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Sake Used to Make Wooden Speakers

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the now-thats-just-bizarre dept.

Music 271

geeber writes "And you thought Sake was only good with Sushi? Well, think again! IEEE Spectrum has an article on how JVC has used sake to enable making speaker cones out of wood. Wood has a wide frequency response which makes it desirable as a material for speaker cones. However Toshikatsu Kuwahata worked for 20 years trying to make the cones out of wood without cracking. Finally he discovered that soaking the wood in sake (but not whiskey) made the wood pliable enough to form into a speaker cone. So let's raise our glasses and toast those clever engineers as we crank up the volume!"

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271 comments

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GNAA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776250)

it feels good in the spichnter

Lucky bastards. (5, Funny)

aardvarko (185108) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776252)

Hell, sake enables me to make all kinds of things, most of them accessory fluids for my American Standard, but I sure as hell don't get any stinkin' Slashdot articles about them, now, do I. Harrumph.

Obvious! (4, Funny)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776253)

Drink enough sake and you will not see any cracks.

Re:Obvious! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776276)

Drink enough sake and crack will almost seem like a good idea.

Sake! (2, Funny)

dolo666 (195584) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776327)

Drink enough sake and you become excellent karate fighter too! :-)

Re:Obvious! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776398)

In other words:

You can use sake for the sake of clouding your vision.

Sorry about that, too much sake ...

Re:Obvious! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776405)

good sake [timeshavers.gnaa.us]

the reverse is true (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776425)

Sake is also used to make wooden speakers
more lifelike when they talk in front of audiences.

Down a few cups of piss warm sour water and the most most wooden speaker is gonna be much more relaxed.

can't (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776259)

resist...

Drink more rice! (1)

Faith_Healer (690508) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776274)

Man 5 minuites with me in that workshop and he would be out of business, bring on the rice wine and rice speakers.

Americans already drink much rice! (2, Interesting)

Osty (16825) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776445)

Budweiser [budweiser.com] , the king of rice beers.


(It's a flash page, so I can't link to the ingredients directly. Make up an age over 21, click on the Beer menu item, then "All About the Beer" at the bottom, then the "Making It" choice on the top left, then Ingredients.)

Whiskey? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776275)

Billions of blistering barnacles!

OMFG TINTIN ROR LOLF (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776473)

ROROROROROR

Rice, eh? (1, Offtopic)

shog9 (154858) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776278)

How can wood be made pliable enough to form into loudspeaker cones? That question stumped engineers for decades until Satoshi Imamura discovered the answer: rice wine.


Hmmm... Perhaps a use has finally been discovered for Budweiser [budweiser.com] ...

Re:Rice, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776313)

Bud: Low alcohol beer-substitute to make 'mericans feel like they're men.

Bud lite: Don't know how that's possible

Re:Rice, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776458)

bud lite: they add water to the horse urine...

Can't resist it (5, Funny)

Magickcat (768797) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776280)

So I guess the sound really does give you wood.

Re:Can't resist it (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776378)

no, but the sight of a crack does :-).

Re:Can't resist it (4, Funny)

cgranade (702534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776524)

Not really... the wood gives you sound... and not just in Soviet Russia, either.

Sigh (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776281)

Dear Japan,

it's called Budweiser.

Sinderely,

USA

Audiophile applications (-1, Informative)

eric434 (161022) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776284)

I wonder when we'll see wood-cone based speakers filter into the world of hi-fi, if ever.

High end manufacturers already use titanium for tweeters and epoxy-treated paper for woofers. The question here would be whether the wood could be manufactured with enough consistency in sonic properties as to ensure reliably good sound quality. The problem with most wood is that the grain varies, and hence the propagation of sound through the driver cone.

What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile App (5, Informative)

B747SP (179471) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776335)

What *I* love about slashdot is that there is no requirement that a poster must read the effing article before being modded up.

I wonder when we'll see wood-cone based speakers filter into the world of hi-fi, if ever.

RTFA....

This year, JVC introduced its first wood-cone speaker product based on Imamura's process

and

The system ships in May, at a suggested retail price of US $550. Back in Maebashi, Japan, his mission accomplished, Kuwahata has announced his retirement.

sigh....

Re:What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile (1)

Deraj DeZine (726641) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776360)

It's funny, because I think I've been duped into following goatse.cx redirects and whatnot more often than I RTFA.

This Slashdot culture can't be healthy.

Re:What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile (1)

B747SP (179471) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776384)

Slashdot editors only put goatse and tubgirl links in the articles on April 1st.

Re:What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile (1)

Deraj DeZine (726641) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776393)

Actually, they don't even do that, they just post stupid articles that aren't funny and hope that the commentors with save them... and they always do.

Re:What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile (4, Informative)

eric434 (161022) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776389)

Uh, I did read the article. But the speakers they're making look like they're aimed at the "Executive desk stereo" market, not the audio market.

These are audiophile speakers:
http://www.wilsonaudio.com

Re:What I love about slashdot (Was: Re:Audiophile (1)

rhuntley12 (621658) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776451)

JVC is making good quality speakers now? Damn, I must be behind in the times. Time to trade in my Triangles I guess.

Re:Audiophile applications (2, Interesting)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776336)

Considering people claim to be able to tell the difference between a Stratovarius (spelling?) and an inferior wooden violin, I'm sure phonophiles will be able to tell the difference between a wooden and titanium speaker (well, will at least be sucked up to by sales droids to open their wallets and pay for the wooden ones).

Re:Audiophile applications (1)

Osty (16825) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776396)

well, will at least be sucked up to by sales droids to open their wallets and pay for the wooden ones

Who needs fancy wood speaker cones when sales droids can already sell a set of piece of shit $2.50 paper cone speakers for $3000+? (yes, I'm talking about Bose [earthlink.net] ). However, I wouldn't trash the idea that audiophiles can tell the difference between cone materials. I'm no audiophile, but I've listened to enough mid- to high-range systems that I can tell what sounds good to me and what doesn't.


If Bose [liquidtheater.com] systems sound good to you, and you don't mind paying 3 to 5 times more than necessary, then enjoy! My own shitty Definitive satellite system set me back less than $1000, and sounds just as good to me as a friend's $3000 Lifestyle system from Bose (both suffer from being satellite speakers rather than full-range, but at least I saved $2000 with my purchase).

Re:Audiophile applications (1)

rhuntley12 (621658) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776469)

Hah Bose, I cannot believe people actually spend money on that absolute junk. Granted I'm not high end audiophile, I use Triangle speakers and my whole system is about $5K setup. It's amazing when I walk through a store and hear their top of the line speakers that cost more then I paid and they sound like absolute shit.

Re:Audiophile applications (3, Funny)

nomadic (141991) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776397)

Considering people claim to be able to tell the difference between a Stratovarius (spelling?) and an inferior wooden violin

I'm picturing a cross between a stratocaster [fender.com] and a Stradivarius [si.edu] ...

Re:Audiophile applications (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776534)

I had a friend who owned two electric guitars.
Both guitars were made by the same manufacturer.
One guitar was made from pieces of whole wood, and the other guitar's neck was made of a kind of pulp-wood.

Even with NO amplification at all, if you put your ear against the neck of the guitars while strumming chords on them, you noticed that the one carved out of a natural block of wood sounded much warmer and richer than the other.

Extending my analogy, I'd expect the sound coming out of wood-cone speakers to be much more natural sounding that sound coming out of a pulp-paper cone...

Of course people say cone made from composite materials should give an ever MORE realistic sound, since the have even lower latency and add less coloration.

Re:Audiophile applications (2, Funny)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776337)

Make sure your home is termite free. Or you just might find holes in your speakers. Damn those things, I hope they choke on a splinter!

Re:Audiophile applications (4, Funny)

CaptBubba (696284) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776347)

It leads to another whole set of different things to tweak. Wood grain spacing, denisity, type sepcies, and even where the tree was grown could all alter the sonic properties.

Of course, true to hi-fi traditions, the best wood will bee the rarest tree on the planet soaked in the oldest and most expensive saki, thereby keeping high end speaker prices in the upper statosphere.

Wrong questions (2, Interesting)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776350)

For Audiophiles the questions isn't how they sound, it's how much they cost and how they flavor the sound. If this takes off in the land on 'Electrons flow better if you hook a cable up one way, but if you reverse it it sounds worse' expect to see fights breaking out on what brand of Sake is best for this application.

Re:Wrong questions (5, Interesting)

eric434 (161022) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776407)

Actually, that cable phenomena you speak of has nothing to do with which directions electrons "flow better" in. Generally, many audiophile cables have a separate shield that is connected at one end, and in order for it to introduce the least amount of noise possible it should be connected at the source end -- hence cable directionality. Also (and more debatably), if you see the trace on a time domain reflectometer of an audio cable (with said construction) connected wrong way round, then you'll be pretty horrified at the massive impedance artifacts.

Re:Audiophile applications (5, Interesting)

DumbRedGuy (218259) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776388)

Aside from the differing sonic qualities of the wood, I wonder how it will hold up to temperature and humidity. Even if the speakers sound great, they have to be able to be used for more than a few months.

I wouldn't be surprised to see this be chic in audiophile circles. The irony of expensive wood sounding great but cheap paper being crap would be could be very appealing to members of the Golden Ear Club.

Re:Audiophile applications (1)

crackshoe (751995) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776400)

If you can afford true audiophine equipement, your entire city can be climate controlled.

Re:Audiophile applications (1)

UnassumingLocalGuy (660007) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776560)

Some mid-end vintage audiophile stuff can be had pretty inexpensively. A Marantz 2240 (what I use now) costs about $200, and sounds much better than any other reciever in that price range today.

Re:Audiophile applications (5, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776395)

As anyone who has had a brush with the world of hi-fi knows, if the material or process just sounds exotic enough and is expensive enough, it will sell very well no matter what the actual benefits may be.

Re:Audiophile applications (2, Interesting)

macshit (157376) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776423)

High end manufacturers already use titanium for tweeters and epoxy-treated paper for woofers. The question here would be whether the wood could be manufactured with enough consistency in sonic properties as to ensure reliably good sound quality.

I don't know about wood, but I've heard titanium tweeters get dissed on quite a bit for being too fatiguing (shrill, brittle), and a popular alternative (which are purported to sound more pleasant) are silk-dome tweeters -- so certainly organic materials are in the running.

Re:Audiophile applications (4, Funny)

Reverberant (303566) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776539)

I wonder when we'll see wood-cone based speakers filter into the world of hi-fi, if ever.

They've been around for some time. They're called "paper cones"

:)

In other news... (5, Funny)

kilocomp (234607) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776285)

In other news researchers are using wasabi to implement "Super Bass".

Whats Next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776301)

Houses made out of wood?

relaxed? (1)

maxbang (598632) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776287)

When I listen to these I feel extreme relaxation so 'sake' it to me! Oh jeez, I couldn't resist. How about a Bond if Austin isn't your bag?

These speakers are best listened to at the precise temperature of ninety-eight degrees fahrenheit.

The Real Truth About Linux (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776291)

Linus Torvalds developed Linux while he was attending university in Finland. A decade later, Linux has gone nowhere but limited to geeks and obscure users.

Why has Linux not made it big time? The reason to this is because Linux developers and users do not have social lives, and most of them were beat up in high school for their interest in computers. I was a high school jock myself, and I spent a lot of time washing my school's geeks' faces in toilets and had them write my homework. The same tactic was used in college, where I managed to graduate with a 3.2 GPA all because of having someone else do my work.

Most of these geeks that I tormented in the past are now Linux developers, and the majority of them pretty much never leave their apartment except for work and maybe the odd family event, which is probably the closest they have to outside human interaction.

I currently work as a notable figure in state politics, and I make over $90,000 a year. Most of the now Linux developers I tormented barely make it past rent.

So quit trying to make Linux better, build some muscles, and get your once fellow kind to do your work, because if you do so, you'll end up like me.

Re:The Real Truth About Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776362)

Trolling about my fantasy life on Slashdot?
Where do I sign up!!!!!!!!!

Just how small is you fucking penis?
Do you even have one? Maybe you were born one of those gender confused children who had hermaphroditic qualities and you look something akin to Pat from SNL?

Don't worry, I'm sure some fat nasty slob will let you rent out your asshole for a few nights crashing at his place living off of the next BJ you pick up at the truck stop.

I hope that Herpes doesn't bother you too much...

Re:The Real Truth About Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776369)

With politicians like you, who in America needs enemies?

Bad, Arnold, Bad! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776575)

Get back to Sacramento NOW or you can't be President!

JVC?!?!?! (-1)

djcreamy (729099) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776297)

I was wondering how they would they sound, but then I saw they were made by JVC. *cough* junk!

These speakers are for one thing... (0, Offtopic)

Faust7 (314817) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776298)

I will use those speakers specifically for watching anime.

It only seems appropriate.

destroy your eardrums, become an alcoholic. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776300)

Don't say I didn't warn you.

---
Mom
(posing anonymously for obvious reasons)

"without cracking" (4, Funny)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776302)

However Toshikatsu Kuwahata worked for 20 years trying to make the cones out of wood without cracking.

Wow, 20 years is a long time to work on a problem without cracking. Congratulations, Toshikatsu.

Re:"without cracking" (1, Interesting)

S.Lemmon (147743) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776403)

I kind of wondered about this - after all, people have been bending and shaping wood with steam and various other tricks for hundreds of years.

I wonder why making a speaker cone was so much of a problem? Seems like this may just have been a pet project of his, but a little historical research might have saved him a decade or two.

Re:"without cracking" (0)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776568)

I kind of wondered about this - after all, people have been bending and shaping wood with steam and various other tricks for hundreds of years.
But generally these have been strips or sheets formed into 2D shapes, the cones of a speaker are 3D shapes.

In response to the inevitable... (0)

-kertrats- (718219) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776305)

'whats the point of this? why would i want this? isn't it easier to just get normal speakers?' That question's gonna come up inevitably in this thread (it always does). The simple answer, that has been used time and time again, is 'because we can.'

Re:In response to the inevitable... (3, Informative)

shog9 (154858) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776343)

Actually, the article states:
wood, Kuwahata knew, has qualities that could make it a superior choice for sound reproduction. For one thing, sound propagates very quickly through wood, which means that the speaker can produce a wide range of frequencies. Wood also has an internal damping effect, which leads to a smoother frequency response.
...but then again, what do i know? Maybe they gave the same reasons back when wood-panel stationwagons first came out...

Temperature (2, Interesting)

halo8 (445515) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776306)

now.. was that Hot or Cold sake?

Re:Temperature (1)

RayMarron (657336) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776330)

I don't think I'd waste the Junmai Ginjo on speaker cones! Most likely the "wine in a bag" quality stuff they heat up and give people with their Sake bombers.

Re:Temperature (1)

Manfre (631065) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776480)

I bet if you were to try and touch the sake to judge the temperature, you would pull back a nub!

All you ever wanted to know... (3, Informative)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776312)

...about sake [ozekisake.com] . From the site:
Chouki Jukuseishu - Aged for 3 years or more in storage tanks after brewing, this sake is darker and has a heavier flavor.
The Guinness of sake, maybe?

Re:All you ever wanted to know... (5, Funny)

Deraj DeZine (726641) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776382)

Aged for 3 years or more

Good. I can't stand underaged drinking.

Re:All you ever wanted to know... (3, Funny)

ChrisMaple (607946) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776531)

Oh, for Guinness sake.

But how was it discovered? (3, Funny)

product byproduct (628318) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776316)

20 years of effort and it's still not working. Time to get drunk. [after a few bottles] heeey woooody, you wanty some sake tooooo?

fluent japanese speaker (4, Funny)

riqnevala (624343) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776339)

After licking too many speakers, they'll start singing karaoke..?

Quality? (4, Interesting)

Ryan Stortz (598060) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776340)

The article mentions that "But wood, Kuwahata knew, has qualities that could make it a superior choice for sound reproduction. For one thing, sound propagates very quickly through wood, which means that the speaker can produce a wide range of frequencies. Wood also has an internal damping effect, which leads to a smoother frequency response."

However, it doesn't tell us how they actually sound as compared to other speakers. Is there any comparison data out there?

Re:Quality? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776497)

Isn't frequency the most important consideration re: accurate reproduction? What type of data are you referring to?

Re:Quality? (1)

ChrisMaple (607946) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776559)

Flat frequency response on axis. Low levels of distortion. Reasonably uniform off-axis response. Ability to be used at high SPL without self-destructing.

Twenty years for this? (2, Informative)

vudufixit (581911) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776351)

Hmmm... I remember seeing something on TV showing the Inuits building canoes out of wooden planks that were made pliable with boiling hot seal oil. That was at least 20 years ago. If only the subject of the story had watched the same program I did back then...

Re:Twenty years for this? (1)

Galvatron (115029) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776468)

I think a cone small enough to fit in a speaker requires a hell of a lot more pliability than the gentle curve of a canoe.

Re:Twenty years for this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776510)

Oh thanks. Cue the blowing seal jokes now why don't you!

No need to write Inuits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776542)

Inuit is plural. One is Inuk.

Violins too (5, Interesting)

mattjb0010 (724744) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776352)

A similar trick was apparently "used" by Stradivarius in making violins, in that inadvertent soaking in brine in combination with the usual varnishes applied creates a good sound. More info further down on this [chemsoc.org] page. I've listened to a talk by Nagyvary in which one of his violins was played, and it's truly stunning to hear (I used to play the violin before I found out I was better at coding :)

Hmm... (3, Funny)

odano (735445) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776353)

I hear their next move is to replace titanium tweeters with spicy rolls.

Why not ammonia? (4, Informative)

Billy the Mountain (225541) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776354)

Every good balsa wood butcher knows that adding ammonium hydroxide to water and boiling it and then soaking the wood in it makes the wood very pliable. This has the added benefit of 1. It's cheaper. 2. More fun because you get to drink the sake while you play with your wood.

BTM

Re:Why not ammonia? (1)

A Bugg (115871) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776461)

More fun because you get to drink the sake while you play with your wood.

Are you sure you are talking about making speakers.

A Bugg

Re:Why not ammonia? (5, Funny)

Cranky_92109 (414726) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776466)

...you get to drink the sake while you play with your wood.

I tried for a long time to think of a joke funnier than this quote.
I couldn't, so lets see it one more time.

...you get to drink the sake while you play with your wood.

Re:Why not ammonia? (1)

ryanvm (247662) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776472)

More fun because you get to drink the sake while you play with your wood.

I prefer to save the food and beverages until after I'm done with that.

Kanpai! (0, Offtopic)

ttfkam (37064) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776361)

Sumimasen. Sake o kudasai.

Re:Kanpai! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776486)

hmmm ... you mean either:


(o)sake wo motte kitte kudasai.


or just


sake kudasai!

Let's have our gratuitous / pretentious use of Japanese at least be accurate, ne?

In related (but pretty old) news.... (2, Funny)

wetson (27135) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776363)

...it's been confirmed that alcohol can loosen up the most wooden [teenwork.com] of individuals.

Why didn't he... (-1, Offtopic)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776375)

Why didn't he simply powder the wood, boil the pulp and let it dry on surface of the cone...
Maybe because then he would come up with what all the speakers in the world are made of... paper?

And now for you religious music fans... (4, Funny)

NewtonsLaw (409638) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776386)

Yes, if religious music is what spins your wheels, now you can have wooden speakers made with... what else but Christ's Sake :-)

After 20 years of saki on his expense reports... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776404)

He had to show some kind of results.

Hello everyone, (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776416)

I use titles such as 'Sake used to make wooden speakers', as if the story covers some technological breakthrough.
My name is Rob Malda, and I'm an alcoholic. I occasionally get drunk and post troll stories to Slashdot.

Leaves a lot of questions... (2, Insightful)

CNERD (121095) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776422)

Wouldn't the wood have to be rather thick/dense/heavy to not want to crack under the pressure (thereby making the speaker ineffecient)? Wouldn't thin wood respond the same as our 20 year old paper cones?

THE JIMMY O'LEARY PHENOMENON (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776424)

If anybody has any information about Jimmy O'Leary, please post it. That guy is fly.

Re:THE JIMMY O'LEARY PHENOMENON (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776471)

Isnt he the guy from that old Emerson Lake and Palmer song?

Jimothy Leary's dead. Oh no no no. He's outside... drinkin' gin.

Listen to the radio (1)

PHPhD2B (675590) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776448)

for good time's Sake

heh (1)

RelliK (4466) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776481)

I prefer to have my wood and my sake separately...

Maybe it's the Sake (1)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776489)

but what does Gilbert Godfrey [ieee.org] have to do with wooden speakers?

But wait! (5, Funny)

Captain Irreverence (761516) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776504)

If they're made of wood, then scientifically speaking they must weigh the same as a duck. And therefore:

They're a witch! Burn them, burn them!

Speaker materials (5, Informative)

The Munger (695154) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776522)

You would be suprised at the different materials conventional speaker cones are made from. You've probably seen plastic and paper cones. Probably even a few different types of plastics.

Speaker cones have to low resonance or at least a very narrow frequency range they resonate in. With a narrow resonating range, you can just put a low-pass/high-pass filter on it so it never receives the resonating frequencies - they get sent to another speaker with a different resonant frequency.

Metal tweeters have become very popular recently. Any really light, but tough metal is good. Alumin(i)um and titanium are the most commonly used, but there are some more exotic ones like Focal/JMLabs beryllium tweeters. The problem with metal cones is that they act like tuning forks - a really narrow resonant frequency range, but if they hit it they really resonate. My B&W 603s have aluminium woofers - which I just love the sound of. They cut them off pretty low though.

Kevlar (yes, the bullet proof vest material) is also a popular material at the moment. B&W and Wharfdale are two companies that make Kevlar based drivers. B&W have some interesting documents on their web site [bwspeakers.com] on what makes it such a good material.

Wooden cones would have a nice wide frequency range. Think about how wood sounds when you knock it with your knuckles - a nice dull thud. Yes, I'm ignoring all the musical instruments made of wood. I'm talking about your normal block of wood. They already make the vast majority of speaker cabinets out of wood precisely for the low-resonant properties that it exhibits.

This is interesting news in the world of hi-fi.

How is this NEWS? (2, Funny)

DKConstant (307421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776535)

I've known for YEARS that alcohol makes music sound better! Where's MY article?

Drink up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776546)

He's probably drinking a lot of it too: http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/WEBONLY/resource/apr0 4/0404tool01.jpg

Hmmm... Wooden speakers... (5, Funny)

shigelojoe (590080) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776550)

I can't wait to get some of these just to have a friend come over, look at them, and say "Cool! Amish speakers!"

What I'm waiting for... (3, Funny)

Perdition (208487) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776563)

I'm waiting for car audio applications so that the following conversation may be possible:

"Sir, do you know how fast you were going?"

"Well, I'm sure I wasn't speeding, officer."

"Sniff, sniff... Would you kindly step out of the vehicle, sir?"

"Oh, the smell! You see, my speakers are soaked with sake. You know, for the wood. Wooden speakers soaked in sake! I don't drink and drive. Seriously."

"Tell you what, sir, just step back here to my car..."

Oh boy! (0, Troll)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 10 years ago | (#8776571)

Let's go clear cut some more trees to sell to Japan for more useless Walmart crap that will end up in the landfill...

You must be 18 years or older... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8776574)

This begs the question: Are minors allowed to own these speakers?
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