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The Sound of Cells

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the C-sharp-above-middle-C dept.

Science 111

Alert Slashdot reader jamie pointed out a story in Smithsonian Magazine on the subject of listening to the sounds cells make in order to detect abnormalities.

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Other identifiers (5, Informative)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#8882986)

From the article: Pelling agrees, and says that he and Gimzewski are doing tests to rule out the possibility that other molecules in the fluid bathing the cells, or even the tip of the microscope itself, are generating vibrations that their probe picks up.

Even if this is the case, because of a cells small molecular fingerprint or components tend to dictate what role a cell plays or what the status of a cell is on a more discrete time basis that say gene expression, one would wonder if this is not also an identifier of status or identity as well. For more detail on cytosomics or metabolomics, see this [utah.edu] site.

Re:Other identifiers (3, Insightful)

BaronAaron (658646) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883225)

Someone want to explain to me why it's so hard to verify where to sound is coming from?

Move the needle off the cell. If the sound stops then you know the sound wasn't coming from the surronding fluid or the tip of the microscope.

Am I missing something?

Re:Other identifiers (4, Interesting)

SEWilco (27983) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883340)

Move the needle off the cell. If the sound stops then you know the sound wasn't coming from the surronding fluid or the tip of the microscope.

Am I missing something?

Maybe the cell or its wall is vibrating due to sound from outside the cell. The probe might not pick it up, for example the cell wall may be resonating to a certain frequency in the sounds while the probe might be too small and rigid.

Re:Other identifiers (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883765)

Well, the tests appear to have been done on lone cells. I don't know that the test will be useful for testing cells which are part of a structure.

You'd have to isolate the cells you want to study. If you have a mass of tissue you want to investigate, then it should be easy to scrape off a cell or two to work with. Otherwise, it'd be hit-or-miss, assuming that a diseased cell is present somewhere in the tissue.

It might be useful to apply the tests to cells taken from a blood sample. As for practicality, you'd probably want an array of atomic-force microscopes, to speed up the process. I don't know that anyone's previously had a reason to build such a device.

Re:Other identifiers (3, Informative)

Thurn und Taxis (411165) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883991)

That's certainly one important control, but it's not enough. The vibration could be due to motion of the microscope stage which is coupled well to the probe tip by the cell, but not by the fluid. The mechanical load of the cell on the probe tip might also reduce the passive resonant frequency of the tip. I'm not sure exactly which tips he's using, but some of the more compliant V-shaped AFM tips unloaded resonant frequencies as low as 20 kHz; loading them with the mass of a cell could easily drop the resonant frequency down to 1 kHz. Unless he's done some careful work to show that these vibrations he's seeing aren't due to thermal noise, I would have serious doubts that they tell you anything about the cells.

I don't understand your point... (1)

rfischer (95276) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885525)

If they are measuring vibrations generated by the AFM tip then they have a problem.

If they are measuring vibrations generated by the fluid bathing the cells (these are in vitro preparations, right?) how could this be useful?

Crying (-1, Offtopic)

crossconnects (140996) | more than 10 years ago | (#8882991)

If they are crying they are hurt?

Nigerian Astronaut Wants To Come Home (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883224)

Subject: Nigerian Astronaut Wants To Come Home
Dr. Bakare Tunde
Astronautics Project Manager
National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA)
Plot 555
Misau Street
PMB 437
Garki, Abuja, FCT NIGERIA

Dear Mr. Sir,

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE-STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL

I am Dr. Bakare Tunde, the cousin of Nigerian Astronaut, Air Force Major Abacha Tunde. He was the first African in space when he made a secret flight to the Salyut 6 space station in 1979. He was on a later Soviet spaceflight, Soyuz T-16Z to the secret Soviet military space station Salyut 8T in 1989. He was stranded there in 1990 when the Soviet Union was dissolved. His other Soviet crew members returned to earth on the Soyuz T-16Z, but his place was taken up by return cargo. There have been occasional Progrez supply flights to keep him going since that time. He is in good humor, but wants to come home.

In the 14-years since he has been on the station, he has accumulated flight pay and interest amounting to almost $ 15,000,000 American Dollars. This is held in a trust at the Lagos National Savings and Trust Association. If we can obtain access to this money, we can place a down payment with the Russian Space Authorities for a Soyuz return flight to bring him back to Earth. I am told this will cost $ 3,000,000 American Dollars. In order to access the his trust fund we need your assistance.

Consequently, my colleagues and I are willing to transfer the total amount to your account or subsequent disbursement, since we as civil servants are prohibited by the Code of Conduct Bureau (Civil Service Laws) from opening and/ or operating foreign accounts in our names.

Needless to say, the trust reposed on you at this juncture is enormous. In return, we have agreed to offer you 20 percent of the transferred sum, while 10 percent shall be set aside for incidental expenses (internal and external) between the parties in the course of the transaction. You will be mandated to remit the balance 70 percent to other accounts in due course.

Kindly expedite action as we are behind schedule to enable us include downpayment in this financial quarter.

Please acknowledge the receipt of this message via my direct number 234 (0) 9-234-2220 only.

Yours Sincerely, Dr. Bakare Tunde
Astronautics Project Manager
tip@nasrda.gov.ng

http://www.nasrda.gov.ng/

hmmm (0, Funny)

deviantonline (542095) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883002)

I wonder if they rock out or are they more into the hip-hop scene?

Beep beep (4, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883004)

I hear the things beeping all over the place now. Little tinny tunes like Mexican Hat Dance too.

Oh, sorry, thought you said cell PHONES.

Re:Beep beep (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883808)

Great...now I've got thoughts of la Cucaracha going through my head. With a new name, it's now el Virus.

La Cucaracha vs Mexican Hat Dance (1)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883893)

It's two different songs:

La Cucaracha:

"La Cucaracha, La Cucaracha
Peanut butter comes in jars"

Mexican Hat Dance:

"I dance
I dance
I dance
Around a Mexican hat
I dance
I dance
I dance
And that's the end of that"

Cool! (-1, Redundant)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883035)

For example, if you hear a rasping or scraping sound, the inmate may be trying to dig his way to freedom...

oh great... (4, Funny)

TR0GD0RtheBURNiNAT0R (734295) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883041)

Even more voices to listen too...

Re:oh great... (1)

mog007 (677810) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884580)

At least now you have a valid excuse for the voices in your head...

If humans use microphones... (0, Offtopic)

TwistedGreen (80055) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883045)

do cells use nanophones?

The Sounds of Silence (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883046)

Hello darkness my old friend.

Re:The Sounds of Silence (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883377)

Bitch, you're lucky I couldn't find the lyrics to the John Valby version!

put your ween into my end [notext] (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883831)

Fuck my Butt until it's red and raw, (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883960)

in some states buttsex is against the law.

I am horny, I would really like gaysex.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884297)

teh liricys

The sound cells make... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883062)

...is an annoying ringing sound. Or sometimes a crappy rendition of a popular song.

The sound of cancer (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883066)

Cancer is always listening to Limp Biskit with the booming base spreading all over the neighborhood. Cancer cells also have superfluous spoilers and purple neon undercarriages.

Re:The smell of cancer (5, Interesting)

jeni generic (751123) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883300)

I hope they continue to delve into the olefactory sences as well. They found out that some dogs can smell melanoma [canoe.ca] . Combine that with sound technology and we can get the lousy HMO check up process out of the way. "Hey doc, whats with this mole on my boob?" "Its a third nipple." "No shit, are you sure it's not cancer" "Of course I'm sure, I'm a doctor!"

Re:The smell of cancer (1)

Graff (532189) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884898)

I hope they continue to delve into the olefactory sences as well.

Ahh but they already have! The infamous mad scientist Professor Hubert Farnsworth has already invented smelloscope [wikipedia.org] , a great leap forward for the field of astronomy. Just don't use it to smell Uranus, er, Urectum... [tvtome.com]

Re:The sound of cancer (0, Offtopic)

cexshun (770970) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883347)

Hmmm. I thought cancer has windows with cold cathodes inside and can heat an entire neighborhood from being overclocked. Although this overclocking has perhaps 0.5% performance gains. Look man, everyone has their own hobbies, so get over yourself.

I'm telling you... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883071)

It's the Midichlorians. You'll hear them too when you learn to quiet your mind.

Re:I'm telling you... (2, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883544)

That was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. They didn't have Prozac back then.

Re:I'm telling you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884407)

You hear that? That's the sound of inevitability.

Makes total sense... (2, Interesting)

turrican (55223) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883073)

This is one of those things is basically an inevitability, waiting only for the proper tools to exist.

Reminds me of how a mechanic might listen to an engine, or part of it, to determine what's going on inside.

It's pretty cool.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883077)


They hook up these big amplifiers to a sensitive microphone. When they hear a cell screaming like a madman, they know it's a bad mutation and wipe out the cell. GATTACA indeed.

well the cells in my butt (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883093)

make sounds all the time

pptpthpthpthtphtpthpthtp

What they will hear... (5, Funny)

hords (619030) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883111)

"Get your body in shape you insensitive clod"

I hear dead people

Re:What they will hear... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883396)

And they called me crazy because I hear voices in my head. Hah!

Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883119)

So from now on doctors will press their ear all over our skin and go "Hark! I think I detect a cancer cell!"

Doctor of musicolonoscopy (2, Funny)

Jtheletter (686279) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883120)

I always wondered what field Dr. Teeth, from Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem, held his degree in, now we know!

Hey man, just relax and bend over the examining table while I prep this guitar tuner for insertion....

KILL THE JEWS/NIGGERS (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883126)

fags

DMCA anyone? (-1, Troll)

r4bb1t (663244) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883144)

Just watch out though, if your cells [chicagogigs.com] catch you recording their music for free you might have to answer to the RIAA!

Obligatory Family Guy Quote: (2, Funny)

Navius Eurisko (322438) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883148)

Skin Cell 1: Hey I saw you on the cover of Scientific American!

Skin Cell 2: Palez! The photo totally made me look fat!

Skin Cell 3: Jesus, just take the complement!

dolphin tech (4, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883163)

Aren't there lots of stories about dolphins bumping swimmers repeatedly with their snouts, causing a medical examination which discovers a tumor? I haven't heard any theories that dolphins are causing the tumors (though they'd have plenty of material for revenge), but these bigbrained cousins are notorious for their sense of sound, superior to our sight. Maybe we should be certifying them, instead of crudely replacing them with machines.

Re:dolphin tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883305)

Well, they make excellent mine-detectors [cnn.com] ...

Re:dolphin tech (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883357)

Wouldn't it be funny if some day, we discover that the most intelligent animal on earth is the tuna? We've been eating dolphin-safe tuna for all these years when we should've been eating tuna-safe dolphins.

Re:dolphin tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883373)

There are also lots of stories about alien abductions. This doesn't make them true. If there is any creedo to this, it ought to be studied, duh.

Re:dolphin tech (2, Informative)

3waygeek (58990) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884833)

I don't know about dolphins, but there's at least one dog [imaginis.com] who can detect melanoma.

Re:dolphin tech (3, Interesting)

marshac (580242) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885424)

I had an oceanography professor who was swimming with some dolphins.... she noticed that they were not playing a "rough" as they had in the past... a week later, she found out that she was pregnant. I really doubt that even dolphins could detect the type of vibrations described in the story however.

I used this before for network monitoring. (5, Interesting)

dekashizl (663505) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883182)

I've used audio feedback in conjunction with network monitoring, and it worked VERY well. I was developing a SOAP-based client/server app, and I tied a different sound (MIDI note actually, sometimes from the percussion instrument, sometimes ascending chords on piano) to each type of message the client and server could send.

In the course of a standard interaction, it would play login, login ack, getlist, getlist-resp, etc. I could hear the timing between calls (yeh, SOAP is kind of slow like that), and more importantly hear if it was doing the right things. You pick it up *immediately* when a chord progression is major, minor, or just plain wrong), All this without taking up any screen real estate.

This works so well, I recommend it highly. AFAIK there are no standard ways of doing this, but it certainly would be great to put some standard techniques and libraries together!

Re:I used this before for network monitoring. (3, Funny)

jmulvey (233344) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883297)

Yeah, I manage my networks using sound the same way. If I make a change to a router, I pick up *immediately* when something is wrong. The sounds are usually way off in the cubicles and go something like this: "What the heck is going on!", "Are you clocking?".

Re:I used this before for network monitoring. (3, Interesting)

Jtheletter (686279) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884076)

Ditto, I wrote a quick routine to play .wav files and plugged that into my code in place of MessageBox alerts for debugging an automated chemistry cell that was running in another lab.

I used babelfish and AT&Ts text-to-speech page to make a bunch of alert sound files in french. Besides being extremely useful (no more interrupting my workflow with a popup message everytime something happened in the lab) it was amusing as hell to watch my coworkers' reactions whenever my workstation started babbling in french about the status of sample sets.

Is it a slow news day??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883190)

Who cares if we can actually hear cells split.

Re:Is it a slow news day??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883410)

Biologists! Last I heard, they were still counted as nerds which this news would then be apropriate for.

Hear cells do what? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883696)

Probably the question asked most often is: Do one-celled animals have orgasms? The answer is yes, they have orgasms almost constantly, which is why they don't mind living in pools of warm slime.
-- Dave Barry, "Sex and the Single Amoeba: What Every Teen Should Know"

true, the sound of your cell indicates abnormality (3, Funny)

Mengoxon (303399) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883194)

...like, when you have Ride of Valkiries as your ring-tone

Re:true, the sound of your cell indicates abnormal (1)

brutus_007 (769774) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883477)

Or the ringer is the Emperor's march (Darth Vader doom song) when the wife calls.

My cells.. (1)

dustinbarbour (721795) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883201)

..all play Beethoven's 5th.

Alex?!!! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883534)

It's a sin, IT'S A SIN! Stop it! For the love of God, please, STOP IT!!!

Re:Alex?!!! (1)

LOL WTF OMG!!!!!!!!! (768357) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884178)

What's all this talk about sin boy?

Voices in my head (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883213)

Is that where all those voices in my head have been coming from?

goatse? (-1, Offtopic)

Icculus (33027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883236)

Am I the only one who thought this picture [si.edu] was some even stranger version of the goatse guy?

Re:goatse? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883575)

No, but you've given me an idea for a rendition of Jesus and the Sacred Heart...

Re:goatse? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884651)

Idiot, that's Superman! [selfgrowth.com]

Madeline L'Engle's 'A Wind in the Door'? (3, Funny)

unithom (544624) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883237)

This is old news, ever since Meg healed her little brother Charles Wallace by teaching his cells how to sing. Or Kythe. Or something.

Re:Madeline L'Engle's 'A Wind in the Door'? (1)

Chuns (723979) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884083)

Omg, that is strange. Both the book and that it got commented on /.

Conformal change vibration and resonance analysis (5, Insightful)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883239)

Whenever a protein or enzyme in a cell changes shape, it should induce characteristic vibrations in the surround media. Each enzyme would emit its own characteristic vibrations when it undergoes a change in shape as it catalyzes a reaction or does its business.

For example, I'd bet nerve cells give off sounds as the propagating impulse causes cell-surfane ion channels to pop open and closed. The ion pumps that restore ion concentrations would also emit a hum with characteristic frequencies. For membrane-embedded enzymes (e.g., the channels on nerve cells), interferometry off the membrane surface might help to detect these minute vibrations. I wonder if one could even detect the sound of prions forming when a protein is warped into the misshaped conformation that characterizes conditions like BSE -- sound of a brain going mad.

I'd bet that one could also analyze protein/enzyme states with a fine-grained analysis of the sound transfer function for a cell. Depending on the physical state of each protein species and its concentration, a cell would attenuate or resonate with particular acoustic frequencies. Large cell structures (e.g. mitochondria) might also have their own characteristic acoustical modulation functions that depend on the size and membrane structure. If analyzing the transfer function for a live, wet cell is too hard, I suspect that flash-freezing the cell might create a better acoustical specimen.

Re:Conformal change vibration and resonance analys (1)

X_Bones (93097) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884746)

psh, big deal. everybody knows that...

Re:Conformal change vibration and resonance analys (1)

Thurn und Taxis (411165) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885256)

Keep in mind, though, that the measurement method he used is going to average the conformational changes of all of the proteins within a cell - averaging a large number of independent random variables gives you an approximately Gaussian distribution, i.e., noise.

That being said, there are cells that use conformational changes to cause motion at audio frequencies. Outer hair cells (OHCs) in your cochlea exhibit length changes in response to changes in transmembrane voltage, with a gain of about 20 nm/mV. They do this using a protein called Prestin - there's still some debate about how it works in detail, but the protein completely covers the lateral walls of the cell membranes. Transfecting other cells with this protein caused them to be motile [nature.com] , and knocking out this protein killed the motility of OHCs [nature.com] .

Without some kind of specialization like that, I find it hard to believe that an entire cell can exhibit a spontaneous oscillation like what's been reported here. I smell the presence of an experimental artefact.

Sound Diagnosis (1)

mspring (126862) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883260)

I wonder why sound isn't used more for the detection of all sorts of mechanical malfunctions. After all, I hear if something is wrong with my car.
-Max

The Sound of Silence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883264)

Hello darkness, my old friend, I've come to talk with you again, Because a vision softly creeping, Left its seeds while I was sleeping, And the vision that was planted in my brain Still remains Within the sound of silence.

Diagnostics (5, Interesting)

gusmao (712388) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883276)

Although they may eventually reach some interesting results, it seems very unlikely that this research will change the way diagnostics are made nowadays. I don't see how someone could replace or question physiological exams based on a source of information so unreliable and subject to noises as this.

Anyway, these guys [berkeley.edu] have already prooved that, in some situations, is very hard to get useful information throught sound, even when you know what you may be looking for.

Re:Diagnostics (1)

bug-eyed monster (89534) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885266)

Perhaps not diagnostics per se, but a method of regular checkup as a precursor to diagnostics. Right now, people usually know they have cancer when it starts to hurt. But if this method was non-invasive and easy enough to administer, you could get yourself scanned regularly and if something showed up you'd go see a doctor for further checks. It may generate some false positives, but it may also catch some cancers a lot sooner.

Careful tho... (0)

Decameron81 (628548) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883295)

...cos if someone drops a nail while you're listening to your cells, it will sound like having your head inside a giant church bell at midnight.

Diego Rey

Great! (1)

aled (228417) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883298)

Just like in Blood Music [gregbear.com] . Now I wonder what cells has to say...

Re:Great! (1)

whathappenedtomonday (581634) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884371)

Now I wonder what cells has to say...

if it's a soft cell, it's probably gonna hum this tune [leoslyrics.com] .

Apologies to George Carlin: (4, Funny)

shadowcabbit (466253) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883317)

Things you don't want to hear from your cells:

"I was thinking of redecorating the place; d'you think some melanoma would look good here?"
"C'mon, all the cool kids are having apoptosis! You're not chicken, are you?"
"The mitochondria must be liberated!"
"Hey, alcohol! Irish stout! All right, time for Liverdance!"

...and the number one thing:
"Ouch!"

Barbarians (3, Funny)

Wiseazz (267052) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883368)

Sprinkling alcohol on a yeast cell to kill it raises the pitch

Won't someone please think of the yeast cells?

And dead cells make noise too (2, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883607)

while dead cells give off a low, rumbling sound that Gimzewski says is probably the result of random atomic motions.

Maybe they're just hungry, for brain cells...

Re:Barbarians (1)

Cyno01 (573917) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883678)

Yeah, they're so cute [giantmicrobes.com] .

Yeah, but it's a b!tch . . . (1)

Goobermunch (771199) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883380)

to get them to use the little microphones. --AC

Towelheads! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883432)

Kill 'em all, they're animals anyway.

YoU FAIL it! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883490)

Are Tied up in

Preceded by the work of tech artist Joe Davis? (4, Informative)

base_chakra (230686) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883539)

Joe Davis is an artist and research affiliate at MIT's Department of Biology. He and other MIT students and faculty assembled a similar system [viewingspace.com] ca. 1999-2000.

Davis is an interesting guy who's gotten a fair amount of professional and media attention for his intriguing work in genetic and biological postmodern art.

Frist stoP!? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8883595)

ccomunity at [goat.cx]

Cell alert.... (2, Funny)

carlos_benj (140796) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883631)

Alert Slashdot reader jamie pointed out a story in Smithsonian Magazine...

Maybe jamie's cells sounded the alert...

peer review, peer review, peer review (4, Insightful)

nesneros (214571) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883649)

I'm not saying the work is bad or anything (I think it shows very novel thinking), but this hasn't been peer reviewed. This is important. Until the work has been scrutinized by experts in the field you can not tell whether or not something is statistically or scientifically significant.

No, peer review is not a perfect process, but its the best one we have. Scientists and the press need to remember this before they make claims about scientific work.

At least this article mentions the fact.

Okay... so they make noise... (2, Funny)

mark-t (151149) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883768)

But the question is, are they into karaoke? Or maybe there's another way someone with an entrepeneural spirit could capitalize on this.

Listening to the sound of cells seems obvious.. (3, Funny)

wfberg (24378) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883802)

Until you realise the article isn't about cell phones..

one octave off (4, Informative)

mossmann (25539) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883809)

1000 Hz is actually about two octaves above middle C, not one as the article states.

A generally good idea... (1)

Nephroth (586753) | more than 10 years ago | (#8883917)

But what do you do if they have a really annoying ring?

Kenya! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884035)

Free snorkel with every visit!

Mitosis with SOUND (3, Funny)

theapodan (737488) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884045)

Hehe, now when the cells split in mitosis, you can hear all the "Ahhhhhh!" and "OOOOOOOHHH YEAH!" cell sex noises that they are sure to make.

Looks like AT&T was just in time... (1)

koa (95614) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884104)

Their new Music ID service [slashdot.org] they just came out with was just the beginning!! Their ACTUAL plans are for you to eventually dial their service; place the phone next to your chest and you'll receive a text message telling you if you cancer or not.

....Incoming text message......

"You have 3 months left to live...."
"Have a nice day!"

The hills are alive.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884136)

with the sound of caaaanceeeer! (ahhhh-ahhhhhhh!)

Dexter's Laboratory (3, Funny)

bluenawab (595006) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884139)

Man! i dont know why i watch cartoon network so much, but i think it has some potential! i watched an episode last week in which Dexter was actually performing this very same experiment! only different being, he finds a virus-boy band! i guess i am a loser ;)

fuck a nisgga (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884202)

My Cell (1)

M. Piedlourd (68092) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884361)

My cell plays the Mexican Hat Dance.

#irc. trooltalk.com (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8884754)

Of ch5allenges that the reaper In a IS DYING LIKE THE

Geek Auto-diagnostic? (1)

JerBear0 (456762) | more than 10 years ago | (#8884770)

This would have some interesting possibilities.

Each person could be implanted with a small, embedded device to monitor, run diagnostics, and transmit an alert to a monitoring station, just like our servers.

Of course the danger of friends hacking your system there is apparent:
knock knock "Uh...Mr.Jones? Its the paramedics, we're here about your um...Hamster problem. Don't worry, we brought the KY!" ;)

I can hear it now... (1)

Mr. Bad Example (31092) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885113)

"Mitosis? Hey, buddy, I didn't know it was yours! Is this thing on? Come on, I know you're out there--I can hear you metabolizing..."

This technique is older than it sounds (1)

Thurn und Taxis (411165) | more than 10 years ago | (#8885569)

For what it's worth, the idea that came to him in 2001 is called Atomic Force Sensing, and is actually about five years older than that [biophysj.org] . The only difference is that Gimzewski is looking at spontaneous oscillations rather than driven oscillations - and that's where the difficulty lies, because it's very, very hard to show that those oscillations are due to activity of the cells and not, say, vibrations caused by a truck driving by outside. I'm skeptical that these oscillations are coming from the cells (as you can tell from my other posts in response to this article), but if they are, it suggests a very, very interesting mechanism that we know nothing about.
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