×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

60GB iPod Coming?

pudge posted more than 9 years ago | from the yes-please dept.

Media (Apple) 563

An anonymous reader writes "Toshiba today announced that it will offer a 60GB version of its 1.8-inch hard drive in the coming months and that Apple has already placed its order. Cindy Lee, deputy manager of Toshiba's hard disk drive division, said the drive will enter mass production during July or August. All three iPod models (15GB, 20GB, and 40GB) use Toshiba drives, while the iPod mini uses a 4GB 1-inch drive from Hitachi. Lee noted that Toshiba is currently shipping 350,000 of the 1.8-inch drives per month to Apple."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

563 comments

poop (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322435)

farts

Too much space! (2, Insightful)

dilweed (698689) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322436)

I can;t even fill my 30Gb Nomad. What the hell are you going to do with 60Gb?

Re:Too much space! (5, Insightful)

stev3 (640425) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322468)

My 3g 30gb iPod is already full, and I'd love to be able to rip most of my music into Apple Lossless and use it on the new 60gb iPod!

Just because you don't have that much music doesn't mean other people don't.

Re:Too much space! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322469)

You could store your massive collection of child and beastiality porns.

Re:Too much space! (5, Informative)

rattler14 (459782) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322510)

Easy (my 30 gig Ipod is full)

-17 gig songs (granted, a 4000+ collection is fairly rare... and i could go to 128 instead of 160)

-Encrypted backup disk images of
digital pictures of friends, family, myself
backup documents from all my classes
family guy episodes

-Standard apple iSync stuff (very small, mind you)
contacts, address book, iCal, etc

I have about 3 gigs free right now (not COMPLETELY full, but close). Bear in mind, my music collection continues to grow, and I have stuff from my office that would be nice to have another backup in my pocket... just in case.

So absurd? probably. But if i didn't have an iPod and was given a choice between a 20,40, and 60... i might still jump for the 60. Always better to have room to grow.

more than music (5, Insightful)

johnpaul191 (240105) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322519)

first, there are a lot of people with more than 40 gigs of music.... second, the iPod is also a firewire drive. it can be used for transporting large files (graphics, audio, video, whatever). it is also possible to boot off of OS X installed on the iPod, so you can dump your whole HD on there. The early lists of 10.3 features mentioned a feature called "home on iPod" that later vanished. it seemed you could copy/sync your whole home dir onto your ipod and login to it from any OS X running Mac. if that's really coming, the more space for music AND home dir, the better.

Re:more than music (1)

HaloZero (610207) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322531)

My iPod serves as a backup storage drive for important files (dev directories, web apps and such, personal information) and holds Disk Images of assorted crap. I think it's about half full right now, a quarter of that being music. It really is a nifty little device. The only downside is, unlike a USB pen drive, you can't just plug it into someone elses box to offload data.

Re:more than music (1, Informative)

damiam (409504) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322572)

Sure you can, if you've got the USB cable. It only works on 2K and XP (preferably w/ USB 2.0), but it does work.

Re:Too much space! (4, Interesting)

midifarm (666278) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322547)

Not everyone uses iPods strictly for music. I remeber reading several articles about how the guys filming the LOTR trilogy used iPods to transport video footage shot in the field to their editing stations offsite. They work just like a HD, at least on OSX. So having 60GB of storage especially for video or possibly high-end digital cameras or even audio would be very useful, especially since it can be a multi-use device.

Peace

Re:Too much space! (5, Funny)

CaptainFrito (599630) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322599)

What's next? an 80G iPod?!?

Next thing you know cops will pull you over just to scan through your iPod's storehouse looking for pirated music. No doubt someone will die choking on the iPod he frantically tried to swallow...

Re:Too much space! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322609)

Wakey wakey! A Video iPod!

Somebody's gonna buy it... (-1)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322438)

If Toshiba can't manage to sell the 60 GB model to Apple, clearly somebody else will gladly buy those drives and put them in iPod competitors. Maybe Apple will play in this generation of drives, maybe they'll skip 60 GB and hold out for 80 GB.

Since the iPod has a reputation of being willing to be used as a general-purpose hard drive, I don't see any limit to how high they'll go. As long as they keep making bigger HDs, we'll keep making bigger data files for them.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322462)

apple has already placed orders for the 60 gig hard drives.

--
peter

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322488)

Wow, not only did you uphold the Slashdot tradition of not RTFA, you didn't even RTFBlurb. Both mention Apple has already placed an order for this drive. So explain how they won't be able to sell these to Apple when they already have.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322499)

What are you, retarded?

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322557)

No, he's +4 insightful. Pffffft.

Metamoderators, if you were caring enough to click "context," please dispense some "unfairs" here and clean up the gene pool a bit. Thanks awfully.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (2, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322527)

I totally agree. All of my music only takes up 25% of my 20GB iPod. Most of the rest is a backup of my home directory, plus a smallish bootable OS X system and a few apps.

It's not the fastest firewire drive on the turnpike, but it rocks in terms of dual-use. Came in quite handy when I wanted to repartition and put Yellow Dog Linux alongside OS X on my Powerbook.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (2, Interesting)

seanadams.com (463190) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322596)

In the past, Apple has negotiated "exclusives" on certain high-demand-although-merely-incremental technologies. A good example would be the Cinema display when it first came out - for at least a year it was the only decent hires (>= 1600x1024) panel you could buy.

It wouldn't surprise me if we see the same thing with higher capacity mini-HDs. Apple's surely willing to pay some premium to be the only ones who can ship a 60G mp3 player.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (3, Insightful)

damiam (409504) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322628)

maybe they'll skip 60 GB

Not reading the article I can understand, but not reading the fucking summary?

Toshiba today announced that it will offer a 60GB version of its 1.8-inch hard drive in the coming months and that Apple has already placed its order.

Re:Somebody's gonna buy it... (1)

Have Blue (616) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322651)

I don't think "reputation" is the right word there. It's a major advertised feature that works out of the box, there's nothing reputed about it.

asd (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322441)

uyg

fp? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322443)

l33t dude - ash

tyo (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322447)

anonymous reader writes "Toshiba today announced that it will offer a 60GB version of its 1.8-inch hard drive in the coming months and that Apple has already placed its order. Cindy Lee, deputy manager of Toshiba's hard disk drive division, said the drive will enter mass production during July or August. All three iPod models (15GB, 20GB, and 40GB) use Toshiba drives, while the iPod mini uses a 4GB 1-inch drive from Hitachi. Lee noted that Toshiba is currently shipping 350,000 of the 1.8-inch drives per month to Apple."

Enough is Enough (3, Interesting)

moberry (756963) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322449)

I have almost 10 GB of music on my pc. I only listen to about 50 of them on a regualr basis. Does anyone really need 60 GB of music. Yes it can be used for backup purposes. But dedicated backup external hard drives at a higher storage capacity are cheaper than this.

Re:Enough is Enough (4, Insightful)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322465)

I'm in the process of "reripping" my entire CD collection at the moment. I've got the extra space, so why should I be listening to 128kbps MP3 files ripped in 1999?

Re:Enough is Enough (3, Informative)

lpontiac (173839) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322618)

I'm in the process of "reripping" my entire CD collection at the moment. I've got the extra space, so why should I be listening to 128kbps MP3 files ripped in 1999?

On a portable, smaller files means you read less off the hard drive, and you fit more minutes of music in your cache. So larger files should hurt your battery life.

Re:Enough is Enough (4, Funny)

Garrett Combs (699749) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322471)

Also, an external backup solution doesn't make your stomach sink when you get a ding or scratch on the casing.

I hate scratches. :(

Re:Enough is Enough (4, Interesting)

jfengel (409917) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322492)

So you only listen to 50 songs on a regular basis. Wouldn't it be cool if you had every song you'd ever owned available on the fly? When you know precisely the right song for this exact mood, and it's right there, that's pretty awesome.

Do you need it? Of course not. You don't really need any of this. It's entertainment. You need your insulin shots, or your defibrillator.

Some people really, really, really like to have all their music with them all the time. (Not me. I don't listen to music. But I have many friends who do.) It only takes a few hundred thousand of 'em to make it worthwhile for Apple to make this.

Re:Enough is Enough (4, Funny)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322493)

Let me be the first to say "40GB is enough for anyone".

So maybe the 60GB drive is for the mythical video iPod. (Not.)

Re:Enough is Enough (5, Interesting)

niko9 (315647) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322500)

Do you listen to 3:05 minute pop songs? I don't. I have a alllot of classical music I would love to take with me. They take up alot of space.

Re:Enough is Enough (2, Insightful)

Wrexen (151642) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322525)

A not-unreasonable collection of CDs compressed with FLAC would be pressing the limits of a 60 Gb drive. When you consider lossless audio (or near-lossless like high-kbps mp3/aac), the large drive sizes are quite reasonable. If you only listen to 128kbps pop singles, fine by me, but don't go around raining on other people's parades. If you don't need it, don't buy it, and market pressures will adjust production accordingly

Doesn't have to all be music (1)

bubba451 (779167) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322584)

It doesn't have to all be music, particularly if Apple ever re-releases Home on iPod [macrumors.com] -- a feature that was once advertised as part of Panther, but then pulled:

Home away from home

Ever thought you could carry your home in the palm of your hands or in your pocket? You can. Panther's Home on iPod feature lets you store your home directory -- files, folders, apps -- on your iPod (or any FireWire hard drive) and take it with you wherever you go. When you find yourself near a Panther-equipped Mac, just plug in the iPod, log in, and you're "home," no matter where you happen to be. And when you return to your home computer, you can synchronize any changes you've made to your files by using File Sync, which automatically updates offline changes to your home directory.

Re:Enough is Enough (1)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322615)

If an iPod was only a music player for compressed audio it'd be pointless, but I know plenty of people who insist on using uncompressed audio - the semi audiophile.

Along with using iTunes lossless compression, acting as an external HD for people who use them from time to time, and being a bit of a wanky showoff, there's a market for this.

Re:Enough is Enough (1)

G-funk (22712) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322621)

My 15gb iPod doesn't even hold a third of my MP3 collection (about 13.5gb of music, 1985 songs atm), and while 80% of the time I'm listening to 20% of the collection, the other 20% of the time I'm listeing to anything from the entire collection. I'd love a 60gb ipod. Then I'd be able to hold all my music and have about 15-20gb free to move shit to and from work.

Minis.. (2, Interesting)

Piranhaa (672441) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322454)

I wonder what kind of breakthrough the mini drive will get in the near future. 4gigs is a decent size for a music player, but what if someone wants to use it for back-up purposes? It would be something if Hitachi came out with a 10gig mini cf card that could still be price-attractive to the consumer point of view!

Re:Minis.. (1)

lucaschan.com (457832) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322581)

Hopefully a 60GB iPod will drive the price of the iPod Mini down. At the moment it really doesn't measure up to your standard iPod in terms value for money.

July or August, eh? (4, Interesting)

Snowspinner (627098) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322456)

Seems perfectly timed to coincide with MacWorld. So that's two announcements we know about now - Tiger and the 60 GB iPod. Wonder what the surprise will be. 3.0 G5s? G5 notebooks? iPonies?

Re:July or August, eh? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322604)

iFaggot, and you're the prototype

Re:July or August, eh? (4, Funny)

WasterDave (20047) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322652)

3GHz G5's wouldn't be a surprise. What would be a surprise would be if anyone was actually able to buy one before 2005.

Dave

60GB on the go??? (1, Interesting)

Soulfarmer (607565) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322461)

I mean, if someone has, like myself, that much music available... wouldn't it be more more handy to store it on a computer than with the player? Player breaks up, bye bye music and so on. And is the extra capacity really worth the price?
I usually tend to think the player's storage capacity in relation to how much music I would be needing before having a chance to load other music to the player thingy. 60gb?? 4gb Creative Muvo sounds about right in that sense.

Re:60GB on the go??? (2)

bw5353 (775333) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322541)

Store the music on the computer instead of with the player? Why? Admittedly you should ideally have a backup on your computer as well. But when you're walking in the desert and suddenly feel that urge to listen to Singing in the Rain, it does no good knowing that you have it on your harddisk at home. Better keep your full collection with you all the time.

I think the real interesting question is... (2, Insightful)

BodyCount07 (260070) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322472)

will this bring a price drop to the smaller capacity iPods?

Use for 60GB HD (4, Insightful)

Alcimedes (398213) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322473)

for those complaining about not being able to fill the HD, the easiest way to use the space is to reencode the music you already have.

just with some quick calculations i did on my own, saving your music as in a lossless format uses approx. 5x as much space as a 256kb MP3.

so only 12GB of mp3's will give you your 60GB of music.

Re:Use for 60GB HD (1)

mlk (18543) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322498)

But re-encoding them 256kb MP3 to will no do you much good :D

Re:Use for 60GB HD (2, Interesting)

lavaface (685630) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322627)

saving your music as in a lossless format uses approx. 5x as much space as a 256kb MP3.

You should be able to do better than that. A cd is 1411(?) kbps. Apple Lossless comes in at about half that so really we're talking 3x as much space max.

Re:Use for 60GB HD (1)

damiam (409504) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322639)

saving your music as in a lossless format uses approx. 5x as much space as a 256kb MP3.

That is, if your lossless format is uncompressed WAV. FLAC generally gets bitrates of 500-800kbps - only 2 or 3 times a 256kbps MP3.

60GB... but anything else? (4, Interesting)

srcosmo (73503) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322480)

Will this new iPod have any other features? I picked up an iRiver iHP 120 [amazon.com] last month for a good $50 (Canadian) less than the similar-capacity iPod, and the iRiver has optical in/out, direct encoding to MP3 or WAV, OGG Vorbis support, USB 2.0, and an FM tuner.

Does Apple have any plans to beef up their offerings, or are they counting on consumers to keep paying for the iPod's hipster image?

Fans are gonna be ecstatic (-1, Troll)

Olaserov (785074) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322485)

I think I'm going to get a lot more sh!t about still having nothing better than my 128 MB rio. Let me get this out of the way now:

Apple -- yours is better, alright? Now DROP IT, already.

They get a better deal than we do... (4, Interesting)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322487)

The price of small-factor drives on the retail market have such a markup that their are actually some music players out there that have a street price lower than the street price of the drive that they contain inside... this is possible because the device-makers are buying the drives on the wholesale market in bulk rather than one at a time.

But it brings up an interesting point... right now there are far more digital music players out there on the market than there are makers of small-factor HDs.

Re:They get a better deal than we do... (4, Interesting)

evilviper (135110) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322653)

their are actually some music players out there that have a street price lower than the street price of the drive that they contain inside...

Well, actually it looks like it was just a matter of Creative Labs eating the extra cost of the CF drives to get the units out the door on-time.

Almost immediately, the CF card disappeared, and it was replaced with an identical-looking hard drive with only an IDE interface (not really a CF card).

If you've got an example of any other MP3 players selling for less than the cost of the drive alone, I'll eat my words...

Who (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322490)

buys these toys? With the price of rent, food, gas, etc, these stupid little toys are out for normal folks. I guess fat fucks that live with mamma get her to buy em'. Sheesh...

Woohoo! (3, Interesting)

tm2b (42473) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322495)

My music collection is about 1500 CDs... I ripped them to AIFFs in iTunes and compress to other formats as necessary, as codecs (esp. Lame and Quicktime) improve (I use iTunes-Lame [blacktree.com] for MP3 compression). This translates to about 160 GB of 160 Kbps AACs. So this is big news for me - I'll be able to fit everything on 3 iPods instead of 4.

I'll be really psyched when 80 GBs are available, and then (dream dream) it'll take a 160 GB iPod to make me really, really happy.

This might not seem like a big deal, but when I'm travelling, especially when I'm flying my Cherokee 180-D across country, I won't be able to anticipate what I'll really want to listen to - and I invariably want to hear something that I didn't bring along.

And if you think iPods are expensive, you should price avionics on an airplane. Or really just about anything on an airplane.

Re:Woohoo! (4, Informative)

foo12 (585116) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322515)

Wait a minute - you have 1500 CDs ripped as AIFFs? You have more invested in hard drives than I do in my car. Why don't you encode all those AIFFs into Apple Lossless [apple.com]? You'll drop file sizes 40-50% and still be able to losslessly transcode into whatever without having to rerip.

Re:Woohoo! (1)

a7244270 (592043) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322598)

you'll drop file sizes 40-50% and still be able to losslessly transcode into whatever without having to rerip.

how do you transcode from the apple format to something else ?

I considered going to apple lossless, but I quit when I realized that I would not be able to burn mp3 CDs from lossless files within iTunes. Is there a way to do this that I am unaware of ?

Re:Woohoo! (4, Interesting)

tm2b (42473) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322635)

Wait a minute - you have 1500 CDs ripped as AIFFs? You have more invested in hard drives than I do in my car.
Well, with all due respect you don't have a very pricy car then - you'll probably spend more on gas this year. It takes about 900 GB, which costs about $1000, or about $.66 per CD. Worth it, I think, for being able to be totally random access in bulk.

I also keep another 900 GB offline in a storage unit as a backup. I do not want to have to rerip. So that's a surcharge of $1.33 per CD, which means that my music infrastructure is done. I never have to worry about it again, modulo replacing harddrives and reencoding to new codecs, at least until 5.1/SACD/DVD-Audio/Whatever mature as audio formats with the whole software ecology around them evolving.
Why don't you encode all those AIFFs into Apple Lossless? You'll drop file sizes 40-50% and still be able to losslessly transcode into whatever without having to rerip.
It's tempting, but I don't like that I'd have to use an Apple closed source tool to access the data. Right now, I can convert my AIFFs on any system with a C compiler and a firewire port, so it's safer format. That decision will change if I can ever get source for something that will decode ALE back to WAV of AIFF.

Similarly, I don't use the other lossless encoders because they're not supported in iTunes/iPod, my preferred music playback platforms.

Re:Woohoo! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322517)

Good for you! rich boy! hope your plane doesn't crash.

Re:Woohoo! (4, Funny)

tm2b (42473) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322580)

Thanks. I can afford it because Red Hat bought my company in 2000.

Twit.

Re:Woohoo! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322626)

This might not seem like a big deal, but when I'm travelling, especially when I'm flying my Cherokee 180-D across country, I won't be able to anticipate what I'll really want to listen to - and I invariably want to hear something that I didn't bring along.

Well, there's always the control tower to listen to, if you can be bothered...

iPod and UFS (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322501)

I'm posting anonymously for obvious reasons.

I'm a 3rd year student at Harvard Law, and as part of my business law course work, we have to put together a case against a corporation. I am a keen FSF and GNU/Linux advocate, so I started an investigation into the iPod, hoping to break their case against playfair.

We're all aware that Apple uses BSD licensed code extensively in their Mac OSX operating system. What we don't know is that the file system that the iPod uses is UFS, a file system that Linux can read. How did I discover this? I removed the hard drive out of my iPod, hooked it up to my IDE controller, and typed

mount -t ufs /dev/hdb /mnt

It is clear that the iPod is using a Linux file system. My question is this:

Why is apple using a GPL'd file system?

I guess the only way to tell is to get the code out of the firmware, but that is a bit beyond my realm of expertise.

Does anybody care to pull apart their iPod and investigate this for me? If so, please respond with your findings to this comment and I'll build it into my report.

One thing seems certain: apple are using a GPL filesystem and not releasing the code to it.

Thanks in advance

Re:iPod and UFS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322578)

Uh, the iPod uses FAT32 or HFS+ depending on which os (Mac OS or Windows) it's used with. That's the way it's always been.

Re:iPod and UFS (5, Informative)

MisterP (156738) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322590)

I think you need to do some homework.

Just because a linux kernel can read UFS doesn't mean it's GPL'd. Almost any unix including commercial ones like Solaris can use UFS. In fact it is the default filesystem used by Solaris. Nowhere does Sun distribute the source to their UFS implementation.

And then there is this:

$ uname -a
FreeBSD xxxx.xxx 5.2.1-RELEASE FreeBSD 5.2.1-RELEASE
$ pwd /usr/src/sys/ufs
$ grep -ir GPL ./*
$

So are the BSD guys violating too? Not likely.

Re:iPod and UFS (4, Insightful)

hayds (738028) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322600)

Not wanting to reply to trolls but just in case anyone actually believes this crap, UFS the filesystem used by BSD systems. If Apple are indeed using this filesystem for the iPod (and it is included in OSX), I'm sure they would be using one of the many BSD implementations and wouldnt bother ripping off a GPL one illegally.....

Re:iPod and UFS (3, Informative)

Kenja (541830) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322624)

"Why is apple using a GPL'd file system?"

Because its not a GPL'd file system?

UFS stands for UNIX file system, which was originally developed from the first versions of UNIX at AT&T. The file system reached its current status in the 4.x BSD distributions. It it currently used in FreeBSD, NetBSD as well as OpenBSD and the Solaris Operating Environment. Linux support is available, but is not standard.

Now, take a deep breath and repeat after me. Not all that is open source is GPL.

Drives? (5, Interesting)

TheOtherKiwi (743507) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322509)

Anyone notice that "Lee noted that Toshiba is currently shipping 350,000" but Apple are stepping up production from 800,000 to 1,000,000 per month...where are all the other drives sourced from?

Pricing (5, Interesting)

maelstrom (638) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322513)

So is Apple ever going to drop the pricing on the other models when they come out with more "advanced" ones?

Re:Pricing (4, Informative)

johnpaul191 (240105) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322559)

usually the pricing stays about the same and the size just goes up...... often the towers will dot he same thing.... Fast, Faster and Fastest will stay about the same price but the specs will jump up a step. not always true, but often is.

right now
15gig = $299
20 = $399
40gig = $499

it would make sense if....
20 gig = $299
40gig = $399
60gig = $499
or something like that depending on what drives are available

though it depends on what kind of deal Apple get's on the drives..... Apple has said theyw ould like to lower the prices on the iPods as much as possible, but there is a set profit margin. as parts come down in price, so will retail prices. the iPod Mini follows another parts list and plan, and those drives are another manufacturer, so it's price has nothing much to do with this.

Re:Pricing (2, Interesting)

drewness (85694) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322582)

Well, the way it's worked to now at least is that there are three pricepoints: $299, $399, $499. Currently they are 15GB, 20GB, 40GB. I think last time around they were 10GB, 15GB, and 20GB. So, basically they keep the price the same and shift keep growing the size. Next round could be maybe 20GB, 40GB, 60GB.

Portable HD durability? (4, Interesting)

achurch (201270) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322522)

Something I've always wondered: just how resistant are these HDs to (physical) shocks? If you drop an iPod while it's reading from the disk, for example, will it still work or will you be left with a worthless chunk of metal and plastic? Portable devices tend to get a lot of wear and tear, so I'd tend to stay away from anything using such a seemingly fragile storage medium.

Re:Portable HD durability? (1)

clem.dickey (102292) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322608)

Toshiba and Hitachi do publish spec sheets for their drives. They're even on this new Internet thing. Toshiba spec sheet for the 1.8" 40 GB drive claims 250G (for how long?) while operating, 1000G when not operating. Hitachi 4GB microdrive is 200G for 1 msec (operating), 2000G for 1 msec (non-operating).

Sure hope... (3, Funny)

ErichTheWebGuy (745925) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322523)

Sure hope that this does not infringe on some Microsoft patent... They just might have a patent on "a mobile computing device with capacity greater than 50 gigabytes"... These days, you just never know.

How long is the iPod thing going to last? (3, Interesting)

SteamyMobile (783822) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322529)

With all of its other innovations (ie, the Macintosh), Apple sets itself up so that no one else can easily copy its unique design features. For example, MacOS has always had vastly better usability than anything else. It has taken years for MS Windows and KDE to catch up. That hasn't given Apple any kind of market dominance, but a lot of people still believe that if you buy a Mac, stuff just works and is easy and intuitive, and they're more right about that than with any other computer system type.

The iPod is a different thing. It's just a music player with some storage and a cool look. It's the kind of thing that can be designed fairly easily. It requires the iTunes service, but that's also something which any company can set up for not too much money. I guess it gives Apple some "cred" but it also sets Apple up to be priced out of the market when iPod-like things become commodities. Just wondering... Do any iPod users have thoughts on this?

---------
WML porn [steamymobile.com] - you must have a WML-capable browser like Opera to click that link

About that link... (1)

SteamyMobile (783822) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322586)

This is off-topic, but a lot of people are clicking on that link so I need to explain it: Most mobile phones are based on WML instead of HTML, so they could access the site steamymobile.com, and they could use that link. It so happens that Opera has native WML support, so it can access it, too. WML pages on Opera look pretty basic and unformatted, but that's because they're meant to display on a phone, not a browser. Sorry for the off-topic post.

Audio books (2, Interesting)

F. Mephit (720161) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322543)

Of course, 60 gigabytes won't be easy to fill with .mp3 files. I've got maybe 250 CDs collected over the years, and with every one of them ripped I've yet to fill half of my 30 Gb iPod. Until I started collecting audio books. The real utility of a .mp3 player with that much capacity is the ability to hold multible audio books [audible.com] and audio periodicals. I've come to realize how nice it is to have something to listen to while I'm on break or on a flight that isn't the 30-favorite songs that everyone ends up playing no matter how many .mp3 files they've got. Audio book files are quite large, and to be able to store them and your collection of music files requires drives big enough to be pretty much overkill for music alone.

Serious (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322550)

June 2, 2004
Chalabi Reportedly Told Iran That U.S. Had Code
By JAMES RISEN and DAVID JOHNSTON

ASHINGTON, June 1 -- Ahmad Chalabi, the Iraqi leader and former ally of the Bush administration, disclosed to an Iranian official that the United States had broken the secret communications code of Iran's intelligence service, betraying one of Washington's most valuable sources of information about Iran, according to United States intelligence officials.

The general charge that Mr. Chalabi provided Iran with critical American intelligence secrets was widely reported last month after the Bush administration cut off financial aid to Mr. Chalabi's organization, the Iraqi National Congress, and American and Iraqi security forces raided his Baghdad headquarters.

The Bush administration, citing national security concerns, asked The New York Times and other news organizations not to publish details of the case. The Times agreed to hold off publication of some specific information that top intelligence officials said would compromise a vital, continuing intelligence operation. The administration withdrew its request on Tuesday, saying information about the code-breaking was starting to appear in news accounts.

Mr. Chalabi and his aides have said he knew of no secret information related to Iran and therefore could not have communicated any intelligence to Tehran.

American officials said that about six weeks ago, Mr. Chalabi told the Baghdad station chief of Iran's Ministry of Intelligence and Security that the United States was reading the communications traffic of the Iranian spy service, one of the most sophisticated in the Middle East.

According to American officials, the Iranian official in Baghdad, possibly not believing Mr. Chalabi's account, sent a cable to Tehran detailing his conversation with Mr. Chalabi, using the broken code. That encrypted cable, intercepted and read by the United States, tipped off American officials to the fact that Mr. Chalabi had betrayed the code-breaking operation, the American officials said.

American officials reported that in the cable to Tehran, the Iranian official recounted how Mr. Chalabi had said that one of "them" -- a reference to an American -- had revealed the code-breaking operation, the officials said. The Iranian reported that Mr. Chalabi said the American was drunk.

The Iranians sent what American intelligence regarded as a test message, which mentioned a cache of weapons inside Iraq, believing that if the code had been broken, United States military forces would be quickly dispatched to the specified site. But there was no such action.

The account of Mr. Chalabi's actions has been confirmed by several senior American officials, who said the leak contributed to the White House decision to break with him.

It could not be learned exactly how the United States broke the code. But intelligence sources said that in the past, the United States has broken into the embassies of foreign governments, including those of Iran, to steal information, including codes.

The F.B.I. has opened an espionage investigation seeking to determine exactly what information Mr. Chalabi turned over to the Iranians as well as who told Mr. Chalabi that the Iranian code had been broken, government officials said. The inquiry, still in an early phase, is focused on a very small number of people who were close to Mr. Chalabi and also had access to the highly restricted information about the Iran code.

Some of the people the F.B.I. expects to interview are civilians at the Pentagon who were among Mr. Chalabi's strongest supporters and served as his main point of contact with the government, the officials said. So far, no one has been accused of any wrongdoing.

In a television interview on May 23, Mr. Chalabi said on CNN's "Late Edition" that he met in Tehran in December with the Iranian supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and the Iranian president, Mohammad Khatami. He also said he had met with Iran's minister of information.

Mr. Chalabi attacked the C.I.A. and the director of central intelligence, George J. Tenet, saying the agency was behind what Mr. Chalabi asserted was an effort to smear him.

"I have never passed any classified information to Iran or have done anything -- participated in any scheme of intelligence against the United States," Mr. Chalabi said on "Fox News Sunday." "This charge is false. I have never seen a U.S. classified document, and I have never seen -- had a U.S. classified briefing."

Mr. Chalabi, a member of the Iraqi Governing Council, said, "We meet people from the Iranian Embassy in Baghdad regularly," but said that was to be expected of Iraqi officials like himself.

Some defenders of Mr. Chalabi in the United States say American officials had encouraged him in his dealings with Iran, urging him to open an office in Tehran in hopes of improving relations between Iran and Washington. Those defenders also say they do not believe that his relationship with Iran involved any exchange of intelligence.

Mr. Chalabi's allies in Washington also saw the Bush administration's decision to sever its ties with Mr. Chalabi and his group as a cynical effort instigated by the C.I.A. and longtime Chalabi critics at the State Department. They believe those agencies want to blame him for mistaken estimates and incorrect information about Iraq before the war, like whether Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction.

One of those who has defended Mr. Chalabi is Richard N. Perle, the former chairman of the Defense Policy Board. "The C.I.A. has disliked him passionately for a long time and has mounted a campaign against him with some considerable success," Mr. Perle said Tuesday. "I've seen no evidence of improper behavior on his part. No evidence whatsoever."

Mr. Perle said he thought the C.I.A. had turned against Mr. Chalabi because he refused to be the agency's "puppet." Mr. Chalabi "has a mind of his own," Mr. Perle said.

American intelligence officials said the F.B.I. investigation into the intelligence leak to Iran did not extend to any charges that Mr. Chalabi provided the United States with incorrect information, or any allegations of corruption.

American officials said the leak about the Iranian codes was a serious loss because the Iranian intelligence service's highly encrypted cable traffic was a crucial source of information, supplying Washington with information about Iranian operations inside Iraq, where Tehran's agents have become increasingly active. It also helped the United States keep track of Iranian intelligence operations around the world.

Until last month, the Iraqi National Congress had a lucrative contract with the Defense Intelligence Agency to provide information about Iraq. Before the United States invasion last year, the group arranged for Iraqi defectors to provide the Pentagon with information about Saddam Hussein's government, particularly evidence purporting to show that Baghdad had active programs to develop weapons of mass destruction. Today, the American intelligence community believes that much of the information passed by the defectors was either wrong or fabricated.

Not for music (1)

PhrostED (785154) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322552)

Sure most MP3 collections span only a few gigabytes on a typical harddrive. I couldn't fill up a 15gig iPod if I tried (damn logic trying to stop me from buying one).

But a full size movie collection could make much better use of the extra space. Could this be an indication of the a/v iPod to come?

Here we go again... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322553)

Lets get this out of the way:

1. 60GB?!? Who would ever use that much space?
2. 60GB?!? Thank god, I'm out of space on my 40GB.
3. Does it support Ogg?
4. Stop whining about Ogg!
5. Apple rules!
6. Apple sucks/is dying/is out of touch!
7. Imagine a Beowulf cluster...
8. The Nomad/Muvo/two cans and a stick are just as good or better.
9. I, for one, welcome our excessive HD space Overlords
10. In Soviet Russia 60GB iPods buy You!

You didn't think of this one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322629)

In Soviet Russia, 60GB doh!

Gyroscopic effect (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322565)

It's already pretty annoying to use a 40 GB iPod compared to the smaller ones, just due to the larger rotating mass of the hard drive. You can definitely feel the difference. If the 60 GB drive has even more platters/rotational speed than the 40, then I'd say "no, thanks" to it for that reason alone.

Who the hell has 60 GB of (legally acquired) .MP3 files, anyway?

Arrest Upon Purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322574)

60GB,who the hell buys that many songs legally?

How many songs is that?

How many hours of music?

Affordable harddrive sub $100 MP3 players ? (2, Interesting)

zymano (581466) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322577)

You can buy hard drives with rebates for under $50 now. What's going on with the prices ?These microdrives are sexy but the cost $150-200 to manufacture. I don't mind carrying a slightly larger 20 gig model if it's priced right.

Apple Selling Bongs for Profit (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322591)

They know marijuana is wrong, but they sell water pipes (aka bongs) anyways. Unethical source of profit, bad karma.

Kwell. I've got 41GBs of audio already. (1)

crovira (10242) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322597)

And I haven't even started in on ripping my vinyl yet.

60GB is about a minimum for me. (right now, my 8060 songs [and I have listened to 'em all] is on a LaCie 160 gigger which is luggable but not really...)

in a word...... video (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322606)

60 gigs will be nice for imovie drag and drop

A bit of an off-shoot... (1, Offtopic)

evilviper (135110) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322611)

But what I want to know, is when is the Rio Karma going to get the ability to work as a normal USB2 hard drive? It seems like a great iPod competitor until you discover that you can only store music files on it, and to get them on you are forced to use the propritary software.

Sure, the java applet works, but that doesn't help me automatically transfer my new files onto the unit, or compare similarly named files to figure out if they are identical, or anything like that.

The Neuros seems like it would be a good option, mainly because it's bigger, and so it would be less expensive, but that's just not the case with the Karma droping down to $200 now.

It's no wonder nobody has really been able to compete with the iPod... They're all only picking up part of the features of the unit, and never enough to be a real alternative.

Okay, sorry, I'm done ranting now. I'd really like an answer if somebody know, though.

Toshiba, Hitachi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9322616)

Toshiba and Hitachi must be making a killing.

Well... (0, Redundant)

Tuxedo Jack (648130) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322643)

46.3GB of music, and about ten gigs of that's for seeding...

However, seeing as I long ago filled my 15GB iPod, I guess I will upgrade.

In the Year 2012 . . . (2, Interesting)

SEE (7681) | more than 9 years ago | (#9322645)

What are you going to do with your terabyte iPod?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...