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KDE Conquers Astrophysics With Kst

simoniker posted more than 10 years ago | from the winner-is-you dept.

KDE 195

Telex4 writes "The Free Software community is constantly inundated with interesting new projects, but occasionally something crops up which is really special. Kst is just such a project. Started by Barth Netterfield, an astrophysicist, as a personal project to plot data from his experiments, it has now taken on a life of its own, being used in numerous academic projects, and finding funding from several government agencies. Intrigued by this project's success, and with a little prod from co-developer George Staikos, I interviewed Barth and George about kst, Free Software and physics."

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KDE Naming (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003163)

I suppose its slightly better than KastroPhysics.

Re:KDE Naming (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003176)

Shouldn't the headline read "KDE Konquers Kastrophysicists kith Kst"?

SAD NEWS... mercatur.net, dead at 5 (?) (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003208)

I just heard some sad news on talk radio - mercatur.net was found without DNS records this morning. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss it. Even if you didn't enjoy Alice's work, there's no denying her contributions to popular culture. Truly an American icon.

Re:KDE Naming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003245)

KastroPhysics

communism = beards * cigars^2

Re:KDE Naming (3, Funny)

name773 (696972) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003449)

communism = beards * cigars^2
you forgot vodka. the following equation will compensate:

communism = (beards * (cigars + vodka)^(1 + 1/e))

This story was ruined (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003166)

by Subscriber Ruiner 1.0!

MY HAND SMELLS LIKE SEMEN IS ON TEH SPOKE!!11 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003167)

I LOVE WANKING!

In soviet.. (0, Offtopic)

Fullmetal Edward (720590) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003183)

In Soviet Russia projects fund the government agencies.... or maybe thats tax.... either way we're getting screwed by top secret agents dressed as penguins riding pink elephants.

Lesson Learned (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003189)

That idiot MIT interviewer should take a page out of this. this is how you ask a guy questions.

screenshot? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003191)

Yes I need screenshots, pretty pictures...

OTOH the site loads quickly, but I still am pretty clueless about the project since I only went there to look at the pictures.

Re:screenshot? (2, Informative)

boarder8925 (714555) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003250)

RTFA!

kst1.png [tomchance.org.uk]
kst2.png [tomchance.org.uk]

Re:screenshot? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003418)

SMFD YHBT hello.jpg [hick.org]

Hexadecimal? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003193)

It'd be nice of it used hexadecimal.

Pychart (5, Informative)

updog (608318) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003201)

That definitely looks cool - another nice way I've found to plot data in a Python/QT environment is with Pychart [hp.com]

It's easy to generate png/pdf/ps plots and they look really nice.

Re:Pychart (4, Informative)

bloosqr (33593) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003259)

If you like Python for doing plotting check out vpython [vpython.org] Its basically a very simple opengl interface glued into python. Its actually originally designed to as a "computational physics" pedagogy language (which its really pretty fantastic for actually) but since its really just python its very easy to turn it into a poor mans 3d/4d plotting program :)

Re:Pychart (4, Informative)

Satai (111172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003507)

Hell, why stop there? VTK [vtk.org] and MayaVi [sf.net] are also pretty amazing visualization kits, both of which are either written in or provide python bindings. (MayaVi is built on VTK, but it provides a nice wrapper.) VTK has great isosurface locaters and some pretty awesome vector algorithms for looking at 2d and 3d data. We use it for physical applications at my work...

Re:Pychart (1)

Coryoth (254751) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003797)

If you're interested in something a little more complex than basic plots and charts I very highly reccomend VTK [kitware.com] a visualisation toolkit that is unparalelled for putting together complex 3D visualisations of data. It's all in C++, is open source, and has Java, and Python bindings.

I generally used the Python myself - and the python API is very nicely done - a pleasure to use, and a great way to do complex 3D data visualisation.

Jedidiah.

Is it Free ? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003203)

As in beer? (* whatever that means)

"kst"? (4, Funny)

kst (168867) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003216)

For the record, I had nothing to do with this.

Shouldn't that be "Konquered"? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003217)

As in "konquered astrophysiks"? How else can I tell that it was written for KDE?

Lets not let this go to our heads (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003220)

The author used Linux/KDE because that is what he was familiar with when he developed it. Its not suprising since universities are very UNIX centric. But that doesn't necessarily mean KDE is better suited for this type of application. In my opinion, no operating system/window manager will really have any significant advantages since the bulk of the work is number crunching. It could of easily been done in Win32.

Not quite... (5, Informative)

DarkMan (32280) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003429)

I take your point - most of this application, like many, is in principle doable independant of the underlying OS.

However, there are a few pluses on the side of Linux for this application.

2 GB+ files. Some versions of Win32 can do them, some can't. Some can only do it with a following wind. When you're talking scientific data, such file sizes can crop up often, if not a regular feature.

Network independance. This is less of an issue for display, but on the processing side, being able to coordinate multiple tasks, spread across many servers, from one desktop is a big win. Particualrly when it's a 'free' side effect (requires no extra programming). Four boxes are cheaper than a quad box - by quite a sizeable margin.

Which leads us on to the scheduler - with Win2K, a background number crunch task will take longer than on Linux, and impact interactive response more. That's not off the top of my head - that's based off my Linux/KDE desktop and my office mates Win2K systems doing the same tasks (computational chemistry, so essentially big matrix sums).

There's also library support. Not such a big one, as they can be ported, but it's more work that way. By libraries, I mean things like FFTW, LAPACK and BLAS.

So, that's a few areas with modest wins for unix/KDE. I'll add that headless admin for Unix is simpler than for Windows, which helps with the headless cruncher boxes, and conclude that there is a reason that unix is popular in universities, as it's got a slight edge.

Yes, it may well have been as easy to write for Win32 as KDE [0] - but in use, the linux is better for the number crunching.

[0] I wouldn't agree to that personally, but there's a degree of personal preference in there, so that's not objective.

Who the heck mods this as "Informative"? (1, Informative)

melted (227442) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003776)

There's so much bullshit in the parent post - it's just mind boggling. First off, every NT based version of Windows supports 2GB+ files. That's since Windows NT 3.51 folks! Wake up!

Network independence section is totally bogus, too. It takes LESS bandwidth to run a Windows box through RDP these days than what a simple X app would create. It's trivial to setup and run, and guess what, Windows has a TCP/IP stack, too.

There's no reason to believe that Windows is slower at number crunching. It's faster at everything else, why would it be slower at this particular task.

Libraries DO WORK under windows, LAPACK at the very least.

I mean, Linux has its strengths, but spreading such a smelly bullshit as the parent does is just insulting to my intelligence.

Re:Lets not let this go to our heads (4, Interesting)

Jeremy Erwin (2054) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003516)

Unix systems have had a historical advantage in scientific computation. Netterfield mentioned that he had first used XForms, looked at gtk+, felt queasy and decided to use KDE instead.
As Kst is primarily a plotter of data, his choice of graphics toolkit is of some importance.

Re:Lets not let this go to our heads (1)

xs650 (741277) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003692)

But it wasn't

I'm sure many will ask this... (4, Interesting)

ZuperDee (161571) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003234)

Why didn't the article headline read, "KDE Konquers Astrophysicists with Kst?"

On a more serious note: This question wouldn't arise if KDE people didn't insist on prefixing EVERYTHING with "K." Of course, same goes for GNOME folks prefixing everything with "G." Why is this necessary?

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003251)

KDE wants everyone to know that the K stands for Krap. It just makes it easy for anyone to realize that derivative products have the same operability.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (5, Funny)

ErichTheWebGuy (745925) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003255)

Why is this necessary?

It's gnecessary kuz it's kool.

Its a pity I don't have mod points (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003294)

Or I'd mod you down -1 FUCKING RETARDED.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (2, Insightful)

adler187 (448837) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003337)

The same could be said for a lot of Windows applications using the Win prefix and Mac OS X apps using the i prefix.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (4, Interesting)

zapp (201236) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003431)

This has all been gone over before, but it isn't new to kde/gnome.

X*, win* go back farther probably.

I think it's both a style thing (recognizable 'gAIM, on that must be AIM for gnome'), and also it makes it easy to tell what works with what. xemacs clearly is the X version of emacs. winamp clearly doesn't work on linux or mac, and konquerer clearly doesn't work on gnome.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003445)

and clearly you are a homo.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003532)

Except that Konqueror does work on Gnome. Or, at least, it works on IceWM, Blackbox, Enlightenment, Fluxbox, Windowmaker, and every other WM I have tried on my Linux box. I also routinely run Gnome apps on KDE.

G could also stand for GNU. gcc isn't a gnome app.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (1)

RedWizzard (192002) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003696)

This has all been gone over before, but it isn't new to kde/gnome. X*, win* go back farther probably.
The difference is that most of these groups are prepending the names with a letter or two, but one of these groups insists on changing C's to K's. I find the KDE approach far too 1337 for my tastes.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003475)

To indicate which desktop environment it's written for making it easier to find apps for your chosen environment.

It's not a KDE thing, they all do it (xeyes, xterm, xcalc) and I'm glad they do.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (4, Interesting)

Azureflare (645778) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003485)

So we know easily what WM libraries a package requires without looking at the depends.

Personally I don't like it when packages don't prepend their names with k or g if they are specifically for KDE or Gnome. It's annoying when you try to install it and it says it wants to install gnome libraries, or KDE libraries (whichever WM libraries you don't like installing, maybe both if you're limited on HD space)

It's consistent, and it works. It may seem a bit lame sometimes, but it makes things really easy for me (And others).

Also from an ease of use standpoint, it makes it easy to know what to expect from a package. "Oh, that has a k before it, that means I'll be seeing KDE themes on that app if I'm running XFce."

Sure, we should probably have a unified theme so things are pretty seamless and you can't tell if something is for KDE or Gnome (or more specifically, using qt or gtk). But we're not there yet, and it would be really confusing if we didn't keep things the way they are.

I think eventually a distro will successfully make it possible for all apps to look similar to each other in all WM, and I think it would be a good thing to do that.

Re:I'm sure many will ask this... (1)

damiam (409504) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003807)

GNOME? Prefacing everything wih a 'G'? I think Anjuta, Abiword, Balsa, Epiphany, Evolution, File Roller, F-Spot, Inkscape, Mergeant, Nautilus, Rhythmbox, Totem, and XChat would take issue with that assertion.

kst (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003256)

It looks good, but I'm skeptical about its usefulness for me. ROOT [root.cern.ch] already produces damn good output and fills most of my needs. And for everything else there's gnuplot. [gnuplot.info]

But I will look at kst. If it's as good as they say it is, I may use it instead of gnuplot.

Re:kst (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003312)

I agree completely! If it were implemented in Win32 you know you could trust the graphics output, but with Qt, you just never know (after all its open source, who knows what was put in there!). I don't think I'll touch it until they do a windows port.

Re:kst (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003386)

Congratulations. That's got to be the stupidest troll I've ever seen, in all of my way-too-many years of reading Slashdot.

Re:kst (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003417)

Thanks. Trolling is hard work and we rarely get recognition. Now I can finally brag on trolltalk [slashdot.org] and not be mocked. I finally have the STUPIDEST TROLL EVER SEEN. Yay!

Re:kst (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003492)

Ooh. Nice naked logo on that ROOT page. Or whatever that thing is.

Another one? (5, Funny)

drsmack1 (698392) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003262)

We need to stop creating all of these astrophysics programs for Linux and develop the ones we have now!

Re:Another one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003334)

Heretic!

Are you actually considering making a useful open source project? That would take away from our freedoms!

If I had a stake, I'd burn you on it.

Re:Another one? (2)

ajs (35943) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003423)

Wow, drsmack1, I'd like to appologize on behalf of the moderators who were clearly drinking when the modded you.

Folks: he was making a joke... you know "another window manager?!", etc., etc....

The moderation flag you were looking for was "funny"

Re:Another one? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003554)

I've been fucked a couple of times; check my history.

Re:Another one? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003769)

You're right! I just asked the gay guy next door, and he said he bent you over yesterday. Amazing!

Re:Another one? (1)

another_henry (570767) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003434)

Honestly, I don't see a whole lot [freshmeat.net] of astrophysics packages out there. Three distinct projects, and one of them's just a code translator.

(Please correct me if I'm wrong about this, IANAA yet)

He'll need it... (4, Funny)

Chemical Serenity (1324) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003276)

... to plot how quickly his site gets slashdotted. ;)

I would have thought Gnome (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003283)

I thought they were looking to find the Grand Gnunified Theory.

Re:I would have thought Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003359)

Did anybody else read that as "grand gayified theory?" LOL

An interesting take on the GPL (5, Insightful)

davidoff404 (764733) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003288)

It's interesting to see some airtime finally given to attitudes that academics have towards the GPL. In my time, I've often found that smaller research groups are more than willing to open-source their code once they're made aware that the GPL exists (you'd be surprised how many mid-career academics are unaware of its existence).

On the flipside, I've seen many instances of arguments between research students and faculty about open-sourcing code. This is especially prevalent in areas like nanotech research, condensed matter, and opto/spin-electronics research groups. It seems to be a worrying trend that many students who are just beginning their postgrad studies are forced to sign NDAs before being allowed to code for their research group. Sometimes I think myself lucky that all I need is chalk and a blackboard...

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (2, Interesting)

aeoo (568706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003348)

For the uninformed ones like me, why exactly are you required to sign an NDA? Isn't science based on sharing information? What am I missing here? How can a researcher be told how to run their research? I don't understand where that power comes from.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (2, Interesting)

pyite (140350) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003373)

Can't do research without money (for the most part). Can't get published unless you have credibility. Can't have credibility unless you have peer review. Can't have peer review unless you have peers. Can't have peers unless you're at a University from which you get funded.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

aeoo (568706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003414)

You failed to connect this to the NDA being a requirement.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (2, Informative)

0racle (667029) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003426)

Because without it, your not doing the research. Essentially its because they said so, you can take it or leave it.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

aeoo (568706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003454)

Who is "THEY"? The U.? The sponsor? Is there some pressure on the U.? What is the source of the pressure? Why is the U. interested in NDA? What if they don't get an NDA, what do they lose?

Answer my question full heartedly please.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (2, Informative)

0racle (667029) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003551)

"THEY" are whomever "YOU" are dealing with. It may be the "U." if they are the "THEY" that wishes to keep the ownership and anything related to the project, or perhaps "THEY" refers to the sponsor if technically "YOU" are working for "THEY" through the "U." In short "THEY" is whomever is asking you to sign the "NDA."

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003614)

What the "HELL!"

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

aeoo (568706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003666)

Ok, please tell me, if you can, how does Philosophy of Science (and in particular, Ethics) deal with NDA's?

Isn't it a little screwy? Isn't the whole point of U. is to resist the political and monetary pressure so as to create a haven for research where thinkers are allowed and even encouraged to be free?

See, this goes back to recent posts I made. It looks to me like U.'s are going down the toylet. I'm always open for suggestions, information and other input (brick on the head, cluestick, etc.). So I am asking here in hopes of getting an answer that will make me think this way, "Aha, yes I see that NDA is a perfectly accetable practice for a scientific researcher, because of _____, and it does not indeed conflict with the ethos of Science." I'm looking for some Aha here, but all I get are vague answer that if anything, just make my current opinions stronger.

I understand that money is needed. The real question is this:

Is it better to do closed research for money or is it better to do no closed research at all? And when you answer, you might as well answer this, "Better for whom and how?"

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

pyite (140350) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003794)

Please don't take this as an insult, but you are quite naive to the ways of the Universities (note, I differentiate U niversities who get all the money for research from u niversities who either don't do much research or are primarily liberal arts institutions). Universities are more political and bureaucratic in nature than many governments. That said, I love working for one as the atmosphere inside individual departments is very laid back and lax. However, once you have to deal with people outside your department, every word you say has to be carefully chosen and your sentences engineered, not written. The fact of the matter is that departments in Universities (and there are lots) are discrete, money making enterprises (whether they are truly "for-profit" or not, semantics makes no difference on reality). Departments are at the beck and call of those who will give them money (big business or government) and will sign NDAs if the need be.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (2, Informative)

davidoff404 (764733) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003704)

For the uninformed ones like me, why exactly are you required to sign an NDA?

As just a single example, recently I spoke to the head of a research group about his policy on these matters. In this person's group, they deal primarily with the properties of subwavelength gold gratings. Now, this is rather a hot topic in optoelectronics at the moment and the techniques used to fabricate these gratings tend to be quite closely guarded secrets. Unsurprisingly, almost the entire process of fabrication is automated, with the software used to drive the foundries being developed entirely in-house, mostly by research students.

Beginning last year, this person asked all researchers involved in the software development process to sign a rather restrictive NDA to prevent them from disclosing their knowledge of code to other groups in the event that they move on once they have completed their PhDs/contracts. Apparently there was a suspicion that an ex-employee had "migrated" their code when he/she moved on to a new job.

To be quite honest, I doubt that this is terribly different from the situation in traditional software companies, who obviously want to protect their code. The main motivation in the academic environment, however, is that you don't want your techniques used by another research group when grants are so hard to come by these days. Again, I'm glad all I deal with is a blackboard.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003354)

Sometimes I think myself lucky that all I need is chalk and a blackboard...

So that's "all" you need? A good blackboard is quite expensive. And if you want a sliding set of blackboards, the cost becomes huge.

Best stick to pen and paper, my friend.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

wdconinc (704592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003377)

Most universities have the policy that on everything you write while you are paid by them, they have the copyright. That means: no GPL possible!

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

ErichTheWebGuy (745925) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003443)

I don't recall the case name or anything right off-hand, but I know that at least in California, that was shot down by the state Supreme Court.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

davidoff404 (764733) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003725)

Well, leaving aside the fact that copyright for written works is a different matter from copyright on software, I don't believe this is true. Certainly, the copyright for any research papers, review articles, theses, written by faculty or students of the university where I work remains the property of the author.

Re:An interesting take on the GPL (1)

wdconinc (704592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003879)

Quotes from copyright policy[1] of umich:

staff (e.g. server admins): "the University owns works created by staff within the scope of their employment duties"

students: "Students who create academic works [...] own the copyright [...] unless: [...] the works qualify as works made for hire in the course of employment"

So, here, you lose your copyright if you are paid for it. It seems to depend on the university though... [2]

Ref.[1]: http://www.copyright.umich.edu/print-policy.html
Ref.[2]: http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic.php?t=165831&hi ghlight=copyright+university

Instructions (2, Funny)

jsweval (693114) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003320)

Anyone else not able to read the instructions because its MIME type is text/html?

Re:Instructions (1)

methano (519830) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003403)

I can't read it either but I didn't want to say anything. I was afraid it was my fault. I only took 2 semesters of physics.

Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003620)

Anyone else not able to read the instructions because its MIME type is not text/html?

Re:Correction (1)

jsweval (693114) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003655)

Thanks, I need more sleep.

Python Announces Fork... (4, Funny)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003322)

Pst (pronounced pissed...or post, depending on who you ask) is a Python fork of the now-popular kst program. Instead of astrophysics, it endeavors to plot a graph of aggression among IT employees.

Finding absolutely no funding from anyone, including government agencies, the project has taken a life of its own among overworked volunteer developers. These Pst programmers work dilligently on the code while concurrently providing enough test data to plot.

Due to its popularity, a port using Microsoft Foundation Classes is in the works. Rumor has it that it will be called MFT (pronounced miffed). A C port is also being made -- and their sourceforge project is located at ifuckinhateusers.sourceforge.net

Re:Python Announces Fork... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003603)

alrighty, that dude that voted informative should take that vote back or something. there should've been a parody/joke disclaimer in there.

Ever since Igor (4, Informative)

PaSTE (88128) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003327)

I used <a href="https://www.wavemetrics.com">Igor</a&g t; as an undergrad for most of my data plotting and graphing (physics), but the interface was not intuitive and without knowing the command-line language, navigating the menus took a very long time, even when you knew what you were looking for. Also, the price ($400 for the latest version) kept me away from using it off campus. Now I tend to stick to <a href="http://root.cern.ch/">ROOT</a> simply because its Cint interpreter is ideal for handling the massive (10^6 n-tuples) amount of data I look over, and because it's free. However, making advanced graphs and plots with ROOT requires a whomping manual and a fairly good grasp of C, as there are virtually no point-and-click features to it. I'm really glad another open-source data manipulation program is in the works, and that it can do the things ROOT can as easliy as Igor can without the emense price restrictions.

Re:Ever since Igor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003375)

Everybody laugh at me for not using "preview."

Igor [wavemetrics.com]

ROOT [root.cern.ch]

Translation (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003328)

The Free Software community is constantly inundated with interesting new projects

Sure, if "interesting" means "pointless" and "new" means "re-hashed". Then yes, this is an accurate statement!

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003371)

Yes, when "accurate statement" means "complete bullshit troll".

Re:Translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003405)

It's a shame that the parent comment will be modded to -1. It is Damn insightful.

Grace (aka Ace/gr) (3, Informative)

nsushkin (222407) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003345)

Why reinvent the wheel, what was wrong with using Grace [weizmann.ac.il] .

While I agree that the Motif app looks a little outdated, the app is free as in GPL and is really powerful in terms of features. For example, it allows scripting.

Re:Grace (aka Ace/gr) (2, Informative)

Satai (111172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003529)

I like the scripting in Grace, but it had quite a learning curve. I found that the python bindings [sourceforge.net] were useful. For scripted plots, supermongo [princeton.edu] (not free) is popular, but I think Grace is prettier.

Re:Grace (aka Ace/gr) (0, Flamebait)

Ariel Sharon (726189) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003548)

That's because slashdot commies are all anti-semitic terrorist-supporting nazis.

Re:Grace (aka Ace/gr) (3, Insightful)

tskisner (775465) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003604)

I'm one of the grad students that uses kst every day for analyzing data for the Boomerang experiment.

Try using Grace to plot 1e6 data samples from 16 different sources in real time as it is acquired. Grace has some nice math features, but I believe that within the next year most of these will be surpassed by the features of kst.

Sometimes it's easier to build a new house that renovate an old one ;-)

Supermongo or gnuplot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003353)

Does the functionality overlap with sm or gnuplot?
Like could I consider using kst to replace sm?

NO! It can't be! (1)

narftrek (549077) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003368)

Barth Vader has conquered astrophysics? With the Kst?

Use the Kst Luke, use the Kst.......

Re:NO! It can't be! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003473)

Use the FUCK YOU TREKKIE!!!

Re:NO! It can't be! (1)

pheesh (231819) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003763)

would have been funny, but you mixed up your nerd categorization. Clearly a Star Wars geek.

Funding (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003398)

I'm glad that Kst has funding from the United States government. I am however, concerned that Kst is using the GPL which restricts my ability to alter the code and make money from it.

I've already paid my taxes that funded this project. Should it not be a BSD licensed project where I can use the code however I want? Why does a tax-funded project have the ability to inflict its restrictions on me?

Re:Funding (3, Interesting)

updog (608318) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003538)

You may be trolling, but that is an interesting question - there are definitely arguments for releasing it as BSD licensed. I don't agree at all with the moderators for modding the comment as Flamebait.

Here's one reason to make it GPL - it makes financial sense. Since they have invested money and time into this project, they should strive to maximize their potential return.

By making it GPL, their initial investment can be improved upon by anyone, and the Kst project can reap the benifits.

Re:Funding (2, Insightful)

aussersterne (212916) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003613)

You mean like your tax-funded congress, your tax-funded police department, or your tax-funded internal revenue service?

Ob Simpsons Reference (1)

Froosh (171409) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003435)

"There is so much i dont know about astro physics; I wish I read that book by that wheel chair guy."
But is this easy enough for Homer to use? ;)

tut doesn't render in mozilla (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003439)

all i get is the raw html page. using mozill 1.7b

Submission stolen from kdenews.org (1)

moxruby (152805) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003453)

While I'm sure the guys over at kdenews are happy this made it to the front page of slashdot, I'm sure they would have appreciated a little credit...

Apologies (1)

moxruby (152805) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003511)

I just notied that the guy who posted the story to kdenews was the same who submitted it to slashdot - he an do as he pleases with his own work...

My apologies.

Re:Submission stolen from kdenews.org (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003771)

That's the problem with the Slashdot posting format of "blahblah writes ....". It's pretty rare for the poster to have originally written anything in the post. It all comes from the linked page(s), but Slashdot attributes the blurb to the submitter erroneously. It's pretty sad, it even borders on plaigarism.

Where the name comes from (4, Informative)

greppling (601175) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003501)

From the tutorial [utoronto.ca] :

Q: What does kst stand for?

A: The 'k' in kst stands for the same thing as the K in KDE. (ie, the letter after J and before L). The 's' and the 't' have a similar explanation.

gnuplot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003560)

What does this provide that you can't do with gnuplot?

Gretl (2, Informative)

Knights who say 'INT (708612) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003674)

Another piece of software that became quite a hit in academia is Gretl, the GNU Econometrics, Time-series and regression library.

It's a perfect clone of eViews, and it's free as in "just grab it"

Kosmic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9003798)

You know, atoms just want to be free, especially the radical ones...

OK, fine... (1, Funny)

Spoing (152917) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003803)

Now KDE has an astophysics program. Can it do colour-magnitude diagrams? Can it give real-time feedback from particle accelerators?

You open source people have to cover this or Microsoft will walk all over you.

(Satire, probably bad, noted here to CMA.)

What does he do with it? (1)

bluGill (862) | more than 10 years ago | (#9003841)

Yawn, same old third for license issues, third for introduction... Leaves just a couple sentences to what would be most interesting to a geek: what is he doing with it.

gondola pointing sensor time traces, and bolometer detector, sound more like something that a fiction author made up to this not an astro physicist, but reasonably smart. I'd be much more interested in his research and how the program works than all the boring details around the program and who uses it.

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