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New Largest Prime Found: Over 7 Million Digits

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the tim-adds-2-and-takes-credit-for-the-next-one dept.

Software 305

Jeff Gilchrist writes "On May 15, 2004, Josh Findley discovered the 41st known Mersenne Prime, 2 to the 24,036,583th power minus 1. The number is nearly a million digits larger than our last find and is now the largest known prime number! Josh's calculation took just over two weeks on his 2.4 GHz Pentium 4 computer. The new prime was verified by Tony Reix in just 5 days using only half the power of a Bull NovaScale 5000 HPC running Linux on 16 Itanium II 1.3 GHz CPUs. A second verification was completed by Jeff Gilchrist of Elytra Enterprises Inc. in Ottawa, Canada using eleven days of time on a HP rx5670 quad Itanium II 1.5 GHz CPU server at SHARCNET. Both verifications used Guillermo Ballester Valor's Glucas program." Read on for more on the discovery, including how you can help find more primes.

Gilchrist continues "If you want to see the number in written in decimal, Perfectly Scientific, Dr. Crandall's company which developed the FFT algorithm used by GIMPS, makes a poster you can order containing the entire number. It is kind of pricey because accurately printing an over-sized poster in 1-point font is not easy! Makes a cool present for the serious math nut in your family.

For more information, the press release is available.

Congratulations to Josh and every GIMPS contributor for their part in this remarkable find. You can download the client for your chance at finding the next world record prime! A forum for newcomers is available to answer any questions you may have.

GIMPS is closing in on the $100,000 Electronic Frontier Foundation award for the first 10-million-digit prime. The new prime is 72% of the size needed, however an award-winning prime could be mere weeks or as much as few years away - that's the fun of math discoveries, said GIMPS founder George Woltman. The GIMPS participant who discovers the prime will receive $50,000. Charity will get $25,000. The rest will be used primarily to fund more prime discoveries. In May 2000, a previous participant won the foundation's $50,000 award for discovering the first million-digit prime."

cancel ×

305 comments

wow (-1, Redundant)

bigben7187 (754240) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291824)

wow thats a big number!

Re:wow (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291919)

Only on Slashdot is the first post modded Redundant.

frist psost for me (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291830)

hell yeah, gotta love that sweet schizzle

I regret to inform you that (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291878)

You fucking fail it.

first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291832)

first

Re:first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291846)

Joo FscKIn6 f@iL It 8iTch!!!

Legit uses for Mersenne Primes (4, Funny)

DarkHelmet (120004) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291833)

It's gonna be a little obvious to crackers when I use two mersenne primes to help create my public and private keys.

But Pseudoprimes? Probability of primeness? Hah! You people cut corners!

Re:Legit uses for Mersenne Primes (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292094)

i dont get it.

I hate to be a pushover... (4, Interesting)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291836)

... but why exactly is this so important? Can we use this number in any way, or is it just another prime?

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (5, Interesting)

barcodez (580516) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291863)

Well we can make a perfect number with it.

Every Mersenne prime gives rise to a perfect number [wolfram.com] .

To answer your question a little more seriously the number is not much use in itself but like many peices of research the route to the goal often turns out more interesting information than the goal. GIMPS pushes back the bounds on many levels such as highly optimised coding and mathematical DC.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (-1, Flamebait)

SpacePunk (17960) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291951)

"To answer your question a little more seriously the number is not much use in itself but like many peices of research the route to the goal often turns out more interesting information than the goal."

Kinda kicks you in the ass when people say "ok, what good is it?"

I know what good it is. It's a way of keeping 'scientists' employed (scientific welfare) so they don't pollute the job and gene pools.

I'm considering doin research on the 'how', 'why', and 'classification' of belly button lint. I'm sure there's a government funded grant in it. We REALLY NEED TO KNOW THESE THINGS 'just in case' they are usefull in the future.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (3, Funny)

kunudo (773239) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292065)

"To answer your question a little more seriously the number is not much use in itself but like many peices of research the route to the goal often turns out more interesting information than the goal."

Kinda kicks you in the ass when people say "ok, what good is it?"

I know what good it is. It's a way of keeping 'scientists' employed (scientific welfare) so they don't pollute the job and gene pools.

I'm considering doin research on the 'how', 'why', and 'classification' of belly button lint. I'm sure there's a government funded grant in it. We REALLY NEED TO KNOW THESE THINGS 'just in case' they are usefull in the future.



Yeah, let's keep the scientists out of the gene pool, maybe even replace them with Christian Scientists(tm). I mean, why would we want people to have even the slightest hint of intellegence, I mean, the public, dear lord. You should let the current administration know you have devised such an excellect scheme for them...

Not that I'm saying this guy is a scientist, but whatever... Oh yeah, and you're a troll, but I couldn't help myself.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (-1, Flamebait)

abigor (540274) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292084)

Are you a Christian? Or just incredibly fucking stupid?

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (3, Informative)

azav (469988) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292083)

And why do we care about the perfect numbers?

In the end, what does this get us?

Please elaborate for those of us who need a reason to care about primes, perfect numbers & the like.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (5, Funny)

irokitt (663593) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291865)

This is of course an attempt to impress chicks.

Hey baby, did you know I discovered the longest prime number?


Notice I said it's an attempt, I didn't say it would work;)

What's next? (1)

rune2 (547599) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291955)

"Hey baby, what's your prime?"

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292049)

Hey baby, did you know I discovered the longest prime number?

Or, "What the hell are all those digits tatto'ed to your dick?"

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (4, Informative)

DarkHelmet (120004) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291877)

A mersenne prime is the easiest form of prime to prove (easy being least computationally expensive).

So right now, this is the largest proven prime number at this point in time. It is 1,000,000 digits larger than the next largest known prime number, (which is also a mersenne prime).

There very well may be a day where primes this large will be used for encryption purposes. But this may be a long way off.

Keep in mind, that so much of the underpinnings of today is based on mathematics from the 1600's to the early 1900's. The math we pursue today will most likely reach a practical application point next century.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (2, Interesting)

vrmlguy (120854) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291907)

Well, you can use it to make a *really* big RSA encryption key.

Yeah, but (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292105)

EVERYONE will think of that.. "oh I'll just make my encryption key the largest known prime"... it's like setting 12345 on your luggage

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (1)

mldl (779187) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291950)

The real reason is to show off how long our digital penis' are on the user page [mersenne.org] and the top producers pages.

What better way is there to pick up girls than to say you're the biggest GIMP on the planet?

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (3, Interesting)

eidechse (472174) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292015)

Binary math was once thought to be a useless curiousity.

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (1)

eidechse (472174) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292034)

Correction: "curiosity".

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (1)

ezzzD55J (697465) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292044)

As was algorithmics. Not so useless now! :)

Re:I hate to be a pushover... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292082)

You can make good random number generators out of them. (All you need is to find a primitive root of it.)

In case you missed it (4, Informative)

barcodez (580516) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291838)

The GIMPS [mersenne.org] Project found this prime. You too can contribute by downloading the client (for various OSes).

Thought I would drive the point home as this is a great DC project that doesn't receive half the attention of some of the more dubious DC projects...

Re:In case you missed it (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291848)

I think I might have a faint idea why. Let's see... do i want to use my spare CPU power to:
  • Search for intelligent aliens?
  • Find a cure for cancer?
or
  • Calculate a really fucking big, really fucking useless number?

Even primes (4, Funny)

Devil's BSD (562630) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291839)

I'm still searching for that even prime number bigger than 2...

Re:Even primes (3, Funny)

mr_jim83 (753759) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291860)

You keep looking. I'll wait here.

Re:Even primes (2, Funny)

DarkHelmet (120004) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291893)

I'm still searching for that even prime number bigger than 2...

Proof of that will require a recalled grey market Pentium 1 with an FDIV "feature" added to it.

All math people wishing to prove / find your number must also "upgrade"

Start checking at 2**1FaE2D1h (1)

Thinkit4 (745166) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291842)

That's where the money starts kicking in for these types of primes.

Re:Start checking at 2**1FaE2D1h (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292026)

most certainly, i already made tons of bucks

Distributed Computing? (3, Interesting)

drskrud (684409) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291844)

Does anyone know if a distributed computing project exists for finding large prime numbers? That would be a pretty cool way to spend some CPU cylces.

Re:Distributed Computing? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291851)

GIMPS

Re:Distributed Computing? (1)

Squirrley (708130) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292074)

wtf?!? how is the parent offtopic? isn't that what the article's about?

Re:Distributed Computing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291892)

That is damn Lazy. Were not even talking about RTFA, you didn't finish the damn submission text.

Re:Distributed Computing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291920)

nah, i side with the parent poster. the submission text didnt really say anything about what GIMPS was (for some reason I thought of Gimp, the image processing program), nor did any of the links say that GIMPS was a DC program either.

CS Majors Unite (1)

sageman (726742) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291849)

My algorithmics and discrete mathematics professors must be foaming at the lips in happiness-induced seizure-ific glory.

Yes, I know happiness does not induce seizure.

What a wonderful day in CS history. Well, here's to finding the 42nd! We can call it the Adams Prime. Wonder if it has some combination of 6's and 9's...hmm.

Re:CS Majors Unite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291870)

This was suppose to be a funny binary joke, but its not one.

Lets see here, one is often substituted for the boolean term true, so "not one" would mean your joke is false, right? Anyone else follow? Or am I entirely missing the joke here?

Re:CS Majors Unite (1)

sageman (726742) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291963)

Haha. Apparently not fond of puns? Probally should be "binary pun" instead of "funny binary joke" I imagine, but I copied it from someone else and didn't think about it, which maybe I should have, especially after all that exposure to boolean algebra and such. How's this: "This was suppose to be a binary pun, but its ~1"? Somehow, "This wasn't suppose to be a true binary joke, but its not one" just fails to induce a modicum of hilarity. Sorry.

Re:CS Majors Unite (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292013)

Nerd humor. Meh, I say. Meh!

So... (2, Funny)

elid (672471) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291855)

...if I add 2 to this number, I just might get another prime [slashdot.org] and find the new largest prime. :-)

Not in this case... (2, Insightful)

kevinatilusa (620125) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291889)

since 2^(odd number)+1 is always a multiple of 3

Re:Not in this case... (2, Funny)

RucasRiot (773111) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291917)

OWNED heh

Who gives a shit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291857)

Big fucking deal. Ooooh another big prime so fucking what.

Re:Who gives a shit (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291866)

Relax...

Getting laid does wonders for the state-of-mind...

Re:Who gives a shit (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291984)

Getting laid does wonders for the state-of-mind...

That's the theory anyway.
But once you enter slashdot.org in your address bar you are doomed.

harrumph (5, Funny)

maxbang (598632) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291862)

Say all you will, but Optimus is still the ultimate prime.

Re:harrumph (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291988)

Well lets hope this Optimus of yours can find the 10 million digit prime.

Re:harrumph (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291989)

Rodimous prime was way cooler. I mean come on he had saws on his hands and lasers build in, he didn't need an external laser cannon like Optiumus. I mean sure he didn't have roller to go out and do reconisance or a fortress on his back but who needs that? He also mopped the floor with Unicron. My vote is for Rodimous prime what a guy.

Re:harrumph (1)

Phosphor3k (542747) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292005)

I dunno. Though not a true prime, I liked Optimus Primal [emerson.edu] quite a bit. Rodimus Prime [emerson.edu] wasn't too shabby either.

Of course, some would argue Optimal Optimus Prime [vendio.com] was the best.

My Hashtable (4, Funny)

KidSock (150684) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291872)

Great. This should improve the distribution of elements in my hashtable implementation.

Re:My Hashtable (1)

cervo (626632) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291908)

Once you implement arbitrary length numbers and an arbitrary length number arithmetic. It will make the constant factor of O(1) bigger than some O(n) algorithms no doubt.

I think Microsoft has use for you and your hash table in longhorn :)

WoW! (1)

beatnitup (616700) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291873)

Josh Findley discovered the 41st known Mersenne Prime, 2 to the 24,036,583th power minus 1!!! Now i can die as a happy man.....

Why? (1)

bstuffer (724771) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291874)

What is the marginal utility of finding out yet another prime number? Arent we doing just fine with the current ones? Or is this a radical discovery disproving something?

Prateek

Re:Why? (1)

Tatarize (682683) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292086)

It serves some uses with encryption ect... It disproves nothing, there are proofs for the infinate number of primes, so there's always another other prime out there...

The real question (1, Interesting)

panxerox (575545) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291875)

is this number now copyrighted?

Re:The real question (1)

barcodez (580516) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291884)

INAL but you can't copyright a number.

Re:The real question (1)

GregChant (305127) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291938)

No... but you can trademark it! To the USPTO!

Re:The real question (1)

damiam (409504) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291987)

Maybe not, but a number can be illegal under the DMCA [cmu.edu] .

Re:The real question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292027)

Yeah, you are correct.

There is an obvious one-one map from valid BMP files to (really big) integers. You can copyright an image defined by a BMP file, can't you?

But of course it's not quite the same as copyrighting a number. Your copyright on the image will extend to other images if they are sufficiently similar, so in a sense it is broader than a number.

Also, if someone has some other useful map from representations of a creative work (MP3, JPG, TIFF, WAV...) to integers, and their work happens to be represented by the same integer, then the copyright system clearly has to permit this sort of collision. So your copyright cannot really be described by a single integer.

As a corollary, (4, Interesting)

kevinatilusa (620125) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291882)

He's also found the largest known perfect number [wikipedia.org] , 2^(24,036,583-1)*((2^24,036,583)-1)

exam revision time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291887)

You will be required to remember this number for this semester's exam. I'd also advise you to bring an extra couple of pens and pencils.

Re:exam revision time... (1)

vijaya_chandra (618284) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292008)

If you promise me that you'd invigilate all through the time I am writing down this number, I am ready

I've got a question about the Mersenne twins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291891)

Are there infinitely many twin primes of the form (2^N)+1, (2^N)-1?

Need an answer by Tuesday.

Re:I've got a question about the Mersenne twins. (1)

WombatDeath (681651) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292061)

Yes.

Hey, this is very important....... (5, Funny)

Lexomatic (779253) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291899)

Who knows, one day you might find yourself struck in the tiger den with multiple doors all marked with Mersenne Primes, and a sign saying, "safe exit thru the door marked with the 41st Mersenne Prime". Yeah, then who is gonna bitch about not memorizing that sucker, huh?

Re:Hey, this is very important....... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291937)

"Roman numerals, they haven't tried to teach us that in school!"

Re:Hey, this is very important....... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291982)

It won't be a problem because you will be given multiple choices like:
  • if you choose 2^2863823647-1, goto number 45
  • if you choose 2^1289778469-1, goto number 126
and you will be able to cheat (like I've always done before)!

I knew it (5, Funny)

jmoen (169557) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291915)

Size does matter :)

What happen ? (2, Funny)

PurifyYourMind (776223) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291923)

Somebody set up us the prime.

Re:What happen ? (1)

professor seagull (677508) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291967)

bad.

That poster is a scam! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291931)

I heard a rumor that some wiseguy in charge of printing changed one of the digits first - you may think you're paying for a prime, but they're really stiffing you and shipping a composite number!

Verification program (1)

vijaya_chandra (618284) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292031)

Don't you worry
A program for verifying,using ocr, whether the poster you get really has the correct prime would be up on sourceforge the day the poster's released

History of Prime #s (2, Informative)

NEOtaku17 (679902) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291932)

http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/HistTopic s/Prime_numbers.html

what I want to know... (0, Troll)

lawngnome (573912) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291936)

The new prime was verified by Tony Reix in just 5...

so why isnt this guy looking for primes if he has such a fast setup?

Re:what I want to know... (1)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292017)

Good idea! I'll find the 42nd Mersenne Prime in no time with the processing power i got here.

ummm... let's see... *shakes the 8-ball* it says I should verify that 2^26.523.804-1 is the 42nd Mersenne Prime.

Re:what I want to know... (1)

vijaya_chandra (618284) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292055)

*verified* is the key
they didn't say that the other guys computed the number again

The verification procedure, used here, might not be a feasible one for actually finding out the correct ones by checking every number

Yeah sure. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291941)

I'm not gonna believe that until I verified it myself.

so.. anyone got a clue on how long it will take on my good old Pentium Pro 200?

hmmm (2, Insightful)

challahc (745267) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291952)

I guess these people trust the accuracy of these programs.

Personally I think someone should work this out on paper. Any volunteers/nominations?

Picture Frame (3, Interesting)

KhalidBoussouara (768934) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291960)

I understand that producing such a poster will be expensive but this is ridiculous:

Without frame: $77.00
With frame: $247.00

SCO's claim that their code has been stolen sounds more logical than this!

Re:Picture Frame (1)

tcgwebs (737923) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292007)

How exactly? I challenge you to find a frame distributor that sells frames that big for less than $170. You won't find any. It's very custom.

Re:Picture Frame (1)

challahc (745267) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292040)

A poster sized frame? Doesn't Wal-Mart sell those?

Here is the whole number! (5, Funny)

fredrikj (629833) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291974)

In binary: 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 11111111111111111111111111111111111111...

Your comment violated the "postercomment" compression filter. Try less whitespace and/or less repetition. Comment aborted.

Sorry :/

fermat was here (5, Funny)

werdnapk (706357) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291979)

I have discovered a truly marvelous demonstration of a 10 million digit prime which this margin is too narrow to contain.

Mod this a troll if you will (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291986)

But seriously, why the hell is this news? It's just a prime number. Can this number be used for any significant way to benefit mankind? Damn, even putting your spare CPU cycles into SETI@Home would be more productive than this.

What if (3, Interesting)

vijaya_chandra (618284) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292097)

What if the message that your SETI's going to find out happens to contains this prime!?!?

Isn't it possible that some civilisation is so advanced that their 'bc' would give back the 50th mersenne prime just like our bc would return 3*5

Wouldn't it be cool to find out that the msg you've just now found on SETI isn't gibberish but a hi from another advanced civilisation

Aliens and primes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291992)

Folding@home is a much more immediate need. IMO.

Stupid humans, they found us all right, but it doesn't matter because they are all dead, they did find a few interesting primes by the way

A lazy newbie question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9291995)

What is a prime number anyway, what's its importance?

I will verfiy on my 66mhz running windows 3.11 (4, Funny)

Numeric (22250) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291997)

i'll let everyone know when i am done!

What kind of data structures are used? (1)

swamp boy (151038) | more than 9 years ago | (#9291998)

What kind of data structures are used to hold that many digits? Obviously, built-in native types can't handle numbers that big - so what do they use? Is it an array of "long long"? Are they stored in string format (each digit as a character)?

Re:What kind of data structures are used? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292028)

A Fortran vector could handle it, I guess.

Re:What kind of data structures are used? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292077)

..... a vector with N (let's say 64) bits per coefficient, and 24,036,583/N coeffs.

Re:What kind of data structures are used? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292075)

You could use the GMP library, but it's GNU code so you might want to be careful about licensing.

For a real free bignum library, try LibTomMath [libtomcrypt.org] . It was written by a guy named Tom.

Call me Fermat (3, Funny)

Alsee (515537) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292012)

I have disovered a most elegant prime exceeding 10 million digits, alas the slashdot comment limit is too small to post it.

-

So an Itanium GHz is worth less that a P4 GHz? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292018)

15 days * 1 CPU * 2.4 GHz = 36 CPU-GHz days

0.5 (5 days * 16 * 1.3) = 52 CPU-GHz days

11 * 4 * 1.5 = 66 CPU-GHz days

My first guess would be that the 16-way box probably used more than "half" its horsepower on this, but even if that's the correct Itanium figure, their GHz appear to be worth about 30 percent less than a P4 GHz. And a P4 GHz is worth a good deal less than either a P3 or Athlon GHz...

...so why are all these big clusters using inefficent, expensive Itaniums, again?

Mod Parent Down!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9292051)

He speaks against the companies that have Slashdot in their back pocket. With all the Microsoft advertising on /. lately it seems that someone has decided to sell out to the big corporations.

Last digit is a 7 (4, Interesting)

product byproduct (628318) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292059)

Actually the last 9 digits are 733969407, as this simple C program will show you:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
int i;
int p = 1;
int m = 1000000000;
for (i = 0; i < 24036583; i++)
p = p*2 % m;
p = (p+m-1) % m; // minus 1
printf("%d\n", p);
}

Please! I have I higher prime. (1)

Tatarize (682683) | more than 9 years ago | (#9292099)

God told me 2^19232891231089 - 1 is prime. Now where were those women for the worlds highest prime? Try to prove me wrong... see, you can't. Prime.
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