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NTT DoCoMo's 4G Tests Hit 300Mbps

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the and-i-still-can't-get-cable dept.

Wireless Networking 259

haunebu writes "'Your brand-spankin'-new 3G phone is nearing obsolesence: NTT DoCoMo reveals the results from a new 4G test system.' says TheFeature. While in a car moving at 30kph, DoCoMo engineers managed a peak throughput of 300Mbps and a sustained transfer rate of 135Mbps with their new variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (WSF-OFCDM) downstream technology. Who comes up with these names, and how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?"

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259 comments

Your brand-spankin'-new 3G phone (5, Funny)

Matey-O (518004) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306363)

'Your brand-spankin'-new 3G phone is nearing obsolesence:'

Not in America it ain't.

Re:Your brand-spankin'-new 3G phone (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306667)

sure it is... just like every other phone you can buy here :(

Re:Your brand-spankin'-new 3G phone (1)

swordboy (472941) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306688)

Not in America it ain't.

Phone, agreed.

Broadband... well... more like cable and DSL just became obsolete. I, for one, welcome our new broadband overlords. I can't wait for the day that I can call Comcrap and let them really know how I feel about their pathetically poor service.

Eat that DSL and Cable (0, Redundant)

binaryspiral (784263) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306366)

mobile ethernet would give my ISP a run for its money... I just got 1Mb!

Re:Eat that DSL and Cable (3, Funny)

tux_deamon (663650) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306553)

Yeah, 135 Mbps would prove great for full motion streaming video, but how good will all that porn look on a 1" LCD?

DoCoMo? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306367)

DoCoMo... is it good or is it whack?

The Modern Liberal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306372)

What It Means to be a Liberal.

The other day I found myself very puzzled.

I know what I believe, why I believe it, the philosophical foundations of my beliefs. I've studied everything from Karl Marx to Ludwig von Mises, from Friedrich Hayek to FDR, from Edmund Burke to Bertrand Russell, from Aristotle to Ayn Rand.

I understand modern conservative thought. I understand libertarian thought. I understand classical liberalism. What I can't begin to comprehend is modern liberalism. Maybe you can help me. As near as I can tell, to be a liberal:

You have to believe the AIDS virus is spread by a lack of funding.

IF there is a church that is valid, it has been pre-approved by the government.

You have to be against capital punishment but for abortion on demand ... in short, you support protecting the guilty and killing the innocent.

You have to believe that the same public school idiot who can't teach 4th graders how to read is qualified to teach those same kids about sex.

You have to believe that trial lawyers are selfless heroes and doctors are overpaid.

You have to believe that guns in the hands of law-abiding Americans are more of a threat than nuclear weapons in the hands of the Red Chinese.

You have to believe that global temperatures are less affected by cyclical, documented changes in the brilliance of the Sun, and more affected by yuppies driving SUVs.

You have to believe that gender roles are artificial but being gay is natural.

You have to believe that businesses create oppression and governments create prosperity.

You have to believe that hunters don't care about nature but pasty, fey activists who've never been outside Seattle do.

You have to believe that self-esteem is more important than actually doing something to earn it.

You have to believe there was no art before federal funding.

You have to believe the military, not corrupt politicians, start wars.

You have to believe the free market that gives us 500+ channels can't deliver the quality that PBS does.

You have to believe the NRA is bad, because they stand up for certain parts of the Constitution, while the ACLU is good, because they stand up for certain parts of the Constitution.

You have to believe that taxes are too low but ATM fees are too high.

You have to believe that Harriet Tubman, Cesar Chavez and Gloria Steinem are more important to American history than Thomas Jefferson, General Robert E. Lee or Thomas Edison.

You have to believe that standardized tests are racist, but racial quotas and set-asides aren't.

You have to believe second-hand smoke is more dangerous than HIV.

You have to believe Hillary Clinton is really a lady and Rosie O'Donnell is not really a man who is jealous of Tom Selleck.

You have to believe conservatives are racists but that black people couldn't make it without your help.

You have to believe that the only reason socialism hasn't worked anywhere it's been tried is because the right people haven't been in charge.

Looking back on my list, it seems shallow, muddled, contradictory, divorced of logic and a bit sadistic.

Well, then. If that doesn't describe the modern liberal, I don't know what does.

Day in the life of a Liberal [Otto] (-1, Troll)

Uber Banker (655221) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306416)

One second, I'm knocking on the front entrance of an upper middle-class home in a respectable eastern Porn Valley `burb, the next second, as I step inside, I'm confronted mere inches away with the demonically-energized sight of Melanie Jagger anally fisting Audrey Hollander as Otto Braun gets ready to pop.
Ah, another Skeeter Kerkove love story, this one entitled Sodomy: Law of the Land, for Metro's newish hardcore imprint, Fusxion.
"Anal fisting," Skeeter pontificates, as he tends to do, "the essence of true romance."
"Cum in her [Hollander's] ass," he directs Braun. "She'll fart it out into your [Jagger's] mouth."
Braun blows his "cock snot" (a big thank you to the inimitable Jim Powers, manning the camera, for expanding my porn vocabulary. - Ed. ) straight into Hollander's heinie hole, she loudly felches it out, and Jagger hungrily laps it up like she's just fallen off the wagon.
"Yum," she says in between gulps, scooping more of the stuff out with her fingers, lickin' em clean, then, for desert, fisting her own ass.
"Now you see why sodomy is the law of the land," Skeeter pronounces into the camera with authority.
A bit later, I witness an equally debauched scene in which former Penthouse Pet Venus, one big-time super-whore (even my jaw dropped at her maelstrom of depraved energy, which is saying something), pulls a double "A" train care of Mark Wood and Benjamin Bratt, loudly exclaiming, "Oh my fucking God."
"Excellent," Skeeter says, "Now let's fill her up with love juice."
The boys squirt in her gaping crapper, she digs it out with her PVC-gloved hand, sucks it dry, then slurps the rest of the spent man muck up off the rug.

Re:Day in the life of a Liberal [Otto] (1, Funny)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306550)

> ... [all kinds of anal-fisting-gaping-hole-miscellaneous-bodily-flui d-drinking deleted] ...

I think this is a description of a painting by Hieronymus Bosch...

I Know! I Know! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306374)

Because they aren't playing StarCraft all the time!

Just what I need... (5, Funny)

the_rajah (749499) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306386)

A cell phone that's equivalent to 87.66234 T-1 lines..

"Do the Right Thing. It will gratify some people and astound the rest." - Mark Twain

Re:Just what I need... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306442)

And probably even more expensive, if US carriers keep up their data billing practices.

their secret is... (5, Funny)

Digitus1337 (671442) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306396)

...that it's a very small island, just put big transmitters on mountantops and you're good to go

Re:their secret is... we already irradiated them (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306494)

We already irradiated them twice so they don't really care that much about the genetic defects associated with 300mbps cellphones.

Re:their secret is... (5, Informative)

mrm677 (456727) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306582)

...that it's a very small island, just put big transmitters on mountantops and you're good to go

Actually this is not funny. The United States is, for the most part, sparsely populated compared to most of Europe and Asia. This is why the U.S. carriers hesitated to adopt GSM in the early 90s, which has a fixed number of supported users/frequency and has a maximum cell size due to being time multiplexed. On the other hand, CDMA is able to create much larger cells at the expense of a higher noise floor (hence less users). It was promised to be better suited to sparsely populated areas, yet still tuneable to suit New York City and etc. Whether or not CDMA IS-95 met those goals is debateable.

Japan is indeed under less contraints. Their cell sizes are very small meaning the required transmission power is reduced. If anybody ever saw a Japanese PDC phone from 10 years ago, and was blown away at how small it was, this is the explanation.

Re:their secret is... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306598)

Yeah, but when a giant lizard (who shall remain nameless) tears down those transmitters every couple of years and they have to be put back up, thats when you see how resourceful the Japanese truely are.

Re:their secret is... (1)

nosphalot (547806) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306690)

Do you even have a clue how cell works?

Big transmitters mean big cells, and big cells defeat the whole point of a cellular network, esp in dense populations like Japan.

The obvious explanation... (2, Funny)

kpansky (577361) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306400)

Who comes up with these names, and how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

The obvious explanation for both of these seemingly puzzling questions is of course Pocky.

WSF-OFCDM? (2, Interesting)

FreeHeel (620639) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306405)

I don't speak Japanese, but shouldn't the acronym for ariable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing be VSF-OFCDM?

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306534)

Actually the Japanese do not have a sound for V in their language, and is therefore replaced by a W.

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306556)

valiable spleading factol olthogonal flequency...

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306606)

The engineer was Scottish... it is a phonetic acronym.

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (1)

forrestt (267374) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306735)

I assume you are referencing the Star Trek Movie in which they are looking for, "Nuclear Wessels" . . .

That was Chekov, and he is in fact Russian (At least in the show. I have no idea what nationality the actor was/is (And no this is not an invitation for those of you who have nothing better to do than dress up as Worf and parade around the mall to "inform" me of all the in's and out's of Star Trek.

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (1)

BalDown (460966) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306613)

I would have to say it's the same reason one of my professors couldn't say Java in a Java programming class. He couldn't say the letter v. It always came out as Jawa. We had to hold off on the laughter so much... Of course, the best part was the kid who sat behind me in class having the name Travis...

Boy how many times did I have to hold in laughter when I heard "Trawis... how you do this in Jawa?"

Re:WSF-OFCDM? (1)

INeededALogin (771371) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306676)

Actually... those words aren't Japanese at all. They are English. The Japanese language does not support Acronyms at all. And very little computer terminology is actually named in Japanese. Instead what you find is that the technology is named as English and then referred to as the English words.

Examples: Computer==konpyuta, website==webusaito, file==fairu, email==emeeru

Pronunciation is of course wrong as I don't know romaji at all

Total area to cover (5, Insightful)

Fiz Ocelot (642698) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306409)

"how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?"

Simple, smaller area to provide coverage = lower cost. That's why in places like South Korea you can get a LOT of bandwith a whole lot cheaper than here (U.S.).

Re:Total area to cover (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306538)

I live in canada and broadband is cheaper here.

Re:Total area to cover (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306585)

Your population is also far more concentrated than the U.S.'s.

Re:Total area to cover (1)

dasmegabyte (267018) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306635)

So how come we don't see similar bandwidth numbers in large American cities like New York or LA? They're very dense and have a miniscule physical area compared to the rest of the country, a market of 7 million+ potential subscribers, and yet until quite recently you couldn't even get cable internet in NYC!

Re:Total area to cover (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306761)

Because there's the rest of the United States providers have to spend money on, not just the densely populated cities you've picked.

Re:Total area to cover (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306706)

Well since so many seem to think area is the single most dominant factor;

There are countries which are less populated than the US and still have a much faster deployment of cell phone technologies.
(e.g. Nordic region)

Culture might also have something to say.

That said;
Even in the "home of nokia/Ericsson" nordic region we envy them their more advanced phones and networks.

Re:Total area to cover (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306711)

if only it were that simple. the Japanese have been ahead technologically (in this sector) for years --- not just in terms of adoption. If it were a simple matter of adoption, we enough high-density areas to make the infrastructure costs similar in those areas, so we should see modern wireless in cities, nothing or old tech in low-density areas.

instead, the whole continent is years behind south east asia (and parts of europe).

Re:Total area to cover (1)

smcavoy (114157) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306755)

I'm not quite sure smaller area translates to cheaper access. In Canada you pay 44.95/month for 5mbps/800kbps cable connection, which afaik is much cheaper then the US and we're about 100 times the size of S. Korea.
Our Cell phone rates however, are significatly higher then the US and I'm sure else where in the world.

Concentration (2, Interesting)

jm92956n (758515) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306412)

Might it be partially due to the higher concentration of people? Because the Japanese people live in closer proximity to one another, fewer cell-towers are needed to provide coverage for a comparable amount of people. Therefore, each cell tower can he of higher quality.

Two words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306415)


"how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?"

Population Density.

Two more words (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306685)

Tentacle porn

WiFi Anyone?? (5, Interesting)

dukeluke (712001) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306418)

After reading this article - it has led me to analyze the benefits of this versus traditional 802.11x and the application of 4G in the broadband arena.

At a proposed sustained rate of 1G, this technology could revolutionize the Internet as we know it today. And, with more and more bandwidth readily available, there will be better multiplayer games online, as well as streaming on-demand cable-like tv off the Net.

I understand that the technology is proposed for gadgets such as a phone or wristwatch that can also watch HDTV - but imagine a world where everyone has a video-phone conference & everyone also has a 1G up/down broadband connection :)

In a word - WOW.

Re:WiFi Anyone?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306636)

I doubt it. Sure, you get 1G to the base stations. For this to have any use as a broadband connection to the internet at large though, those base stations are either going to have to number in the millions or, somewhere, have a massive link to the internet as the number of users increases. I don't see any major cities in the US allowing base stations every 20 feet, and I don't see anybody paying for the kind of base station connections that can sustain hundreds if not thousands of users at anywhere near 1G being realized either.

Replacing all of the wires with this isn't going to fly either - do you want to be the person that gets to rig the chain of transmitters up through the rockies and then maintain them? And how do you plan to cross the oceans?

This technology is really cool, but it's not going to be useful for creating anything except pockets of high speed until the good old fashioned internet connections get cheap enough to keep up.

What are the power requirements? (1, Interesting)

tstoneman (589372) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306427)

Does this need more power? I'm afraid as it is about using cell phones so close to my head (Richard Brandon, owner of Virgin refused to use a cell phone without a headset, and he has done stupider things like trying to balloon around the world!).

I guess the only mitigating factor is that you generally won't be using the 4G features with the phone pressed against your head....

Re:What are the power requirements? (1)

98jonesd (633833) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306493)

" (Richard Brandon, owner of Virgin refused to use a cell phone without a headset, and he has done stupider things like trying to balloon around the world!)."

Sorry to troll but I think you mean Richard Branson.

Re:What are the power requirements? (1)

DoctorDeath (774634) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306633)

With poor battery technology not even close to keeping up, you will need either an extension cord always plugged in or get about 30 minutes of battery life.

Names (4, Informative)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306428)

Who comes up with these names...

Assuming the poster is referring to ``variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (WSF-OFCDM) downstream technology'', the name describes exactly how the technology works. Without reading a technical paper on the technology, I don't know the exact details, but I know what it is doing and what it isn't doing.

Re:Names (2, Funny)

Tenebrious1 (530949) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306575)

...variable spreading factor ... (WSF-...

Is it a typo, or maybe it's supposed to be "Wearable spreading factor"? The Japanese phones are pretty small, it's possible they've sewn it into a shirt collar or something?

Re:Names (5, Insightful)

borroff (267566) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306580)

At least physicists have the decency to choose names like "gluons" instead of "strong nuclear force gauge bosons". Unless I'm in the field, neither "gluons" nor "variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing" is going to mean that much to me, but "gluons" is a lot easier to say.

Population density helps (5, Informative)

giliath (200249) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306429)

Who comes up with these names, and how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless
Part of the reason they are able to stay ahead of everyone else is the density of the country. It is a lot easier to deploy new technologies like this when they don't have to worry about huge land masses like found in China/USA/Russia, and even somewhat in Europe.

Re:Population density helps (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306504)

Ironically, the first mobilde phones from Ericsson in the mid 80s were developed because of large distances; cables were (are?) even more expensive than the 1st generation mobiles.

Ahem! (4, Funny)

orthogonal (588627) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306431)

their new variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (WSF-OFCDM) downstream technology

This is a lie!

I had nothing to do with this!

(And I don't do variable spreading of my factor. And certainly not in a car going 35 mph.)

(Ok, now that you've laughed at me, "Vote" in my unofficial presidential poll [slashdot.org].)

How Japan is "lightyears" ahead of us... (5, Insightful)

Nerviswreck (238452) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306432)

Japan is small, The US is huge. Converting the entire japanese network is a meager task compared to converting the entire US network, or even in all the major cities in the US.

--Nerviswreck

Re:How Japan is "lightyears" ahead of us... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306744)

fuck!
why cant anyone admit that the japs are better?

THE JAPS ARE BETTER THAN AMERICANS IN MANY AREAS, INCLUDING TELECOMMUNICATION. ( - that was a period, cant write it UPPERCASE)

Small island == Small cost of deployment (1)

jjjefff (525754) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306438)

...how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

It's a whole lot cheaper (especially per user) to deploy all-new equipment on a very small, very densly-populated island.

Because Cell phones weren't distracting enough (5, Funny)

VanWEric (700062) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306439)

Now we can drive with one knee, eat with one hand and watch /.-The Movie at 90mph.

There is a race in technology : Things That Distract Drivers vs Things That Replace Drivers (TTDDvTTRD). If automatic nav doesn't catch up, we will all be victims of our own entertainment.

Cheers!

Speed (1)

BearJ (783382) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306449)

Ok, sure it works at 30Kph...but that's under 19Mph! Is speeding up like moving farther from your phone company's CO and using DSL? (slower speed)

Doppler (2, Interesting)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306617)

Is speeding up like moving farther from your phone company's CO and using DSL? (slower speed)

The faster you are going means the Doppler effect is more pronounced. Wide Doppler ranges can be a pain to deal with in the receiver.

Bandwidth (3, Funny)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306453)

That's all very nice, but the real question is: what's the bandiwdth of a station wagon full of telephones barrelling down the highway?

So let's see... (5, Funny)

moehoward (668736) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306458)


That means that they got....let's see....carry the one...

135Mb of data through before the battery ran out.

Pretty good.

WSF-OFCDM? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306461)

You sure it's not WTF-OFCDM?

wariable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306471)

"variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (WSF-OFCDM) downstream technology"

now i find it downright rude that you'd imply that the japanese population has trouble pronouncing the Voiced labiodental fricative (commonly known as the letter V).

Basically (1)

puargsss (731990) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306472)

In places like Japan or Korea, you can replace phone systems within a few months or a relatively short amount of time, as compared with the United States, which still doesn't even have coverage in some parts. When you live in a country the size of California, things can get done a lot quicker.

Simple (1)

CarrionBird (589738) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306473)

Small area to cover. And a population that is willing to send more on the latest gadgets than we are. Heck, most people here just take whatever phone comes with the plan.

Re:Simple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306541)

I think the reason is that US is seriously behind on most things important.

Re:Simple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306736)

You're a retard and that sentence makes no sense. Shut-up.

How does Japan stay ahead? (0)

sirgoran (221190) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306476)

I'll take a guess at that...

Their not spending billions on two wars in two countries.

That and perhaps having a better business model ;)

-Goran

Re:How does Japan stay ahead? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306618)

sprint and verizon are spending billions on wars?

Yes Yes.. (3, Interesting)

Rytr23 (704409) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306486)

High speed data is fantastic..but will it prevent me from having dropped calls?

Am I the only one that is worried? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306487)

While in a car moving at 30kph, DoCoMo engineers managed a peak throughput of 300Mbps and a sustained transfer rate of 135Mbps with their new variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing (WSF-OFCDM) downstream technology.

These days we have problems with people talking on the cell phone while driving. With this bandwidth and video capabilities how soon before we have people watching pr0n and driving? Gives new meaning to the term "spill-over"

Re:Am I the only one that is worried? (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306610)

with this kind of bandwith, you could integrate a mobile HDTV porn broadcasting studio in you car...

why Japan is lightyears ahead is... (5, Insightful)

nomad63 (686331) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306490)

because the alternative they have, which is to rewire the humongous buildings that they have in the very limited amount of space available.

Same story with Chine from a different perspective. Wiring the old buildings for phone communications is not feasible fianncially.

At the end, when alternative is very expensive, people tend to be more creative than what is expected of them. Can be applied to anything, not only wireless or technology...

How do they do it? (2, Funny)

pegr (46683) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306492)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

Can't tell you how, but why is obvious... You can't run cable through paper walls...

Re:How do they do it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306584)

Ricepaper walls are the easiest in terms of running cables. All walls should be movable ricepaper or foot-thick concrete, none of this half-assed drywall stuff.

Rehtorical question? (4, Informative)

epiphani (254981) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306499)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

Might have something to do with the fact that they have 130 Million people in an area slightly smaller than california [worldfactsandfigures.com].

Lot less area to provide coverage for. Not to mention 26 million people in Tokyo alone, making it the highest density city on the planet.

Re:Rehtorical question? (1)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306542)

And just like Hong Kong and all these other cramped up asian countries. It costs $20 US to rent a basketball court for an hour, here in the US we got free ones at every public school. Streets are not packed to the point where you rub shoulders with everybody.

Japan needs to stop bragging about gig fibre in every kid's bedroom etc etc.

Japan is not that large... (2, Insightful)

onion_breath (453270) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306503)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

Because Japan is densely populated on a mall landmass, it's not such a logistical nightmare to have almost all the area covered by high end wireless service. It also can offer a quick market turnaround and a stepping stone into the greater world market.

Simple, they want the best, we want the values. (4, Interesting)

blanks (108019) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306519)

From what I understand (never been to Japan), everyone wants the best coolest *insert random item here*. People will upgrade their phones and other gadgets every month, and get rid of their old ones.

In the US (live in US so cant say the same about other countries), yes people will buy the latest greatest, but will keep it for years, how many people do you know that have cellphones that are 2-3 years old.
People will only upgrade when their gadgets break, or a new technology comes out they really need. so new phones come out slower, and cheaper (cheap = break easy).

No point in rushing out the newest greatest items when people will allways wait.

Let me guess... (1)

Hamster Lover (558288) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306524)

Were they driving the wrong way down a one-way street naked from the waist down and surfing for child porn on a hacked wireless connection? If not they should talk to this [canoe.ca] man.

how does Japan manage to stay light years ahead? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306552)

Because DoCoMo has an effective monopoly in a country that has 127 million people ( large mobile market) and is smaller that the state of California ( small network footprint). Think about the carriers in the US that have to support physical wireless networks that spread from Alaska to Florida. Also the demand for new wireless features is HUGE in Japan and people upgrade their phones (and other electronic devices) at a pretty rapid pace compared to the western markets. Mobile wireless in Japan is best compared to the Internet, instead of mobile wireless in the west.

why japan is always ahead (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306561)

My theory is that the Japanese have come here from a far superior planet to our own thousands of years ago. They are smarter than the average person, have interesting ceremonies and traditions not seen anywhere else on earth, and their language is designed in a way that makes sense.

It's not a coincedence that Vulcan in the Star Trek movies looked a lot like some of the scenes in Mortal Kombat (up in the mountains, japanese lookin' temples).

Great. (2, Funny)

Snarph (596331) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306566)

One more feature that will be over-sold and over-priced when it reaches the States.

I'll be happy if I can just get a working basic connection in the Bay Area (thanks so much, AT&T).

Simple... (0)

tbase (666607) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306597)

"...and how does Japan manage to stay light years ahead of everyone else in wireless?"

Population Dens... Ha! Gotcha! I'm not going to say what 47 other people did...

The real reason they can stay ahead is two-fold.
1.) They don't have near as many lawyers per capita and
B.) They have a different philosophy on devices that "thin the heard" being a "bad" thing.

Japan Loves Gadgets (1)

SoopahMan (706062) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306622)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

Three words (well, 2 and some ASCII art).

Japan <3 Gadgets.

Witty Japan Response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306643)

Because they have enormous eyes, they all dress like schoolgirls, and they can't get enough math!

E-mail me if you want to start a REAL wireless ISP (1)

numbski (515011) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306649)

I'm not kidding. 20 people or so who are willing to mortgage their lives away, license this technology and get it out the door.

300Mbit per sec to anywhere near a tower we can get on????

I kid you not. We could rule the world...until we get bought out. ;)

Not spamming, FYI. (1)

numbski (515011) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306714)

I'm CCNA nearing CCNP test readiness, have MANY years of ISP running experience, and am a bit fed up with the unlicensed spectrum.

Licensed technology. Real throughput. Cheap bandwidth abound to link it to.....ah, a network engineer's dream. And nightmare.

Coincidence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9306650)

Who comes up with these names, and how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?


Have you heard that weed is popular among a thriving subculture in Japan?

It was only a question of time before the engineers got a hold of some.

I can't see how the US can allow the Japanese to outsmoke them.

few cooks = faster innovation (1)

MoFoQ (584566) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306655)

It's 'cause Japanese wireless companies tend to work together to advance forward instead of trying to promote their own standards and slowing things down.

Why do you think we have so many different cellular technologies here in the states...most of them aren't compatible with each other?
We just need to standardize and streamline (especially the FCC procedures) our wireless so we can get 300Mbps.

Also, Japanese wireless companies don't try to keep old technology active to milk money off of it; instead they continously innovate and improve the technology to entice customers to upgrade and buy new technology. That's where they make their money.

Lightyears ahead of everyone... (3, Funny)

raistphrk (203742) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306664)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

By protecting their secrets with giant anime robots.

Either that, or they found some ancient, advanced, lost wireless technology and got a patent on it.

Now I can (1)

Prince Vegeta SSJ4 (718736) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306672)

Play Unreal Tournament while crash..er driving my car. Headshot! Multi Kill! mmmm Monster Kill! mmmm Monsterrrrrrrrrrrrchchchc boom.

Even Better, in UT2k3, I can drive the vehicles. Uhh ohh watch out for that RL, left turn----crash....bang, whoops I meant left arrow, sorry officer.

As if cell phone distractions weren't bad enough.

Answers (Requiring thougth :) (1)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306701)

how does Japan manage to stay lightyears ahead of everyone else in wireless?

A very densely populated country, with concentrated cities that allow a high level of money return for every repeater installed. Also, more repeaters imply less distance to the possible target, which allows for more data troughoutput^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hspeed. A gadget-loving population also helps.

Who comes up with these names?

Uh? That should be self-evident^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hobvious. Committees, of course.

(revised by the anti-pedantic spell checker)

Huh (1)

Omega1045 (584264) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306705)

variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing

Is that like multi-modal reflection sorting? (link [216.239.51.104])

Are 4G phones considered weapons? (1)

percheron_normand (777900) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306709)

Is it possible to fry a chicken or my boss with such a phone? I mean, 4.9GHz radio signal is really impressive... I'm not sure we'll use those phones here in Europe, where you need a permit to hold a weapon...

Cool name (1)

Genevish (93570) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306731)

variable spreading factor orthogonal frequency code division multiplexing

Wow, that's the coolest name ever...

Note: Requires L-O-S to the base station... (3, Informative)

Assmasher (456699) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306750)

It would be nice to mention that before the furor erupts...

Density of wealth amongst populace (4, Interesting)

Peter Cooper (660482) | more than 9 years ago | (#9306754)

More specifically, financial density. Japan is the world's second biggest economy, with an economy roughly half that of the US, or three times bigger than the UK, but with only double the population of the UK. Money is also more equally spread between the rich and poor in Japan. This leads to a relatively high monetary density country-wide, meaning lots of people who can afford high-end services.

This would explain why other densely populated counties, like Bangladesh, aren't riding high on the wagon.. it's because Japan is rich, has wealth more fairly disitributed, and has a dense population. Scandinavia also has its wealth more fairly spread between its citizens, and also boasts some of the world's most impressive mass technologies.
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