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Italy Approves Jail for P2P Users

CmdrTaco posted more than 10 years ago | from the well-bully-for-them dept.

The Courts 533

funkdid writes "Italy has made transferring content via the Internet without the permission of the copyright holder a criminal offence.Those found guilty of the unauthorised distribution of copyright material now face a fine of between 154 and 1032 ($185-1240), a jail sentence of between six months and three years, the confiscation of their hardware and software, and the revelation of their misdeeds in Italy's two national newspapers, La Repubblica and Corriere della Sera."

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Email is copyrighted... (5, Interesting)

WigginX (104107) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270083)

Can I still forward emails to Italy?

Re:Email is copyrighted... (3, Funny)

Random Web Developer (776291) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270113)

Maybe we should include footers in the line of "I allow any recipient of this email to forward it without my written conscent".

Re:Email is copyrighted... (2, Insightful)

Needanewnick (672293) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270225)

Then that is your written concent.?

Re:Email is copyrighted... (-1, Offtopic)

Random Web Developer (776291) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270273)

lol

Re:Email is copyrighted... (3, Funny)

Vihai (668734) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270274)

I am italian and I declare that the content of this post is copyright is not redistributable. Cmdrtaco, I'm waiting for you at the airport along with the police :)

Re:Email is copyrighted... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270326)

Why are you waiting for the police at the airport? Shouldn't they have come with you?

FP (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270087)

FP - I guess everyone else is deleting their Shared Folders :)

porn?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270091)

Holy Shit Man!

Cool! (-1, Offtopic)

bplipschitz (265300) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270096)

I've been wanting to know how to run P2P apps in jail, so this tutorial ought to be instructive!

yes thats right boys and girls (1)

imthatguy (772683) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270098)

listen to britney spears without paying GO DIRECTLY TO JAIL, do not pass go, do not collect 200 dollars

Re:yes thats right boys and girls (1)

TCaptain (115352) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270120)

Well anyone who listens to her should go to jail anyway....

Re:yes thats right boys and girls (1)

joggle (594025) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270291)

I better not turn my radio on then. Didn't want to listen to her anyway.

This seems right at home (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270099)

From the country that gave us the mafia.

here we go (-1, Redundant)

chachob (746500) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270107)

and so it begins...

At least the trains will run on time. (5, Insightful)

turambar386 (254373) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270108)

I guess the fascists are back in power these days?

Re:At least the trains will run on time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270258)

The fascists have been back in power for years... Berlusconi isn't exactly moderate.

Re:At least the trains will run on time. (5, Informative)

Lochin Rabbar (577821) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270271)

My aren't you quick on the uptake [bbc.co.uk] .

Re:At least the trains will run on time. (2, Interesting)

j_sp_r (656354) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270295)

berlusconi (president of italy) is a strange politician. He's accused of corruption and has called a german politician a nazi or something like that. But he's more fasist I think then anyone in europe

Re:At least the trains will run on time. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270337)

Not the fascists, the capitalists. Silvio Berlusconi, the prime minister of Italy is a huge media mogul! Of course he wants P2P to be illegal.

Which is worse? (1)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270110)

Not testing before making production changes, or jailing P2P users??

Re:Which is worse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270160)

Not testing .. You know untested code can cause trains to crash.

Italian law? (2, Interesting)

GrouchoMarx (153170) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270111)

Perhaps someone can explain to this ignorant American exactly how the government can use publication in a newspaper as a punishment for a crime (whatever the crime may be). At least here in the US, we at least pretend to have freedom of the press.

Re:Italian law? (1)

turambar386 (254373) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270141)

The government can buy ad space in the papers?

Re:Italian law? (1)

EsbenMoseHansen (731150) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270175)

you can buy a bit of space in a publication for your own message. This is what we in europe call ad-ver-ti-cing ;-

Re:Italian law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270189)

Freedom of press? When the First Minister owns the majority of the media and still is complaining they are all against him?

Re:Italian law? (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270191)

Perhaps someone can explain to this ignorant American exactly how the government can use publication in a newspaper as a punishment for a crime (whatever the crime may be). At least here in the US, we at least pretend to have freedom of the press.

Perhaps the Italian papers are simply accepting a paid classified ad, similar to an obituary notice. When someone changes their name, aren't they also required to publish this in a local paper in the US?

Re:Italian law? (1)

dabraun (626287) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270343)

Required to publish a name change in a newspaper? Newspapers are private entities - no law requires you to put anything in a newspaper - sounds pretty silly to me.

Besides, as far as I am concerned paper newspapers and magazines are dead ...

David

Re:Italian law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270193)

I guess you've never seen the lists of repeat DWI offenders listed in the newspapers.

Re:Italian law? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270203)

Can you read Italian?

Didn't think so.

Re:Italian law? (1)

blueZhift (652272) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270215)

Well actually some local governments in the US have been known to publish offenders names in the local newspapers. I think Naperville IL publishes the names of people arrested for DUIs in one of the local papers. I don't think the papers are compelled to carry this, but to them it's just more ad money.

Re:Italian law? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270223)

Well, think about it from this perspective --

Every year, there are people who are charged with crimes that they didn't actually commit. However, their names are splashed around newspapers and people begin to know them as "the person who did [insert crime]." So, even if they are found innocent, they will never TRULY be innocent in the public's eyes.

Carry this over to what's going on in Italy. If you are caught for theft of copyrighted works, your boss, your friends/family -- everybody will see what you have done. This will bring disgrace upon everybody you are associated with. (Not everybody is as forgving for P2P acts as Slashdotters are.) This may result in a loss of your job/friends/whatever. That...is bad.

Also, a good exmaple about what I discussed above can be found in one of the short stories in Frederick Forsyth's book, No Comebacks. (Yeah, same guy who wrote "Day of the Jackal")

Re:Italian law? (1)

SpaFF (18764) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270239)

I imagine this would be much like the "crime report" section of American papers, but would list the person's name also. I guess it's meant to shame the person.

Re:Italian law? (4, Informative)

Seth Finklestein (582901) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270241)

I spent about 25 years practising law in Italy, so I feel that I am uniquely qualified to answer this question.

Italy also has a notion of freedom of the press, although they call it "illa libertario della prensa." However, there is also something called the "obligation of the press" (illa obligadrio della prensa) in which all nationally-sanctioned newspapers are required to print certain materials. Much like legal notices and novenas in American newspapers, the Italian government has the power to influence the press. All of these announcements are clearly labeled and are almost never mentioned in the newspaper itself, but of course this P2P issue will easily become a page 1 news story of its own.

I welcome any other questions that you have about the Italian press.

Sincerely,
Seth Finklestein
Il Duche Della Cybersecuridata

It's not so different from "John Lists" (1)

Vengeance (46019) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270254)

I seem to recall that years ago a number of municipalities around the US raised a stink by publishing the names of people who had been convicted of the truly terrible offense of visiting a prostitute.

I suppose it stopped when someone too high up was found on one of the lists.

Re:Italian law? (2, Informative)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270282)

At least one of the local papers here in NJ publish the names and street name of residence of guys who have been busted for picking up hookers. You think that wouldn't be punishment?

Re:Italian law? (1)

mr_mischief (456295) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270288)

The same way the state of Illinois, among others, use publication as a punishment.

The state of Illinois puts on its websites registered sex offenders, deadbeat parents who refuse to pay child support, and probably other offenders in the future. It helps the public protect themselves in the one case and uses humiliation as a deterrent in the other.

It's not an amazing stretch that even in private newspapers ad space could be purchased or that this would be reported as news or public service. With government-run media, it'd be even easier.

I didn't read closely enough to tell if these Italian papers mentioned are run by the government, but that wouldn't be unusual in much of the world.

Re:Italian law? (1)

PsychoFurryEwok (467266) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270297)

There are some local news channels that used to actually post the mugshots of men who were caught soliciting prostitution. It was interesting how quickly prostitution went down after that. No one wants their wife to see them on public access tv. :)

Italian bootlegs (5, Interesting)

Vic (6867) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270114)

It's interesting that this would happen in Italy. From my understanding (I'm not an expert in this), Italy has had very relaxed laws about bootlegged music, especially live recordings. That's why so many concert CDs come from Italy.

Anyone care to comment on this or clear it up?

Cheers,
Vic

Re:Italian bootlegs (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270267)

Italy's prime minister is a high up executive of one of their major media conglomerates. Its a major conflict of interest. I believe the company has dealings with both music and owns the newspapers as well as some national television stations.

Re:Italian bootlegs (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270329)

To be more exact...

Berlusconi Background [economist.com]

Re:Italian bootlegs (1)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270281)

It could be simple enough as the recording industry finally lobbying enough to get the law passed. Just because they've been relaxed in the past doesn't mean they have to in the future.

Re:Italian bootlegs (4, Interesting)

michael path (94586) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270318)

Kiss the Stone was there for quite a while at http://www.kts.it and http://www.kissthestone.com. They were a prominant live CD seller because the way things worked was they could have shows recorded, and sell the recording IF they allocated money for the artist featured in the recording (I believe through an escrow account). IF the money went uncollected after XX length, they could keep it. This would put the responsibility on the artist to collect the money.

They took advantage of this to make money both through recordings and artists failing to collect.

My understanding is that the US threatened their operations, maybe the RIAA via proxy, and they ceased for that reason.

I know the full story is out there, as my friend dealt with them often. I'll post more once I know more.

mirror (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270115)

its slashdottet try this mirror [tinyurl.com] .

I think it wrong to illegally copy... (5, Insightful)

EsbenMoseHansen (731150) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270117)

.. but this is insane by any standard. Only the most extreme economic offenses should be punishable by imprisonment. Fines and compensation can do for the rest.

Enforce it. (5, Insightful)

blamanj (253811) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270243)

The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. -- Abraham Lincoln

If this law is really so draconian as the discription implies (this is /. after all), then I'd go looking for an intelligent, like-minded DA (or whatever the Italian equivalent is) and have him start arresting people left and right for the slightest violation, as long as it meets the letter of the law.

I guarantee we'd here the angry screams all the way to N. America and it would be dropped pretty darn fast, I'll bet.

Mama Mia! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270119)

That's a spicy meatball!

over reaction (5, Insightful)

Suburbanpride (755823) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270124)

I think speeding is a lot worse than sharing files. whats the fine for speeding in italy? i bet its a lot less than $1000 and 6 months in prison. extreme penalties will only drive the shares underground it wont stop them.

Re:over reaction (2, Informative)

turambar386 (254373) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270211)

What country are you from? I'm willing to bet that the potential fines for the illegal trading of copyrighted material are MUCH higher than the fines for speeding in just about any nation on the planet, with the possible exception of Finland.

Insurance Penalties Fines (2, Interesting)

kannibal_klown (531544) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270285)

The fine isn't what deters me from speeding...

It's the insurance companies that do.

If I get caught speeding, sure, I have to pay a fine to the town / county. No biggie.

But then, I get "points" on my insurance. And while those points stay there, I have to pay a higher premium.

Frankly, getting jail time for P2P scares the crap out of me. I'm glad Im not in Italy.

I mean, paying the RIAA a few grand is bad, but getting tossed in the slammer would really suck. Besides the obvious suckiness, you'd probably lose your job, and then have to admit you're a fellon for your interviews.

GPL violations? (5, Interesting)

j-beda (85386) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270128)

Since the GPL is a copyright lisence - does this mean that if somone violated the GPL in Italy it could get them thrown in jail?

And people complain that they are afraid of the viral nature of the GPL - this would really scare them!

Re:GPL violations? (1)

incom (570967) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270192)

Only if they broke the GPL and then distributed that broken software online, then probably yes.

But officer... (5, Funny)

Nuclear Elephant (700938) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270130)

The Italian parliament yesterday voted in favour of imposing jail sentences of up to three years on anyone caught uploading or downloading unauthorised copyright material to and from the Net.

People don't download pirated music, computers download pirated music. Everybody calm down, unless you're routing packets by hand, you're safe.

Re:But officer... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270314)

If they put my computer in jail, after 3 years it'll be of no use at all... damn Moore's Law...

In related news... (0, Redundant)

bobhagopian (681765) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270138)

Mussolini has been reinstated as the leader of Italy.

Open-source music and movies? (3, Insightful)

mr_mischief (456295) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270139)

How long, with computerized production bringing music and movie making power to the desktop like never before and laws like this popping up, will it be before we see free or even Open Source movies.

I can foresee a possible future with Creative Commons, the GPL, the Free Documentation License, and the BSD license influencing the licensing of droves of hobbyist movies and music. I'm talking much, much more than we see now. Maybe the music and movie companies see this coming. Maybe they want to kill p2p not only because their own work is distributed royalty-free across it, but also because with the software to make competitive products getting better and p2p being a great distribution method, they're afraid of losing market share to upstarts.

Think of how scared SCO and MS are of Linux.

Re:Open-source music and movies? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270307)

How long, with computerized production bringing music and movie making power to the desktop like never before and laws like this popping up, will it be before we see free or even Open Source movies.

Open Source movies? Here you go. [archive.org]

Re:Open-source music and movies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270315)

What exactly is "open source movies"? Please don't throw buzz words around like this, they only cheapen them and you. How about "open source underwear"?

Looks like Italy's government are fascists (-1, Redundant)

incom (570967) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270142)

Again.

Newspapers (2, Interesting)

gr8_phk (621180) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270144)

Does that mean their government controls what is printed in the newspaper?

Re:Newspapers (3, Insightful)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270220)

Ever since Berlusconi is prime minister.

Re:Newspapers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270296)

Berluscolini?

Re:Newspapers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270221)

you have to pay to publish your information...
it's like a advertisment

Re:Newspapers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270331)

I believe that Silvio Berlusconi owns La Repubblica. He probably owns the other one as well.

Re:Newspapers (4, Informative)

dmoen (88623) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270350)

Does that mean their government controls what is printed in the newspaper?


All of the Italian media is under direct government control, mostly because it is controlled by prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, who owns all the media. Criticism of the government, and criticism of Berlusconi in particular, by the media, is not tolerated.

If I copyright my criminal record (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270156)

Does that mean the prosecutor will get tossed in jail if he uses it without my permission?

Mussolini (1)

Apreche (239272) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270158)

Fascism returns to the country shaped like a boot. The boot that stamps out fair use.

So what? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270159)

Why is throwing theives in jail a bad thing? ( pre-emptive strike against /.'ers that will whine about how "information wants to be free" or "CD's are too expensive!")

P2P now a crime!? (1, Insightful)

lofoforabr (751004) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270161)

Fine... I wonder how the prosecutors will prove that you have been using it. Logs? Logs can be easily forged.
Anyway, with the advances in P2P technology, it can become impossible to track who is getting what. Just like in Freenet.

Mussolini would be proud... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270174)

Thank you, Italian justice system for proving once again that reason and logic have no place in a court.

Absolute Insanity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270179)

This is just sickening. The worst kind of abuse of goverment by corporations.

light! (2, Funny)

deego (587575) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270180)

Well, at least they don't execute them (unlike virus writers)

we should expect this... (2, Informative)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270186)

from a country that chooses ,a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3034600.st m">its own version of Rupert Murdoch to be the supreme leader.

I'll risk it (2, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270188)

If they promise to confiscate my windows box and all my MS CD's

Ultimate Deterrment (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270198)

If the jail time and the fine won't deter the fileswappers, certainly the public humiliation in two national newspapers will!

I guess you expect that... (5, Funny)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270199)

...with a Prime Minister who makes his money from media companies. Those corrupt Italians! Imagine something like that happened in the US. If the President or Vice President stood to make money from invading Iraq, say, there'd be a hue and cry about it and they'd have no chance of getting away with it.

Re:I guess you expect that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270334)

Only there is a hue and cry, and they still seem to be getting away with it.

Welcome Italy! (5, Interesting)

kannibal_klown (531544) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270216)

Finally!!!

Don't get me wrong, I think this is complete BS and wrong on soooooo many levels...

But it's nice to know that America isn't the biggest (or the only) a$$-hat when it comes to p2p. Up until now, we've looked draconian in our handling of such matters compared to other parts of the world.

This makes what the RIAA is doing look like a slap on the wrist. Hopefully they don't get any ideas.

Does this have something to do with Silvio? (4, Insightful)

Glowing Fish (155236) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270236)

The Prime Minister of Italy got his job in large part because he controls something like 90% of the media there.

I could imagine that along with his general right wing Agenda, Prime Minister Silvio Whats-his-name might want to protect the interests of media companies. Or rather, the media company, since he is the only one.

Google Cache going away? (4, Interesting)

interiot (50685) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270245)

Google Cache has always operated in at least a slightly gray area legally, in that there's undoubtedly unauthorized copyrighted material [paperlined.org] available via the cache that authors wouldn't want there if they knew about it. Google obviously is on the up-and-up, and will remove content from cache [google.com] when specifically requested to. However, with a minimum jail sentance of six months, anything questionable like this may be deemed to risky. Is it possible that Google cache (and anything similarly risky) may be disabled for the .IT section of the internet?

Sure (1)

awhelan (781773) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270247)

I laughed at the idea of killing virus writers [slashdot.org] , then I celebrated when the Buffalo Spammer [slashdot.org] went to jail, but now I'm worried, I've shared plenty of files in my day....
No more /. for me, I'm afraid the next time I refresh I'll see "US approves tar and feathering of wardrivers."

Scouring for test cases (3, Interesting)

nacturation (646836) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270252)

Now all we need to do is to find some areas where one of the officials who voted to pass this legislation violates this law themselves. Scrutinize everything the Italian government puts out to try and catch them posting material which is copyrighted. Time to make examples of them of how passing such a shitty law will come back to bite them in the ass.

Idiots... (0, Flamebait)

the_mad_poster (640772) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270253)

Italy Approves Jail for P2P Users

Ahhh Slashdot. Nothing like coming into a psuedo newsite full of ranting loons going off against the bias of Fox News or anything else then seeing half-truth, inflammatory headlines like that just to grab people's attention.

What you MEANT to say, of course, is:

Italy Approves Jail for P2P Users Who Transfer Copywritten Materials Without Permission to Do So

Which is, of course, already illegal in most places. Moral arguments about the punishment not fitting the crime etc. aside, it would be nice if Slashdot would at least pretend to be a news site every now and then instead of just trying to sell us ads by playing off of reactionary attitudes on this site.

Prime Minister Berlusconi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270255)

Anyone familiar with Italy's PM, Silvio Berlusconi [italyemb.org] , founder of, among other things, Italy's first national commercial TV network, shouldn't be surprised.

The analogue in the States might be President Orrin Hatch. (?) Except more corrupt and more successful.

Ouch (1)

cshark (673578) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270261)

Sounds like they're doing everything but Caining them.

On the bright side, it doesn't sound like this is anywhere near over.

Re:Ouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270335)

Would suck to be turned into Adam n Eve's son... Does this have something to do with cloning?

Selective Authorization (1)

Eberlin (570874) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270262)

The SCO 699 principle -- Since I didn't specifically see anything about P2P, transferring content over the Internet would include stuff over the web.

I post to slashdot and claim copyright to my comments (which Slashdot willingly concedes with "Comments are owned by the Poster."

I then state in my comment that it is intended for viewing only by myself and trained monkeys from the San Diego Zoo.

Thus any Italians who are in violation of this -- by logging onto slashdot and downloading this page with MY copyrighted material and without my permission are jailward bound.

Hang on to your meatballs, dudes.

Just a testament to how lame this law sounds. I understand what they're trying to accomplish, but this can't be the way it's supposed to be done.

Yet... (4, Interesting)

NickRipley (142042) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270265)

Did you ever notice how almost any "silver" or manufactured bootleg CD comes from Italy? Their law (unless it's changed lately) is that as long as you pay the artist/publishing company something, it's legal to make any recording for sale.

This results in a lot of these bootlegging companies paying less than a cent per unit manufactured to the record companies for "compensation." This new law seems sort of extreme if they still allow this other behavior.

middle age? (3, Insightful)

golgafrincham (774723) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270270)

as stupid as this new "law" is, but for this one:

and the revelation of their misdeeds in Italy's two national newspapers, La Repubblica and Corriere della Sera.

they should be kicked out of the european union instantly. i mean, sorry, but this is a punishment from the middle age.

I'd be less bothered by this... (4, Insightful)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270277)

... if consumers were getting a fair shake in the first place. The music industry can sell me an overpriced album without showing me what is in it, but I don't get a satisfaction guaranteed return policy. Therefore, the industry has no economic incentive to strive to make better content.

Level the playing field before punishing consumers for being the only competitor this industry has.

If anyone... (2, Funny)

The Fanta Menace (607612) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270283)

...needs someone to help them break this law, I am more than willing to assist.

In other news... (1)

JonLatane (750195) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270289)

Construction of Mussolini's arch has resumed after a 50+ year hiatus.

I know where I'm not going this summer!!! (1)

mrmdls (684047) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270298)

Well that makes my mind up as far as travel plans this summer. Sorry Hon, we can't vacation in Italy this year, It be a little hard to explain why daddy's gone to jail for listening to music on his computer.

The Need for Effective Anonymous P2P (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270300)

I'm worried about how the international community is going to react to this law; I could easily see the XXAA's performing "research studies" that show that this form of legislation is effective and desirable, and should be used elsewhere.

As I see it, one of the most effective ways to counter this is to use once again raise the technological bar of P2P technologies. A system where the user does not know or control what content is stored on their PC (a la Freenet) would eliminate the ability of the legal system to charge an individual for distribution. In order for this to occur, anonymous software systems need to be made more effective and easier to use for the average user.

I'm sure many people will suggest that I just want to make sure things are easy to steal. The honest answer is that I don't; the same technology used to ensure illicit communications are caught could just as easily be used against legal but undesirable communications. The increased availability of raw information has revolutionized our society (just look at the Abu Gharaib scandal; that could not have happened a decade ago), and any attempts to restrict that movement must be opposed or countered.

they cant put everybody in jail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270313)

and that is what it will take to stop this.

Slashdot (1)

nkh (750837) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270330)

At the bottom of every Slashdot page is written: 'Comments are owned by the Poster.'
If you read my message, you've just bought yourself a trip to prison...

Not Suprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9270338)

When most of italy's media is owned by that Italian president, and soft-core porn king and cretin Berlesconi, it isn't hard to imagine getting the newspapers on tack.

I recommend reading "The Dark Heart Of Italy". It is a very good book which shows just how much control Berlesconi has over that country. It is pretty scary. Some people joke about Moussolini's return...they aren't too far wrong.

No capital punishment? (1)

MrRuslan (767128) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270339)

some not so computer litarete download viruses with there warez and therfore spread them and since they are thinking about excecuting virus writes, Should they at least be castrated?

How do you know if you've been caught... (1, Funny)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 10 years ago | (#9270342)

You'll wake up with the head of the Napster mascot next to you in bed.
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