!

Does SCO know about this? (2, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767847)

(1.2 billion Linux users) x ($699) =
PROFIT!

Geez. With this, Darl might approach the riches of the head of Ikea [thetick.nl] , who recently bumped Gates off the "richest dude" list.

Red Flag (4, Interesting)

somethinghollow (530478) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767866)

Wasn't that the Idea with Red Flag Linux (or whatever it is called... Slashdot's search feature rarely returns anything that has my search terms)? Will South Korea and Japan go for Red Flag or will they start a-fresh?

At least China already has some experience in this market. Kudos for supporting OSS and maybe (if that actually write any code) helping Linux improve even faster.

Re:Red Flag (3, Informative)

spafbnerf (749681) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767934)

China's Red Flag and Japan's Miracle Linux have a joint project named 'Asianux' which is now in beta.

SCO filing 1.3 billion lawsuits then? (2, Funny)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767874)

So in the near future, will we see SCO/RIAA file 1.3 billion lawsuits , 1 for each person in China, Japan and Korea? That would be a fabulous waste of money. They can just issue 1.3 billion trial delays, and SCO can take a rest for 30 thousand years!

Asian-language localized UNIX tools (5, Interesting)

Debian Troll's Best (678194) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767879)

This article is great news for proponents of Linux in the Asian IT market. However, this is only a first step on the long march to acceptance. In my experience, a big stumbling block of new IT rollouts in non-Western environments are the language and alphabet related ones. These problems extend from the GUI and applications right at the top, all the way down to basic command line tools. Making sure that there are suitably localized versions of commonly used Open Source and GNU tools would be a great first step in the cultural revolution taking place in workplaces across Asia.

For example, the apt-get software is a key tool in the system administrator's arsenel. It has a relatively simple command line syntax, but it is obviously in English, and therefore would pose a problem for Japanese, Chinese or Korean administrators wanting to come rapidly up to speed. What would people think about tools like apt-get being re-engineered to include a language abstraction layer, so locales could be exchanged like plugins, to customise the tool for new countries? In fact, this type of localisation need not be limited merely to language changes. Entire cultural paradigms could be replicated via a plug-in system. For example, in Chinese markets the apt-get package management model could be described as a yum-cha cart, bringing tasty morsels of .deb packages to each table, or system. The package database would be the little card the attendant checks when you receive each plate, or in this case, .deb package

I look forward to the community's response!

Re:Asian-language localized UNIX tools (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768002)

Are the mods on crack?

Wikipedia reaches 241,000 articles! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767891)

GNAA [wikipedia.org] is one of them! Vandalize the page for the piece of SCUM that the GNAA are!

Microsoft (1, Flamebait)

stephenry (648792) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767901)

Heh! I'd like to see Microsoft "innovate" themselves out of this one!

Steve...

What about Red Flag? (2, Interesting)

xandroid (680978) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767908)

I wonder how this will fare for Red Flag Linux [redflag-linux.com] (English [redflag-linux.com] )? Nothing like a government-sponsored monopoly to cut into profits...

Asian stuff (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767915)

My favorite thing about asians: http://www.glandscape.com/ascii.html [glandscape.com]

"If you stare long enough into the abyss, the abyss will stare into you."

Ehrm..... (1, Funny)

ardor (673957) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767929)

According to the reports, the three countries will help their private sectors develop Linux, an open-source OS that can be copied and modified freely. Dude, this is SLASHDOT. In Slashdot, EVERYONE knows what Linux is :)

Another example of Microsofts big fear. (4, Insightful)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767933)

Things getting to a point where no one wants them.

Kind of an interesting analogy. This could be similar to the Big Iron vs PC issues that happened during the 80's. Everyone wants the speed, responsiveness, and immediate feedback of the PC. From a core OS standpoint, Microsoft just doesn't provide this. If you want a change, such as how it handles your system of written communication, you either pay the big bucks and DIY or wait for them to do it for you. Security issues tend to take longer with Microsoft. Etc, etc...

Microsoft won't ever go away. But I fee that they will become less relevant.

At least... (4, Insightful)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767940)

At the very least, given the big number of hardware companies in those countries (added those of Taiwan that probably wasn't in the agreement because China doesn't recognize it, but whose interests lie in the same line), this agreement will help improve Linux driver support.

That's good news and no mistake.

Don't want to admit it... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767947)

...but its true. An international "win" for OSS almost always means a bigger "loss" for the U.S.

So now a few more countries stop buying their software from an American corporation. Its just more and more lost exports and GDP we all have to endure, regardless of the particular goods or service.

So the Monopoly is now..... where? (-1, Insightful)

isa-kuruption (317695) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767952)

So is a Linux monopoly better than a Microsoft monopoly all of a sudden? Some may say yes, but no monopoly is good. What these countries are doing is basically giving Linux the advantage within their own borders. Some may say this is a good thing, but to me this is government intereferance in a sector they should not touch.

Re:So the Monopoly is now..... where? (1)

Jesus IS the Devil (317662) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767992)

Considering the U.S. government is prone to pulling dirty tricks via deliberate sabotage of software code, I don't blame any of these countries to want to use open-source software. At least there they can audit the code.

http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,62806,00. html [wired.com]

The author of a new book detailing a plan to use a Trojan horse embedded in stolen software to wage economic war against the Soviet Union fired back Thursday at charges the book's revelations are "rubbish."

Thomas C. Reed, a former secretary of the Air Force and special assistant to President Reagan, detailed the stunning story in At the Abyss: An Insider's History of the Cold War.

According to Reed, the Reagan administration faced a choice in 1981 when it "gained access to a KGB agent in their technical intelligence directorate" and discovered that Soviet theft of American technology had been "massive."

"In essence, the Pentagon had been in an arms race with itself," Reed said in a phone interview.

Rather than arrest everyone they could to try to close the operation down and halt further espionage, CIA director William Casey and National Security Council staffer Gus Weiss cooked up a better plan: They turned into hackers.

"(Soviet agents) stole stuff, and we knew what they were going to steal," Reed said. "Every microchip they stole would run fine for 10 million cycles, and then it would go into some other mode. It wouldn't break down, it would start delivering false signals and go to a different logic."

The most spectacular result of this hacking, according to Reed, was a massive explosion during the summer of 1982 in the controversial pipeline delivering Siberian natural gas to Western Europe.

Soviet spies stole software needed to operate the pipeline, not knowing that "it had a few lines of software added that constituted a Trojan horse," said Reed. "They checked it out, it looked fine, and ran just fine for a few months. But the Trojan horse was programmed to let it run for four or five months and then the pumps and compressors are told, 'Today is the day we are going to run a pressure test at some significantly increased pressure.'"

He continued: "We expected that the pipeline would spring leaks all the way from Siberia to Germany, but that wasn't what happened. Instead the welds all blew apart. It was a huge explosion. The Air Force thought it was a 3-kiloton blast."

Former KGB agent Vasily Pchelintsev, who was reportedly head of the KGB office in the area of the 1982 blast, told the English-language Moscow Times in a recent interview that Reed's account was inaccurate. "What the Americans have written is rubbish," the former agent said.

Pchelintsev said the only explosion that occurred in Siberia that year came in April, not during the summer, and was near the city of Tobolsk in the Tyumen region. A government investigation blamed the explosion -- which was not disclosed in public until after Reed's book -- on construction violations, Pchelintsev said.

The former KGB agent added that no one was killed in the explosion, the damage was repaired within one day and the pipeline in question supplied gas locally, to the city of Chelyabinsk, not to Western Europe along the Urengoi-Uzhgorod pipeline.

Re:So the Monopoly is now..... where? (3, Informative)

ctid (449118) | more than 10 years ago | (#8768007)

Linux is an open system. How could it become a monopoly? In other words, if company X introduces a Linux-based solution, what is to stop company Y from emulating that, or producing products that interoperate with it? If they don't abide by the terms of the GPL, you might have a point, but why would they want to do that? The point is that they're not beholden to a gigantic foreign company - the GPL helps them there.


May I ask why you think that IT infrastructure is a sector that government should not touch? I mean, is there a real reason for believing that the private sector is superior in this area?

Re:So the Monopoly is now..... where? (2, Informative)

rokzy (687636) | more than 10 years ago | (#8768038)

are you retarded? yes. here's why: a monopoly isn't about having the most users, it's about control. linux can't be a monopoly because no-one owns it or controls it in the way MS controls Windows. users have the choice, and the idea of this choice is built into the GPL such that it cannot be removed.

monopolies are capable of being very good, for example they can make things standardised and there's no waste caused by repeating what's already been done. monopolies are ONLY bad when they act in such a way to remove a user's choice, otherwise survival of the fittest still applies.

This will assure us the hardware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8767957)

This will assure is us that there will still be hardware capable of running linux when the next generation of hardware coming from the U.S (and E.U. ?) will be forced to use DRM to limit its OS choice to two (MS,Apple) or three (SUN).

I'll believe it when I see... (5, Interesting)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767971)

I'll believe it when I see Korean websites that are actually usable for people running Linux. In the Korean web, IE6 on Windows is pretty much required to do anything useful at all.

Korean Ebay is IE6 only, Korean banks offer internet banking only to IE6 users, Many Korean government websites don't function properly with anything but IE6, etc. etc.

I've been seeing articles about Korea's "committment to Linux" for a long time, but I've yet to see any evidence that the Korean web is anything other than completely and utterly owned by Microsoft.

3 countries have different causes (5, Insightful)

News for nerds (448130) | more than 10 years ago | (#8767975)

For Japan, the most wanted goodness in Linux is security, which is considered higher than that of MS Windows. Money is not that big issue for Japanese government, as Japanese electronics giants such as Fujitsu which are close to the governemnt are traditionally big for their SPARC servers. Migrating to Linux may be short loss for those companies but killing license fee to MS and Sun will offset it.

For Korea, the most wanted is cheapness of Linux, that will help the country to grow without paying licence fee to the US company.

For China, to kill rampant piracy to meet global standard, Linux is ideal solution, and of course it is free of security backdoor that may be present in software made in the US as GNU/RMS repeats it. You may worry about China use Linux as a tool to suppress free speech, but considering this is a project of 3 countries, such aspect won't be in its contents.

Though 3 countries have different causes, as the initiative of so-called Open Source development is still in the hand of the Western people and internationalization of current OSS is poor, it is no wonder those countries start their own movement.

microsoft won't go away (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768001)

It seems to me that M$ does best when they have serious competition. I remember that their VC compilers were always top notch when they were busy hammering away at Borland. The same thing was probably true when they were trying to break Wordperfect. The truth is that this competition will force M$ to work on their products and do good service - which is really the whole point of competition.

Google News related stories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8768036)

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