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Sapphire: A Liquid That Won't Get Things Wet

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the it-tastes-different-though dept.

Science 843

eaglebtc writes "Tuesday on Good Morning America, a representative from Tyco Fire & Security demonstrated an amazing new substance called Sapphire: a water-like fluid that does not get things wet. He filled a small fish tank with Sapphire and submerged a book, a laptop, and a flat panel TV. Both electronics were turned on when submerged; all three items came out completely unharmed. Click here for a slideshow of the demonstration. The official name for Sapphire is actually Novec 1230. Read about it here (PDF). Tyco sees practical applications of Sapphire in fire extinguisher systems for museums and libraries. By the same token of practicality, regular readers of Slashdot probably have something else in mind: total-immersion watercooling. Just think of the possibilities!"

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"Water"-cooling (5, Informative)

Liselle (684663) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861658)

Offtopic, but the submitter opened the door: according to their specs sheet [mmm.com] (PDF warning), this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that, how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas? I also have to wonder what the long-term effects of exposure would be... it's one thing to dunk a laptop for a few seconds, it's something else entirely to have it swimming all day long. At least your machine would never catch on fire.

They might have some information there about how well the stuff will conduct heat, but I got a lousy grade in Chemistry, so I'll leave it to the experts. ;)

Re:"Water"-cooling (1, Interesting)

davebarz (546161) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861749)

how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas?
Potentially very useful depending on the properties of that gas.

Re:"Water"-cooling (2, Insightful)

Brento (26177) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861750)

...according to their specs sheet (PDF warning), this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that, how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas?

If they're using it to put out fires, it's a safe bet that it can handle your Athlon.

Re:"Water"-cooling (4, Informative)

Frymaster (171343) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861794)

If they're using it to put out fires, it's a safe bet that it can handle your Athlon.

yes... but no-one's concerned about reusing the water you used to put out the fire. coolant, on the other hand, should stick around for more than a few seconds before it bubbles off into the atmosphere.

Re:"Water"-cooling (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Custard (587661) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861811)

"...according to their specs sheet (PDF warning), this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that, how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas?"

If they're using it to put out fires, it's a safe bet that it can handle your Athlon.


Not if it doesn't conduct heat very well. A cloud of scalding hot carbon dioxide gas would put out a fire, too, but it wouldn't do much for cooling your processor.

Re:"Water"-cooling (4, Insightful)

shuz (706678) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861760)

You could always do a cooling tower like system. The saphire boils, turns into a gas, and then in the cooling stack condensates back into a liquid. Also it should be noted that 3M has a liquid product that does the same thing as saphire and has a higher boiling point. It probably still gets things wet, which saphire aparently doesn't, but it is not electicly conductive. Its also really expensive! I think THG did an article on the stuff a few years back.

Re:"Water"-cooling (5, Interesting)

stereoroid (234317) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861764)

The actual usefulness of the fluid in any state depends on the specific heat capacity, which I can't see 'coz the site is /.'d ...

Since the phase change itself is be a major energy-absorber, that could be very helpful indeed as long as fresh condensed fluid comes in after a radiator of some sort.

Specs Data (5, Informative)

Liselle (684663) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861847)

Here, I pulled it before /. nuked the site:
Chemical Formula CF3CF2C(O)CF(CF3)2
Molecular Weight 316.04
Boiling Point @ 1 atm 49.2°C (120.6°F)
Freezing Point -108.0°C (-162.4°F)
Critical Temperature 168.7°C (335.6°F)
Critical Pressure 18.65 bar (270.44 psi)
Critical Volume 494.5 cc/mole (0.0251 ft3/lbm)
Critical Density 639.1 kg/m3 (39.91 lbm/ft3)
Density, Sat. Liquid 1.60 g/ml (99.9 lbm/ft3)
Density, Gas @ 1 atm 0.0136 g/ml (0.851 lbm/ft3)
Specific Volume, Gas @ 1 atm 0.0733 m3/kg (1.175 ft3/lb)
Specific Heat, Liquid 1.103 kJ/kg°C (0.2634 BTU/lb°F)
Specific Heat, Vapor @ 1 atm 0.891 kJ/kg°C (0.2127 BTU/lb°F)
Heat of Vaporization @ boiling point 88.0 kJ/kg (37.9 BTU/lb)
Liquid Viscosity @ 0°C/25°C 0.56/0.39 centistokes
Solubility of Water in Novec 1230 Fluid <0.001 % by wt.
Vapor Pressure 0.404 bar (5.85 psig)
Relative Dielectric Strength, 1 atm (N2=1.0) 2.3

Re:"Water"-cooling (1)

akaina (472254) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861768)

I think the point is to squelch the flames. No product can really ever claim to make things "melt proof"

Re:"Water"-cooling (4, Insightful)

rangek (16645) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861773)

this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that

Not if they are cooled. The real question is what is this stuff's heat capacity and thermal conductivity. (I.e., how much heat can I stuff in to a given mass of this substance, while staying below a certain temperature (like 49C) and how quickly can I suck it up and push it out?)

Re:"Water"-cooling - Phase-change cooling? (1)

jmac880n (659699) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861778)

according to their specs sheet (PDF warning), this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that, how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas?

Phase-change cooling comes to mind. Does anyone know if it would be better/cheaper/safer than freon?

Re:"Water"-cooling (1)

purdue_thor (260386) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861782)

That might be very useful. It takes a huge amount of heat to boil something -- and then the vapor just takes it away. Then you place a condenser somewhere and have the vapor condense, dump the heat, and then return to the processor in a loop.

This is essentially why places use radiators. A heater vaporizes water and then the steam carries that heat efficiently to the radiator where it's dumped into the room. The vapor condenses and the liquid returns to the boiler.

Re:"Water"-cooling (1)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861788)

Even if "total immersion" cooling were possible with water... it still wouldn't be that good an idea. The idea behind water cooling is that the water that is over heat-producing components is quickly pushed away and will spend most of its time in the radiator where it is cooled.

This idea just doesn't make much sense...

Re:"Water"-cooling (1)

robslimo (587196) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861812)

OK, so use a pressurized system like in automobiles. Well, maybe that's not so practical.

Still, looking at the MSDS sheet, this stuff is amazingly stable and non-irritant. Maybe I'm being too cynical, but a new wonder-compound like this leaves me thinking cancer.

Re:"Water"-cooling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861817)

True, processors do run hotter than the boiling point...but if it does any kind of good job cooling, we wouldn't have to worry about it boiling.

The real question is how does it compare to water in terms of heat retention and transfer...or how easy is it to cool this stuff?

I know, i know...i didn't RTFA.

Re:"Water"-cooling (1)

underworld (135618) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861840)

If this stuff boils at 120, how useful and practical is it for fire suppression?

Conductivity? (1)

addie (470476) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861855)

In addition to how good a conductor of heat it is (the fact sheet doesn't say) what about its electrical conductivity? They only say it is "water-like" and don't really get into detail on physical properties aside from boiling point. If one can build a totally sealed cooling system for a PC it would obviously have to have zero conductivity. One would still need a pump to move this substance in and out of the case, and the substance would have to have low heat retention for it to be useful at all... None of these things are really covered in the whitepaper.

That said, this is a very clever invention. They'll have no problem marketing something that can be so easily demonstrated to have such remarkable properties.

Re:"Water"-cooling (4, Funny)

Dr. Bent (533421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861860)

this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F). Processors burn hotter than that, how useful would it still be for cooling purposes if it were a gas?

So you pump the substance in a liquid state over the processor, the heat boils it and it turns to a gas, taking much of the heat along with it. The gas passes through a small turbine, which generates electricity to power a peltier cooler, attached to a condensing tank. That cools the gas down to liquid state again, and the liquid is fed back into the system.

I call it the Rube Goldburg 2000 cooling system. Time to file a patent!

Re:"Water"-cooling (2, Interesting)

Chiasmus_ (171285) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861861)

this stuff has a boiling point of 49.2C (120.6F)

I'm sure that's the boiling point at standard atmospheric pressure at sea level, although the page is slashdotted, so I can't verify that.

It's not difficult to raise a liquid's boiling point by pressurizing it. Cooks do it all the time: it's called a pressure cooker.

But really, there's no reason to bother with that. Cooling a processor isn't about dunking a computer in a liquid and letting the heat evenly distribute. You're gonna want to chill it, no? It's probably more relevant to talk about the liquid's freezing point than its boiling point.

Don't tell my boss (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861665)


[...] a total flooding clean agent, which serves as an effective halon replacement.

So, in other words, a server room full of "Sapphire" will kill us just as fast as a server room full of Halon? That and the added entertainment of watching lifeless geeks float around behind the room's glass wall? My PHB will likely be faxing Tyco a P.O. this afternoon!

PHB Alert! (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861739)

My PHB will likely be faxing Tyco a P.O. this afternoon!

Memo To All Valued Employees:

When a fire breaks out, please remain calm. Additional stress during this time of continued right-sizing is unproductive. I personally assure you that all valued assets will be safe and secure.

If you have any questions, please address them to my secretary who can forward them to me in my personal bunker in Tahiti.

Safe? (2, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861674)

The new substance by Tyco is supposed to be environmentally safe.

Have them drink a glass of it, then I'll believe it.

Prior Art(!): Bartholomew and the Oobleck

Re:Safe? (1)

C.Batt (715986) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861755)

So did blinky the 3 eyed fish.

3 eyes!

Still, not as bad as mexican water.

Re:Safe? (4, Insightful)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861779)

There are a lot of things that are poisonous to humans in the environment. Being poisonous in large doses is not a problem.

The problems would occur if it is poisonous in small or cumulative doses, or if it breaks down into something that is. If it clears out quickly, and does no lasting harm (to humans, plants, animals, land, water or air) while doing so, it is environmentally safe. Just don't drink it.

Re:Safe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861819)

Nitrogen is environmentally safe, too, but I don't plan on drinking a glass of it. Then again, this guy did [wpi.edu] , and (barely) lived to tell about it.

Re:Safe? (1)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861856)

The PDF says:

"the inhalation LC50 and cardiac sensitization NOAEL are greater than 10% v/v."

Jews! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861676)

Jews!

Uhm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861678)

I'm no expert but if something's on fire, getting it wet is the least of your worries.

Re:Uhm (5, Interesting)

strictnein (318940) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861709)

I'm no expert but if something's on fire, getting it wet is the least of your worries.

Yep, you are no expert. In many fires by far the most damage is not caused by the fire itself, but by the massive amounts of water used to put it out.

Re:Uhm (1)

four12 (129324) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861815)

...and if you "wet" it first, you can keep it from burning.

Re:Uhm (1)

Proud like a god (656928) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861821)

Think electic fires. Never noticed the extinguishers say whether they can be used on electric fires or not because they use conductive substances?

FAQ on the new substance (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861680)

Spacker.net did a good synopsis of this Sapphire substance. Their article can be found here [spacker.net] .

Re:FAQ on the new substance (-1, Offtopic)

qualico (731143) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861742)

I feel sick.

Help!

Re:FAQ on the new substance (0, Offtopic)

Paul d'Aoust (679461) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861866)

you cruel, heartless person.

No, wait. If you were truly heartless, you'd make pop-overs and -unders that all showed those hideous pictures and screamed that inane alarm.

Great! (5, Funny)

Rapid Home Offer (770408) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861684)

Now I don't have to rub myself with ducks before I go swimming!

Re:Great! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861699)


FUCK OFF you spamming cunt! No one gives a FLYING FUCK about your home sales website you SPAMMING FUCKING CUNT!

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861743)

Dear Mr. User ID 770408, Must you overtly spam /. so? We're not retards and will look at your site if we want without it having to be in your sig and your message headers. Not to mention it being your user name as well! Jesus H. Krust with a buttplug, you're clueless.

That's pretty cool. (5, Funny)

demonic-halo (652519) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861692)

Perhaps I'll use it to fake my death by submerging myself in a bath tub full of it, then dropping a hair dryer into the tub and video tape the whole thing.

Sapphire 101 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861695)

Don't use Sapphire on your girlfriend.

You Insensitive Clod! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861838)

Don't use Sapphire on your girlfriend.

Girlfriend? What's a girlfriend?

BTW, did I mention I just got another 512MB of DDR RAM and an Audigy 2 ZS Platinum and a pair of 160GB SATA drives on order? Gosh. I may have to install a couple more LED fans, I hope 7 is enough...

Fluorocarbons (5, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861696)

Hmmmm. This sounds like the fluorocarbons that we used to bathe the insides of Cray supercomputers with. They were pretty cool with little windows that one could look in and see "waterfalls" of fluorocarbon flowing over the circuitboards and components to keep them cool.

Of course we had to have an entire floor below us dedicated to refrigeration, but hey. Governments can afford this kind of stuff.

Pricey (4, Interesting)

Brento (26177) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861698)

If they're targeting it for fire prevention applications, not industrial cooling, then you can bet it's pretty pricey.

After all, 3M's not stupid: they price things correctly. These are the guys behind the Post-It Note.

Re:Pricey (1)

pangloss (25315) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861825)

After all, 3M's not stupid: they price things correctly. These are the guys behind the Post-It Note.

Like, everyone knows Romy & Michele like invented Post-It Notes.

powerbook (1)

blackmonday (607916) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861700)

You know it's safe when they drop a precious running powerbook in there. I mean, they didn't use an emachines, did they?

Re:powerbook (1)

blackmonday (607916) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861747)

oops I'm on the stupid tip today. I will now dissapear.

Finally... (5, Funny)

jlowery (47102) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861710)

Now I can give my cat a bath.

Re:Finally... (1, Funny)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861822)

"Gave my cat a bath the other day... she LOVED it, it was fun for me, fun for the cat, the fur kept sticking to my tongue though."

- Steve Martin

Re:Finally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861829)

Forget about your cat. Now _I_ can take a bath!

Ted Kennedy (5, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861712)

If they could make this available on Cape Cod, Ted Kennedy would not have to worry about explaining his drenched suits after he goes driving.

Re:Ted Kennedy (3, Funny)

michaelggreer (612022) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861777)

Wow. I didn't know anyone here was old enough to make that joke.
It was in Chappaquiddick, by the way.

Re:Ted Kennedy (1)

CrackedButter (646746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861857)

Its so funny yet I don't get the joke! I am literally pissing myself at a joke a don't understand, god its so hard to type this post!!!@

Beyond 2000 (1)

menacing_cheese (687890) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861713)

I don't know if its the same stuff or not, but I saw something like this liquid on Beyond 2000 at least a decade ago. They even mentioned that it could be useful in cooling supercomputers.

Re:Beyond 2000 (1)

frankie (91710) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861823)

For the benefit of /.ers who (as usual) didn't RTFA:
There was a substance that had similar properties produced in the past, but that fire suppression liquid was damaging the ozone layer. The new substance by Tyco is supposed to be environmentally safe.
Obvious question: anyone know if Tyco is telling true, or is this just a stunt to distract us from the Kozlowski trial?

Re:Beyond 2000 (1)

willwinter (200040) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861824)

Check the calendar. Its 4 years beyond 2000.

Ramen noodles? (2, Funny)

Himring (646324) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861714)

Has anyone tried it with ramen noodles? I figure, no need to drain!...

Freezing temperature (2, Informative)

akaina (472254) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861722)

A very interesting note is that Saphire/Novec 1230 has a freezing point at -162.4*F according to 3M's white paper

Hasn't this been done before? (2, Informative)

PeterChenoweth (603694) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861726)

I remember watching a show called "Beyond 2000" on the Discovery Channel years and years ago (1995ish?). I remember an episode where they had a tank of some liquid that they submerged a TV into.

So is this concept of non-conductive-water-like substances all that new?

First beer with no alcohol, (-1)

93,000 (150453) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861728)

Now water that isn't wet.

Screwy, ain't it?

Distilled Water? (3, Informative)

tvh2k (738947) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861729)

Wouldn't distilled water work just fine for total-submergion water cooling? After all, it's the ions in water that make it a conductor, correct?

Re:Distilled Water? (3, Informative)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861835)

The short answer is no. Distilled water has far less conductivity but it still is a conductor.

Re:Distilled Water? (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861845)

for about 1/10000 of a second till all the dirt on what you are placing in the h20 disolves into it turing your distilled h20 into 'normal' conductive h20.

Re:Distilled Water? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861849)

Water ionizes itself. There is a certain amount of the reaction 2 H20 -> H30+ + OH-. While very distilled water does not conduct electricity very well, it is still a highly polar substance and will still foul things up.

Re:Distilled Water? (1)

ForestGrump (644805) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861850)

But you have contamination in the laptop and such.

If you were to douse a room with distilled water, the water would probably be ionized by something in the room, and zap! there goes your electornics.

-Grump

Re:Distilled Water? (2, Interesting)

tstoneman (589372) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861852)

Water naturally ionized into H+ and OH-, which is the cause of the conduction of water.

Re:Distilled Water? (1)

Daniel_Staal (609844) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861867)

In theory. In practice, your distilled water will probably pick up enough silver and lead ions from the circuit traces to be conductive. That's if you managed the required level of purity required in the first place.

Electronics will benifit the most.. (1)

xot (663131) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861730)

Rightly said that water cooling systems for electronics and computers will benefit the most. I can think of many places where you'd like to put in cooled liquid but cannot cause it would messup the electronic system.
Also , it appears that its not a conductor of electricity which will help tremendously.

Neato (1)

DrunkenTerror (561616) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861736)

I like images 14 & 15 in the sldeshow [go.com] . I wish they had video clips, though.

What we really need (4, Funny)

Rorschach1 (174480) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861737)

Forget water that doesn't get stuff wet.

What we need is fire that doesn't burn stuff.

Chemical properties (4, Insightful)

detritus` (32392) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861738)

Sorry to say but this wont be a very good immersion cooling solution, the heat capacity of this stuff is WAY less than water, at least according to the info i could find on it. As well the toxicity is not something you'd want to be exposed to on a daily basis, i just feel sorry for that poor guy on TV who was blithely sticking his hands into the tank of this stuff and such, hope he doesnt need his liver for anything if he does this sort of thing on a regular basis.

Uh.. (5, Insightful)

hookedup (630460) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861754)

Why give a new substance the name of an older substance?

I was just about to ask the same thing (1)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861854)

I would have thought that the word Sapphire [wikipedia.org] was already taken. What's it gonna be next? A superconducting coolant called 'Gold?'

It sounds like dry-cleaning fluid (1)

bartash (93498) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861757)

Could someone leave a dirty jacket in the machine room and accidentally cause it to be flooded with Sapphire? File your report as a reply here.

Tyco... (1)

PixelScuba (686633) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861758)

...making showering quicker and more efficient since 2004.

here is a video (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861759)

of the chemical in action [3m.com] .

If it doesn't get things wet... (5, Interesting)

ShdwStkr (454413) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861761)

how to you clean it up? Or pick it up? Say, after it's been used to put out a fire? Or does some 'special' cloth absorb it?

-j

Re:If it doesn't get things wet... (2, Funny)

PixelScuba (686633) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861800)

Use the quilted, quicker picker upper... ...Bounty

Slideshow was made of Sapphire as well (1)

your_mother_sews_soc (528221) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861762)

I followed the link but it was all dried up. No slideshow. BTW, the only thing nice I ever saw on WPVI.com was Monica Malpas in a short skirt, but that was 10 years ago.

Another liquid that won't get things wet: (5, Funny)

rsidd (6328) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861766)

Mercury. May not be a good idea to submerge electronics in it though. And it's expensive, and toxic.

Tastes good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861767)

What... Mercury?

wow? (-1, Troll)

Doktor Memory (237313) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861771)

He filled a small fish tank with Sapphire and submerged a book, a laptop, and a flat panel TV. Both electronics were turned on when submerged; all three items came out completely unharmed.

Wow, just like, uh, inert mineral oil. Stop the presses?

Distilled water (1)

getnate (518090) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861774)

I dont think distilled water will conduct either. Could you drop a running tv into a vat of distilled water and it will still work then?

Tyco? (3, Funny)

sulli (195030) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861776)

Does this mean that the liquid will be pissed out [thesmokinggun.com] by an ice sculpture of David?

This is TV. (1)

botzi (673768) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861781)

Charles Gibson/Good Morning America: "It looks like water, but it's not."

Half the liquids on earth "look like" water. Pretty sad when Good Morning America makes /..

They should call it... (4, Funny)

thestarz (719386) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861783)

"I can't believe it's not water."

Read the PDF (3, Informative)

Ralconte (599174) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861789)

This was on Fark already. Read the PDF. It's stored as a liquid in the tank, but its a cyclic fluorocarbon that vaporizes on release. This is simply the latest version of Halon (TM) fire extinguishers, not an "non-wetting water" or an "non-flammable organic with a water-like viscosity" At work we have carbon dioxide jets in the server room in case of fire. We've never had the building burn down so I don't know the merits of either method.

Sapphire (1)

fkamogee (619579) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861792)

How is it acceptable to create a new substance and give it the same name as an existing substance? Can I grow some Magic Rocks, call them "Diamonds" and sell them online?

Quicksilver anyone? (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861793)

Except the fact that it's rather poisonous and conducts electricity so it won't do any good to submerged electronics, it doesn't make things wet and has several other interesting properties as a liquid.

Breath.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861796)

Call me when i can breathe it k? Although it is going to be pretty nice for cooling applications.

Combination (1)

Deraj DeZine (726641) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861797)

Actually, all the suggestions in the summary will work for me. My 486 66Mhz belongs in a museum, but I've overclocked it (manually) to nearly 200MHz, so I can put out fires in my museum-worthy system, while utilizing water cooling!

I don't like to brag, but I smell a Nobel Prize...

Fluorinert (5, Informative)

Winter (87716) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861799)

This is of course not the first liquid that does not cause harm to electronics, and can be used for total immersion water cooling. Fluorinert (3m) [3m.com] has been around for a while. One version of it is(was) also used for liquid breething deep diving (same as used on "The Abyss").

That's what they thought about... (1)

MrNonchalant (767683) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861805)

...Dihydrogen Monoxide [dhmo.org] , but how wrong they were.

In Soviet Russia... (-1, Troll)

CrackedButter (646746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861809)

....water wets YOU!

Gratuitous TMBG quote (3, Funny)

swordboy (472941) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861816)

When he's underwater does he get wet or does the water get him instead? Nobody knows, particle man!

You'll forgive me (1)

karmaflux (148909) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861826)

if I don't believe that a material which doesn't conduct electricity might also be a poor conductor of heat.

Just sayin' is all.

Re:You'll forgive me (1)

karmaflux (148909) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861863)

for typing things in that don't make sense.

I bet bad electricity conduction means bad heat conduction -- as evidenced by its low boiling point -- and thus, this stuff is useless for cooling computers.

A few things.... (1)

ghettoboy22 (723339) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861831)

What is the energy capacity of this liquid? That would be the real question of whether this would feasibly work for a total immersion liquid cooling setup. Other points to consider would be if there is any long term corrosive properties, as well as the price of the liquid as well. One would think if they're planning it for fire-suppression systems the price wouldn't be too prohibitive, however I bet Tyco plopped a good amount of $$ in R&D for this substance.

Conductivity (1)

davebarz (546161) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861839)

The all-important questions for amazing water cooling:

1. Is it electrically conductive? 2. Is it thermally conductive?

If it is electrically conductive, you can pretty much forget about it having any greater use in water cooling than water, except to minimize risk in spills. If not, we can move on to question 2.

Just because it is a liquid does not necessarily mean it will have the thermal conductivity necessary to successfully cool a system.

Saphire doesn't really cool anything (1)

kazama (468542) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861842)

From Tyco's Press Release, "The SAPPHIRE Suppression System chemically interferes with the fire combustion process, therefore bringing it to a halt." The side effect would be a reduction of flames and heat but it's primary purpose is not to draw heat away from a fire. It is to stop the fire from continuing to combust. That's why electronics submerged int he fluid would still work. You aren't damaging the components with a heat reducing element, you are bathing them in a combustion stopping element. Tv's don't tend to combust from what I rememebr. :)

/.'d (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8861853)

Ansul's Newest Gem: SAPPHIRE(TM) Clean Agent Fire Suppression System

August 4 2003

Ansul Incorporated, a business unit of Tyco Fire & Security, announces its SAPPHIRE(TM) Fire Suppression System containing a total flooding clean agent, which serves as an effective halon replacement. Complementing Ansul's existing INERGEN® line of fire suppression systems, the new product has been presented at the National Fire Protection Association Annual Exposition in Dallas on May 2003.

"The SAPPHIRE system is a sustainable, long-term technology. It meets today's regulations and those for the foreseeable future," says Joe Ziemba, Ansul's marketing manager for engineered systems. "It paid off waiting for the right agent to introduce with our SAPPHIRE system. It is based on NOVEC(TM) 1230 fluid by 3M, which is the first alternative chemical clean agent to offer a viable long-term solution for special hazards fire protection."

'With pressure from environmental regulations growing in all industries, sustainability is becoming a critical issue in selecting a clean agent fire protection system,' says John Schuster, business development manager at 3M Performance Materials Division. 'Ansul is a leader in environmentally responsible fire protection and with NOVEC 1230 fluid and the new SAPPHIRE system, Ansul's global organization can now offer its customers everywhere an even broader choice of sustainable fire protection technologies.'

NOVEC 1230 fire protection fluid has zero ozone depletion potential and an atmospheric lifetime of just five days, the lowest for halocarbon alternatives. Its global warming potential is one; lower than any halocarbon agent acceptable for use in occupied spaces. Stored as a liquid but expelled as a gas, NOVEC 1230 fluid is easy to handle, is field rechargeable, and requires about the same number of cylinders as halocarbon agents. It is ideal for special hazards like electronics, ships and critical military applications.

About Ansul Incorporated
Ansul Incorporated, a unit of Tyco Fire and Safety, is a leader in the design, manufacture and sale of "special hazard" fire protection equipment. Ansul's products include portable and wheeled fire extinguishers; pre-engineered vehicle, restaurant, and industrial systems; engineered detection and suppression systems; firefighting foams and hardware; large-hose units; fire extinguishing agents and hazardous spill control products. Ansul products protect people and property from fire in virtually every market around the world.

About Tyco Fire & Security
Tyco Fire & Security designs, manufactures, installs and services electronic security systems, fire protection, detection and suppression systems, sprinklers and fire extinguishers. Tyco Fire & Security consists of more than 60 brands including ADT, Scott, Sensormatic, SimplexGrinnell, Ansul, Total Walther, and Wormald, which are represented in over 100 countries. Its products are used to safeguard firefighters, prevent and fight fires, deter thieves and protect people and property.

--
Yeah, not a complete karma whore, posting this as AC :P

If you really think about it... (0)

Psyqlone (681556) | more than 10 years ago | (#8861858)

...you really only rent Sapphire/Novec 1230.

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