Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Simulate "The Day After Tomorrow" On Your PC

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the well-not-on-mine dept.

Software 285

kpearson writes "climateprediction.net, a distributed computing project to predict Earth's climate 50 years from now, has a new add-on project to study THC slowdown (how climate might change as CO2 changes in the event of a decrease in the strength of the thermohaline circulation). This kind of rapid, extreme climate change is shown in the movie The Day After Tomorrow, in which New York City is treated to a 10,000-year-long ski season. Anyone can download the project's client software and participate in the simulation. climateprediction.net was previously mentioned in the September 13, 2003 article Distributed Computing and Climate Change." Clients are available for various varieties of Microsoft Windows, but none are listed for other OSes.

cancel ×

285 comments

THC slowdown (4, Funny)

quigonn (80360) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181373)

I always experience THC slowdown after I smoked some good pot. No need for a simulation here, absolutely not.

Re:THC slowdown (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181380)

Now we can improve it using the simulations!

Re:THC slowdown (4, Funny)

Brendan Byrd (105387) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181396)

Same thoughts here. In fact, everybody's thoughts. One would think that the planet would benefit from increased levels of THC :)

Re:THC slowdown (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181406)

How come everyone is so obsessed with female plants -- you can even get "100% female seeds" {obtained from a hermaphrodite plant} in most outlets -- when the almost-undisputed best form of dope is pollen? Am I missing something? Is this a conspiracy to keep us from getting our hands on pollen? Or is what the hashman calls "pollen" not really pollen?

Re:THC slowdown (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181473)

Yes my friend, you're missing something. The "pollen" that your friendly hashman refers to is most likely polm. The finest morrocan hashes are polm. I am unsure as to the genesis of the word, but it could be related to palm, or else is an indigenous north african word.

There are varieties of hash called pollen I believe, but they are "brand names" much like "northern lights" or "silver pearl" are to skunk herb.

Your dealer is either using the name in this way, or has bastardised polm. It seems to be a commonish error. But, now you know...

The reason why 100% female plants are preferred to males is that they are much stronger and more productive. The ladies give us concentrated trichomes containing high levels of THC/CBD, whereas the males contain little of the active ingredients and give us a headache and a weak buzz.

So, spread the word brother.! No more pollen. Polm!

I for one ... (3, Funny)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181407)

... welcome our THC overlords, and would like to remind them that as a qualified potsmoker, I've done my fair share of THC propagation in the world ... ;)

Re:THC slowdown (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181476)

I usually see faces [starmatch.vg.no] after I smoke too much pot! (Btw, is that an a or an e?)

Re:THC slowdown (3, Funny)

Haydn Fenton (752330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181524)

These guys are a little late with the THC slowdown project, us stoners had one years ago (Download Here [thcradio.net] ), yet they all call us the slow ones, pffft!

And remember, 420 is ten times better than the meaning of life :-p

THC slowdown? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181374)

he's been smoking pot instead of researching, apparantly.

THC slowdown? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181375)

Dude that is truly a doomsday scenario... and here I thought the greenhouse effect had a bright side!

Who Cares? (2, Interesting)

essreenim (647659) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181467)

I'm sick of these movies focusing as if its the greatest city in the world or something. They expect ppl of the world to flock to the cinema to see a post apoalyptic New York which is actually primarily being caused by Americans ..! I would have more emotion in my heart if it were London or Paris or somewhere. ps. I'm Irish

Re:Who Cares? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181591)

You're noticing that the film was made as if it were for an American audience. Perhaps it was.

It's an "Election Year" in the USA, and perhaps the movie is part of an attempt to create a media frenzy surrounding an issue (the environment) on which our sitting president is politically very vulnerable. It may all just be a bunch of propaganda.

At least one billionaire (George Soros) has positively committed himself toward the goal of unseating President Bush in the upcoming election. Expect things to get very wierd in the coming months.

THC Slowdown (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181379)

I would have had first post, if it wasn't for THC Slowdown!

Re:THC Slowdown (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181389)

You mean first pot, right? :D

I you have to wonder that (4, Insightful)

Ckwop (707653) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181381)

.. if back at the time of the dinosaurs all this carbon was in the air.. then how can be releasing it be the end of "life as we know it".. The Dinosaurs did quite well :)

Personally, It's my opinion that the earth is a pretty robust system and our climate models will be rather wrong.

Simon.

Re:I you have to wonder that (2, Funny)

loyalsonofrutgers (736778) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181418)

Yes, those dinosaurs did great... which is why they are... extinct... and all. Yeah.

Re:I you have to wonder that (1)

NickeB (763713) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181452)

Indeed, after a few measly million years on earth.

Re:I you have to wonder that (4, Insightful)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181438)

"life as we know it".. The Dinosaurs did quite well :)

I for one welcome our new/old dinosaur overlords!

Joking aside, the argument that the earth has been experiencing major differences in temperatures in the past and that this is normal and all is very fascinating except for one small fact: We're humans. We don't like having volcanoes in our back yards, ferns all over our lawns, hurricanes ripping our houses to shreds and brontosaurs trampling our offspring. We're kinda picky that way.

Re:I you have to wonder that (4, Insightful)

Epistax (544591) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181612)

What I'd like to know is which animal on this planet will (would have) evolve into the next "Big Thing"? If it weren't for our timely sentience, many species we've killed over the years would still be around (mammoth, anyone?). My point is: is this planet at an evolutionary dead end until a disaster strikes, or is there a contender to be top eater? Could humanity be considered the natural disaster that they need?

Re:I you have to wonder that (0, Insightful)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181629)

As they say, everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it (I think that saying must be over 100 years old, before worries over CO2 became fashionable). I have magazines from 1927 where nutcases write in, sure that the unusually wet weather we're having is due to all these newfangled radio transmitting stations going up - you can't pump all those kilowatts into the aether w/o some damage to the earth!

Anyway, as someone who has had a hurricane in his back yard and lived to talk about it, what I'm afraid of is what primitive superstitious corrective actions you are going to take to 'fix' the human/earth balance and restore reality to the garden of eden state. If history is any guide it will probably involve pagen sacrifices of virgins into the co2 spewing volcano, much wailing and weeping begging to sun not to go further south than the winter equinox and other such idiotic nonsense - except it will be federally and UN mandated upon otherwise rational beings who know better, all to appease an angry militant band of vegatable chomping gaia worshippers.

The ultimate goal of all this kookiness is impeding US industry and prosperity, pure and simple - a propagande attack from the former Soviet Union couldn't have been better that todays enviros and is behind the same moving of industrial production to better climes offshore that the same folks decry. For some reason a plant in the US is singled out as the sole source of earth's destruction, while the exact same plant in Mexico, China or India is just A-OK with even less pollution controls. For example, production and use of Freon in Mexico goes on unchecked, but now that the US consumer has been hamstrung and pays more for less, suddenly the ozone hole is getting better all the time! Bullocks. Utter bullocks.

Re:I you have to wonder that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181647)

"...and brontosaurs trampling our offspring. We're kinda picky that way...."

Actually, the proper name for the dinosaur known as Brontosaurus is Apatosaurus. Sorry, but I'm "kinda picky that way". Let it also be argued I'm an anal asshole (is that a redundant description?).

http://www.dinoworld.net/apato.htm [dinoworld.net]

Re:I you have to wonder that (4, Insightful)

nmoog (701216) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181455)

I agree that the earth has a pretty robust system. Once it can kill off all those pesky humans it will take no time to bring itself back to good health, and enjoy the good life for another few million years.

Re:I you have to wonder that (1)

Theresa1 (748664) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181458)

I completely agree. The truth is - we don't understand shit about climate. So why do we assume the worst?

Re:I you have to wonder that (5, Insightful)

kd4evr (712384) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181486)

Hmm...

Earth may have a self-regulating system we do not yet (fully) understand. When you say its a robust system, you are right. Our climate models may well be worth squat, right again.

Dinosaurs did quite well for quite a long time, until they could...

However, the issue is not whether human interventions can fully derail earth's climate or only tackle the parameters a bit.
The point is, that the changes in the weather we as a civilisation started will most certainly affect our way of life as we know it. Human is considered the most adaptable species, present in all kinds of environments. I cannot argue whether we are going to drive ourselves into extinction or not by what we did to the climate, but surely life (and survival) in either dry deserts, frozen glaciers or stormy swamps has little to do with the current trends in economy. There is a vast difference between a habitable and comfortable climate, you see...

Dont start the IPO on that dino-breeding company just yet ;-)

Re:I you have to wonder that (2, Interesting)

hey! (33014) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181577)

The new form of anthropocentrism displaces the paternal role of God into systems: whether it be the Market or the Biosphere or Climate. If so, these are blind, impersonal gods that follow their own agenda: they even aware of our existence, much less are they working for our benefit.

Systems do have negative feedback behavior, which create short term stability, but they also have positive feedback behavior which can create rapid shifts and oscillations. We should be aware of this and act accordingly. While its fairly clear that people are sufficiently adaptible that they will survive practicaly anything, our culture, economic systems and populations can in fact go extinct very easily.

Inevitably, climate will shift without anthropogenic help. The real question is whether anthropogenic factors can tip it earlier than it would otherwise? If so, then it would be wise to buy time. If not, then we should make hay while the sun shines and store it away to carry us in lean times.

Re:I you have to wonder that (3, Insightful)

Decaff (42676) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181579)

The earth and life are robust, but we aren't. Most of human civilisation has occurred within a 10,000 year period since the last glaciation in which ice sheets covered much of the Northern hemisphere. The climate has been particularly and unusually stable for the past millenium. This is not going to last. If (as is very likely) the ice returns, or if global warming stirs up the climate, millions could die and many more will be forced to migrate. In terms of life as a whole on our planet, what we do matters little in the long term, but we could, and probably will, make things very unpleasant for ourselves.

Robust, with a large latency. (2, Insightful)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181582)

You refer to the lie that some of the eco-freaks like to believe in. That is that we're "saving the planet". As George Carlin put it, "That planet is fine, the people are fucked".

You're right that the earths eco-system is very robust. It's survived meteor collisions, massive climate changes, etc. Human society isn't particularly robust though. While you may be fine with the eco-system taking a few thousand years to adjust to a new climate, most people aren't. I think mass famine because of crop failure and flooding of the coasts is a Bad Thing (for us humans that is). That's the real reason people should be concerned about climate change, and not this altruistic bull that a small minority wants to shove down our throats.

consider... (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181382)

...WWIII in the simulation

Re:consider... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181548)

I did.

We lose.

Oh crap....

I need sleep. (3, Funny)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181383)

I missed the first word and thought this was going to be an article about Suprnova.

Here's how the simulation works: (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181384)

We all leave our computers on
- running this software,
- thereby using more electricity,
- creating more greenhouse gases and the like,
- increasing global warming...
and therefore getting a very accurate answer much sooner.

Re:Here's how the simulation works: (0)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181550)

i am not so sure about this, coz

MS OS hangs repeatedly...
you get bored using the software...
and will turn off the computer... ...and the day will never come

THC Slowdown? (3, Funny)

kevinvee (581676) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181386)

Fond memories of high school, but I think THC Slowdown goes better with a 10,000 year snowboarding season. Or 10,000 years of marshmallow creme and funyuns.

Attempting to model the real world on this scale (0, Insightful)

sanermind (512885) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181391)

Foolish. Current advanced computer modelling isn't even capable of predicting the weather next week with any great accuracy.

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181419)

climate != weather, fool

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (5, Insightful)

zopu (558866) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181422)

True, but isn't that a different problem?

I admit I'm a bit clueless here, but AFAIK climate modelling deals with overall changes at a high level e.g. "It's going to be colder in the north atlantic by about 2 degrees on average in a few decades" and the like.
As opposed to weather prediction which says "It will rain in this spot on this day"

Just because we can't predict the 'noise' in the short term doesn't mean we can't determine overall changes long term.

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (1)

will_die (586523) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181521)

However none of theses computer models have been able to predicte current overall changes, using previous data, without a bunch of fudges and changes to specificly handle how the climate is in reality.

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (2, Informative)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181578)

Yes and no. Interannual trends are captured fairly well, seasonal forecasts tend to be off (worse, as you get down to the scale of weather) See here, [ucar.edu] for more information than you'd possibly want.

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181566)

Since long term climate change depends heavily on how active the sun is, any climate model that does not take into account the solar cycle isn't worth the electrons it's written on.

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181596)

Exactly.

Here's a question.
(1) The solar activity and solar flares has been increasing.
(2) The more solar activity there is, the bigger the hole in the ozone layer is.
(3) The hotter the sun is, the more global warming there is.
(4) The Sun affects the world *a lot* more than we affect the world.

So why do environmentalists conclude that the ozone hole is due mostly to man made CFCs and global warming to man made CO2?

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181443)

may be this would help...

ieee [ieee.org]

computing the weather [mcgill.ca]

Re:Attempting to model the real world on this scal (1)

freshtonic (650437) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181456)

I always thought that predicting specific weather at a specific time was supposed to be extremely difficult due to the chaotic nature of the weather systems, but on a larger more fuzzy timescale you can predict more general trends. Are there any climatologists on /. that can back be up on this?

Re:Attempting to model the planet trajectories (2, Funny)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181525)

Foolish. Theres no way that computer simulations could possibly predict the motions of the planets. We can't even predict the quantum fluctuation of individual molecules!

Re:Attempting to model the planet trajectories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181592)

Motions of planets -- isn't that astronomy?

Motions of the atmosphere can be predicted using differental equations that approximate real-world fluid and non-hydrostatic motions of scale.

Concerning the movie "The Day after Tomorrow" (5, Insightful)

Peden (753161) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181394)

That movie is expected to draw furhter focus on the environment and specifically global warming. This is both good and bad, as too much focus on the environment can draw focus from other points of interesets. Danish Scientist "Bjorn Lomborg" (one of Time Magazines top 100 important persons) has been warning politicians to not forget other points of importance, such as healthcare and clean water. I hope this does not distort the vision of politicians around the globe, lets not forget how er priotitize.

Re:Concerning the movie "The Day after Tomorrow" (4, Insightful)

Hektor_Troy (262592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181466)

Danish Scientist "Bjorn Lomborg"
You placed the "" the wrong place. It should be
Danish "Scientist" Bjørn Lomborg
He's in statistics, and judging by some of the critisism he's gotten from other people in that area, not a very good one either.

Re:Concerning the movie "The Day after Tomorrow" (1, Informative)

nacturation (646836) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181487)

That movie is expected to draw furhter focus on the environment and specifically global warming.

And what we learn from the movie is that this global warming you speak of causes a 10,000 year winter. Or, the warmer it gets, the more snow falls on New York ... or something like that.

Re:Concerning the movie "The Day after Tomorrow" (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181576)

Don't forget to visit:

http://www.stopesso.org/
and
http://www.theday aftertomorrow.org/#

Re:Concerning the movie "The Day after Tomorrow" (4, Informative)

JasonAWallwork (620569) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181651)

The Abrupt Climate Change FAQ [ucsusa.org] from the Union of Concerned Scientists, has a lot to say on the subject and the movie:

Can what happens in The Day After Tomorrow happen in real life?

No. The dramatic, virtually instantaneous and widespread cooling envisioned in the film is fiction. But like all good science fiction, the film is premised on several important scientific facts. We know with great certainty that the Earth is already warming, largely because as we burn fossil fuels and clear forests we are releasing carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere. This warming is expected to continue in the coming decades, accompanied by changes in rainfall patterns and rising sea levels. The possibility of an abrupt shift in the climate system is only one feature of a changing climate that is expected to become more erratic, with extreme weather events like droughts, torrential rainfall, and extreme heat becoming more common. We can slow down global warming and reduce the likelihood of future abrupt climate changes by reducing our emissions of heat-trapping gases.

The other interesting thing it mentions is that Abrupt Climage Change refers to changes that happen over years to decades as opposed to climate change that is happening now over decades and centuries. Make no mistake, we have changed our climate more in the last hundred years than in the previous thousand years.

One question... (4, Insightful)

beacher (82033) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181397)

Does it come with media fearmongering "THE WORLD ENDS TOMORROW. DETAILS AT 8" addons? Seriously. Every single damn weather event is a showstopper. If my team blew everything out of proportion like the media did, I'd sack em. Also speaking of weather... They can't even get the 3 days forecast even close much less years out.

Interested in weather, love/hate to watch tornados and hurricanes.. trouble is the news makes it out like "The Perfect Storm" is about to happen ..
-B

Re:One question... (1)

Maeve77 (691970) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181611)

And one more question. Previous ice ages have onset over the course of hundreds years, giving plant and animal life time to adapt to the new climate or migrate to slightly warmer areas. Wouldn't the insta-freeze depicted in this movie kill all flora and fauna in its path? Who wants to survive in a world where they won't be able to find anything to eat but a bit of lichen or some hundred-year-old Twinkies after the snows go away?

Or maybe I think too much. It's just a movie after all.

simulation not required (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181399)

i already live in a city with that kinda atmosphere created in the simulation.

Re:simulation not required (1)

NickeB (763713) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181469)

Houston? I'm not that much into US cities, but I do belive that's the most polluted one?

Re:simulation not required (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181489)

i think you conviniently assumed i live in US

Re:simulation not required (1)

NickeB (763713) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181499)

I did indeed, most slashdotters tend to afaik.

Re:simulation not required (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181514)

that's sad.

don't u think it's not fair for all the non-US citizens?

Re:simulation not required (1)

NickeB (763713) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181540)

Neither am I a US citizen, I merely took a guess and missed. No need to make a hen out of a feather.

The responses so far. (1)

cjellibebi (645568) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181403)

The first four responses to this article about climate change were responses to the bit about 'THC slowdown' and not responses to anything else in the article (even the 'first-post' people are hiding behind the woodwork). So when we've completely wrecked the planet, is the plan to just get completely stoned and ignore the dire situation?

Re:The responses so far. (2, Funny)

RangerFish (770981) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181511)

Sounds like a good plan...

Simulating a fiction...? (2, Informative)

ZaMoose (24734) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181404)

Considering that most serious climatologists think the very premise of Day After Tomorrow is bunk [rutgers.edu] , what does that say for the utility of us wasting CPU cycles on it?

Or is the association with the upcoming movie merely some editorial license on the part of the /. crew?

mods: MOD DOWN YOU SHOULD!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181573)

Mods, please check the site he references before modding up.... thank you.

Re:Simulating a fiction...? (1)

phusg (699891) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181574)

Sort your link out please I'm interested :-)

GIGO? (4, Insightful)

pesc (147035) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181408)

So if the computer is big enough, the garbage-in, garbage-out problem disappears?

We can't predict the weather for the next week, but doing it for the next 50 years might work if we only can get a computer big enough?

Re:GIGO? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181464)

Someone else has already answered this. We can't tell whether it will rain on your house reliably a week in avance, but we can tell it will be 5 degrees warmer 15 years from now in your state. We can then tell how string winds will likely be in your state, and how much moisture (i.e. rain) will be in the air that your state lies under. All this allows better prediction of when your state gets hit by force-12 hurricanes every week or every year...

Re:GIGO? (2, Interesting)

pe1rxq (141710) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181479)

The input is totally different if you are doing climate predictions than for weather.....
For predicting the climate in 50 years it is not necessarry to known for each day if it rained in your back yard.

Jeroen

Re:GIGO? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181545)

Climatology begins where Numerical Weather Predictional models temporally end (I.e., usually 16 days from the model initialization time). Instead of all this needless conjecture, how about inquring of a world authority -- the World Meteorological Organization (a special agency of the United Nations)?

Southern Africa in Peril. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181411)

Although the effects of global warming and specifically the increase in temperature associated iwith rising CO2 levels are often highlighted, the western media seems oblivious to another impending climate disaster which will affect much of southern Africa.

Because the moon is gradually moving close to the earth, tides are gradually increasing. In most places in the World this effect is negligable, a few centimetres a year at most, however the eccientricity of the moon's orbit added to the factor of the Marianas Trench mean that the effect in Southern Africa is set to be devestating, with tides increasing by up to 20 metres within the next 100 years.

The countries involved have little or no resources to guard against this and almost no scientific research is being carried out as most climate budget goes towards greenhouse effect studies. Indded the president of Botswana, the country most likely to be affected, recently called on the UN to do more.

wrong! (3, Informative)

QuasiRob (134012) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181432)

The moons orbit is expanding.

Where did you get all that from, tarot cards?

Re:wrong! (1, Flamebait)

RobertHooke (777480) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181450)

The moon's orbit is not expanding. The moon is gradually falling to earth, becuase it is gradually losing energy to tidal forces. This is the point made in the grandparent post.

Re:wrong! (3, Informative)

QuasiRob (134012) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181547)

Good grief, dont you people know how to use a search engine to do a little research before you post?

Freemars [freemars.org] - Gravitational interaction (tides on the Earth caused by the Moon) transfers kinetic energy from Earth to the Moon, slowing Earth's rotation and raising the Moon's orbit, currently at a rate of 3.8 centimeters per year.

another page [autodynamicsuk.org]

and another [astro.uu.nl]

and another [jimloy.com]

Re:wrong! (1)

Stridar (325860) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181563)

Other way around.

Windows to the Universe [ucar.edu]

or

PhysLink [physlink.com]

Re:wrong! (1)

Evan Meakyl (762695) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181609)

Botswana: lowest point: junction of the Limpopo and Shashe Rivers 513 m highest point: Tsodilo Hills 1,489 m So I think 20m-waves are not really dangerous for this country. And as others said, the moon is going away from us, not coming closer... So please mod the parent down!!!

Re:wrong! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181608)

It's the Earth that's losing energy to tides - more specifically the gravitational torque exerted by the Moon on the tidal bulges is slowing Earth's rotation down. No such force is exerted on the Moon because it is already tidally locked facing Earth. (see http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/physics/TidalTorqu e.html for details).

Therefore to conserve angular momentum in the Earth-Moon system, the Moon is moving further away. We have observed this using laser ranging on reflectors placed by the Apollo astronauts on the Moon's surface - the current rate is about 38mm per year.

This means that in maybe a billion years' time, total eclipses will not be possible. Ultimately, the Earth will be tidally locked to the Moon as well. The Moon will be stationary in Earth's sky - assuming they don't get swallowed by the Sun's red giant phase.

Re:Southern Africa in Peril. (2, Informative)

JasonAWallwork (620569) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181584)

Do you have a source that suggests the moon is getting closer? According to this article [space.com] , (and many others) it's been moving further away. The water levels will rise drastically in the next few years probably but it will be due to global warming, not the moon.

Mod down, that's all made up (1)

SmilingBoy (686281) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181630)

I don't know whether I have ever read as much bullshit in 3 paragraphs. Mod down parent, all he says is made up.

Foolishness (4, Interesting)

Yonkeltron (720465) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181412)

Lorenze proved that weather was non-deterministic about 40 years ago. It seems foolish to believe we can predict weather to such a degree even with today's technology. I'll be saving my cycles for Seti@Home

Re:Foolishness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181430)

Might one suggest folding@home may be of more use to your DNA propagation in the medium term sir?

Seti will surely only bring doom to mankind?

Re:Foolishness (2, Interesting)

gowen (141411) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181544)

Lorenz proved that weather was non-deterministic about 40 years ago.
But Lorenz, being much, much, much smarter than you, appreciated that weather is not climate.

Strange (2, Interesting)

Roland Piquepaille (780675) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181413)

Clients are available for various varieties of Microsoft Windows, but none are listed for other OSes.

If I was to make a program that basically asks of people to give me something for free (in this case, CPU time, and a little aggravation to install the client), I'd make the Linux/*BSD client a priority, since those OSes have been made almost entirely by people on their own time for free.

At least I'd know I'd be likely to find a sympathetic hear to whatever cause my client serves in that community.

Re:Strange (1)

Xilman (191715) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181516)

If I was to make a program that basically asks of people to give me something for free ...

... my highest priority would be to see where the greatest numbers of clients are likely to run and build the program for that platform.

But then, I'm a pragmatist and like to get as big a bang for my buck as possible.

Paul

Re:Strange (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181565)

Absurd comment in today's world of mult-platform languages such as Numerical Python which can run on any platform. The fact that the developers created the app specifically for Windows is an indication that they are flawed in their social modeling.

Looks like it will be a bad film (5, Informative)

QuasiRob (134012) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181415)

Just from watching the trailers it looks like it will be another contender for inclusion on various bad movie [intuitor.com] websites [slashdot.org] .

How much of the public will be mislead into thinking thats how it really happens? I still cringe whenever Armageddon is on.

Wine / CrossOver? (4, Interesting)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181421)

Has anyone gotten the client running with Wine [winehq.com] or CodeWeaver'sCrossOver [codeweavers.com] ? It installs and starts alright, but on the console, a bunch of warnings is printed:
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 60 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 62 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 63 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 64 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 65 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 66 Not Opened
CLOSE: WARNING: Unit 67 Not Opened
It doesn't seem to continue further...

Re:Wine / CrossOver? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181461)

Must be working on Unit 61...

On global warming. (5, Insightful)

ForestGrump (644805) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181427)

"There is nothing wrong with the planet. The planet is fine . . . been
here 4 1/2 billion years. We've been here, what, a 100,000 years, maybe
200,000. And we've only been engaged in heavy industry a little over 200
years. 200 years versus 4 1/2 billion. And we have the conceit to think
that somehow we're a threat? The planet isn't going away. We are."
-George Carlin

Re:On global warming. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181562)

In Soviet Russia, the Planet destroys YOU!
followed by
Imagine a Beowulf cluster of greenhouse-causing things...oh wait...
followed by
I don't belong to the Milky Way, you insensitive CLOD!
followed by
Well I for one welcome our greenhouse-gas spewing overlords...oh wait...DOH!

Re:On global warming. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181569)

Carlin's joke about the "hippie dippie weatherman" is well known!

"Simulate "The Day After Tomorrow" On Your PC" (5, Funny)

NineteenSixtyNine (775581) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181429)

Windows ME?

Ski in NY (5, Funny)

Roland Piquepaille (780675) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181441)

in which New York City is treated to a 10,000-year-long ski season If this is to happen, I hope there's a massive earthquake crust movement to tilt the city a bit...

Re:Ski in NY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181617)

Nah, downhill skiing is for handicapped wimps who are so weak they cannot do cross-country skiing.

Dont know but.. (1)

idsCypher (542075) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181504)

Since that 50 years from now i dont know if i'm arround. Why dont predict something like the lotery. just an ideia :)

Not gonna work (5, Insightful)

bigHairyDog (686475) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181505)

I did a climate modeling project for my dissertation at university. These guys have a good idea - throw massive computing power at it - but it's not that simple. Compared to SETI or protein folding, climate modeling is not as highly parallelisable. Plus what's holding back the state of the art right now is the quality of the algorithms we're using - they loose accuracy pretty fast as the result of feedback between multiple iterations of a process that introduces quantisation noise each time.

IMHO this project will produce the same quantisation noise-ruined results we have now, just more finely ovesampled

Still, they might get some useful insights into how to tackle the problems of parallel dynamic system simulation

Re:Not gonna work (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181529)

shame your uni didn't teach you the difference between "loose" and "lose"

funny how people that think they are clever usually ain't

Re:Not gonna work (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181539)

Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

You might like to consider that yourself.

torture... terrorism... exciting like a pussy hole (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181509)

i watch TV... I watch TV... hahahaha....

torture is legitimate hahahaha... my fault for not being a terrorist...

it's funny (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181589)


its the ones with the most to lose who always seem to disagree with the science, not suprising when the people from the highest polluting countries have been conditioned to think that you can pump as much shit in the air as you like and it will have 0 enviromental impact, but who cares right ? i get to drive a SUV and have air conditioning right NOW, who gives a shit about our childrens future lets ruin today while we can !

stupiditity knows no bounds

Funny but.. (3, Funny)

Hewhosaysni (780774) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181607)

"The Day After Tomorrow" (dagen efter) means hangover in swedish .

What good are all the computers in the world... (3, Insightful)

Walkiry (698192) | more than 10 years ago | (#9181626)

when you don't know all the variables involved?

In other news (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181627)


hollywood will do anything to promote their Films, why do it on merit when you can use deception instead....film at 11........the story of how USA captured the german enigma machine from a military sub.......

thats great (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9181646)


corrupt a genuine (or was) science projects reputation to promote a fly-by-night film, shows how low Advertising can get really when they get this desperate, but then again we are used to watching "Making of ____ movie" on TV which are really 25min commercials thinly disguised as a "documentary" so i guess we can look at science in the same light now,

is it science or is it an advert ?, you decide !

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...