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MySQL and Perl for the Web

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the good-place-for-em dept.

Perl 244

Craig Maloney writes "MySQL (love it or hate it) is one of the most popular databases for deploying websites. Perl (also love it or hate it) was almost synonymous with website programming. Arguably there are different choices for different needs in web development (PostgreSQL, PHP, Java, etc.), but there is no argument that if you are planning on putting together a website, using MySQL and Perl that MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development." Read on for the rest of Maloney's concise review of the book. While not new, he says it's still a valuable volume.

Who is this book for?

Developers looking for a quality book on Perl and database development should not pass this book up. While the title of this book is MySQL & Perl for the Web, it could have easily been called DBD/DBI & Perl for the Web. The SQL examples may or may not work with various databases, but the DBI interface code should remain the same. This book will also do well as a reference for experienced coders looking for well-crafted examples of web-based applications.

What's good?

The second chapter should be enough to get anyone up to speed with using Perl, DBI, CGI, Apache, and MySQL. After a brief introduction and configuration of MySQL and Apache, the author settles in to discuss coding DBI and Perl. The remainder of the chapter details the best practices for using Perl and DBI together. Near the end of the second chapter, the author creates a fully functional to-do list, demonstrating ways to add, update, and delete information from the database using Perl and DBI. Instead of taking small baby steps over many chapters, the author shows important concepts and best practices for those concepts quickly. Even seasoned (hardened?) programmers may learn new tricks or methodologies from the second chapter of this book.

Is that the end? Are we left with one very well written tutorial chapter? Thankfully, the rest of the book has plenty to offer. Subsequent chapters include:

  • Improving performance with mod_perl
  • Generating and processing forms
  • Writing form-based applications
  • Automating the form-handling process
  • Performing searches
  • Session management
  • Security and privacy issues
  • E-commerce applications

Each chapter is clearly written, with several examples used to demonstrate the concepts presented. The examples are clearly written, and the author makes the whole learning process enjoyable and fun. The examples range from a give-away contest (including a random drawing), an electronic greeting card program, polling programs, and a shopping cart program. Each of the examples is presented completely, but are introduced in pieces (subroutines, modules, etc.) The full source code is available from the author's website at http://www.kitebird.com/mysql-perl/

What's in it for me?

MySQL & Perl for the Web is the book that Perl programmers on any project will wish The Other Guy had read. The examples are clear, the writing is engaging, and the code is maintainable. This is a practical book and should not be overlooked in any serious Perl programmer's library.


You can purchase MySQL and Perl for the Web from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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244 comments

How's about ... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976059)

MyFP?

'FP' ... Front Page, or First Post? (0)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976296)

I know I've never been a fan of Front Page, with the security problems it has had in the past, but if this message was about that, then it's not directly offtopic.

Of course, the lack of a real message makes it rather useless, so it should probably be scored down for some reason or another.

How to Suck Cock [It's springtime again, folks!] (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976062)

For gay men and straight women.

Document history:
Apr. 23, 2004 Added information about the hormonal content of semen
Nov. 30, 2003 First version
Aug. 6, 2003 Initial rough draft

I love blow jobs. Not just getting them, but giving them. It's an amazing experience. Being gay, I may not be typical for a man, however straight women generally have an even stronger aversion from dick sucking than straight men. Females not only don't know how to suck dick, they don't want to learn. They don't own the equipment, they don't understand the male drive, they don't know how a blow job feels, and they don't know how penises work. In fact, while many women have experimented with dick sucking, 90% of them don't like or don't want to try sucking dick. That's unfortunate because they are missing out on a rewarding experience. Likewise, their men are missing out on a very exciting experience. Let's face it, if you want to receive not just a blowjob, but a blowjob, you probably want a guy for a partner. Unless, of course, this guide helps transfer the carnal knowledge of pleasuring a man from a gay man to the straight women out there. If not, I hope to at least transfer this knowledge to another gay man out there. :)

The penis is one of the most wonderful parts of the body to suck. Nothing can compare to its size, shape, texture, warmth, taste, and its response to touch. Female breasts are rather inanimate in comparison. Their only redeeming qualities are the nipples that respond to touch, but guys have nipples too, so it's not an exclusively feminine part of the body.

It is important to give yourself a weekend of privacy the first time you try to suck off a guy. You may not be able to the first time and will need extra time the next day or two to try again. If you don't give yourself a weekend, you can end up failing and then next time you will make the same mistakes again because you will not remember what you did wrong the previous time.

You probably have noticed it's much harder to masturbate while standing up. It is much more difficult to get a guy off if he's standing up, especially if you've never sucked off a guy before. Although blowjobs are stereotypically associated with a kneeling giver, in practice, that is an uncomfortable position for the receiver as he must either sit or stand. Instead, have your partner lie down on his back on a bed (or somewhere soft and flat). Here's [bluefurry.com] a good (censored cartoon) example of such a position. Note how both bodies are aligned. Note also that it will get very hot underneath a blanket of any thickness, so lose the blanket unless the room is uncomfortably cold. Use your own experiences of masturbation in private to guide you as much as possible.

Notice how the dick is not completely cylindrical, but is slightly flattened? That shape is designed to fit perfectly in the mouth. There's no way evolution could have better designed a part for sucking. Note that the most sensitive portion of the penis is the length underneath the shaft. This should clue you in on how to position yourself to suck him. You will want to scoot yourself down so that you are 1) straddling one or both of his legs or 2) kneeling beside him or between his legs. Find out what works for the both of you.

The underneath of his shaft should rest on your tongue and his penis should lie flat in your mouth. Once you take him into your mouth, try turning your head 90 degrees around his cock and you will notice that you will have to open wider to accomodate him. The wider you have open your mouth, the quicker you will tire, so make sure you align yourself for the most comfort. Likewise, your partner will enjoy it more if your tongue is in the right place.

Lick along the length of the shaft and give the tip a few licks around the ridge of the tip. Have fun. Take his tip in your mouth and suck. You may want to hold his shaft down at an angle just enough to allow his penis to enter your mouth smoothly. By now, you may notice a drip of clear liquid forming at the tip of his dick. Some men produce a lot of precome, others a little, some none at all. Take a lick at it. It's sweet tasting and quite a bit different from come. Think of it as an appetizer. Once you are ready for main course, note that you do not actually have to suck like you would a drinking straw and probably shouldn't because it's very tiring. Instead, let your lips and tongue do the work. Some guys like a little bit of teeth, but be careful with them. Teeth are very rough, so the slightest touch goes a long way. You will want to stimulate him by taking him in and out of your mouth. Your lips need only lightly brush against his dick. From time to time, you will feel his tip swelling. Increase the pressure from your lips to match the swelling of his tip. Decrease the pressure as his tip softens. Stimulate him by moving your mouth up and down his shaft. Move your whole body, not just your neck (which quickly becomes uncomfortable). On the downstroke, go down only as far as comfortable. Remember, it will take many minutes to get him off, so avoid anything that causes you to ache or prevents you from breathing. On the stroke upwards, let your lips slide over the tip, but do not actually let the penis come out of your mouth. Try to keep contact at all times. If you need a moment to breathe, take him deep into your mouth as far as comfort allows and breathe through your nose. If you have trouble breathing through your nose, pull up off his dick a little bit. If you are getting tired and need a few moments rest, pull off of him and relax beside your partner. Chances are he'll be going down on you in a few minutes! However, if it is your first time to suck him off, it's best that he not bring you to climax. You will want to be plenty horny when the time comes.

It will take some practice learning to sense the moment your partner comes. As he nears orgasm, his tip will swell and he may arch his back. If he's not circumsized it may be a bit more difficult to feel the tip swelling. The second he comes, the tip softens again while the shaft remains hard. His body will relax and his breathing will change. Often you will hear a puff of breath at the moment of climax. Now's your cue to slow down. Don't stop completely as that reduces the pleasure, but be careful. If he flinches, you are causing him pain, so slow down even more. It's best to go overly slow than not slow enough. Now you will taste him cum. If he's a distance shooter, it will take several seconds before you will taste him. Most of his cum will shoot into the back of your throat and you will only taste the cum once it dribbles down to your tongue. The experience is kind of like drinking water from a watergun. You've done that before right? Except water guns have higher pressure than your partner will. While a watergun can shoot a dozen or two feet away, your partner will only be able to squirt several feet in distance. The pressure is not strong enough to feel. But you will know for certain he has come when you taste his male syrup. If your partner spurts out a thick jet of cum only an inch or two in distance, you will taste him the moment he shoots. Instant gratification!

Your partner's penis will now be very sensitive, so wait until the orgasm subsides before pulling off. Once his shaft begins to soften and shrivel in your mouth, slowly pull off and swallow his come. Yep, swallow. If you like the taste, you can wait before swallowing, of course. But if you don't like the taste, swallow anyways. You will just end up tasting more of it if you spit it out, something that most dick sucking women unfortunately never learn. That's because they are not afraid so much of the actual taste than they are of your penis and semen. If you are a woman, resist your fears of the male body and just swallow! If you'd rather not taste it at all, you can try pulling off the moment your partner comes. However, that sometimes fails (like coitus interruptus), so for now, get use to the taste. It's a natural side effect of pleasing a male and it won't hurt you. It certainly hasn't hurt me. :) Although semen tastes kind of bitter, don't judge it by taste alone. It is full of harmones that are linked to sensations similar to that of an orgasm. There is nothing dirty about the male genitals or the liquid product of a male orgasm. Also, spitting out is uber unsexy for the male on the receiving side of the blowjob, something women generally don't comprehend because they are not male. You've got to be a male to understand, so just trust me. Your boyfriend will thank me (and you, too).

I hope you find these steps helpful as they fill a void in today's sex education that only details boring coital missionary position sex. It's an important procedure for the reproduction of the human species, but hardly the last word in sexual intimacy. Experiment and have fun.

+1 Informative (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976206)

I could really go for a BJ right about now. If only I got my dick sucked as often as I reload slashdot...

gain (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976065)

gain

troll (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976114)

troll

MySQL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976066)

HATED IT!!

Two snaps down!!!

Web, schmeb (5, Insightful)

jargoone (166102) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976068)

Perl (also love it or hate it) was almost synonymous with website programming.

Love Perl for most anything, hate it for web "programming". There's a good reason it was synonymous with website programming. It's because there now exist more flexible, robust, easy-to-use platforms for web development.

Re:Web, schmeb (4, Interesting)

wawannem (591061) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976143)

Currently working in a Java/JSP/Sybase-based web programming environment and I love it.

But, I will give perl it's props.

I often use it to prototype large projects. Despite most arguments for other languages, I will say that you can pump out perl code pretty fast and it does help when you need some mockups and basic functionality to sell a concept.

Re:Web, schmeb (1)

DebianRcksLindowsLie (752247) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976415)

Perl DEFINITELY has its uses. You've just got to use the right tool for the right job. There are good tools out there, just use the right tool in the right place.

Re:Web, schmeb (2, Informative)

zerocool^ (112121) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976181)

Thank you, that was my immediate first reaction. Perl is a regexp manipulation language first, and very well suited for a variety of other tasks, other than web development. But, for webdev, there are many other languages that have been developed since perl that are much better.

Perl had to be adapted to web development, and it still suffers from various problems (for example, it's significantly slower than php). Php was written to be a web processing language. It's easier to understand and easier to program in, and faster. The only reasons to use perl over PHP for web development are 1.) familiarity with perl (slashdot), and 2.) security (to avoid "today's php upload root exploit").

~Will

Re:Web, schmeb (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976241)

Please support you statement that Perl is slower than php.

Re:Web, schmeb (3, Informative)

zerocool^ (112121) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976358)


?? Support your inferrence that perl is faster than PHP?

I don't have hard numbers, but I have been in environments where both are used, and perl seems to perform much worse. Specifically, I administer ~100 webservers, and clients that use more php put far less of a load on the system than people writing in perl scripts executed through web pages or mod_perl. In multiple years of working with both, perl just has become synonymous with higher system load.

The load jumps related to PHP that I see are always MySQL based loads.

~Will

Re:Web, schmeb (3, Interesting)

consumer (9588) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976447)

Frankly, if PHP outperformed mod_perl on your system it was probably because of mistakes in the Perl code. Even PHP boosters admit that mod_perl is faster, as in this talk [yahoo.com] from Yahoo.

Re:Web, schmeb (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976475)

Perhaps that is because people are doing complex things with perl while the PHP users are doing this:

<?PHP echo 'Welcome to my leet haxoring page, you have been ownzored' ?>
<?PHP header("Location: http://www.goatse.cx/") ?>

Re:Web, schmeb (1)

hotfries (89386) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976295)

I call bullshit on the PHP is faster part:

http://www.chamas.com/bench/#2000 [chamas.com]

Re:Web, schmeb (2, Insightful)

skiflyer (716312) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976441)

Perhaps I'm not reading the graphs right, but more requests per second is better correct?

If so, PHP beats Perl on every graph except one, where they tie... and it has better memory utilization too... or am I way off on how I'm reading these?

Either way, they're both pretty close on that specific benchmark, I don't think I'd consider it proof of much of anything.

Re:Web, schmeb (1)

zerocool^ (112121) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976444)


I call bullshit on your link:

While there are some numbers here available for your review, benchmarking does not provide a real world assessment for any application operating in a specific real world scenario, and this does not try to demonstrate any proof that any system is better than any other.

Not to mention that, in those graphs, perl occasionally handles more requests per second than PHP, but almost ALWAYS has higher system load, and in many applications is SIGNIFICANTLY slower than PHP. For instance, who runs mod_perl on a webserver without a LOT of those modules added in (when you add stuff like Mason, Image::Magick, DBD::MySQL, it makes mod perl slower!).

Take another look at that graph, and average all of the perl instances versus the one PHP instance that they have listed, and compare the speed and requests per second.

~Will

Re:Web, schmeb (1)

consumer (9588) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976490)

Simply using modules does not make mod_perl slower. There is no performance overhead for just loading them. A program that does things will take longer than a program that does nothing, but that's just as true for PHP.

Re:Web, schmeb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976313)

Check out this book [amazon.com] on PHP and MySQL intergration by David Lane, one of my favorite new O'Reilly writers.

Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister (2, Informative)

IO ERROR (128968) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976231)

Yes, that's what it stands for, but don't tell anybody.

I love perl for what it was designed to do: process text in just about any way imaginable. I hate it for the purpose proposed here: CGI scripts.

I usually use PHP for Web pages, a mixture of PHP, Perl and Bourne shell (and whatever else is at hand) for the back end, and I wouldn't touch MySQL for a database if my life depended on it, when there are vastly superior OSS altrernatives [postgresql.org] available.

Re:Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister (5, Funny)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976292)

I can think of nothing more likely to start a flamewar on /. than singing the praises of Perl and MySQL in the same story.

<1/2 g>

Re:Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister (2, Funny)

Etyenne (4915) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976460)

I was expecting the Python zealots to overwhelm this discussion with their usual snobbism of Perl, but for some reasons the PHP fanboys are the one making the most noise. It will be interesting to see where this will lead.

Why bother? (2, Interesting)

Decaff (42676) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976346)

Perl is a superb scripting language for system coding, but...

Now with systems like Java Server Faces and Creator you can design a web form in a few seconds using a drag-and-drop designer, clip in some data validators, and visually design navigation through a complex website. A few more clicks and you have an single archive file that can be dropped into any J2EE application server, using any JDBC database on any platform.

You can design, code and test complex form-based web applications in minutes.. and all the tools are free.

So why would anyone want to hand-code all this in Perl?

Even more puzzling, given that Perl has a portable database interface, why restrict things to MySQL?

Re:Web, schmeb (0, Flamebait)

Mr. Neutron (3115) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976378)

Besides, why use Perl with MySQL when PHP exists? Isn't PHP designed around MySQL? I haven't used it, but it can't possibly be as painful as Perl.

One time for kicks I wrote a small bulletin-board engine in Perl+MySQL. A few years later I re-wrote it from scratch with JSP/Servlets+MySQL. Guess which took an order of magnitude less development time? :-)

Re:Web, schmeb (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976514)

A few years later I re-wrote it from scratch with JSP/Servlets+MySQL

The difference, my friend, is the "few years", and not the tool. Your productivity improvement can be attributed to improvements in the IDEs, testing tools, frameworks, etc., which evolve over time.

Re:Web, schmeb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976436)

there now exist more flexible, robust, easy-to-use platforms for web development

Indeed. I have done some simple scripting in Perl, but unless you already use it day in and day out and are comfortable with the syntax, there's not much incentive to use it for Web programming.


PHP is relatively easy to learn and does most anything you would need to do for basic Web development. Is there anything Perl can do that PHP can't?

Three cheers for LAMP (2, Insightful)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976083)

Linux, Apache, Mysql, and Perl. They changed the world forever.

Re:Three cheers for LAMP (3, Informative)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976136)

the P in LAMP stands for PHP not Perl. PHP and MySQL are a perfect fit. Perl and Mysql are a real PITA.

Re:Three cheers for LAMP (1)

crass751 (682736) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976186)

I learned all I needed to know about Perl and MySQL from the Perl Cookbook. I wrote a whole DB interface in CGI. It wasn't that hard. Once I learned the few commands necessary, it was really easy. I agree though, PHP is even easier.

Zero cheers for WIAV (3, Funny)

conner_bw (120497) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976272)

Windows, IIS, Access, and Visual Basic.

These also changed the web for ever.

Microsoft, WIAV you done for me lately?

Re:Three cheers for LAMP (-1, Flamebait)

NineNine (235196) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976331)

Linux, Apache, Mysql, and Perl. They changed the world forever.

Hitler also changed the world forever. What's your point?

Re:Three cheers for LAMP (5, Funny)

Monkey Angst (577685) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976479)

Hitler also changed the world forever. What's your point?

How the hell do you Godwin a thread about a Perl book?

Re:Three cheers for LAMP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976509)

Goodwin and his 'laws' are worse than Hitler ever was.

guffaw (-1, Troll)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976090)

"Website programming".

Tee-hee. I still laugh when I see that phrase.

Re:guffaw (3, Insightful)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976135)

"Website programming".

Tee-hee. I still laugh when I see that phrase.


Heh, not every website is a 50 line PHP hack made by a kid. You can do extremely powerful things with a website and those things can require complex programming skills. And that programming can be done in Perl.

Re:guffaw (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976261)

Yes. The Web (love it or hate it) is the preferred platform for delivering ... well, just about everything that goes over a network, these days. The days when "website programming" meant throwing together some 1337 Javascript hack to make your personal site flashier and more irritating than everyone else's are long gone, and they're not coming back. For some reason, this seems to bother some people; I'm not sure why.

Re:guffaw (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976244)

I still laugh when I see nerds trying to make themselves feel better by downplaying the skills of others. At the end of the day, although you state using Perl or PHP to generate dynamic webpages isn't programming in order to feel satisfied, you're still a nerd, and most people programming webpages are cooler than you. And you know it. nslookup that, nerd.

slashdot.com wankers share their opinions (-1, Troll)

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Last Modified: 7/02/02
How do I get an IP Unbanned?

Email banned@slashdot.org. Make sure to include the IP in question, UID, timeframes, and any other pertinent information. If you are connecting through a proxy server, you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 3/26/02
My RSS Headline Reader Tells me I Was Banned!

Due largely to the absolutely ridiculous amount of abuse we get on a daily basis from poorly implemented headline readers, we were forced to implement a much more liberal automated banning system on RSS/RDF headline reading applications. Our policy is to allow one request every 30 minutes. We'll allow a few more before you will get banned, and we are more flexible still with proxy servers. However, in many cases, we have no choice but to ban abuse.

You should still be able to access the rest of the website, just not the .rss, .rdf, and .xml pages.

You have 2 options: First is to stop beating the crap out of our servers, and just wait a few days/hours. Depending on the severity of the abuse, you should be back in a couple of days. If, after 72 hours, you are still banned, please Email banned@slashdot.org and ask for help. Please include the approximate time of the ban, the MD5 that the ban message told you to tell us, and what you think your IP number is.

If you have reason to believe you're connecting through a proxy server, please mention that too -- and you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 4/05/03
Why is someone else's User Name appearing on my User Page's Menu?

This is not a bug. This is a feature! That name is the last user page (besides your own ;) that you have visited. This is useful when you want to hop around between your user info, and someone else's: to compare friends and foes for example. Your account has not been hacked, this is totally by design.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/06/03
What are Login Sessions?

A login session is a glorified cookie. To provide some added security, you can determine the location and time duration for your session. The duration choices are 'Lasts Forever' and 'Closes With Browser' and should be pretty self-explanatory. The former is good if you are the only person using your computer. The latter is nice if you are slightly paranoid, or often log in from remote terminals.

The second decision is your location. The first choice is 'Never Moves' which basically means you have a static IP and you never log out of Slashdot or share your computer. The second choice is 'Moves within Subnet' which is useful if you have a desktop and never log out, but your ISP likes to change your IP on you occasionally. The last choice is 'Follows me Everywhere' which is the choice for machines that move from network to network. This last option is the least secure, but oh-so convenient. It is also the default.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/25/04

Re:slashdot.com wankers share their opinions (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976137)

slashdot.com?

Hmmm - silly me. I always use slashdot.org. Guess that just redirects to slashdot.org. Good to know.

Italics.. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976127)

..isn't meant to be used for whole paragraphs, because it is hard to read.

Good! (1, Troll)

JaxWeb (715417) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976128)

I find there are a lot of books and resources which each Perl, or teach SQL, but don't teach you how to use Perl, or use SQL. For example, it is perfectly possible to read a book, learn Perl, and not be able to actually use it for anything useful (in regard to websites). Not many books that I've seen have addresses this. My personal knowledge of Perl for use in webpages is scraped together. Perldoc.com [perldoc.com] helps a lot, however. Books like this seem useful as a starting ground. PHP is gaining a lot of ground on PHP (It's overtaken it, I hear). This may be because it is more suited to suited to web development, or it may be more because all it does is web development: As soon as you know PHP, you know how to make a website using PHP. Most Slashdot readers will be past this point in learning a language I should imagine, so, without reading anymore than this book review, I might suggest it wouldn't be worth buying, but this is certainly the sort of book which should be on the bookselves in shops. A lot more helpful than 101 books about how to use IOSTREAMs in C++.

Re:Good! (1)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976175)

PHP is gaining a lot of ground on PHP (It's overtaken it, I hear).
PHP is gaining ground on PHP?

Sounds like it's the leader if it's gaining on itself :)

Re:Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976179)

Where did you cut and paste this from?

Re:Good! (0, Flamebait)

JaxWeb (715417) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976180)

I find there are a lot of books and resources which each Perl, or teach SQL, but don't teach you how to use Perl, or use SQL.

For example, it is perfectly possible to read a book, learn Perl, and not be able to actually use it for anything useful (in regard to websites). Not many books that I've seen have addresses this. My personal knowledge of Perl for use in webpages is scraped together.

Perldoc.com [perldoc.com] helps a lot, however. Books like this seem useful as a starting ground.

PHP is gaining a lot of ground on PHP (It's overtaken it, I hear). This may be because it is more suited to suited to web development, or it may be more because all it does is web development: As soon as you know PHP, you know how to make a website using PHP.

Most Slashdot readers will be past this point in learning a language I should imagine, so, without reading anymore than this book review, I might suggest it wouldn't be worth buying, but this is certainly the sort of book which should be on the bookselves in shops. A lot more helpful than 101 books about how to use IOSTREAMs in C++.

(This is a repost with correct HTML... why didn't I pressed Preview? :D)

Re:Good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976332)

Perhaps you need to preview for correct content as well. :) Did you mean "PHP is gaining a lot of ground on Perl"?

As far as books on how to use Perl or SQL, there are tons of them, especially SQL that has been around forever. I've found one good way to learn how to use a language is to look at other people's code. Go to your favorite open source website and search for applications similar to yours, that use the same technology. Copy these applications, read them and learn from them, especially from their mistakes.

Re:Good! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976187)

All bold is just as unreadable as all italics.

Re:Good! (1)

wawannem (591061) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976199)

How about a book on using HTML? Pay close attention to the chapter on closing your tags.

Re:Good! (1)

JaxWeb (715417) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976245)

Yes. I'm an idiot. Fair point.

I really, really should had pressed Preview. I was thinking about clicking preview, but I thought, "Nah, I'm not going to make a mistake with HTML am I?"... I forgot about those things called line breaks...

JaxWeb (Score: -1, Retarded)

Re:Good! (1)

wawannem (591061) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976312)

Glad you can take it without insulting me right back... I'll give you credit though, it is *Monday*

Re:Good! (2, Funny)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976220)

I find there are a lot of books and resources which each HTML, or teach Slashdot posting, but don't teach you how to close your HTML tags, or use the Preview button ...

Oh, hell, you know the rest. ;)

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976144)

but there is no argument that if you are planning on putting together a website, using MySQL and Perl that MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development

Translation please?

Re:Huh? (2, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976275)

It translates roughly to this (my dingbat is rusty, please forgive me);

Blah blah blah buzzword buzzword buzzword spacefiller spacefiller blah blah this submission is now longer.

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976387)

but there is no argument that if you are planning on putting together a website using MySQL and Perl, MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development.

Re:Huh? (1)

Decaff (42676) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976394)

there is no argument that... using MySQL and Perl will aid immensely in that development

Translation: either ignorance or flamebait.

You don't use phrases like 'no argument' without expecting an argument.

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976428)

but there is no argument that if you are planning on putting together a website, using MySQL and Perl that MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development

Perl is very flexible (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976148)

It could be programmed to tell you when you forget a closing </I> tag.

USE ASP! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976154)

PerlScript ASP is available for Apache on Linux [apache-asp.org], ready to work with MySQL through a REAL scripting language, ASP. Makes PHP look like a kids' toy, really.

Re:USE ASP! (2, Interesting)

I confirm I'm not a (720413) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976310)

ASP's not a scripting language, it's a technology. The language in this implementation is PerlScript, which is pretty much - wait for it - Perl. You don't specify how this implementation of ASP makes PHP "look like a kids' [sic] toy" but I've used two implementations of ASP - ChiliSoft (now SunONE) and Microsoft's - and PHP compares very favourably to both. I'd be surprised if apache-asp differed significantly.

Re:USE ASP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976353)

PHP is not object oriented, therefore making it teh ghey.

Re:USE ASP! (1)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976533)

So to understand you correctly, you use perl over chillisoft ASP to run your code on a non-iis box? Are you related to MacGuyver? I mean, really dude.... mod_perl on Apache is a lot less layers to have to depend on. Less stuff that can go wrong really.

Perl / MySQL CMS solution. (3, Informative)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976156)

I have been using a MySQL / Perl solution called WebGUI [plainblack.com] for quite a while
now. It is a full CMS system that is truly open source and cross
platform, running on *nix, Windows and MacOS.

It truly is powerful yet very easy to use. Plenty of features such as Submissions system, Bulletin Board, Calendar, Syndicated Content and much more.

If you are looking for such a solution, feel free to give it a try.

are the plainblack docs still non-free? (1)

jbellis (142590) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976270)

pretty extreme example of writing free software and charging for "services." I'm probably not the only one who didn't bother looking closer after seeing that.

Italic (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976158)

Does the whole thing have to appear like this?

I used to use Perl until.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976169)

I discovered PHP. It just seems to be such a natural language when it come to designing a dynamic website.

I'm sure I'm redundant (-1, Redundant)

mao che minh (611166) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976177)

But PHP is far better suited for webpage development than Perl. For starters, PHP is understood by more people, meaning there are more existing projects that you can implement or just borrow code from.

Re:I'm sure I'm redundant (1)

INeededALogin (771371) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976277)

PHP is understood by more people than Perl?!?

Since when did PHP take these large grounds in popularity to overtake the most popular scripting language in history. PHP is nice, but it is very limited. Perl is very mature, stable and benefits from one of the best programmers in the world(Larry Wall). Not to mention that you can almost make toast with regular expressions.

And, I hate to say it, but installing PHP is one of my least favorite things to do, along with stabbing my eyes out with a rusty knife.

I feel your love for PHP, but different tools for different people.

Re:I'm sure I'm redundant (1)

consumer (9588) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976290)

PHP is understood by more people, meaning there are more existing projects that you can implement or just borrow code from.

I'd love to know where you got that statistic from. My guess is "nowhere" or "my friends like PHP." PHP is popular within a certain community of designers who became programmers, but I strongly suspect that Perl has a wider base of users if you look at programmers as a whole.

As for your comment about borrowing code, there is really no language out there that has been as successful at sharing code in a resuable way as Perl with its CPAN system. Borrowing PHP code usually means copy, paste, modify. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that PHP seems to make all functions global within a single namespace, so you have no way of knowing if someone else is stepping on your function name.

Re:I'm sure I'm redundant (1)

lpangelrob2 (721920) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976437)

Actually, I'm an on-again, off-again PHP website developer that came from a community of programmers who happened to fall into web design. And happened not to like Perl enough to want to learn it.

PHP sometimes seems more than hackish at times, and I won't start the whole separation of presentation and data thing started. (i.e., if you care, use JSPs). But it's done well for me in small, interactive websites that require a convenient interface to a database of some type.

Call me ignorant of Perl... but I would also like to see some more complex programming in websites. Next time I'm at Barnes and Noble, I'll give this book a look.

Re:I'm sure I'm redundant (1)

consumer (9588) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976530)

I would actually consider JSP a bad example, unless you use taglibs. Something like WebMacro or Velocity would be better.

There are some large and complex sites written in Perl: TicketMaster.com, Amazon.com's newer stores, imdb.com, and others. PHP can be made to work in many situations, but Perl has more features for progamming in the large with teams and sharing code.

ATTENTION: Parent is NOT OFFTOPIC !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976357)

Okay, so it discusses the merits of PHP vs. Perl. So friggin' what? It's an attempt at creating a discussion, and has been replied to already. Why mod the hell out of something that could be interesting. And it IS Ontopic - it only widens the area of discussion in a logical fashion.

ATTENTION: He's right! They were TROLLING! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976489)

The OP discusses nothing of the merits of PHP vs Perl. It gives an uninformed opinion.

It really should've really been modded "troll"....just like all the other PHP, Ruby, Python karma whoring wankers...

tacofags wave their idiot flags (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976182)

bwhahaha cuntface died
Why should I log in?

Logged in users have a variety of benefits on Slashdot that are unavailable to users who don't bother logging in. Among these benefits are:

* The ability to save user preferences from visit to visit.
* Your own Journal in which to share your innermost feelings.
* The ability to define Friends & Foes to aid in reading discussions.
* A chance to participate in Slashdot's Moderation and Meta Moderation System.
* Posting in Discussions at Score:1 instead of Score:0 means twice as many people will see your comments.

So do it! Log In Already!

Answered by: Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda
Last Modified: 6/16/03
Can I change my nickname?

You can't. Sorry. It's just too prone to abuse. You can't delete your own comments. You can't change your name. There are no exceptions to this.

Answered by: Samzenpus
Last Modified: 12/19/01
How do I change my password or email address?

Go to the User Info Editing Page while you are logged in and use the form provided there.

Answered by: CowboyNeal
Last Modified: 4/03/03
How can I delete my account?

You can't. The system needs to keep track of the users, so accounts are permanent. Don't sweat leaving unused accounts hanging around. It doesn't hurt anything.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00
I forgot/can't get my password!
You should be able to get it from the user login page. Just type in your nickname and hit 'mailpasswd' and your password will be whisked off to your email address. If, however, this doesn't seem to be working, email passwords@slashdot.org for help.

Answered by: CowboyNeal
Last Modified: 3/4/02
I'm having trouble logging in.

Make sure you have cookies turned on. If you don't, it won't work. Also make sure that the date and time on your computer is correct. In an handful of cases, the problem could be related to a problem with a proxy server, but this is very unlikely. If you've turned cookies on and tried again to log in, and it still doesn't work, drop CowboyNeal a note and he'll try to help you.

Really, though, the system works for thousands of people every day, so the problem is most likely on your end ;)

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00

I'm having trouble logging into Slashdot Sections (Like Apple, YRO, or BSD)

You can be logged into slashdot while you view any of the subsections. All you need to do is hit any of the sections, and log in. Logging into one of them logs you into all. But you need to log into at least one section seperate from logging into http://slashdot.org.

Yeah, we know this is confusing, but we didn't write the RFC for cookies. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 3/30/02

I don't want to accept a cookie!

A lot of people are paranoid about cookies, and not without reason, but the simple fact is that this is how you create persistence in a stateless protocol. I've heard all the arguments and all the debates on the subject, and this is how we're doing it.

If you don't want to use cookies, you don't have to. You can still post (either anonymously, or by entering your password each time you submit a comment) but you will not be able to use all of the advanced features of Slashdot (story filtering, customized Slashboxes, user preferences etc.). If your paranoia requires you not to use cookies, this is the sacrifice you'll have to make.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00
Someone is posting under a false identity, or an account designed to look like someone else

There are many accounts in the system that were created for malicious purposes. There are dozens of variations on names like 'CmdrTaco' and 'Hemos' as well as heads of many corporations, writers, etc. We don't tamper with existing accounts though, so there's nothing we can do about it. Over the last few years, numerous restrictions have been placed on accounts to make this difficult (for example the system won't let you create an account named 'CmdrTaco' because there already is one listed) but that doesn't prevent any of the hundreds of existing ninnies from doing what ninnies do.

In most cases, these folks are caught by moderation, and they eventually get karma that is low enough to make it obvious that they are impostors.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/19/00
Why do I keep getting randomly logged out?

You might need to log in to both 'foo.slashdot.org' and 'slashdot.org'. Because of how cookies work, if you log into the latter first, you might find yourself logged out of the former. Or vice versa. Once you log into both, you'll be fine. Yes, this is annoying. No we can't fix it. We don't write the RFCs.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 7/08/02
Do you ban people from Slashdot?

Occassionally we ban IPs who are abusing our servers in some way. If this happens, please read How do I get an IP Unbanned. These bans are relatively rare, but they are necessary in cases where specific Users or IPs intentionally try to disrupt service for other users by crapflooding the forums, game the moderation system, or to overburden our servers.

The moderation system has a variety of limits in it as well, but these bans are temporary and exist more as a rate limiter to make sure that people stay on topic, and everyone gets a chance to speak. You can learn more about the moderation system by reading Comments and Moderation.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 03/26/02
Why is my IP banned?

Perhaps you are running some sort of program that loaded thousands of Slashdot Pages. We have limited resources here and are fairly protective of them. We need to make sure that everyone shares. If your IP loads thousands of pages in a day, you will likely be banned. Please note that many proxy servers load large quantities of pages, but we can usually distinguish between proxy servers being used by humans, and IPs running software that is hammering our servers.

Your IP might have been used to perform some sort of denial of service attack against Slashdot. These range from simple programs that just load a lot of pages, to programs that attempt to coordinate an avalanche of posts in the forums (often through misconfigured "Open Relay" proxy servers).

You might be using a proxy server that is also being used by another person who did something from the above list. You should have your proxy server administrator contact us.

Your IP might have been used to post comments designed to break web browser rendering.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 7/02/02
How do I get an IP Unbanned?

Email banned@slashdot.org. Make sure to include the IP in question, UID, timeframes, and any other pertinent information. If you are connecting through a proxy server, you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 3/26/02
My RSS Headline Reader Tells me I Was Banned!

Due largely to the absolutely ridiculous amount of abuse we get on a daily basis from poorly implemented headline readers, we were forced to implement a much more liberal automated banning system on RSS/RDF headline reading applications. Our policy is to allow one request every 30 minutes. We'll allow a few more before you will get banned, and we are more flexible still with proxy servers. However, in many cases, we have no choice but to ban abuse.

You should still be able to access the rest of the website, just not the .rss, .rdf, and .xml pages.

You have 2 options: First is to stop beating the crap out of our servers, and just wait a few days/hours. Depending on the severity of the abuse, you should be back in a couple of days. If, after 72 hours, you are still banned, please Email banned@slashdot.org and ask for help. Please include the approximate time of the ban, the MD5 that the ban message told you to tell us, and what you think your IP number is.

If you have reason to believe you're connecting through a proxy server, please mention that too -- and you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 4/05/03
Why is someone else's User Name appearing on my User Page's Menu?

This is not a bug. This is a feature! That name is the last user page (besides your own ;) that you have visited. This is useful when you want to hop around between your user info, and someone else's: to compare friends and foes for example. Your account has not been hacked, this is totally by design.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/06/03
What are Login Sessions?

A login session is a glorified cookie. To provide some added security, you can determine the location and time duration for your session. The duration choices are 'Lasts Forever' and 'Closes With Browser' and should be pretty self-explanatory. The former is good if you are the only person using your computer. The latter is nice if you are slightly paranoid, or often log in from remote terminals.

The second decision is your location. The first choice is 'Never Moves' which basically means you have a static IP and you never log out of Slashdot or share your computer. The second choice is 'Moves within Subnet' which is useful if you have a desktop and never log out, but your ISP likes to change your IP on you occasionally. The last choice is 'Follows me Everywhere' which is the choice for machines that move from network to network. This last option is the least secure, but oh-so convenient. It is also the default.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/25/04

If you're familiar with DBI... (2, Informative)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976191)

...and you've got a Ruby [ruby-lang.org] app to write, you'll be happy to know that Ruby/DBI [rubyforge.org] is available.

It's being actively developed - a FrontBase release just happened a few days ago - and it supports a big list [rubyforge.org] of databases.

Re:If you're familiar with DBI... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976495)

For once Tom Copeland isn't measuring how good code is with his cute little app, and he's presented useful information to me!

This is TOTALLY on topic. Thanks, Tom!

I'm going to have to get my copy.. (2, Informative)

Metallic Matty (579124) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976194)

This will be an excellent addition to the O'Reilly books on Perl I already have.

The whole love or hate thing in the article intrigues me I might add. I love both MySQL and Perl. Why? Well, you can't beat MySQL for its cheapness facor. Let's face it, most people don't need some professional job, myself included. And as far as Perl goes, well, anyone who's used it significantly can understand how great it is for practical answers on the fly.

I used to enjoy coding in Perl… (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976223)

...until I discovered poking myself with a sharp stick.

Re:I used to enjoy coding in Perl… (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976500)

You know you've been coding in Perl too long when...
  • It starts to look like line noise.
  • You start copying line noise into your perl scripts.
  • The scripts still work.

old book? (5, Informative)

inf0c0m (83209) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976227)

does anyone else realize that this book is exteremly old?

Paperback, August 2001

also.... on the same bn site

A new copy is not available from Barnes & Noble.com at this time.

One whole chapter? (2, Interesting)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976246)

Even seasoned (hardened?) programmers may learn new tricks or methodologies from the second chapter of this book.
I don't know about you, but one whole chapter seems to be little reason to purchase a book.

As there are already books such as Programming the Perl DBI and Web Development with Apache and Perl, is the niche that this book is trying to fill actually worth it? Would I be better off reading Writing CGI Applications with Perl and The Official Guide to Programming with CGI.pm?

Personally, I haven't read a single one of them, so I'd really love to know. (one of these days, I'll actually read the copy of Practical mod_perl that's been collecting dust on my shelf.)

Thinkgeek most pathetic online store for 5th year (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976286)

Congratulations O$DN!

Why should log in?

Logged in users have a variety of benefits on Slashdot that are unavailable to users who don't bother logging in. Among these benefits are:

* The ability to save user preferences from visit to visit.
* Your own Journal in which to share your innermost feelings.
* The ability to define Friends & Foes to aid in reading discussions.
* A chance to participate in Slashdot's Moderation and Meta Moderation System.
* Posting in Discussions at Score:1 instead of Score:0 means twice as many people will see your comments.

So do it! Log In Already!

Answered by: Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda
Last Modified: 6/16/03
Can I change my nickname?

You can't. Sorry. It's just too prone to abuse. You can't delete your own comments. You can't change your name. There are no exceptions to this.

Answered by: Samzenpus
Last Modified: 12/19/01
How do I change my password or email address?

Go to the User Info Editing Page while you are logged in and use the form provided there.

Answered by: CowboyNeal
Last Modified: 4/03/03
How can I delete my account?

You can't. The system needs to keep track of the users, so accounts are permanent. Don't sweat leaving unused accounts hanging around. It doesn't hurt anything.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00
I forgot/can't get my password!
You should be able to get it from the user login page. Just type in your nickname and hit 'mailpasswd' and your password will be whisked off to your email address. If, however, this doesn't seem to be working, email passwords@slashdot.org for help.

Answered by: CowboyNeal
Last Modified: 3/4/02
I'm having trouble logging in.

Make sure you have cookies turned on. If you don't, it won't work. Also make sure that the date and time on your computer is correct. In an handful of cases, the problem could be related to a problem with a proxy server, but this is very unlikely. If you've turned cookies on and tried again to log in, and it still doesn't work, drop CowboyNeal a note and he'll try to help you.

Really, though, the system works for thousands of people every day, so the problem is most likely on your end ;)

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00

I'm having trouble logging into Slashdot Sections (Like Apple, YRO, or BSD)

You can be logged into slashdot while you view any of the subsections. All you need to do is hit any of the sections, and log in. Logging into one of them logs you into all. But you need to log into at least one section seperate from logging into http://slashdot.org.

Yeah, we know this is confusing, but we didn't write the RFC for cookies. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 3/30/02

I don't want to accept a cookie!

A lot of people are paranoid about cookies, and not without reason, but the simple fact is that this is how you create persistence in a stateless protocol. I've heard all the arguments and all the debates on the subject, and this is how we're doing it.

If you don't want to use cookies, you don't have to. You can still post (either anonymously, or by entering your password each time you submit a comment) but you will not be able to use all of the advanced features of Slashdot (story filtering, customized Slashboxes, user preferences etc.). If your paranoia requires you not to use cookies, this is the sacrifice you'll have to make.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/13/00
Someone is posting under a false identity, or an account designed to look like someone else

There are many accounts in the system that were created for malicious purposes. There are dozens of variations on names like 'CmdrTaco' and 'Hemos' as well as heads of many corporations, writers, etc. We don't tamper with existing accounts though, so there's nothing we can do about it. Over the last few years, numerous restrictions have been placed on accounts to make this difficult (for example the system won't let you create an account named 'CmdrTaco' because there already is one listed) but that doesn't prevent any of the hundreds of existing ninnies from doing what ninnies do.

In most cases, these folks are caught by moderation, and they eventually get karma that is low enough to make it obvious that they are impostors.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 6/19/00
Why do I keep getting randomly logged out?

You might need to log in to both 'foo.slashdot.org' and 'slashdot.org'. Because of how cookies work, if you log into the latter first, you might find yourself logged out of the former. Or vice versa. Once you log into both, you'll be fine. Yes, this is annoying. No we can't fix it. We don't write the RFCs.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 7/08/02
Do you ban people from Slashdot?

Occassionally we ban IPs who are abusing our servers in some way. If this happens, please read How do I get an IP Unbanned. These bans are relatively rare, but they are necessary in cases where specific Users or IPs intentionally try to disrupt service for other users by crapflooding the forums, game the moderation system, or to overburden our servers.

The moderation system has a variety of limits in it as well, but these bans are temporary and exist more as a rate limiter to make sure that people stay on topic, and everyone gets a chance to speak. You can learn more about the moderation system by reading Comments and Moderation.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 03/26/02
Why is my IP banned?

Perhaps you are running some sort of program that loaded thousands of Slashdot Pages. We have limited resources here and are fairly protective of them. We need to make sure that everyone shares. If your IP loads thousands of pages in a day, you will likely be banned. Please note that many proxy servers load large quantities of pages, but we can usually distinguish between proxy servers being used by humans, and IPs running software that is hammering our servers.

Your IP might have been used to perform some sort of denial of service attack against Slashdot. These range from simple programs that just load a lot of pages, to programs that attempt to coordinate an avalanche of posts in the forums (often through misconfigured "Open Relay" proxy servers).

You might be using a proxy server that is also being used by another person who did something from the above list. You should have your proxy server administrator contact us.

Your IP might have been used to post comments designed to break web browser rendering.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 7/02/02
How do I get an IP Unbanned?

Email banned@slashdot.org. Make sure to include the IP in question, UID, timeframes, and any other pertinent information. If you are connecting through a proxy server, you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 3/26/02
My RSS Headline Reader Tells me I Was Banned!

Due largely to the absolutely ridiculous amount of abuse we get on a daily basis from poorly implemented headline readers, we were forced to implement a much more liberal automated banning system on RSS/RDF headline reading applications. Our policy is to allow one request every 30 minutes. We'll allow a few more before you will get banned, and we are more flexible still with proxy servers. However, in many cases, we have no choice but to ban abuse.

You should still be able to access the rest of the website, just not the .rss, .rdf, and .xml pages.

You have 2 options: First is to stop beating the crap out of our servers, and just wait a few days/hours. Depending on the severity of the abuse, you should be back in a couple of days. If, after 72 hours, you are still banned, please Email banned@slashdot.org and ask for help. Please include the approximate time of the ban, the MD5 that the ban message told you to tell us, and what you think your IP number is.

If you have reason to believe you're connecting through a proxy server, please mention that too -- and you might need to have your proxy server's admin contact us instead of you.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 4/05/03
Why is someone else's User Name appearing on my User Page's Menu?

This is not a bug. This is a feature! That name is the last user page (besides your own ;) that you have visited. This is useful when you want to hop around between your user info, and someone else's: to compare friends and foes for example. Your account has not been hacked, this is totally by design.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/06/03
What are Login Sessions?

A login session is a glorified cookie. To provide some added security, you can determine the location and time duration for your session. The duration choices are 'Lasts Forever' and 'Closes With Browser' and should be pretty self-explanatory. The former is good if you are the only person using your computer. The latter is nice if you are slightly paranoid, or often log in from remote terminals.

The second decision is your location. The first choice is 'Never Moves' which basically means you have a static IP and you never log out of Slashdot or share your computer. The second choice is 'Moves within Subnet' which is useful if you have a desktop and never log out, but your ISP likes to change your IP on you occasionally. The last choice is 'Follows me Everywhere' which is the choice for machines that move from network to network. This last option is the least secure, but oh-so convenient. It is also the default.

Answered by: CmdrTaco
Last Modified: 1/25/04

Authors other books... (2, Informative)

agwis (690872) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976300)

I personally won't use Perl for backend programming on a website but if I had to I would probably buy this book based on the fact that it is authored by Paul DuBois.

When I first started out with MySQL I bought the book titled 'MySQL' written by DuBois. Since then, I've obtained a couple of other books about it and still find myself referring to his most often.

Too bad it isn't MySQL and (PHP|Python|Java). Who uses Perl in web programming anymore?

*dons flame retardant suit*

-Pat

Re:Authors other books... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976541)

Who uses Perl in web programming anymore?

Well, my company does (note the anonymous posting :)

We use Perl with Mason, mod_perl and Oracle to process huge amounts of data. The main obstacle we've found is that we have to hire a much better class of programmer who understands the limitations of Perl's OO model but is willing to accept that sacrifice in exchange for raw power. Combining that knowledge with test-driven development and we have teams of programmers who respond so fast to changing requirements that we're leaving our competitors in the dust and making a ton of money.

That being said, the reality is that we'd choose mod_ruby or mod_python if those languages had anything even remotely comparable to the CPAN. Since they don't, we've grabbed the biggest toolbox and accepted that some of the tools are made from cheap alloys. Were we able to go the Ruby/Python route, we'd have the luxury of hiring programmers of lesser skill and not be worried as much about their using a hammer on a screw.

For those getting started with Perl... (3, Informative)

CaptainPinko (753849) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976306)

Nice. I'm planning on learning how to tie scripting (have decided on Perl yet but it's a contender) and databases this summer anyway. This book might make the decision as to what to use for me.



However, for those just picking up Perl for the first time I recommend the free ebook Picking Up Perl, and the [ebb.org] ActiveState Perl Interpreter [activestate.com] for Windows (this was a while ago-- if you are using Linux it probably aleraday has Perl installed). And then as it was Windows I was learning Perl on I used OpenPerl IDE [sourceforge.net]. For Linux I recommend using Kate and Konsole.



Not trying to be off-topic here but I figure someone reading this may want to try out what this Perl thing is.



Disclaimer: Not a Perl fan at all, I actually perfer Python, but to each their own and as any Perl hacker can appreciate TIMTOWTDI! ;)

too many linebreaks (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976466)

Seriously, when your type in BR 5 times after each paragraph, don't you feel that at least 3 of them are superflous.




It's bad enough we have people posting the slashdot FAQ at 60 second intervals.




And what are the 2 linebreaks after the end of your post for? Deliberate annoyance? Extra scrolling pleasure? come on.

Re:too many linebreaks (1)

CaptainPinko (753849) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976499)

sorry, i just used the paragraph tags, no break-lines, and some white space just to see what i was writing better and still missed a few mistakes, sorry about that

ahem... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976322)

*cough*python*cough*

you don't want your pages turning into hacked up messes do you?

Put me down for... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976396)

> MySQL (love it or hate it)

Hate it. And stupid fuckhead zealots like Jeremy Zawodny that prostitute it. Mysql is the choice or ignorant newbies and dishonest greedy hucksters.

> Perl (also love it or hate it)

It's "okay". Love a lot of the modules in cpan - PORT THEM TO OTHER LANGUAGES (HELLO? PHP?)!!

Re:Put me down for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#8976455)

Fucking shit, lame ass slashdot doesn't have an "edit" button.

Mysql is the choice of ignorant newbies and dishonest greedy hucksters.

Choice Quote (1, Funny)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976405)

"if you are planning on putting together a website, using MySQL and Perl that MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development."

However if you are putting together a basket and require that this be done while not being mentally "all there" and submerged in seawater, "Underwater Basketweaving for the Mildly Retarded" will aid immensely in your project.

I mean c'mon, can't we infer the subject matter from the book title? I'll admit that there are some obscure ones out there that you can't tell but this one just seems to be a no-brainer.

one thing perl did right (3, Insightful)

jd142 (129673) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976419)

One thing that Perl has going for it that PHP doesn't is that it has correctly set up the database connection functions. Once you connect to a data source, all of the commands you use to interact with that connection are the same, whether you are using mysql, postgresql, or just a csv file. This means that you can change backend databases trivially, merely by changing one line of code.

With php, the commands for connecting to a database and running a query change, sometimes drastically, depending on the database you are using. For example, until recently if you had a query to run on a mysql backend, you did mysql_query($query) but for a postgres it was pg_exec($query). That is changing at least so now it's pg_query($query) but it still makes changing backends a large search, replace, and hope nothing breaks task.

Re:one thing perl did right (3, Informative)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976498)

Not true. There's database layers for PHP you can use that'll make your database connections heterogeneous...

ezSQL [justinvincent.com] is one that comes to mind. There's plenty more.

Why actually choose MySQL? (4, Interesting)

jesterzog (189797) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976480)

Arguably there are different choices for different needs in web development (PostgreSQL, PHP, Java, etc.), but there is no argument that if you are planning on putting together a website, using MySQL and Perl that MySQL & Perl for the Web will aid immensely in that development.

Maybe so, but I still have trouble figuring out why MySQL is given so much credibility in the first place.

In the previous story about MySQL [slashdot.org], I posted a comment asking what it actually did that other databases (including the also-free PostgreSQL) didn't do at least as well, or better. The main responses seemed to include:

  • MySQL being the only DB supported for an application that someone wanted.
  • People already being very familiar with MySQL's strange ways of doing things [sql-info.de] that are inconsistent with every other respected database, not to mention SQL standards.
  • No other free databases having reliable Windows builds. (A Windows build of Postgres is on the way, but not yet fully complete.)
  • ISP's only providing a MySQL server.
  • Simply not knowing anything else due to past experience.

The Windows build issue seems quite reasonable, but the other reasons imply that the main reason MySQL is so popular is simply due to lock-in. People use it because they have to, or because they're not familiar with the alternatives --- not necessarily because it's actually better for the task-at-hand.

Perhaps MySQL is such a common name that people haven't heard of better alternatives out there. Presumably the book that this story reviews, which gives it even more publicity, is yet another reason that someone might consider MySQL without even thinking about alternatives.

Can anyone tell me if I've missed anything, though? Besides the typical lock-in reasons for using MySQL, does it actually do anything better than other databases as any sort of killer feature?

If not, and if you're looking to start learning about a database and actually have a choice, it seems that you're much better off looking at an alternative database.... whether it be a free one such as Postgres, or one of the big ones such as Oracle or SQL Server. At the very least, you'd get a more reliable database than MySQL, a more portable database than MySQL, and even postgres (just as free) offers a wealth of additional -- often useful and important -- features such as stored procedures and more complete data integrity. You'll probably also become much more familiar with correct SQL syntax ... for what it's worth.

Perl synonymous? (3, Insightful)

Laptop Dancer (572075) | more than 9 years ago | (#8976535)

Perl (also love it or hate it) was almost synonymous with website programming. Arguably there are different choices for different needs in web development..
I'm willing to argue vociferously with that!
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