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Nanotube Non-Volatile Memory Entering Production

michael posted more than 10 years ago | from the nano-nano dept.

Hardware 242

hovermike writes "Nantero and LSI Logic are expected to announce that nanotube non-volatile memory will be going into production, at least as far as the NY Times is concerned. Nanotubes have been discussed previously, Nanotube Applications..., and Buckminsterfullerene..., but I'm certainly surprised something like this has moved into production this quickly. Could this be the ultimate 'bubble' memory?" Reader hovermike writes "The press release can be found at the Nantero website. I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life."

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Press release, sans PDF (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9367958)

I have never understood why companies would release text information exclusively in PDF format. So here you go... and since I learned my lesson [slashdot.org] about Karma Whoring, I'll post AC. No troll text, I promise.

For Immediate Release Contact: Suzanne Gibbons-Neff
SGN Public Relations & Marketing
(203) 656-0833/ Suzanne@nantero.com
Nantero, Inc. Announces Carbon Nanotube Technology Development Project with LSI Logic
Woburn, MA - June 7, 2004. Nantero, Inc. announced today that it is teaming with LSI Logic Corporation (NYSE: LSI) to develop semiconductor process technology, expediting the effective utilization of carbon nanotubes in CMOS fabrication.
The joint development project is taking place at LSI Logics Gresham (Oregon) manufacturing campus, which is capable of process R&D down to the 65nm node.
The high electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and tensile strength of carbon nanotubes make them highly attractive for electronic device applications. These properties enable performance breakthroughs both through incorporation into existing semiconductor products and in the development of next generation products.
"LSI Logic has all of the necessary ingredients to accelerate the development of carbon nanotubes in CMOS: a strong focus on innovation, a highly qualified engineering team, and a world-class fab, said Greg Schmergel, Nanteros co-founder and CEO. "All of these factors and more makes LSI Logic an ideal partner for us in developing Nanteros carbon nanotube technology for high-volume manufacturing.
Nanteros proprietary processes for the use of carbon nanotubes are CMOS-compatible and are presently under development at LSI Logics Gresham semiconductor manufacturing campus. The LSI Logic facility was recognized by Semiconductor International magazine as Fab of the Year for 2002.
"LSI Logic has and continues to focus its process technology R&D efforts to solving technology challenges, such as the issues associated with low-k dielectrics, said Richard Schinella, LSI Logic vice president of Wafer Process R&D. "Teaming with Nantero, LSI Logic is applying its silicon integration skills to realizing the potential of carbon nanotubes in advanced CMOS manufacturing.
About Nantero
Nantero is a nanotechnology company using carbon nanotubes for the development of next-generation semiconductor devices. Nantero itself is developing NRAM -a high-density nonvolatile random access storage device. The potential applications for the nonvolatile storage device Nantero is developing are extensive and include the ability to enable instant-on computers and to replace the memory in devices such as cell phones, MP3 players, digital
cameras, and PDAs, as well as applications in the networking arena. NRAM can be manufactured for both standalone and embedded memory applications. Nantero is also working with licensees on the development of additional applications of Nanteros core nanotube-based technology.
About LSI Logic
LSI Logic Corporation (NYSE: LSI) is a leading designer and manufacturer of communications, consumer and storage semiconductors for applications that access, interconnect and store data, voice and video. In addition, the company supplies storage network solutions for the enterprise. LSI Logic is headquartered at 1621 Barber Lane, Milpitas, CA 95035. http://www.lsilogic.com

Re:Press release, sans PDF (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368061)

why companies would release text information exclusively in PDF format

Perhaps they can't figure out any other way to digitally sign the document?

Because (1, Offtopic)

fasura (169795) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368415)

The formatting is preserved and there is a much higher chance that the data will be preserved in it's original form. Also many companies to believe that the encryption in Acrobat will protect their information.

Re:Because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368485)

formatting I agree with... encryption - on a press release?! They want to release this and get the most readership - why not make it available in lots of formats so no one is left out?

NYT article text (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9367960)

Nantero, a start-up developing memory chips using nanotechnology, and LSI Logic, a leading maker of specialty microchips, are expected to announce today that they have transferred Nantero's technology to a standard semiconductor production line.

Nantero is creating NRAM, a high-density nonvolatile random access memory chip, which it hopes will replace existing forms of memory. Its technology, using cylindrical molecules of carbon known as nanotubes, will be used on a production line in LSI's semiconductor factory in Gresham, Ore.

Carbon nanotubes are among the new forms of carbon, known as fullerenes, whose discovery helped ignite interest in manipulation of materials at the molecular level, the field known as nanotechnology. Fullerenes consist of carbon atoms arranged in patterns resembling the nodes of the geodesic domes designed by Buckminster Fuller. Nanotubes, which researchers first created in 1991, consist of single- or multiwalled cylinders that can be less than 10 nanometers wide. A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.

The transition from laboratory to production line took more than nine months, the companies said, adding that considerable work remains to improve the chips.

"But it's following the same type of road map as any other semiconductor product," said Norman L. Armour, vice president and general manager of the LSI factory in Gresham. Mr. Armour said that processors embedded with carbon nanotube memories in place of static random access memory, or SRAM, could be supplied commercially from the factory's pilot line next year if no problems developed.

If so, analysts said, such devices could emerge as one of the first products to exploit something other than the extraordinary strength of carbon nanotubes.

The nanotubes are up to 100 times as strong as steel and one-sixth its weight, qualities that have quickly led to their use in products like tennis rackets and automotive plastics, where they are mixed with other materials to improve their performance.

Researchers have also shown that the nanotubes have extraordinary electrical and magnetic characteristics. Recent reports, for example, have highlighted their ability to be quickly altered from metal-like conductors into semiconductors and back by applying magnetic fields.

Such novel qualities have helped make them a powerful symbol of nanotechnology's potential, but except as strengtheners nanotubes have proved difficult to bring to market. The challenges have included preventing clumping and the tendency of the simplest manufacturing approaches to produce mixes of single-walled and multiwalled tubes with varying characteristics.

Nantero's design applies charges to groups of single-walled nanotubes suspended over an electrode. Applying opposite charges to the tubes and the electrode causes the tubes to bend down, creating a junction that represents a 1. Applying like charges forces them apart into the 0 state. As with all digital memory, NRAM stores data as a pattern of 1's and 0's.

Carbon nanotube memories could sharply improve the performance of cellphones, laptop computers and other electronic devices. Like today's flash and SRAM memories, carbon nanotube designs can maintain data when power is turned off, an advantage over dynamic random access memory, or DRAM, memory chips, which must constantly be refreshed. But it can operate considerably faster and on less power than flash memory, and is much cheaper and more compact than SRAM.

Analysts caution that Nantero's carbon nanotubes face plenty of competition. Memories that hold their charge are crucial to improving the performance and design flexibility of a wide range of electronic products, and thus have become the most profitable and fastest-growing segment of the $35 billion memory market, according to Radu Andrei, a Web-Feet Research analyst based in Dallas. That is attracting heavy investment in technologies that could replace flash and SRAM.

"I count around 30 technology variations trying to get a piece of that pie," Mr. Andrei said. Among them are I.B.M., Intel, Motorola and numerous start-ups. Flash memory is now so inexpensive, he added, that innovators will have a hard time displacing it from all but the most demanding applications even if they surpass it technically.

Re:NYT article text (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368163)

Wow 7 mod points wasted on cut & paste in the first 2 AC posts.

w t f (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9367964)

"I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life."

whoa
get a life!

How about trying to use it to feed children?

Re:w t f (4, Funny)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368018)

"I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life."
whoa get a life!
How about trying to use it to feed children?


Yeah, 'cause a typical CF card contains 100% of the US RDA of High-Impact Plastic! Not to mention 62.5% of the RDA for Silicon, plus important trace elements like copper wiring and gold plating!

Re:w t f (3, Funny)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368031)

How about trying to use it to feed children?

I seem to remember an earlier story about fish dying when they were fed nanotubes- so I doubt you'd want to feed it to children.

Re:w t f (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368403)

China disagrees.

Re:w t f (3, Funny)

betelgeuse-4 (745816) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368044)

I doubt that a child would eat a memory card, even if they were really hungry.

Re:w t f (5, Funny)

kclittle (625128) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368206)

I doubt that a child would eat a memory card, even if they were really hungry.

You've obviously never been the parent of a 18 month old toddler.

Re:w t f (1)

spankfish (167192) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368231)

what's stopping them? they already eat dirt. a memory card would be a step up, i think.

Re:w t f (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368272)

Nice computer: $2000; Operating System: $0; Only rebooting when I want to: Fucking Priceless

Hey I use Windows 2K too!

Re:w t f (1)

Eviscero (675126) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368314)

What about with ketchup? Will they eat it with ketchup???? Lots of people will eat anything with ketchup on it, maybe they will too.

Only for so long (5, Funny)

Luguber123 (203502) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367966)

"I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life"

With that said, I'm sure they are taken out of production again :)

Re:Only for so long (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368562)

Ah! Like The Man In The White Suit?

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044876/

Man shoves nanotube into brain (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9367967)

Scientists find out that it doesn't help his memory, but rather leaves him a vegetable.

Great (3, Interesting)

EduardoFonseca (703176) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367968)

Great stuff. But, is it reliable? This technology is becoming mainstream too quickly.

Does anyone have more data on this?

Re:Great (5, Funny)

errxn (108621) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368009)

Well, if it's not, you can always say that your memory "went down the nanotubes."

Re:Great (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368116)

that's a pipe dream

Re:Great (1)

Charles Dart (731692) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368291)

I/O errors will be known as having your tubes tied. Put that in your pipe and smoke it!

Re:Great (0, Offtopic)

wankledot (712148) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368219)

Har har har. Am I the only person that thinks we should have a (Score:-1 Pun) option? :)

Re:Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368464)

Someone once scored me "+1 Groan" ...

Re:Great (3, Interesting)

Eviscero (675126) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368261)

And what kind of storage vs space as well as bandwidth can we expect out of memory developed with this techology?

Re:Great (3, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368376)

I'm thrilled that it's becoming mainstream so quickly. Because even if the company utterly fails to deliver a product that costs a reasonable amount, the simple fact of orders/production of bulk nanotubes will help drive CNT prices down and encourage a lot more CNT research, especially on the critical issues of size, purity, and consistancy of nanotube forms.

Space elevators, ultracheap rockets, massive bridges, giant skyscrapers.... here we come! (ok, perhaps not that fast... but it's a good start. ;) ).

Re:Great (1)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368449)

How can anything not be more reliable than floppies and consumer-grade bulk CD-Rs? But yeah the bigger the memory the more un-backed up only-copy stuff people will try and fit on it and the more screwed they'll be when it breaks. But on the other hand, lets get it through before the bloody RIAA/MPAA etc get their mits on it and decide it can only be released in DRM form.

Proper bo!

Re:Great (1)

op00to (219949) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368559)

I love how you say "consumer grade" as if all CDR's aren't built in the same facilities...

Rushed (0, Redundant)

paganizer (566360) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367971)

Seems like they might be rushing this a little too much; hopefully, this will get a gradual adoption that will allow some of the first-gen bugs to be worked out before serious implementation.
(where can I pre-order?)

Re:Rushed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368103)

Why was this moderated up? It has no content of any value!

Re:Rushed (0, Troll)

Deflagro (187160) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368138)

Yea I agree. I remember when they were first messing with carbon nanotubes, tried to take a picture and the whole thing violently combusted. Who would have thought??!

That's exactly the problem, who knows what these things can do. They need to make sure it's completely tested before selling it.

just imagine... (1)

Kjuib (584451) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367974)

never deleting picture off you digital camera... (but then your future wife will see all the voyeur pics you took when you were younger)

Quickly? (5, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367975)

I was doing expirements of buckminsterfullerenes back in 1996-97, it shouldn't be suprising that a superior material made it to market in 8-10 years after the start of expiremental evaluation. I doubt it took that long to develop nylon, rayon, or any of the other wonder fibers into products for sale.

Re:Quickly? (4, Insightful)

laigle (614390) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368036)

True, but there is a great deal of difference between developing the material and developing the application. Just making the nanotubes doens't allow you to make a memory card out of them. I would be rather interested in how much research has been put into memory-holding, write/read times, memory density, interference and the like before deciding to switch over to NRAM.

Re:Quickly? (2, Funny)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368062)

I was doing expirements of buckminsterfullerenes back in 1996-97

really?! well way back in the stone age, I was experimenting with rocks! and we were glad to have them too!

Re:Quickly? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368500)

Yeah, and I bet you rolled them uphill both ways, too.

Wait a second...rolled?

Damn...where's that patent application form?!

Re:Quickly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368130)

I doubt it. I think you're lying.

Re:Quickly? (1)

solodex2151 (700977) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368143)

I think they might be heading in a little too quickly. Then again, it makes sense with MRAM on the horizon. Fullerenes (i.e. nanotubes and bucky balls) have been around for a while now. It doesn't surprise me that they are used in memory considering their application in Organic solar cells and some OLED applications.

Re:Quickly? (2, Interesting)

No Such Agency (136681) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368154)

I think nylon was developed during WWII, wasn't it? That must have been a big boost to rapid innovation cycles. All we need is another big war, to be fought entirely with computers... hmm...

Re:Quickly? (1)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368301)

All we need is another big war, to be fought entirely with computers

The war on spam isnt big enough for you?

Re:Quickly? (4, Funny)

king-manic (409855) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368360)

Lets invade Canada. We can use the French Canadians for medical experiments, and We'll appropriate enough maple syrup to pay for the invasion. They have WMD (celine dion) and are more then willing to use it.

Re:Quickly? (1)

the melon (89066) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368432)

Willing to use it? They are using it on a daily basis and some are paying $ for the torture. Damn Caesers Palace for making her their main show.

Re:Quickly? (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368451)

Wasn't The Dion Bomb contained in Las Vegas? Can't we do like they did in Wasteland and just nuke our own country to save humanity? We can build a New Las Vegas near Virgin, Utah.

eh yeah... (1)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368417)


maybe you labrats can 'make things' in your laboratories, but lets see you 'grow' a full-blown scaled facility that is capable of yields warranting the ultra-millions the finance monkies are throwing at the problem ...

industry. its not just a petri dish.

Another new memory (5, Interesting)

swordboy (472941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367977)

STM recently announced [linuxelectrons.com] that they are entering the production phase for PRAM, or phase-change memory. This is important because PRAM is nonvolatile and has the potential to be written and read much faster than flash. There will come a day when DRAM will go away and we'll be left with extremely fast and simple NVRAM for main memory and possibly even archival storage. It'd be really great if there was only ONE memory in a system. At this point, most high-performance CPUs are mostly cache memory anyway.

Re:Another new memory (4, Funny)

ron_ivi (607351) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368114)

"There will come a day when DRAM will go away and we'll be left with extremely fast and simple NVRAM for main memory and possibly even archival storage."

Then not even rebooting will "fix" a MS-Windows computer, and everyone'll go Linux. :)

Re:Another new memory (3, Funny)

Paulrothrock (685079) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368132)

Yes, but will you have to zap your PRAM?

Ugh...

Re:Another new memory (1)

mikael (484) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368354)

Undoubtably in the future, high-performance PC's will have turbo-charged double PRAMS's.

Re:Another new memory (1)

APDent (81994) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368424)

turbo-charged double PRAMS's

<humor style="british">
Yes. But only for turbo-charged babies; preferably twins.
</humor>

Re:Another new memory (3, Insightful)

Mz6 (741941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368208)

"There will come a day when DRAM will go away and we'll be left with extremely fast and simple NVRAM for main memory and possibly even archival storage"

This is obviously not the right way if you are worried about passwords being found years later on hard disks, as was mentioned in previous slashdot article.

Re:Another new memory (1)

Glock27 (446276) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368284)

This is obviously not the right way if you are worried about passwords being found years later on hard disks, as was mentioned in previous slashdot article.

Zeroing and/or encrypting the password buffer is the right solution there, as the article pointed out.

Re:Another new memory (1)

Eviscero (675126) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368364)

Ah PRAM. Sweet PRAM.

I'll have 3 large PRAMs with a side of 1 TB bandwidth...Thank you...Come again.

I wouldn't mind this in my PDA (3, Interesting)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367978)

Sounds like it would be lower power than flash memory- and if they can get the manufacturing process cheaper, this could mean finally having say a 40 GB memory card on my PDA- copy my entire desktop to the PDA for mobile applications.

Toxicology (5, Informative)

morcheeba (260908) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367980)

I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life.

It seems that a 1GB nano-tube based memory card should last the rest of your life [oupjournals.org] . Of course, a silicon-based memory card to last the rest of your life would have to be much larger.

Re:Toxicology (2, Insightful)

Cat_Byte (621676) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368071)

It seems that a 1GB nano-tube based memory card should last the rest of your life

And 640K of memory should be enough for anybody ;)

Re:Toxicology (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368324)

You (or the people who modded you Informative) may want to actually read what he linked -- the implication is that your life may be cut down to where Moore's Law is no longer relevant.

Re:Toxicology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368366)

I was being a smartass...grin....I think its funny it got modded informative ;)

Re:Toxicology (1)

arjay-tea (471877) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368157)

"It seems that a 1GB nano-tube based memory card should last the rest of your life."

Why would anyone ever need that much memory!

Re:Toxicology (3, Funny)

iabervon (1971) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368474)

Warning: do not inhale memory card.

Life's worth of pictures (3, Insightful)

sjonke (457707) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367987)

"I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life."

And to losing them all in one fell swoop?

Re:Life's worth of pictures (1)

Mz6 (741941) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368030)

Yeah.. I was thinking that exact same thing. Why would you store everything all in one place like that?

More details please (3, Interesting)

Mr. Sketch (111112) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367988)

The articles seemed weak on details, does anyone know what sizes of memory these will be available in? Are we talking megs of memory (like current flash cards), gigs of memory (to replace hard drives), or teras of memory (for the future)?

Toxicity? (4, Interesting)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367989)

Last I heard certain nanotubes were toxic to the environment. Does anyone know whether these suffer from the same issue?

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368070)

Depends- are you planning on shredding your memory cards anytime soon?

Re:Toxicity? (1)

cbreaker (561297) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368188)

So is motor oil and about a thousand other things you keep around the house every day.

Re:Toxicity? (5, Insightful)

th3axe (690230) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368346)

From what I remember, the concern about nanotubes (as well as other nano-materials) is that we don't have a great deal of experience with them yet. Motor oil has been around for quite some time and isn't a truly "new" material, while nanotubes are. The unique properties of the material brings with it both benefits and possible problems. Given our history with cool, new stuff, it would be wise to see what possible issues might arise.

I'm no Luddite, but I don't think it's a bad idea to work through the lifecycle of this type of material. If it decays, how does it decay? What happens to it or its components when it does decay? Can we just just toss it into landfills or does it count as hazardous waste? Lots of questions, maybe they've been answered, but I don't recall there being a great deal of study on it.

That said though, it's a cool thing that we're gonna see this stuff in real life.

Re:Toxicity? (2, Funny)

kilocomp (234607) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368321)

The radiation from the wireless card or CRT you have should neturalize it.

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Revek (133289) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368401)

I thought that was carbon buckyballs or maybe just bucks balls.

I'm waiting for it to be proven that water causes cancer

Re:Toxicity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368518)

I'm waiting for it to be proven that water causes cancer

You asked for it. [dhmo.org] :)

Re:Toxicity? (1)

Borg453b (746808) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368578)

Extended exposure to life will result in death.

Re:Toxicity? (1)

HerbieStone (64244) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368410)

Nanotubes are as toxic as Gen-modified ogranisms... they pose a potential thread to the current known environment... we just don't know if the thread is real or not, and in what way.

The thread comes from the size of nanotubes. Nanotubes are so small, that they can slip past your skin and later pierce a cell. Then within the cell nanotubes might influence how the cell reproduces... namly the DNA could be changed. Result: random mutation and possibly cancer.

That's what the Nanotube-danger gossip tells. Fact is, I haven't seen a single test with animals or smaller organisms exposed to nano-tech. Maybe Nanotubes aren't hazordous by themself. Maybe there are simple procedures or a mechanism to protect the environment from nano-tech, like self distruction when exposed to light or something.

But maybe not. We shall see.

Re:Toxicity? (4, Informative)

MenTaLguY (5483) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368459)

Fact is, I haven't seen a single test with animals or smaller organisms exposed to nano-tech.

hellooooooooo? [oupjournals.org]

(courtesy of morcheeba [slashdot.org] )

Re:Toxicity? (1)

danharan (714822) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368427)

Last I heard certain nanotubes were toxic to the environment. Does anyone know whether these suffer from the same issue?
Rachels environment and health weekly had a three [rachel.org] part [rachel.org] series [rachel.org] looking at dangers of new technologies, including nanotech.

Apparently, studies on lab rats show that small particles don't harm them as much as very small ones, and that nanoparticles are worst of all.

It probably won't be a big problem for consumers, assuming the end product is stable; I'm more concerned for those producing it. Likely a few scientists, like the Curies, will die from stuff that's in their labs :(

I'm also less concerned with the grey goo hypothesis than the nanohaze we could be getting.

Re:Toxicity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368435)

I am sure the people working with the stuff with eventually tell us how toxic it is.

no specs? (1)

Cat_Byte (621676) | more than 10 years ago | (#9367995)

Anyone know much about these things? Speed? Power consumption advantages/disadvantages? This just seems like a VP presentation spew about "we're using this. good day.".

Only two questions... (1)

Spaceman40 (565797) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368000)

How much, and when is this going to get into my Neuros [neurosaudio.com] ?

Pricing (1)

BlindSpy (772849) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368032)

Anyone have any speculations on what the price trend will be? Expensive? Cheaper? compared to similar products on the market.

I speculate (3, Funny)

Tsiangkun (746511) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368113)

that we will be promised larger, faster, cheaper, longer lastings products, but do to low levels of adoption they will be more expensive then the existing products at release. Slowly over time, as more people switch to the new products, the price will rise even higher with demand, and our formerly cheaper products will rise in price too, because they are now in limited supply.

It's just a speculation.

Re:I speculate (1)

tweek (18111) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368343)

Sad thing is...I don't think anyone will get this post.

Brilliant sir.

Re:Pricing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368334)

Slashdot is only full of mindless, dull sysadmins who cannot think outside the box. How dare you ask this question.

No way (3, Insightful)

nizo (81281) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368055)

I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life.

I don't empty my 8MB card to the computer often enough already, so if the card never got full the family pictures wouldn't get seen by anyone else until I died and someone else inherited my camera.

what about it's environmental effects (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368065)

how about if it is left in the environment, or becomes airborne and is inhaled, or is accidentally ingested??

Re:what about it's environmental effects (4, Interesting)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368115)

And just how exactly is that supposed to happen with a chip encased in plastic? Are you going to put your memory chips in a blender? I guarantee you- if you powder any silicon chip to a size where it could become airborne and inhaled, you're likely to cause siliconitis at the very least (this used to happen to coal miners all the time, horrible disease that can take 60-80 years to do enough damage to your lungs to kill you).

Re:what about it's environmental effects (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368144)

yeah! wtf! how the hell is anyone gonna inhale it?!

however, what if it has properties similar to asbestos?

Re:what about it's environmental effects (5, Insightful)

Carl T (749426) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368316)

however, what if it has properties similar to asbestos?

Cheap, well-insulating, durable, and rather bad for construction workers and others who shred and inhale lots of it? I think how the hell is anyone gonna inhale it?! pretty much sums it up. Disposing of these little nanotubes should be easy enough if you can burn them, I would think. That leaves the question of how to disassemble the chips in an orderly fashion, but I figure that's pretty much the same problem you're faced with when recycling electronics today. Not that people don't just dump their old machines in the trash, but anyway.

I'd worry a lot more about the flame retardants and other goo that's still being used in enormous amounts in computers. There's a half-year old computer in my office, and ever since it got here I've had to open the window every morning, or the fumes from it make me cough. Not sure what exactly the computer is giving off, but whatever it is I don't think it's particularly good for me.

Re:what about it's environmental effects (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368258)

how about if it is left in the environment, or becomes airborne and is inhaled, or is accidentally ingested??


If you're worried about this, stay away from the gas tank on your car.

stock prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368094)

well, they haven't jumped yet, but I bet this would be a good time to invest, if you had the money...

have to say it... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368111)

more space for pr0n!!!!

you know you were thinking it...

How long before... (4, Interesting)

farzadb82 (735100) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368112)

Hardware vendors use this technolog to bring us a truely "instant on" feature to our laptops and PCs ?

Macs already do this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9368361)

... the iBook I'm typing this on wakes up instantly when you open the lid. It will sleep for about a month (my estimate) on a full battery charge.

My PowerMac is usable within a second of wakeup, though my CRT monitor takes a little longer to show a picture.

Wait till Steve Jobs gets ahold of these (1)

TVC15 (518429) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368171)

when they get of large enough capacity. iPod Nanos for Everyone!

Re:Wait till Steve Jobs gets ahold of these (2, Funny)

taped2thedesk (614051) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368267)

iPod Nanos for Everyone!

Maybe they'll look something like Will Ferrell's tiny cell phone in the SNL rich clothing store sketch ?

5Mbit or 5Mpixel? (3, Insightful)

tji (74570) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368245)

I'm looking forward to only needing one memory card to store all the 5Mbit pictures that I'll take for the rest of my life

5Mbit pictures? 5Mb = 640KB, so you can already store 6,250 pictures on a 4GB microdrive. Not a lifetime's amount, but quite a long time at my rate of picture taking.

I suspect he meant 5 Mpixel, which would be much bigger than 640KB each.

Re:5Mbit or 5Mpixel? (1)

linzeal (197905) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368524)

I use my cheap digital camera [amazon.com] for taking pictures of local venues for my up and coming local review site and go through about 30-50 pictures a day. This will be heaven sent for those of us who would use this for business or the like.

Vaporware? Not on LSI Logic site (3, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368249)

There's no mention of this on the LSI Logic site. [lsilogic.com]

Nantero isn't publicly held, though, so this isn't a stock hype.

Publicly held...sort of! (2, Interesting)

Prince Vegeta SSJ4 (718736) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368489)

Nantero itself is not publicly held, nevertheless Harris and Harris [hhgp.com] has significant holdings in Nantero, and they are traded as TINY [msn.com]

So while not a pure play on a single stock, it can still suffer from some of the volatility generated in the market environment.

If only ... (5, Interesting)

torpor (458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368340)

only needing one ... more people thought like this, about lots of things.

but alas, what will more likely happen is 'consumericans' and other dis-world orders will 'drive the demand' up for super hi-res video, and we'll all be having HDTV Home Video dumps to sony-marketed 'nano-bricks' ... and you'll still be needing piles and piles of 'media' around, for those moments.

things will just get 'prettier' and 'waaay bigger', the functions will stay the same ... and so will the markets.

some more information (5, Informative)

vmircea (730382) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368375)

Check out some of these sites:

Nano Dot Article [nanodot.org]
Tech Review [technologyreview.com]
A neat simulation [msu.edu]
WordIQ [wordiq.com]

These all do a good deal to help explain / show you some interesting things. Give them a look-see.

Are memory futures down? (2, Informative)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368385)

I'll believe it when the memory futures market nose-dives. If I go to Micro Center, and regular RAM chip prices are down 20% or more across the board, then nanotube memory is DEFINITELY coming to market like, soon.

No, I'm not using the 80's translation server, I really do talk like this... sorry, I lived in the valley in the 80's (when I was little) and it totally warped my speech.

I think the article is misleading (4, Insightful)

SteroidMan (782859) | more than 10 years ago | (#9368513)

It says nothing about being ready to mass-produce the technology. In fact, the way I read the article, the partnership is so that they can try to create any sort of working process that is even remotely cost-effective and works reliably. This is a long way from commercial viability. Without this partnership, Nantero has no ability to fab this kind of technology at any volume on their own. It sounds as if they are using the joint partership to go hunting for funding. I don't even see a concrete product announcement
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