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Non-English Programming Languages?

Cliff posted more than 10 years ago | from the localized-keywords dept.

Communications 191

jjohnson asks: "As a coder I've been exposed to a lot of programming languages, big and small, and they're all in (pseudo) English, reflecting their invention and development in English speaking countries (or to gain traction in English speaking countries, such as Ruby). Of course, there's no reason a programming language couldn't be developed in Russian, using a cyrillic character set; or Chinese, using kanji; or Japanese, using hiragana. All three of those nations have big/advanced enough developer communities to justify the development of native-tongue programming languages, which have the obvious benefit of not requiring their developers to learn/code in a foreign language. What non-English programming languages exist, and how do they compare?"

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191 comments

Swedish Chef BASIC (1, Funny)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116328)

10 FOR I = 1 to 10
20 PRINT "BORK!"
30 NEXT I

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (2, Interesting)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116420)

10 PRINT "BORK!"
20 GOTO 10

See - 1/3 reduction in code!

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (1)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116455)

... its not a valid reduction if the effect isn't the same ...

But it is much more efficient! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116493)

By altering the code as he has, he has increased the output in a rather significant fashion.

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116546)

Yeah, but not only is it 1/3 less code, it's also infinitely more BORKtastic!

You might even say it's BORKalicious!

BORK!BORK!

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (3, Funny)

RevAaron (125240) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117243)

Except, that illustrates the problem precisely. If it truly were Swedish chef, the words "PRINT" and "GOTO" would be in their Swedish equvalents. And since I don't speak Swedish, I'll approximate:

10 DRUCKENJORGESPORGE "BORK!"
20 GEHENJASUREj00BECHA 10

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9118796)

So BORK means BORK in Swedish too?! How amazing.

Re:Swedish Chef BASIC - optimized! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9118859)

In "proper" swedish.

10 SKRIV "BORK!"
20 HOPPATILL 10

Google (4, Informative)

marco0009 (716718) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116353)

Thank you google for your infinite wisdom:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/encyclopedia/non_engli sh_based_programming_languages

Re:Google (3, Informative)

Profane MuthaFucka (574406) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116523)

proper link [wikipedia.org]

Re:Google (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116891)

For some reason, it doesn't include APL [acm.org] which, at most, only uses ASCII characters for names and numbers. (The meta-language (e.g., ")SAVE") does use english words.)

Re:Google (2, Insightful)

sharkdba (625280) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118725)

Thank you google for your infinite wisdom

It's not wisdom, it's knowledge. Indexed and searchable, but still only knowledge. Wisdom is knowing which information is relevant to context at hand, AND what to do with this knowledge.

Re:Google (1)

Bradee-oh! (459922) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118965)

Thank you google for your infinite wisdom

It's not wisdom, it's knowledge. Indexed and searchable, but still only knowledge. Wisdom is knowing which information is relevant to context at hand, AND what to do with this knowledge.


Well, if you want to get so nit picky about it, knowledge and information aren't interchangable either...

lots o' dupes today (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116354)

Re:lots o' dupes today (1, Informative)

y0bhgu0d (168149) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116511)

#1 - Not the same article. Similar, yes, but not the same article.

#2 - That was posted nearly 4 years ago. Not only may views have changed, but maybe there have been new developments in non-english programming languages.

I, for one, tire of the "nyuk nyuk too many dupes on slashdot" comments. Life is a cycle, things are going to repeat. Get over it.

Many of them... (3, Insightful)

addaon (41825) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116384)

Any language which doesn't define a core of keywords, but instead just has functions that can be overridden... and which supports unicode. Variants of lisp anf forth qualify, off the top of my head. Of course, languages with only a few keywords, like java, are amenable to trivial pre-processing of those keywords, and also support unicode right out of the box.

When you mention lisp (1)

UrgleHoth (50415) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116850)

I think of the car, cdr, and cons functions in lisp. Now cons is for construct. Car gets you the first element in a list, cdr the the second link (& therefore the remaining list) of a list.
I heard that car and cdr are are artifacts of machine code mnemomics, which I assume are English. But when you look at the functions, they are now cryptic and esoteric enough that they do not appear language specific. How many languages use cons as an abbreviation for the local equivalent of construct?

Re:When you mention lisp (3, Informative)

notfancy (113542) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117160)

CAR [wikipedia.org] (Contents of Address Register) and CDR [wikipedia.org] (Contents of Decrement Register) are effectively mnemonics for what we call nowadays (in ML or Haskell) the hd (head) and the tl (tail) of a list.

But, since in Latin head is caput and tail is cauda, you could say that CAR stands for CApite Regesta (literally, "what's written at the head") and CDR for CauDa Regesta ("what is written at the tail")! The Classicist purists among you will probably find that a better non-etymology would be "CApitis Recensio" and "CauDae Recensio", but who's worrying anyway. Then of course, you have that CONS [wikipedia.org] is also Latin for "CONStruo".

What do you want, universe? (4, Interesting)

Michael.Forman (169981) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116398)


Klingon Var'aq [geocities.com] .

Example:
Name: hello, world
Dialect: English
Version: 5 June 2000
Comments: Not the canonical var'aq "hello, world"; actually prints "What do you want, universe?" in Klingon

~ nuqneH { ~ 'u' ~ nuqneH disp disp } name
nuqneH

Michael. [michael-forman.com]

brainfuck (3, Funny)

kwoff (516741) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116409)

brainfuck [muppetlabs.com] though, granted, it's still in ASCII.

Re:brainfuck (1)

BRSloth (578824) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116636)

And let's not forget about whitespace [dur.ac.uk] .

Re:brainfuck (2, Funny)

Frnknstn (663642) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117128)

If you prefer you language colourful, try f*ck f*ck. [chilliwilli.co.uk]

Translated Visual Basic (2, Informative)

Scarblac (122480) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116421)

Ah, apparently the submitter hasn't heard of the horror that is (was, I hope) translated VBA. If you had a Dutch version of Office, your Visual Basic was Dutch as well. That is, the language itself. A FOR..NEXT loop was something like a VAN..NAAR loop (I have only seen this stuff, not coded in it).

I can't find the right Google keywords at the moment to find an example, but it was horrible, and of course totally incompatible with other versions...

Re:Translated Visual Basic (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116502)

and of course totally incompatible with other versions...

That's not true - it's totally compatible, and in fact even translates itself. If you make your Excel document using a French version of Office, and then open the same document in an English version, all the code has miraculously become the standard VBA that we all know and (possibly) love.

Re:Translated Visual Basic (1)

Scarblac (122480) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116649)

Hmm, guess it shows that I didn't code in it. Someone should mod me -1, Wrong...

Re:Translated Visual Basic (1)

wcb4 (75520) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116902)

don't be silly, you won't be modded -1. Your comment was a veiled MS bash, you will of course be modded 5 insightful before the day is over. This is slashdot after all.

Re:Translated Visual Basic (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117566)

Still not touching it with a 10 foot pole, so speaking without trying, but... how compatible it could be with "cut and paste" code?

I could be have the spanish version of Office (urgh), found a nice macro in some web site, try to paste it in a document and found that it don't work because the keywords are all wrong.

Or worse, think I already know vbs and try to write a macro, then who of the alternate translations of "print" (or whatever uses vb to display text, to put a very basic example) i should use in my "translated" code? Should i ask the guide for every keyword before i try to write a "hello world" program?

I think i saw similar approachs in some try to localize linux into spanish, that included not only the man descriptions, but also translating the executable names, i.e. instead of find, buscar, instead of cut, cortar, and so on. Can be done, linux is free software, you can do anything... but i doubt that even the perpetrators of that would use such system.

Re:Translated Visual Basic (1)

spitzak (4019) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117308)

In older Basic's this was totally compatable by just substituting the keywords. If they were stored as tokens it would even come up in your language instantly.

Compatability is probably impossible in modern VB or any other language, for two reasons: first there is new syntax rules where the parser cannot use context to figure out if a word is a keyword or a variable name. Second is that everything is stored as text so that formatting by the programmer can be preserved, so there is no tokenized version that will come up correctly, and translating back & forth would lose too much information even if the translator flagged and renamed conflicting variable names.

None English programming languages? (4, Informative)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116428)

As far as I know there are none.
The reason is pretty simple. English is probably the most commonly spoken language for business and science on the earth today. Before someone says that there are x billion Chinese yes they are but there are many dialects of Chinese and also of Hindi. Also a very large percentage of the Computer industry is centered in the US. I just do not think that there is any other language that has so many educated speakers. If you want to be an Airline pilot in any country in the world you must speak english. Yes a Russian airline pilot landing in Germany will speak to the towner in english. Or back in the 1800s French was the language of Science. For now it is English that is more or less the universal language.

Re:None English programming languages? (3, Funny)

LocoBurger (18797) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116638)

Yup, French was pretty universal, at least in the west, hence the phrase 'lingua franca' which practically means 'the language that you can use everywhere' but literally means 'the French language,' (in Latin, no less..). I think..

Anyway, speaking of French, I knew a guy in college who had programmed C in French. All you need to do is fiddle with where the keywords are defined in the compiler. So he was writing 'durant' and 'pour' loops, along with 'si' statements. Pretty whacky..

In French, though, 'C++' is 'Ç++'. Cool huh? :)

Re:None English programming languages? (2, Informative)

Prior Restraint (179698) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117364)

In French, though, 'C++' is 'Ç++'.

Why would they do that? The letter "C" in French is pronounced much like the word "say" in English. The only point of the cedilla is to soften what would otherwise be a "hard c," such as in façade and François. "C" by itself already has a soft sound.

Re:None English programming languages? (4, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116743)

An interesting story someone once posted here -- he was living in a Central American country and asked a developer if he found it uncomfortable to code in a foreign language. The developer asked him if he could read music. He could. The developer asked him if he was bothered by the Italian used in the instructions (or whatever they're called). Never occurred to him to worry about it.

Explained the developer: Well, just like an "allegro" or "pianissimo" is just the historical way music is annotated, "switch" and "if" are, for historical reasons, the way code is written.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

joostje (126457) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116776)

Before someone says that there are x billion Chinese yes they are but there are many dialects of Chinese

But (nearly?) all dialects of Chinese use the same writing system, so your argument doesn't really hold.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116876)

But how many educated Chinese do not read, write, and speak english?
How many educated people in India read, write, and speak English?
You have to play the persentages I would still say that English is the most common language on earth right now.
I am not sure about that writing systems used in China. I know that there are a couple used in Japan.
The main point is a programing language is sucsessful if it is popular. The more people that use it the more libraries that it will have the more useful it becomes. Most programers know English.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117448)

It may not be the most 'common' language on Earth by counting the people that actually speak whatever language ... but it is easily the 'common denominator' language in that regardless of where you are, -somebody- there will also speak it.

May not speak it well, but you will be able to get across your general ideas. I attribute this not to anything the Americans have done, but mostly to the British attempted colonization of just about any flat dry land area over the previous two or three centuries.

Re:None English programming languages? (2, Funny)

Methuseus (468642) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117479)

I have to say that not everywhere has someone who speaks English. I was driving cross-half-country in the US and stopped for gas in a small town down south. All the signs were in English, but nobody seemed to speak it.......

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117792)

Actually it has a lot to do with the English and the Americans. The use after WWII was really the only country with a healthy economy. Almost every other country wanted to do business with the US so the all the schools had classes in English. The only country that had tourists and airlines was the US and England so all air traffic control was done in English.
The dismiss what the US has done in since WWII is really just anti-american bias. The US did a lot to rebuild many of the countries in the current EU. The Marshal plan was a huge investment in the future of Europe not to the cost of Nato to the US. While the US is not perfect it has been one of the most benign super powers in history. I often hear that people in other countries claim that Americans do not know or care about history. I would say the same is now true about a lot of the member states of the EU. Or maybe the are afraid of their own 20th century history?

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117940)

The spread of English to Africa, India, Australia, Ireland, Brazil(?), and the like ... all of those I attribute to England. I agree with you though, all through out Europe the 'doing business with the US' side of the house has driven the English language equally well.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

rpresser (610529) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118315)

It's a shame the above wasn't written in English.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117918)

I attribute this not to anything the Americans have done, but mostly to the British attempted colonization of just about any flat dry land area over the previous two or three centuries.

Actually, even if it is something the Americans have done (does it count as talking about myself in the 3rd person if I say 'the Americans'?), then it's still due to British attempted colonization.

Re:None English programming languages? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116893)

There are two distinct writing styles - Traditional and Simplified characters. Simplified characters are used in the People's Republic of China (Mainland), and Traditional characters are used in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and abroad. Reading one does not mean that you can read the other.

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

acramon1 (226153) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117226)

Being able to read Traditional means one can read Simplified, albeit with some difficulty.

When I took Chinese in school, we were expected to learn both; I found it acceptable to just learn the Traditional and wing the Simplified (I would write in Traditional, but read in both).

Nevertheless, most Chinese is Simplified just because PRC endorses Simplified. And I'm not too sure how many Chinese actually read/write English well at all....

Re:None English programming languages? (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117823)

At least he didn't call Chinese characters "kanji".

Fucking anime nerds [slashdot.org] . Diediedie.

Re:None English programming languages? (2, Funny)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117948)

At least he didn't call Chinese characters "kanji".

Fucking anime nerds [xmission.com] . Diediedie.

forgot the http in the link, fixed

Re:None English programming languages? (2, Interesting)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117407)

It also might have something to do with the origins of the technology, most of the original inventing engineers coming from English speaking backgrounds.

Perhaps had Grace Hopper been German she would have coined the phrase 'Computerwanze' instead of 'Computer Bug'.

Not too difficult... (4, Funny)

BobTheJanitor (114890) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116429)

With a bit of Lex and Yacc [ds9a.nl] , it should be pretty simple to come up with a C++ variant in any given language. When I was in college, some friends of mine and I wrote a compiler in ebonics, called Eubonicode [iastate.edu] . Granted, I don't know how well lex/yacc cover non-ascii character sets, but it wouldn't be hard to whip up a compiler for a French, Spanish, or German version of C++.

Eubonicode (1)

stumbler (219354) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116571)

That's pretty funny.

Your sourse link is 404 though. You should consider reposting it.

Re:Eubonicode (1)

BobTheJanitor (114890) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116690)

One of the other guys hosts it, so I can't change anything, but all the appropriate files are here [iastate.edu] .

Re:Not too difficult... (2, Interesting)

Glonoinha (587375) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117569)

Oh man that is hilarious.

Actually as a side project in college I wrote a Pascal to C compiler (wrote it in Pascal) as a hack to get my way through all those pesky C coding homework problems in a hurry. I was a long time Pascal coder and fairly new to C, didn't particularly care for the syntax of C. I would do the C homework in Pascal, run it rhrough my pre-processor to convert the Pascal versions of the homework to C, compile the output in TurboC and Voila! I was done in half the time.

I have hence learned to love C, for the record.

I guess someone could do the same thing, take all the keywords and translate them, write your own 'language' using those, and write a YourLanguage to C compiler to pre-process the source code before compiling it as regular C in your C compiler.

Re:Not too difficult... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9118054)

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

Niggers talk funny.

See you at the next Klan meeting Bob.

Bad Idea (3, Insightful)

Captain Rotundo (165816) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116471)

I am sure there are or were some non-english programming languages (and even as a native english speaker I've thought about this problem myself). But, and its a big but, right now using english gets you access to the most diverse and largest audience (except maybe mandorin, but even there your talking basically the chinese (mandorin is not generally taught as a second language as widely as english).

With the internet and the "global economy" it makes NO sence to have a localized language, unless your a proprietary developer that doesn't want you code to have the longest life it could :)

You may think I am just saying this because I speak english so of course I think english should be the most used, but I honestly can tell you I would be quite happy to learn another language as best I could if english weren't the primary communication language for programming (and most anything really). I would obviously be severely inconvienenced, but no more so that maybe people whose software I use now.

Maybe the best choice would be to have translatable keywords for a language, because the syntax really doesn't match english in all cases anyway. Of course translatable keywords would become a nightmare quickly due to the severe limitation on variable names etc, for instance how could you ever choose a word and be sure the language wouldn't end up need that for "if" in some language you never heard of?

As far as different character sets, this becomes a non-issue as all software moves towards unicode and UTF-8 (or equivalent) encoding. Once that happens you can for get about worring about character sets (and its happening fast).

Re:Bad Idea (2, Insightful)

Tux2000 (523259) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117445)

Maybe the best choice would be to have translatable keywords for a language

Have you ever seen Visual Basic for Applications in a localized version of MS Office? It really hurts the eye. If you have ever coded an advanced hello world programm in nearly any language, you know what a FOR loop looks like. If you look at VBA with translated keywords, you can't see anything but bla bla because of the translated keywords.

English is very helpful for keywords because you can understand english sentences no matter what order the words are in ("to station go now I"). In other languages (like german and french), order of words is more important, so the pseudo-english grammar of many computer languages does not match the translated keywords. It is simply much harder to read german with a pseudo-english grammar than reading english with a pseudo-english grammar.

I use to code completely in english (including comments and docs) for about 5 years now. It is just easier to read than mixing german comments and message strings with the english grammar of the language. And it has the nice side-effect that others can read my code without the babelfish.

BTW: See also Scarblac's posting "Translated Visual Basic" for a nice comparison to music and its italian "keywords".

Tux2000

Re:Bad Idea (1)

kunudo (773239) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117646)

mandorin

It's mandarin.

Re:Bad Idea (1)

ptaff (165113) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117938)

As far as different character sets, this becomes a non-issue as all software moves towards unicode and UTF-8 (or equivalent) encoding. Once that happens you can for get about worring about character sets (and its happening fast).
Won't happen in our lifetime. If you're a non-native english writer, how many encoding tricks did you learn in your lifetime? in my everyday activities, I have to know at least:
  • ISO-8859-1;
  • UTF-8;
  • Regular Unicode
  • HTML entities (& e a c u t e ; );
  • XML entities (& # 2 3 3; );
  • XML entities, hex ( & # x e 9 ; );
  • Javascript way ( \u 0 0 e 9; ).
I know I could use UTF charsets in my HTML documents, but the web is all about IE6^Wlegacy browsers, ain't it? So that makes at least 7 ways I must encode, simply to use french. And I'm not even counting the illegal Unicode char tricks to decode texts pasted from Microsoft apps (the 128-160 range is supposed to be unused, Bill...). Yeah, I wish everything was UTF-friendly; Microsoft doesn't even look as though it's trying...

LOGO (2, Insightful)

agdv (457752) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116548)

I used to program in LOGO in elementary school, and the version we used was in Spanish. Might have been translated to other languages as well.
So what if it was interpreted rather than compiled, and it was a very limited program made for children, it was a programming language, so stop laughing, all of you.

Re:LOGO (1)

arhar (773548) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116759)

LOGO was awesome! One of the best programming languages ever created. Oh, the stuff I used to do with that turtle ...
I think I even wrote a Raptor-type game where the turtle is flying through a narrow tunnel, shooting at obstacles and trying not to hit anything.

Those were the days.

Oh, and this post is on-topic because it was in Russian (as far as I can remember)

Re:LOGO (1)

PeteQC (680043) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117174)

I used LOGO in French. Maybe it was not the most powerful language, but for a 10-year old that I was, it was perfect...

Avance 10
Tourne 90

It was a really good initiation to what programming is like...

Here's (1)

Kickasso (210195) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116560)

one reputable source of information [slashdot.org] about non-English programming languages.

Re:Here's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116620)

Reputable source of information? Where? All I see is a link to a Slashdot story.

*ducks*

Oh, I see. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117006)

This Slashdot story is bound to be so much more informative and useful than that Slashdot story. Right?

Perl ... (3, Funny)

Tux2000 (523259) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116603)

... completely without letters if you do it right! ;-)

How about K? (1)

ambient (8381) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116734)

The K Programming Language [kx.com] is language agnostic. Quote: "One of the hardest things for many people to get over at first is the way K looks. Even the strongest K enthusiast will freely admit that K tends to look like line noise." [A Shallow Introduction to the K Programming Language" [kuro5hin.org] ]

Re:Perl ... (1)

jonadab (583620) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118990)

> ... completely without letters if you do it right! ;-)

Or, with nothing _but_ letters [perlmonks.org] . This still looks nothing like English. Of course, that's a deliberate obfuscation; normal Perl code is considerably more English-based than that. But with Perl6 you'll be able to define your own grammar, so it ought to be easy to make a version based on another language.

Translated Hebrew Basic (2, Interesting)

udif (32355) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116654)

Back in the DOS days, an Israeli company called "248 software" created a translated BASIC interpreter, complete with Right-to-left line entry:
5 TO 1 = X FOR 10
"HELLO" PRINT 20
NEXT 30
(sorry for lack of right-alignment - I couldn't get this to work in the comment window. Just assume the lines above are right aligned).

substitute the regular keywords with the equivalent hebrew words in a hebrew font, and you get the idea.

Notice that unlike the keywords here which are left-to-right, the hebrew keywords are actually read right-to-left, so the only thing on the line read left-to-right are the numbers.

Re:Translated Hebrew Basic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117059)

Notice that unlike the keywords here which are left-to-right, the hebrew keywords are actually read right-to-left, so the only thing on the line read left-to-right are the numbers.
I'm pretty sure they read the numbers right-to-left too, even though the order isn't changed around (this is at least the case for Arabic).

Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117473)

Arabic and Hebrew are different in this regard.

Re:Nope. (1)

Shipud (685171) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118994)

Both of you are wrong. In Hebrew and in Arabic, letters & words are right->left, numbers left->right. That is, the 10^0 position is rightmost, to its left the 10^1, etc. However, dates in Arabic are commonly right->left, (yyyy/mm/dd) but time notation is left->right (hh:mm).

whitespace (1)

ShecoDu (447850) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116655)

I havent seen nobody mention whitespace [dur.ac.uk] , it has no english keywords whatsoever =)

Well at least another poster already posted about brainfuck [muppetlabs.com]

I can't remember of any other languages, but maybe one could try machine code, nah, just kidding (are there people who program directly in machine code?, I found this link about the Psion organizer [surfeu.at] or something, but I didn't get too deep into it)

Re:whitespace (1)

jonadab (583620) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118873)

> I havent seen nobody mention whitespace, it has no english keywords whatsoever

Other examples along these lines include Unlambda, Remorse, and Malbolge.

In Russian (2, Interesting)

AndyElf (23331) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116679)

There most certainly were quite a few, and not only programming languages, but also OSes. One of programming languages that comes to my mind is Rapira (). If you do a search you'll get quite a few references to it. I always had a problem with this sort of "localized versions" -- especially in Slavic lannguages: our average word length is longer than English (hence lots of abbreviations in these laguages), most of computer terminolgy is anyway borrowed...

Just the same I am generally having big problems with localized Excel -- I once saw my mothers excel worksheet (Russian version) and could not figure out half of the formulas!

Re:In Russian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117529)

In Soviet Russia,

OS boots YOU

(sorry, couldn't resist this one)

Just change the lexical analyzer (1)

benpharr (163979) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116723)

If a compiler was designed correctly you should be able to change the keywords just by changing the lexical analyzer. Everything else would stay the same.

machinecode ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9116724)

You could try machinecode (not not assembly, machine code)
Not English atleast ;)

relevant paper (1)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116809)

Hello World or Καλ ημέρα κόσμε or こんに ちは 世界

[ how ironic that /. wont let you insert html entity refs ]

Rob Pike & Ken Thompson

<a href="http://plan9.bell-labs.com/sys/doc/utf.html" >http://plan9.bell-labs.com/sys/doc/utf.html</a&gt ;

Re:relevant paper (1)

Prior Restraint (179698) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118912)

[ how ironic that /. wont let you insert html entity refs ]

...because Slashdot is where HTML entities come from? I've been racking my brain for a while now, and I cannot fathom how this is in any way ironic. It's definitely an annoyance, but there's no irony in that.

C ? (5, Interesting)

noselasd (594905) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116849)

"#define" is your friend.(enemy..)

#define if hvis
#define do gjør
#define while sålenge
#define return returner
#define void ingenting
#define char karakter
#define const konstant
typedef int tall;

tall lengde(konstant karakter *p){
tall i = 0;
sålenge(*p){
i++;
p++;
}
returner i;
}

Re:C ? (2)

sweet cunny muffin (771671) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117322)

You might want to learn to program in English before you try another language. All your #defines have the two parameters the wrong way round.

Re:C ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117837)

Du glemte en alternativ versjon på nynorsk...

Actually ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 10 years ago | (#9119020)

Since you've said it, your 2nd and 3rd defines have characters which might be out of the range of characters a normal C compiler might use, no?

Would this really work?

Sorry I find a mistake (1)

School_HK (757129) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116896)

In the article, it said Chinese is using a kind of characters called kanji -- which is not true. Don't try to clone what Japanese called Chinese characters.

Re:Sorry I find a mistake (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9118915)

Chill out man. It's just a mistake. Correct them nicely and don't hate on the Japanese.

What the parent meant to say was that Chinese characters are typically written in the GB or Big5 format, not kanji. Kanji is simply a Japanese writing system that existed long before PCs.

APL (1)

Bob Cat - NYMPHS (313647) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116908)

"A Programming Language", which uses Greek letters and special shapes as operators.

http://www.acm.org/sigapl/

A Programming Language (1)

zoneball (568363) | more than 10 years ago | (#9116946)

There is APL ("A Programming Language"), which I remember getting some limited use (not by me) on campus when I was an undergrad. The language was sufficiently greek that it used some Greek characters as part of its language; I think the aim was to design a language programmed by mathematical notation. The keyboards for APL also came with stickers on the keys so that you knew which keys to chord in order to generate the non-standard language constructs. It looked like a very symbolic programming language to me. And I was scared of its keyboards.

Wiki page at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APL_programming_langu age

Saw a Finnish one in the 1980's (1)

heikkile (111814) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117020)

Way back, probably in the early 80's, I saw a guy tweak the Tiny Basic on our RCA-based computers, so that all the words were in Finnish. All 12 of them. He called if AKVOK, which was a direct translation of the "Beginners All-purpose Simple Instruction Code" into Finnish "Aloittelijan KaikkiValtias Ohjaus Koodi". For some reason nobody took him very seriously - but we all had great fun!

English is the language of computers (1)

gtrubetskoy (734033) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117052)

Sometimes it makes more sense to use one language in a particular field regardless of which country you're in. It makes it easier for professionals from different countries to communicate clearly.

Just like Italian is the language used in music notation, Latin in medical and botanical terms, English is the de facto language of computers.

Java? (1)

Mr. Piddle (567882) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117068)


For those masochistic enough, Java supports Unicode for symbol names. Imagine a project that has been outsourced at various times to Russia, India, Mexico, and China, whose developers decided to make full use of the Java Language Specification (not using features is wasteful, right?).

Port that Code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117127)

10 I=1
20 Print "BORK!"
30 IF I=10 GOTO 60
40 I=I+1
50 GOTO 20
60 END

(Ported to C64)

Latin (1)

Ugmo (36922) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117185)

It is actually a module for Perl to let you write Perl in Latin:

Perl in Latin [monash.edu.au]

I guess it was intended as a toy but it could be used as a model for other languages.

Re:Latin (1)

kabloom (755503) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117638)

Do they have Perl in yiddish [yoz.com] ? (It would just be so cool to program internet yiddish in yiddish)

You wanna see strange languages? (1)

kwench (539630) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117276)

Check Wouter van Oortmerssen's web page [fov120.com] and be sure to have a look at False [fov120.com] .

Perl in Latin (1)

Entropy Unleashed (682552) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117335)

I realize it's not an entirely new programming language, but Damian Conway wrote a Perl module [monash.edu.au] that allows one to program Perl in Latin. Since Latin relies on inflection of words instead of word order to convey meaning, it eliminates a lot of the normal syntactical issues involving positioning. Although you're unlikely to find very many native speakers of Latin, it certainly won't hurt Perl's readability.

Japanese programming language (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9117706)

The Mind programming language [scripts-lab.co.jp] , which is in Japanese, was recently discussed [kuro5hin.org] on Kuro5hin. Apparently the syntax reads like natural declarative Japanese.

Small problem (1)

sabNetwork (416076) | more than 10 years ago | (#9117714)

I have two words for you:

Accent marks.

Lexical Analyzer (1)

basking2 (233941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118103)

I saw someone else say this, but the score was 0!!! I hope that wasn't uninformed moderation. :\ Anyway...

... you can change most compilers to accept any variation of strings as the tokens by changing the lexer! If you would like C in Finnish, it's a very strait forward task once you settle on words that you want to use. Even change the file format from ASCII to UTF-8! It's just bytes that go into the lexer and then everything is a token.

Writting a wholey new language doesn't make much sense if you don't have an innovative idea for expressivity. Again, we are only talking about changing the lexer. Ideas of natural language grammar don't come into programming languages all that often with some strange exceptions. (Consider "instanceof" in Java where the operand order relates to English grammar. Kinda kluge even for an English speaker.)

1C Accounting software (1)

dimss (457848) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118298)

There is at least one "russian" programming language. 1C Enterprise [1c.ru] is common accounting software across Russia and its neighbors (incl. Latvia). Our company provides 1C localization in Latvia.

So-called "built-in language" of 1C Enterprise in fact is based on Russian. There is also "english" form but seems nobody uses it. Unfortunately, slashdot doesn't use unicode. I'll post some links to code examples:

1 [almea.ru] 2 [perlscript.ru] 3 [klerk.ru]

Hex, Hello!? (1)

arfonrg (81735) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118312)

The first language I programmed in, Hex codes! definitely NOT English.

OP Codes are for wussies.

APL (1)

sysadmn (29788) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118325)

You're forgetting the granddaddy of them all, APL. oeо...OEZ¼Ss-&#24 7; ± [acm.org] Sheesh, it's greek to me!

Programming in Latin (1)

TuringTest (533084) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118448)

Not a language per se but a Perl dialect, Lingua::Romana::Perligata [monash.edu.au] allows you to program in something that strongly resembles Latin (that is, if you don't know real Latin to tell the difference).

Fjölnir (1)

orrij (515114) | more than 10 years ago | (#9118801)

Fjölnir is in Icelandic, a language spoken by only about 300k people.

Documentation [www.hi.is] in Icelandic is available. You can also get a compiler [www.hi.is] .

As a PHB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9118878)

It's all Greek to me.
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