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Lindows Allowed to Use Company Name in Holland

CowboyNeal posted more than 9 years ago | from the a-company-by-any-other-name dept.

Linux Business 228

Supp0rtLinux writes "It appears that Lindows/Linspire has finally made some headway against Microsoft in the Netherlands. According this article, the Judge ruled that Linspire's continued, but minimal use of 'Lindows' for legal and trademark purposes doesn't violate Microsoft's trademark. With the US court date on this issue coming up soon, one can only wonder if Microsoft will have effectively cut off its nose to spite its face. And following immediately on the heels of today's Netherlands news, the latest Michael's Minutes from Linspire pegs all the blame for virus problems on Microsoft and basically says that Linux (well, Lindows anyway) is the cure."

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228 comments

heyheyhey (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276000)

tyler!!!yioyoaoyrorafjadfasfsafsafjdsa

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276003)

first post :)

Could it be? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276008)

Fist pr0st?

It's nice to hear good things from my country. (5, Funny)

Da Fokka (94074) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276012)

But unfortunately, a wise man said about us:

'You think you're a superpower, and everyone else thinks your capital is copenhagen'.

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (3, Funny)

kitofers (783669) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276042)

that wise man must've been an american. ;)

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (-1, Troll)

TallGuy (12087) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276070)

That's impossible. They don't breed 'em over there... *eg*

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (4, Funny)

pubjames (468013) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276102)

that wise man must've been an american. ;)

No. An American would say "Holland? Is that in France?"

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276172)

As an American I am insulted. Kind of shows you how 'important' or is it 'impotent' Holland is in world affairs.

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276364)

Yes, of course. But have you ever looked at the mess the US is making in Iraq?

Oh, and BTW, didn't the Dutch found New York (or Nieuw Amsterdam as it was called then)?

Yeah, the US is THE most important country in the world, at least the they think they are (maybe they should start thinking...)

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276209)

If the country is called The Netherlands, then what is Holland? and who are the Dutch?

Brought to you by George Costanza

Slightly OT: The Netherlands, Holland, Dutch (5, Informative)

Serious Simon (701084) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276355)

If the country is called The Netherlands, then what is Holland? and who are the Dutch?

The official name of the country is Nederland (The Netherlands) which is an appropriate name as a considerable area of the country actually lies below sea level, protected by dikes that keep the water out.

Holland is the name of two provinces in the West of the country, with port cities Amsterdam and Rotterdam, and the seat of the government The Hague. Historically, international trade was done mostly out of Holland, therefore this name is often used for the whole country throughout the world.

"Dutch" is the English word for the language of the Netherlands, it is related to the German word for "German" which is "Deutsch". The Dutch call themselves "Nederlanders".

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (2, Funny)

AKnightCowboy (608632) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276253)

No. An American would say "Holland? Is that in France?"

Denmark, Norway, and Holland make up the Netherlands right?

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276170)

No. It was indeed a wise man from the Netherlands.
But the Netherlands are so unimportant in the view of the world, that the world even don't get the capital right. "Just some small, quite prosperous country at the Northern Sea... Was it t'Gravenhage? Or Copenhagen?" (The Hague is called in Dutch Den Haag or t'Gravenhage ;) )

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (1)

kitofers (783669) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276196)

amsterdam really deserves much more credit than this, if you know what i mean (and you most probably do). :)

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276258)

Ok, ok... for the sake of the joke I ignored the difference between "capital" and "seat of Parliament and Government" ;)

Re:It's nice to hear good things from my country. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276218)

I'll trade you one formerly-great nation that people were in awe when you told them "I'm an American" in other nations that now has the hate and scorn of the entire world no matter what we do (right or wrong) for one tiny insignificant modernized country that isn't in anyone's way, isn't hated by anyone and passes quietly in the background in bliss.

Not Holland... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276116)

it's the Netherlands!!!!!!!

Re:Not Holland... (0)

Nermal6693 (622898) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276279)

It was always Holland when I was a kid. I had never heard the name "Netherlands" until a few years ago.

Re:Not Holland... (1)

BorgDrone (64343) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276313)

It was never Holland, there are two provinces in the Netherlands with Holland in the name Noord holland en Zuid Holland (North & South Holland). The dutch name for the country is Nederland which translates more or less directly to "the netherlands".

Re:Not Holland... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276331)

Which says enough about your educational system!

Re:Not Holland... (1)

pommiekiwifruit (570416) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276368)

Yup, and the country that has Washington DC as the capital city is Texas.

Oh wait... that is actually how it looks at the moment.

Copenhagen? (1)

zonix (592337) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276456)

'You think you're a superpower, and everyone else thinks your capital is copenhagen'.

Heh, that's funny, Copenhagen being the capital of my country: Denmark. But then again, most people think Denmark is a city in Sweden. :-)

z

What a Linspiring outcome! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276013)

I guess Microsoft's lawyers were Lindozing on the job.

IN SOVIET DAGOBAH (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276015)

Yoda shoves a greased up slashbot doll up his ass!

Re:IN SOVIET DAGOBAH (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276038)

you sick fuck, that truly made me laugh! I'd forgotten about our deal old grease loving fetishist known as Yoda.

Re:IN SOVIET DAGOBAH (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276054)

Troll? Off topic, overrated no matter what, possibly even flamebait, and definately just crap. But troll? Moderators are smoking crack again.

Linux is magically more secure (-1, Troll)

Ckwop (707653) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276026)

If Joe Average ran GNU/linux.. we'd see just as many worms, just as many viruses, just as many spam boxes..

The problem isn't the MS operating system as such (well.. *splutters* the buffer overflows are just lame).. The problem is that those idiots are just so damn ingenious.

Simon.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (4, Insightful)

BurritoWarrior (90481) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276093)

Really? So all the holes in Outlook through the years haven't meant anything?

And the fact that all home users were "root" by default prior to XP means nothing?

And the fact that unless set up differently, even in XP the average user is "root" is not an issue?

Suuuuuuuuuuuuuure....

Re:Linux is magically more secure (1)

hutkey (709330) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276147)

then the 'root' cause must be found out and be up'rooted' in Lindows immediately.

does Lindows prevents all the bugs seen in Windows? is the primary question

Re:Linux is magically more secure (5, Informative)

Erasmus Darwin (183180) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276149)

"And the fact that all home users were "root" by default prior to XP means nothing?"

Apparently, Lindows was guilty of this even more recently than Windows. From a July 21, 2002 Washington Post article [washingtonpost.com] :

But the single worst feature of Lindows lurks under its colorful interface. Lindows sets the PC's owner up to run the machine as its "root" user, with unrestricted access to every system command and capability, no matter how potentially damaging. Worse yet, the test system left the root password blank.

However, for the record, I've seen passing references while googling that indicate this has been fixed. But the point still stands that if you're going to criticize Microsoft for doing this in the past, it's only fair to criticize Lindows for also doing this in the past.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (2, Insightful)

sheriff_p (138609) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276150)

Exactly.

The idea that a virus/worm needs its exploited user to be root to replicate and spread to other people is ludicrous. Almost all recent Windows viruses wouldn't have been particularly hindered if the user wasn't running as root - in most cases, they simply replicate, by email - a situation you don't need to be running as a privileged user to replicate.

And if we're picking random piece of software oft-associated with a platform, and looking at their security history, try taking a deep look bind/sendmail.

+Pete (a commited OpenBSD user)

Re:Linux is magically more secure (2, Insightful)

Frit Mock (708952) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276238)


Although I think that Linux is more secure, I think the writer of the parent article is (almost) right.

How many Worms/Viruses/Spams we "see", is less related to the number of security hole that exist in a certain system, it is more related to the number of "attackers" and the number of targets!

Not every securityhole is exploited, typically a high number of securityholes means nothing more, than only a tiny fraction of them are exploited.

If the number of systems prone to an attack is the same and the number of attackers is the same, then the fraction of exploited securityholes just increases ... and the total number of attacks stays nearly constant.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (5, Insightful)

JaF893 (745419) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276100)

What you have said isn't really true. One of the major strengths of Linux is the lack of a monoculture. Most distributions come with 3 or 4 web browsers, e-mail programs, and media players etc. It would take a very good hacker to find a generic security hole in every program.

The only other option would be to try and exploit a security hole in the Kernel. Given that not everybody runs the same Kernel this would also prove difficult.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (2, Interesting)

It'sYerMam (762418) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276136)

Also, because developers often release updates very frequently, bugs get fixed very quickly. You don't get Microsoft Windows XP.6.5-1.358, now, do you?
This of course may change if Linux "goes mainstream" as developers start being more concerned that users don't want to get updates every two minutes
Still, the use of update system like up2date mean that this happens relatively painlessly.

Perhaps, though, a patch based system similar to CVS would be a better idea, so as to minimize download times and bandwidth usage.

No, that's not a "strength" (2, Interesting)

fmaxwell (249001) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276302)

One of the major strengths of Linux is the lack of a monoculture. Most distributions come with 3 or 4 web browsers, e-mail programs, and media players etc.

Spoken like a true, myopic computer geek. It's the "monoculture" of Windows that makes it usable by the average person. It's what makes it possible to publish books with screen shots. It's what allows the tech-savvy family member to tell his parents and siblings to "click on file and then click on ..." It's why ISPs can support users cost-effectively. The lack of consistency in Linux, the fact that each major distro installs three, four, or more browsers rather than one, and the lack of recognition of this as a problem is why, despite being free (as in beer), it still has no significant penetration onto end-user desktops.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276434)

What you have said isn't really true. One of the major strengths of Linux is the lack of a monoculture. Most distributions come with 3 or 4 web browsers, e-mail programs, and media players etc. It would take a very good hacker to find a generic security hole in every program.

Also Redhat, Debian, SuSE, etc all have different binaries of the same program. With things like buffer overflow attacks it's the binary which matters.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (5, Insightful)

lazy_arabica (750133) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276103)

If Joe Average ran GNU/linux.. we'd see just as many worms, just as many viruses, just as many spam boxes..
If you only knew how many times I heard that argument... Go learn what a security model is, and how design-time decisions can make an OS much more secure than another one.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (1)

Decker-Mage (782424) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276161)

and if you only knew how many times I've heard that argument... I suggest that you subscribe to the various industry newsletters (SecurityFocus.com is a good start). I receive them all. There are many holes in Linux apps and distros, many of which can grant root from user, and the list keeps growing on their side of the house as well, just not as fast. Should it become a bigger target, well then we'll see more vulnerabilities sought. Simple economics here (look up opportunity costs). I am 0S agnostic, do security consulting among other things, and frankly, no OS is absolutely pure, perfectly armored, nor any application suite. The article gets another thing wrong. The right collection of free tools and for a home setup, each day should take a couple of minutes at most, reboot rarely.

Mandatory Linux vulnerability disagreement here... (2, Insightful)

the_rajah (749499) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276123)

While the "safety by obscurity" factor has some validity and would largely disappear if a larger percentage of people were using GNU/linux, the simple fact is that Linux is much more secure by default.

Think of all those vulnerabilities that are defaults in Windows. Think also about the fact that most Linux distros do not encourage the user to run as "root". Not that Linux has no potential vulnerabilities, but they are much fewer than Windows..

Re:Mandatory Linux vulnerability disagreement here (2, Informative)

mpe (36238) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276493)

Think of all those vulnerabilities that are defaults in Windows. Think also about the fact that most Linux distros do not encourage the user to run as "root". Not that Linux has no potential vulnerabilities, but they are much fewer than Windows..

The other difference is that Linux code, both kernel and application, is more likely to be modular and structured.
Both because this is the "unix way" but also because it's far easier for a diverse group of developers to work with such code.

Re:Linux is magically more secure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276213)

Many say it's because of the large community of Windows users that Windows suffers like it does from worms and viruses and therefore are likely to say this will be the case if another OS like Linux or Mac OS X became mainstream.

But let's not forget that Apache holds nearly if not already 70% of the webserver marketshare, so you could call Apache mainstream. But by a long way is it as vulnerable to worms and viruses like it's Windows counterparts are.

The problem is the business model (3, Insightful)

mangu (126918) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276248)

Linux is intrinsically more secure because it's open source. Linux is used in so many universities all over the world that there are too many professors and researchers looking over the code for a dangerous weak spot to grow. Windows, on the other hand, is known only by a few programmers in Redmond. It's a combination of two factors: fewer eyes looking at the code and monoculture.


A team of programmers in a commercial company distributes the work in the most cost-effective way, so that each person in the team specializes in a section of the code. There is little cross-checking if any. In open source, OTOH, there are people with different backgrounds verifying the code, independently.

That's the same reason why crackers find weak spots in software, they verify details that the programmers who created the software never thought about checking. In open source there is a balance of forces that's strongly biased to "good", instead of "evil", because the "black hats" are more often immature teens while the "white hats" are university professors. In commercial software, the balance of forces tends more to the "evil" side, because of the larger number of people in the black hats.

to michael credit (4, Insightful)

xlyz (695304) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276028)

even if there are things he does that I don't like, I must concede he is really relentless and aggressive in pushing lindows

Re:to michael credit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276244)

Sorta reminiscent of how Usama bin Laden is "really relentless and aggressive" in pushing radical Islam.

robbIE's fauxking pateNTdead PostBlock censorship (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276030)

devise, STILL broken? despite bullocking IPs from annapolis to annaheim. what a surprise?

Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, anonymous comment posting has temporarily (forever, if we had some ept) been disabled. You can still login to post. However, if bad posting continues from your IP or Subnet that privilege could be revoked as well. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in the timeout corner or login and improve your posting . If it's someone else, this is a chance to hunt them down (like with fuddles' phonIE bouNTy hunter scam). If you think this is unfair, we just don't care.

lookout bullow. tell 'em robbIE?

all is not lost.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators.... the returns are immeasurable/infinite.

see you there?

difference between Europe and US (5, Insightful)

myom (642275) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276049)

There are some differences between USA and Europe that will give some varying and odd court decisions. Big business has a strong hold of the US courts. The only way they can lose is if anyone even stronger is the counterpart, or if a state or country invests heavily in the suit to gain even larger monetary gains from winning in the court. In Europe, this is rarely the case, but on the other hand many European legislators and courts are weak, have little resources and time. In Sweden, for example, the Social Democarat party tends to legislate and vote in the EU parlament often following the US court results and organisation bullying (MPAA, RIAA) Some countries invest time and resources to actually learn what the cases are about, and court cases involving Microsoft etc, can in fact be lost by the larger companies, liek in this case.

Re:difference between Europe and US (-1, Troll)

Lucius Septimius Sev (766060) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276105)

The court system in Europe is very weak compaired to other parts of the government and has always been so. They do pretty much what the party in power wants them to do with few exceptions. Here in the United States that is different the courts have far more power and once in place a Judge has less pressure on them then his/her counterparts in europe. We still have to deal with politcal morons on the bench but they never make it far as judges have been pretty good at overturning stupid decisions.

Re:difference between Europe and US (1)

mpe (36238) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276232)

The court system in Europe is very weak compaired to other parts of the government and has always been so. They do pretty much what the party in power wants them to do with few exceptions.

Actually European courts are quite good at telling the party in power where to stick it. The difficulty is that the party in power is likely to subsequently ammend the law...

Here in the United States that is different the courts have far more power and once in place a Judge has less pressure on them then his/her counterparts in europe.

The real difference is that in the US 2 political parties dominate at all levels. In most European countries there are not only more political parties but is perfectly possible to have independent judges and magistrates.

Re:difference between Europe and US (2, Insightful)

Ludo.Sanders (594901) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276201)

I'm missing the word "yet". As the recent software patents in Europe painfully demonstrates, the European union is sold to big corporations. Ask Bolkestein [eu.int] , he'll confirm

I'm going to trademark "gates" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276052)

As in "Gates of Hell"

Major Break for Lindows (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276060)

This is huge news for the future of Lindows. I predict this will begin the groundswell of support into a burgeoning grass roots movement that will sweep into a Lindows frenzy. Within 6 months Lindows will most likely become the standard corporate desktop and Lindows will be THE OS. More than likely, Micro$loth (that shitty company) will be bankrupt in 1 year.

Re:Major Break for Lindows (1)

whowho (706277) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276085)

Just the "I predict" start sets the tone to the post...

--
coming to italy? http://alltuscany.com

Windows a generic term? (5, Interesting)

houghi (78078) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276084)

a jury [...] would be instructed to consider whether "windows" was a generic term before Microsoft introduced software with that name in 1985.

I can understand that such a thing is a different matter in non-English speaking countries, like The Netherlands.
How could they ever not say that it is a generic term in English speaking countries, like the USA?. I look in awe to the fact that such a thing has to be considerd.

Re:Windows a generic term? (1, Insightful)

khuber (5664) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276137)

An operating system using the name Lindows when the most popular desktop OS is Windows is obviously using that name to capitalize on Microsoft's brand recognition.

Re:Windows a generic term? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276389)

An operating system using the name Lindows when the most popular desktop OS is Windows is obviously using that name to capitalize on Microsoft's brand recognition.

I don't think there's any doubt about that but that isn't enough. The question is whether "Windows" is a generic term in computer graphical interfaces and it seems pretty obvious that it is.

People are allowed to capitalize on all manner of things. Saying "but he's obviously trying to make money and stuff!" doesn't make a case for trademark infringement.

Re:Windows a generic term? (1)

nickol (208154) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276155)

In non-English speaking countries "Lindows" and "Windows" are different names. One trade mark could be considered similar to another only if their written styles are looking similar.

In Russia Microsoft can win the case easily by bribing jury, but not normal way.

BTW, Xerox already lost their case. "Xerox" can not be a trade mark in Russia any more, because it is a "generic term". Not "Windows", however...

Re:Windows a generic term? (1)

Rhubarb Crumble (581156) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276230)

BTW, Xerox already lost their case. "Xerox" can not be a trade mark in Russia any more, because it is a "generic term". Not "Windows", however...

Yes, but "to xerox" is used as a synonym for "to photocopy" (at least it used to be - not as widespread anymore).

Nobody says "windows" as a generic term for "operating system" unless they are terminally stupid.

"What Windows does it use?"
"Let me check... uh, RedHat 7.2".

Re:Windows a generic term? (3, Interesting)

Sique (173459) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276447)

Nobody says "windows" as a generic term for "operating system" unless they are terminally stupid.

I remember once to dispute with a quite intelligent but somewhat computer illiterate woman about the weaknesses of Windows. She was contradicting me the whole time and not accepting the flaws I pointed out.

Later I realized she was using a Mac, and for her the Mac desktop was "Windows" because it had many of them. Talk about generic terms...

Re:Windows a generic term? (1)

Rhubarb Crumble (581156) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276500)

Later I realized she was using a Mac, and for her the Mac desktop was "Windows" because it had many of them. Talk about generic terms...

Yeah, after I posted that I realised that while using "Windows" as a generic term for OS is far-fetched, using it as a generic term for GUI isn't - after all people (including me) say things like "X-Windows" even if pedants point out that isn't the right term. And the earlier versions of Windows(tm) were just GUIs that needed an OS to run on, which didn't even have to be MSDOS.

And of course for a lot of (computer illiterate) people GUI and OS are the same.

GUI vs. OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276225)

The argument is that Windows may have been a generic term to describe a graphical user interface, but it wasn't a generic term to describe an operating system.

Re:GUI vs. OS (1)

dsfox (2694) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276249)

However, this might mean that one is willing to accept that there could *be* an operating system without a GUI, so the argument becomes a bit difficult.

Re:Windows a generic term? (2, Funny)

mpe (36238) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276394)

I can understand that such a thing is a different matter in non-English speaking countries, like The Netherlands.

The vast majority of the Dutch speak perfectly good English.

How could they ever not say that it is a generic term in English speaking countries, like the USA?

What proportion of the US population speak English?

Lindows and Security??? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276090)

And the security subject comes up when they run the user as root?? Its having having a blind man sell you glasses...

This guy is starting to get really annoying (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276094)

I like to see Linux being promoted because in some areas it is better than windows, in others its weaker. Personally I prefer to see its strengths advertised. The whole lindows strategy seems to be to take cheap shots at MS and cash in on the PR it generates.

After reading his minutes article which, personally I think FUD at best, I have a question for him regarding where blame lies. In this current period of rampant terrorism if someone fires an rpg round (a terrorist weapon of choice) through his front window and takes out all the good china and silverware, does the responsibility lie with himself for not installing rpg proof glass or with the moron who fired it?

So how long... (0, Offtopic)

innerlimit (593217) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276098)

before Apple sues LinSpire over their website design?

Re:So how long... (3, Insightful)

aixou (756713) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276317)

You think Lindows' site is bad? Browse a couple pages on THIS [go-l.com] site. People are going to copy Apple no matter what. For the most part, all Apple can do is keep innovating and stay ahead of the game

Irony (4, Insightful)

omnirealm (244599) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276110)

...the latest Michael's Minutes from Linspire pegs all the blame for virus problems on Microsoft and basically says that Linux (well, Lindows anyway) is the cure.

The irony of this statement is that Lindows will probably be one of the driving forces in getting Linux viruses popular. By marketing the software to those who are less computer-savvy while making the root user the default user, Lindows is opening up the door for some nasty widespread security exploits. Some of the reasons why viruses have not been a problem under Linux so far has been due to smaller desktop market penetration, heterogeneity, the computer literacy of those who run Linux, and the restricted account privileges of the user. Lindows threatens all of those factors.

Re:Irony (2, Interesting)

dmaxwell (43234) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276128)

What's sad about this is that Linspire could EASILY do this the way OS X does it. When you install something in OS X, a box pops up asking for the admininstrator password. It's easy and maintains security for the system level stuff. It wouldn't be that big a deal to prettify and simplify something like Kpackage.

Re:Irony (2, Informative)

mpe (36238) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276521)

What's sad about this is that Linspire could EASILY do this the way OS X does it. When you install something in OS X, a box pops up asking for the admininstrator password. It's easy and maintains security for the system level stuff.

As well as maintaining a distinction between "administrator" and "user" tasks. Which means that it is far more difficult to get the "click on a web link and have some malware quietly installed" senario.

Who started using the term WINDOW(s) ? (1)

formal_entity (778568) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276121)

Wasnt there something called "XWindows" or "Windows X" on Unix years before M$ coined their Windows?

Re:Who started using the term WINDOW(s) ? (2, Informative)

bheer (633842) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276131)

For the last time, people: NO. It was the "X Window System".

Re:Who started using the term WINDOW(s) ? (3, Insightful)

formal_entity (778568) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276212)

Well say that "X Window System" where first, then Microsoft added a single letter and it became "Windows" with an plural s. After that Lindows release yet another GUI system and changed again 1 letter... (W became L) and then Microsoft is all pissed off about it?! These word games are just aweful, it would be so much better if they could just write code instead! :)

Re:Who started using the term WINDOW(s) ? (1)

LilMikey (615759) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276449)

...it would be so much better if they could just write code instead!

Well, you stick to what you're good at.

You have been Rooted (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276138)

Lindows from what I understand makes the big mistake opf giving users the nice experiance by running as the root user.

This is pretty brain dead at the best of times and will allow worms to propogate as badly as at present. If windows users were not always logged in as admin there wouldn't be such a problem as there is. I am sure the same will be said for any OS, where you can do anything as the normal user.

If a Lindows user gets a browser worm or similar and is root, it can still propgate and do what it like just as on windows.

Thank you, Bill Gates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276239)

Casual computer users now have the expectation of being able to do anything on a computer whenever they want to.

Lindows is just playing to that "cult" of users, and until that cult is deprogrammed we'll always be feeling the effects of "There's no security in Microsoft".

Re viri: MacOSX is the one to watch (3, Insightful)

jdesbonnet (22) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276151)

I don't have the latest figures, but I'm pretty sure that MacOSX desktop figures far outweight those of any Linux distribution (right now anyway ;-)

MacOSX is a real OS. What's the virus situation here? I think it will be a good indication of what life will be like when Linux desktop becomes more common.

BTW: this is a question... not a statement, but my hunch is that MacOSX malware is rare (?)

Big fish in a small pond (-1, Redundant)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276160)

> latest Michael's Minutes from Linspire pegs
> all the blame for virus problems on Microsoft
> and basically says that Linux (well, Lindows
> anyway) is the cure."

Do you guys really think for one second that if Linux were the dominant operating system, and thus had the attention of hackers worldwide, that it would remain as secure as it seems to be now?

I'll bet it would turn up at least as full of holes as Windows is now. Microsoft OSes are under asault in a trial by fire the likes of which no one has ever seen before.

Re:Big fish in a small pond (5, Insightful)

I confirm I'm not a (720413) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276241)

Do you guys really think for one second that if Linux were the dominant operating system, and thus had the attention of hackers worldwide, that it would remain as secure as it seems to be now?

I'll bet it would turn up at least as full of holes as Windows is now. Microsoft OSes are under asault in a trial by fire the likes of which no one has ever seen before.

Really, this hoary old chestnut has been done-to-death. No. I don' think for one second that if Linux yada yada yada. For numerous reasons outlined already in this thread. Because Linux has a competent security model. Because Windows is homogenous - many/most users use identical apps (think Outlook Express, IE), on Linux there's too much choice for a worm, etc, to successfully propogate using one target. Because Linux doesn't default to running as root, and provides an easy mechanism for dropping-into root when you need to (disclaimer: maybe Windows has this - I've never found it, and I've been running Windows a lot longer than I've been running Linux).

Please, people, rather than using arguments like "I'll bet...", try just googling for facts. Or give up trolling.

Re:Big fish in a small pond (4, Insightful)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276303)

if Linux were the dominant operating system, and thus had the attention of hackers worldwide

What do you mean, 'if'? Linux does have the attention of hackers worldwide. How else do you think it ever got written?

Re:Big fish in a small pond (1)

cball2k (319068) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276510)

...and those same people are writting viruses to attack MS products, soooooo draw a few conclusions based on your statement...

- linux users are hackers
- linux users write viruses to attack MS os's
- linux users are a security risk
- linux users should be detained for cybercrimes

see how easy it is to spout FUD against an OS....

do something constructive instead of riding the ms-hater bandwagons...

Re:Big fish in a small pond (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276312)

Do you guys really think for one second that if Linux were the dominant operating system, and thus had the attention of hackers worldwide, that it would remain as secure as it seems to be now?

YES.

at least our programmers are not stupid enough to make the email client able to execute software or HIDE FILE EXTENSIONS.

PLUS I dont see a RPC hole there, or the databases shipping with the default username password of sa/none.

I could go on... but the biggest thing is that patches for linux holes are fixed within hours instead of weeks.

Kinspire (5, Funny)

2br02b (448267) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276162)

Under what's new (right hand side of page)

New Linspire name
Rock with Lsongs
Lphoto ships


Looks Like Lanother KDE Lin Lthe Lmaking

Ok, first off... (2, Insightful)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276221)

...I really don't like Microsoft.

But saying Linspire pegs all the blame for virus problems on Microsoft and basically says that Linux (well, Lindows anyway) is the cure." strikes me as wrongheaded. The problems with Microsoft/virus issue are all legacy issues. If you think about it, all Microsoft code is based on a pre-Internet OS. It really isn't geared to the Internet to day. It's kind of like why pre-'70s (US) cars may not need to meet modern pollution codes. This does not make it right. But Microsoft itself is too monolithic to respond properly.

Also the users that are having the problems are all the "unwashed masses" that don't know to patch their systems properly and to pratice safe web surfing. They need to be educated.

Re:Ok, first off... (1)

_|()|\| (159991) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276399)

The problems with Microsoft/virus issue are all legacy issues.

We just read a story about Netscape's last gasp against IE's dominance, in which one comment [slashdot.org] linked to Browsers used to visit Google, April 2004 [google.com] . The graph shows an overwhelming adoption of IE 6.0--if Microsoft delivers a secure browser, users will adopt it.

Re:Ok, first off... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276522)

If you think about it, all Microsoft code is based on a pre-Internet OS.
So, would you say that a cheap UNIX knockoff was based on a pre- or post-Internet OS? Not to mention that modern MS OS's are based on Windows 2000, a complete rewrite of the codebase for the Internet era.

Go Lindows/Linspire! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276224)

I enjoy reading the weekly Michael's Minute, always a good read, except of course for the obligatory Lindows advertisements.

With regards to the fight over the Lindows name, I like to see Lindows standing up for principles and also for taking on Microsoft.

I applaud Lindows efforts to create a user friendly Linux release, I wish that it was a free distribution that I could just make copies of and give out to people, with revenue coming from optional support, click n run subscriptions.

keep the new name (2, Interesting)

qBeaks (98833) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276234)

I wonder if they will change the name back, I'm just starting to like Linspire better than Lindows.

Don't be silly... (-1, Offtopic)

rainwadj (58293) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276251)

Linspire pegs all the blame for virus problems on Microsoft and basically says that Linux (well, Lindows anyway) is the cure.

Everyone KNOWS that Mac OS X is the REAL cure.

Ot but had to say - (1)

JosKarith (757063) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276266)

Look at the Related links bar on the right - about halfway down it says:
-Linspire
-Microsoft
-doesn't infringe Microsoft's patent

Well I thought it was funny anyway.

So then why isn't spyware blamed on Windows too? (2, Insightful)

goldspider (445116) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276299)

Here's what I want to know.

Most slashdotters direct much wrath towards the makers of spyware, adware, and malware in general, because they are a pain in the ass that inconvenience users.

However when someone writes a virus that inconveniences users, almost everyone here blames Microsoft and not the writer of the virus.

Seeing how there is almost no difference between the two, why are spyware publishers lambasted but virus writers given a free pass, and in many cases, lauded as champions against the evil Microsoft Empire?

Re:So then why isn't spyware blamed on Windows too (1)

cranos (592602) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276452)

I think you'll find that aside from a tiny minority of pimply gits, most people here would love to take virus writers out the back and show them the sharp end of a mainframe. However we would also like to have a quiet word with the idiots who wrote the code that allows these viruses, malwares and trojans to infest your machine without any iaction by the user.

It is a two way street, the virus writers are a pain in the arse for the damage they do, but MS has allowed these attacks to happen through non-existant security and software development run by the fucking Marketing Department.

just more food for slashdot trolls (0)

cball2k (319068) | more than 9 years ago | (#9276422)

if it involves MS, the trolls will spout their FUD and worthless opinions...

shame slashdot trolls can't do constructive things, but they are soooooo busy riding ms-hate bandwagons, and feeling superior, they can't see how childish they appear to the rest...

Stupid Name (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9276488)

"Lindows" is such a stupid name in the first place. I mean, it's REALLY original and fresh, right? Message to geeks: Try using the Right side of your brain from time to time!
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