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A Look at the Newly Released Mozilla Firefox 0.9

simoniker posted more than 10 years ago | from the detonate-the-samantha dept.

Mozilla 799

SilentBob4 writes "Mad Penguin is one of the first to review the latest Mozilla Firefox release, numbered 0.9. According to the reviewer, there's a lot to be thankful for, as this release is far more stable than its earlier versions and sports some new features along with a new interface. My new all-time-favorite line: 'Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle'. Nicely put."

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Mozilla takes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424361)

FP Bizznitch. Suck Boot

Great browser, but... (5, Insightful)

SIGALRM (784769) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424369)

'Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle'

Unfortunately, the most feature-rich products do not always get to be standard-setters. <thinking>countless examples</thinking> It often takes loads of marketing hype and product leverage to leap over the competition, something that Firefox doesn't have in spades.

I love Firefox. The best it can do--at least IMO--is raise the bar for commercial browsers. I do hope I'm wrong on this point, however.

You most certainly are (wrong) (4, Insightful)

jamonterrell (517500) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424407)

It's pretty much decided that our 150+ employee company will be running mozilla firefox. Now, I understand that our little 150 employee company doesn't mean all that much in the big scheme of things, but if we're doing it, there has to be lots more that are also considering and/or doing it.

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424436)

Just curious, but could you shed some light as to the reasons your company opted to make the move to Mozilla? It would be interesting to know. Thanks...

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424439)

you must not run an NT authenticated intranet. The one big thing stopping us is IE can auto-authenticate. I can only imagine the uproar if I told everyone they had to logon the intranet each time they accessed it...

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424463)

Then why don't you write an extenstion for Firefox?

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424490)

That has to be one of the top ten most fucking ridiculous /. suggestions ever. When you grow up, come play with us adults in the real IT world.

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424482)

NTLM auth is supported by mozilla as well (source [mozillazine.org] )

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (3, Interesting)

jamonterrell (517500) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424486)

Yes we do, actually. But we've decided it's better that we have people login than to have spyware and viruses on every desktop.

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424533)

it's better that we have people login than to have spyware and viruses

What does that have to do w/the price of ginseng in Shanghai? Logging in does not prevent the proliferation of malware, lol.

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (1)

stevejsmith (614145) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424605)

But using Firefox does...that's what grandparent is trying to say.

Re:You most certainly are (wrong) (5, Interesting)

Aliencow (653119) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424542)

At Imperial Home Decor Group / Blue Mountain Wallcoverings, we decided to switch to Firefox too just to avoid having to lock down Internet Explorer.

Re:Great browser, but... (5, Insightful)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424442)

It often takes loads of marketing hype and product leverage to leap over the competition, something that Firefox doesn't have in spades.

Or including the browser with the OS. Hell, even I know better than most users, and I use Safari on my mac because a) it came with it b) has the best OS integration and c) it pretty much works.

Camino is a close second, it might be better with future releases. I'm not sure if I have the newest Firefox on my mac, but the one I have doesn't even create a window. Mozilla isn't that pretty on osx either.

Re:Great browser, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424517)

i love firefox, but i still doubt that it can take IE.

I still refuse to put mozilla/firefox on my clients computers, because you never know what webpage will just not work without IE. It saves me many hours of consulting time to just not give people another way to break the internet...spyware does enough of that for everybody!

Re:Great browser, but... (5, Insightful)

jamonterrell (517500) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424562)

Are you fucking kidding me? Pick any web developer and ask them whether they have more problems making websites work with IE or making them work with Mozilla. They'll ALL tell you that IE is a pain in the ass and doesn't comply to standards. I, personally have given up on making my own webpages work with IE, it's not worth the effort...

Re:Great browser, but... (2, Insightful)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424598)

I have three things to say:
1. I installed Firsfox 0.9RC on three computers. None of the install went smooth. One crashed at the end leaving me with no browser. One crashes unsexpectedly every so often, the last one crashes every time I try to select some text.
Of course, I reported all of these. I'm just not sure it is ready for "Prime Time" yet. And I'm posting that with IE ;-(
2. Slashdot and numerous other websites looks quite bad 10% of the time and refresh fixes it. This is here since Mozilla 1.2. Again, for an "IE Killer" it is a little worrysome.
3. In agreement with the parent, I'd say that if you guys think that having a technically better product is sufficient to kill IE, then you didn't learn anything from the history of software. Almost never has the technically superior product won a battle. In fact, even during the v3 browsers (NS3 vs IE3), IE was gaining ground, even though it was being a much worse browser.

Anyways, I don't think the days of IE are counted yet. Although I am glad to have a better browser.

Nice? no (4, Insightful)

acxr is wasted (653126) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424370)

'Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle'. Nicely put.

Nicely put? Whatever. The writer seems so excited about his pun about Microsoft wetting itself that he ignored how awkward it sounds using the root word "shake" twice so quickly. He could have said "precarious position" instead of "shaky foundations," or even "trembling" instead of "shaking."

On topic: Microsoft has nothing to worry about from Firefox. Until Microsoft is forced to package Firefox along with Windows, as well as make it the default browser, the Mozilla crew will never catch up.

Re:Nice? no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424420)

As an English graduate, I rather liked the punning use of "shake"/"shaky" - using the same word in two different senses quickly is a time-honoured rhetorical technique. Don't be so quick to criticise others' style when you clearly have a very shaky grasp of rhetoric yourself...

Re:Nice? no (5, Informative)

MisterP (156738) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424450)

uh huh.

check out this: http://www.google.com/press/zeitgeist.html [google.com]

and more specifically this: http://www.google.com/press/zeitgeist/may04_browse rs.gif [google.com]

I love it to death, even have my family converted (unknowingly... changed the big blue E to point at firefox instead) but that graph doesn't paint a nice picture.

Re:Nice? no (1)

FlipmodePlaya (719010) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424470)

Sometimes redundancy adds emphasis... The line is pretty poor overall, though, IMO. It sounds better if you imagine it with a Greek accent.

Re:Nice? no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424569)

Then you have obviously never touched Firefox.

Superior Quality != Market Dominance (3, Insightful)

Alphanos (596595) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424373)

If superior quality software always beat out the competition, Microsoft would not have their current market dominance. Sadly, they do.

Re:Superior Quality != Market Dominance (2, Insightful)

Citizen of Earth (569446) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424566)

If superior quality software always beat out the competition, Microsoft would not have their current market dominance. Sadly, they do.

I think that superior quality and price does always win, but it may take a long time. Fortunately, there is no Mozilla corporation to go out of business in the meantime. There is nothing that can save the Microsoft empire in the long term, apart from moving out of open-source commoditized product areas, though it has had very little luck with that. Ten years from now, Microsoft OSes/browsers/office programs will be quaint relics from an era when people paid money for such things.

RTFP's (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424573)




PARENT == REDUNDANT


Forgive the ignorance... (1)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424376)

Firefox is Mozilla without the email client, right? It can accept the same modules/plugins and everything, right? Or am I way off?

Re:Forgive the ignorance... (5, Informative)

j-pimp (177072) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424458)


Firefox is Mozilla without the email client, right? It can accept the same modules/plugins and everything, right? Or am I way off?


Firefox is based on mozilla code. They created a stand alone browser that was better, smaller, faster than the mozilla one. They also want to redo the concept of mozilla proper where all the components can either be stand alone application or extensions to FireFox. Chec out the roadmap [mozilla.org] for a better explanation.

Re:Forgive the ignorance... (4, Informative)

chuonthis (715628) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424459)

From the release notes:

7. Is Firefox just Mozilla with a couple UI tweaks?

Firefox is substantially different, featuring a number of exclusive features and countless refinements. Well over 120,000 lines of code have been added or changed in the browser and toolkit CVS directories since the project began.


Firefox is a web browser and does not do email. For email, use Thunderbird [mozilla.org] . Plugins for Mozilla generally work with Firefox but the extensions are usually not compatible with each other.

Re:Forgive the ignorance... (3, Informative)

Moonshadow (84117) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424477)

Not quite. It is only a browser, but the plugin structure and all that is different from Mozilla. Firefox is based on the Mozilla source, but it's been gutted and reworked to be leaner and meaner, and a lot of things have changed, so plugins and skins have to be Firefox-specific. However, it's tons faster than Mozilla and much smaller, too, and there are already tons of skins and plugins for it. The authoritative resource for Firefox skins/plugins is here [texturizer.net] , and more are being ported every day, so chances are, if there's a plugin or skin you love for Mozilla, you can find it for Firefox.

Re:Forgive the ignorance... (1)

kensai (139597) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424520)

Correct.

Firefox is just the browser portion of the Mozilla suite. It is fully compatible with Mozilla based plugins.

Re:Forgive the ignorance... (3, Informative)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424548)

OK, let's correct the previous posters on this one.

Mozilla and Firefox share plugin (Java, Flash, etc...) structure.

Mozilla and Firefox are internally different when it comes to extensions (mouse gestures, etc...) and themes.

Not there yet (2, Informative)

ack154 (591432) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424382)

I think it should be noted that the Firefox homepage makes no mention of 0.9 yet. Though, there is a release notes [mozilla.org] page for it, the links point to 0.8 still. Also, there is nothing in the releases folder [mozilla.org] on the Mozilla.org ftp for it yet.

Re:Not there yet (4, Informative)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424428)

On the Mozilla [mozilla.org] main page, there are links to download Firefox 0.9 RC.

Re:Not there yet (1)

nanter (613346) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424453)

Yes, but then when you go to install it, the installer indicates it's 0.8.

Could be that the installer wasn't updated or it could be that the file is improperly named..

Re:Not there yet (2, Funny)

aslate (675607) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424560)

Yes, the installer wasn't updated and still shows the 0.8 version number. This was brought up in the last Firefox discussion too.

Re:Not there yet (1)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424454)

Yes. RC aka Release Candidate - it's not the release, it's a build that may possibly become the 0.9 release and the fact that they've made such a fuss about this RC means people are mixing it up with 0.9 which it is not.

Re:Not there yet (1)

ack154 (591432) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424472)

Right, but 0.9 RC has been out for nearly a week. That isn't news at all. This is supposed to be just for the official 0.9 release.

Is it just me.. (4, Insightful)

AirLace (86148) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424385)

or has 0.9 not yet been released? How can you review software that isn't yet available?

Re:Is it just me.. (0)

Inuvik (733458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424397)

Good question.

Re:Is it just me.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424413)

0.9 is a Release Candidate, so claiming it as a release would seem to be at least a slight mistake.

Re:Is it just me.. (4, Informative)

nick0909 (721613) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424422)

If you go to the main page [mozilla.org] , you can see that 0.9 RC has been released. Mozilla has a habit of updating their main page when a new firefox is out, but not updating their firefox page.

0.9 has NOT been released. (2, Informative)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424479)

0.9 has NOT been released. Only the release candidate is available, which I've been using for the last two days, and seems okay.

no installation tips: They' (1)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424515)

As usual, there are no installation tips, so everyone in the world wastes time if their history and bookmarks don't import correctly, as happened to me.

Re:no installation tips: They' (2, Informative)

ajna (151852) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424583)

Somehow it thought that it would be proper to import my IE favorites and cookies, overwriting my existing Firefox settings while doing so. Oh well.

Re:0.9 has NOT been released. (0, Redundant)

jx100 (453615) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424538)

"RC" means "Release Candidate"

Re:Is it just me.. (3, Insightful)

AirLace (86148) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424539)

Yes, it's a testing candidate and not 0.9 at all. 0.9 is not out. Claiming to have reviewed 0.9 is misleading. From the page:


Firefox 0.9 RC now available

A testing candidate for the newest and best preview release of Mozilla's next generation browser is available for download - featuring a new theme for Windows and Linux and much more!

Mozilla is Dying (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424387)

It is official; Netcraft confirms: Mozilla is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered Mozilla community when IDC confirmed that Mozilla market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all web browsers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that Mozilla has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. Mozilla is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be a Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict Mozilla's future. The hand writing is on the wall: Mozilla faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for Mozilla because Mozilla is dying. Things are looking very bad for Mozilla. As many of us are already aware, Mozilla continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

Netscape 7 is the most endangered of them all, having lost 100% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant firing of all 50 Netscape developers [mozillazine.org] by AOL only serves to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: Mozilla is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

Mozilla.org leader Mitchell Baker states that there are 7000 users of Mozilla. How many users of Firebird are there? Let's see. The number of Mozilla versus Firebird posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 Firebird users. Camino posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of Firebird posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of Camino. A recent article put Netscape 7 at about 80 percent of the Mozilla market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 Netscape 7 users. This is consistent with the number of Netscape 7 usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Mozilla, abysmal sales and so on, Netscape went out of business and will probably be taken over by AOL who sell another troubled browser. Now AOL is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that Mozilla has steadily declined in market share. Mozilla is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If Mozilla is to survive at all it will be among browser dilettante dabblers. Mozilla continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, Mozilla is dead.

Fact: Mozilla is dying

Re:Mozilla is Dying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424404)

Can anyone confirm this news? There is no corroborating evidence on the Mozilla website. Nice try huckster. You won't fool me again.

Re:Mozilla is Dying (1)

Inuvik (733458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424455)

Pretty much everyone I know uses Mozilla Firefox for their browser and loves it.

Re:Mozilla is Dying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424513)

You must not know very many people.

Re:Mozilla is Dying (0, Troll)

poohsuntzu (753886) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424536)

Do they love it because it blocks the popup and spyware ads? Or is it because you didn't show them how to do the same in IE?

Re:Mozilla is Dying (5, Interesting)

Laivincolmo (778355) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424525)

Hmmm...

I used to use Netscape all of the time. Not because it was a good browser, it actually felt too big, but because it wasn't IE. When firefox came out, I rejoiced at a small browser that didn't have all the crap that Netscape had built in. Firefox is the answer that I think many of us had been waiting for. Once it becomes more stable, more and more people will be switching over to it.

So... no, Mozilla is not dead.

What's next? (5, Funny)

KevinXWang (745864) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424390)

0.8, 0.9, 0.99, 0.999, 0.9999... Man, we are so close to 1.0!

Re:What's next? (5, Funny)

WebMasterP (642061) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424429)

Oh no, that is 1, see: Blizzard has a proof [blizzard.com] :P

/.'ed already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424391)

anyone have a google cache or cut/paste of the article ? :\

her you go (0, Redundant)

jomas1 (696853) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424443)

First Look at Mozilla Firefox 0.9 Last update: 06-14-2004 Submitted by Adam Doxtater The last time we looked at Mozilla Firefox , it was still called Mozilla Firebird and then only in version 0.6. Times have changed. Oh how they've changed. Today, The browser with the identity crisis has a sleek new interface, modern features, and is blowing the doors off its competition... and this is putting it mildly.
Mozilla Firefox ( release notes | roadmap ) is a completely modular browser consisting of a basic, streamlined framework upon which users can add ' extensions ', which (just as the name implies) are essentially plugins for the browser. The idea of less is more has been taken to the next level with this browser. With the default browser, you have just enough browser to do pretty much anything you can on the Internet, while more advanced, custom functionality is reserved to the extensions. For instance, you can load extra functionality such as more precise ad blocking, mouse gestures, website registration bypassing, dictionary, user agent switching, complete page and listbox/textbox searching, text zooming, UI tweaks, and the list goes on. There are so many possibilities I can't go into them all here.
When compared to browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox is light years ahead. Microsoft will need to do some serious footwork to catch up to the usability and functionality of this browser. Seriously. The only browsers that come close are Mozilla (of course), Opera , and Konqueror . Safari is also coming along nicely on OS X . The beauty of this browser is not only its functionality... it also lies in its portability. Firefox is currently supported under Linux (GTK+-Xft), Mac OSX, Sun Solaris SPARC/x86, Sun JDS 2003, Microsoft Windows (all versions), and IBM OS/2 , so you can drop it onto almost anything with a modern CPU ( system requirements ) The Mozilla Firefox 0.9 browser
What's new in version 0.9? This is the last preview release before Firefox comes of age at milestone version 1.0, so what new features have been implemented? Well, at first glance all you will notice is the interface has been redesigned with an updated theme. At first I didn't quite know how to take it, but now that I've used it for a while it's grown on me. The new look is very minimalistic, clinging tightly to the focus of the browser itself. Anyway, here's a more complete listing for those of you who are skimming:
* New default theme - Like I said, it sports a new sleek skin (seen in the screenshots of this review).
* Redesigned theme/extension managers & SmartUpdate - Newly redesigned interfaces make it even easier to manage your browser, as well as keeping it up to date with smart notifications .
* Installer updates - Linux now has an installer for GTK2, and the Windows package has gotten smaller - to the tune of 4.6MB.
* Easier migration - Migrating your important information and settings from other browsers has never been easier. Firefox can now import settings from previous versions, Internet Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, and Opera. This includes favorites, settings, cookies, history and saved passwords.
* Help - An updated online help system is now available. This is in addition to the wonderful Firefox Forums and existing help material .
* Linux look and feel - Much work has gone into the UI, making it adhere better to GTK2 themes. Menus now look like they belong in the desktop scheme like they were meant to be.
Not only were new features added to this release, work continues to keep bugs squashed, past and present, so the browser feels far more stable than it has in the past. Don't get me wrong, this browser has always been ahead of its time in terms of vision and scope, but it has had its fair share of bugs, but so far as I can tell by running this release constantly for the past week or so it looks pretty solid. It hasn't crashed once, and let me tell you this is a definite improvement over the previous versions. For instance, the biggest annoyance from previous versions involved tabbed browsing. Every so often (and I could almost set my watch to this) when clicking on an existing tab or opening a new tab the browser would simply exit. No complaints, no errors, just a silent stage left . The new version hasn't done this to me yet and I've been using it constantly.
Importing settings from other browsers is a snap Redesigned management and update utilities
On the browsing side of things, Firefox couldn't be faster. It hums along at top speed, never hesitating on pages that other browsers might hang on. One good example of this is Vonage.com , which seems to load notoriously slow on any browser, and even though it's still slow, it's a far sight better than other browsers. This, among others, serves as one of my benchmarks... the sites I go to immediately to see if a new browser is going to sweep me off of my feet. So far none of them have, but Firefox comes closest in terms of raw speed. This is after installing the latest Macromedia Flash Player , which loaded flawlessly into Firefox. Of course, with a few tried and true tweaks , you can nudge the browser even closer to the edge (some of these 'enhancements' might come at the expense of stability and broken standards of course).
One small thing that I'd like to point out is that the home directory has changed since the last release. This info might help to relieve a little stress as you struggle to find out where exactly the browser placed all of your personal files. These are the new locations of Mozilla Firefox files:
Linux - ~/.mozilla/firefox/ Mac OS X - ~/Library/Application Support/Firefox Microsoft Windows - C:\Documents and Settings\ username \Application Data\Mozilla\Firefox (wow! now that's a mouthful)
This is actually a much better layout than what was previously used if you ask me. If all Mozilla products follow this same standard, then all we need to be concerned with during backups is one directory. This also goes a long way for organization, especially on Linux. As we all know, our home directories quickly get cluttered with a new .packagname for every package we install, and sometimes a new directory for updates to those packages. I've seen it many times. While on that subject, wouldn't it be nice to see a standard put in place which would force apps to categorize themselves and place their data in appropriate directories. In example, Gaim and Kopete would be placed in ~/.messaging/gaim and ~/.messaging/kopete respectively. In that same light, OpenOffice.org and KOffice preferences and user data would be located in ~/.productivity/OpenOffice.org and ~/.productivity/koffice respectively. This way, application data would be found quickly when it was needed, and the overall filesystem structure would be more organized. If anyone would like to discuss this topic further, please feel free to email me and we can chat.
Managing bookmarks in Mozilla Firefox Using the browser Like I was saying earlier, using this browser was pretty much without fail. I've been running various stages of the build for over a week now and it's been smooth sailing for me and my browser. There are only a couple of things that stood out as troublesome, but I imagine that either it's just me having this issue, or they are known bugs and will be addressed soon. The first problem I came across was with the installation. I installed the browser on Fedora Core 2 using the 'installer' version (Firefox comes in a 'flat' install and a version that is packaged with an installation utility) as root into a directory I created called /opt/firefox . The installation was flawless as far as I could tell. Still logged in as root, I tested the browser to make sure it would launch without error. It did, so I tested it under my normal user account.. and this is where I found the problem. Immediately Firefox informed me that my profile was already in use, and to either choose another or create a new one. This was odd since I'd never used the browser before, so I investigated a bit further. The problem was easy to identify: I had read only access to the ~/.mozilla/firefox directory and to the mozver.dat (contains component version information. Not sure if this should be read only, but I changed it to be sure) file in the same root directory. Not only were these locations set to read only , but my user account had no rights to change the attributes, so I had to sudo over to change the permissions. After this was complete, Firefox launched every time it was invoked without a hitch. Like I said, I'm not sure if this was a problem with my installation or a common bug, but at least it was easily cured. Another issue I found was with the 'Save As' dialog. The buttons used for Go up a level , Go home , and Create new directory were lacking icons (see screenshot). They were rendered as simple gray blocks. No big deal really, since the rollovers still work fine and I already know what these buttons are used for from other applications. L to R: Granular popup control, read only file issue Missing button images in the 'Save As' dialog Overall, I give this browser a 4.5 out of 5 stars. Currently there are no 5 star browsers in my opinion, but Firefox is the closest thing to perfection we have going. It's slim, fast, and handles almost anything you throw at it. In addition to that, it supports almost all of the standard Mozilla plugins available today. The reason I say almost is because I've had great success with plugin support in this browser but this isn't to say that someone else has had problems with one plugin or another. I'll play it safe here. Stability has gotten 100% better on my equipment over the previous versions, and this goes a long way to making this browser #1 in my book. We are close to having a perfect browser here... as a matter of fact, as Firefox gears up for landmark version 1.0, I fear we will see miracles before us in the form of an Internet browser. Firefox is that good. It really is. Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle. Until next time my friends.... This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Reviewed by Adam Doxtater - Co-author of Snort 2.1 Intrusion Detection 2nd Edition, Snort 2.0 Intrusion Detection and MCSE Designing Windows 2000 Directory Services by Syngress/Osbourne/McGraw-Hill. Adam is the founder and Chief Technology Editor of Mad Penguin. He is available for business consultation for Linux implementation and Open Source software support on a first-come/first-serve basis, and can be contacted here for rates. Related Article(s): ^ Top Page * Mad Penguin Reviews Fedora Core 2 05/31/04 * A First Look at CodeWeaver's CrossOver Office 3.0 05/22/04 * College Linux 2.5 Reviewed 05/03/04 * Scribus 1.1.6 Reviewed 04/24/04 * Quick Look At SUSE Linux 9.1 Personal 04/16/04 * First Look at SUSE LINUX 9.1 Professional 04/03/04 * Xandros gets down to business 03/16/04 * Mandrake 10 - An outstanding effort 03/12/04 * Sun's Java Desktop System 2003 reviewed 01/28/04 * Xandros 2.0 - King of the Linux Desktop 01/06/04

Mozilla Blues (5, Insightful)

CommanderData (782739) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424394)

The work that the Mozilla team is doing is great, and we are all aware that Interent Explorer is worthless right now. Unfortunately they may be winning the battle but losing the war so to speak. Microsoft is sitting out this round because they can afford to.

Microsoft is NOT an innovator, so they need to get their ideas somewhere. I'd be willing to bet that they're biding their time, letting open source do free research and development for them. Then hand pick the best ideas for plugins, tabbed interfaces, etc and incorporate them into IE for Longhorn, which will then be shoved down the throats of the masses in 2006.

Re:Mozilla Blues (5, Insightful)

Urkki (668283) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424474)

I don't agree that MS can afford to sit this out. If non-IE browsers gain too much market share, more and more web sites will make pages that are standards-compliant (as opposed to IE-compliant). And that' quite a "battle" to lose, even for MS.

Re:Mozilla Blues (1)

CommanderData (782739) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424565)

If non-IE browsers gain too much market share, more and more web sites will make pages that are standards-compliant (as opposed to IE-compliant)

Unfortunately that is a pretty big if (emphasis mine). Every day there are new computers being sold with WindowsXP and IE as the default browser. That's all most of the uninformed market knows or cares to know. As sad as it is, we slashdot readers are severely outnumbered in the world. IE will likely have a long healthy life.

Re:Mozilla Blues (2, Interesting)

xoboots (683791) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424485)

Despite claims that IE isn't innovative (I should say "wasn't" since it is far past its prime now), can anyone tell me if Mozilla/Firefox support css behaviours yet? Is there any reason not to support them? Believe it or not, for all its failings, IE still has some "innovations" which the other guys simply refuse to address for whatever reasons.

Anyways, long live the Phoenix, I mean the Firebird, I mean Firefox, damnit!

Re:Mozilla Blues (4, Insightful)

gtaluvit (218726) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424496)

Yes, but thats not for 2 years. And thats only for a NEW version of windows, not the existing. The key to gainging back dominance is to get Firefox on any PC you can find. Word of mouth means alot.

Re:Mozilla Blues (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424512)

The fact that someone can get modded +3 insightful while saying microsoft isnt in innovator blows me away.

Dont like Microsoft innovations? Fine.
Don't innovate? Just more slashdot trolls.

Re:Mozilla Blues (4, Insightful)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424531)

And this is a bad thing because?

I use Firefox and probably always will. My family use Firefox because I installed it on the home computers and they find it just as easy as IE but without the spyware and popups. You probably use Firefox and put your friends and family on it because, like me, you're a Slashdot reading geek who knows it exists and knows it's superior.

The rest of the world uses IE. They will not leave IE either because (and this is the case 90% of the time) it is the internet to them - they know nothing else or because they don't think it's worth the effort. If the IE using public get a better version of IE pressed onto them by MS and we get to keep our Firefox I'd say everyone wins. It's not the perfect scenario but it's better than it could be.

Re:Mozilla Blues (1)

CommanderData (782739) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424596)

You make very good points. It may not be bad at all for the rest of the world to have a new version of IE influenced by Firefox and other browsers. My only real problem is that they will take all the cash and credit for it....

Text grab from server before it dies. (5, Informative)

john_smith_45678 (607592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424396)

First Look at Mozilla Firefox 0.9
Last update: 06-14-2004

Submitted by Adam Doxtater

The last time we looked at Mozilla Firefox , it was still called Mozilla Firebird and then only in version 0.6. Times have changed. Oh how they've changed. Today, The browser with the identity crisis has a sleek new interface, modern features, and is blowing the doors off its competition... and this is putting it mildly.

Mozilla Firefox ( release notes | roadmap ) is a completely modular browser consisting of a basic, streamlined framework upon which users can add ' extensions ', which (just as the name implies) are essentially plugins for the browser. The idea of less is more has been taken to the next level with this browser. With the default browser, you have just enough browser to do pretty much anything you can on the Internet, while more advanced, custom functionality is reserved to the extensions. For instance, you can load extra functionality such as more precise ad blocking, mouse gestures, website registration bypassing, dictionary, user agent switching, complete page and listbox/textbox searching, text zooming, UI tweaks, and the list goes on. There are so many possibilities I can't go into them all here.

When compared to browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox is light years ahead. Microsoft will need to do some serious footwork to catch up to the usability and functionality of this browser. Seriously. The only browsers that come close are Mozilla (of course), Opera , and Konqueror . Safari is also coming along nicely on OS X . The beauty of this browser is not only its functionality... it also lies in its portability. Firefox is currently supported under Linux (GTK+-Xft), Mac OSX, Sun Solaris SPARC/x86, Sun JDS 2003, Microsoft Windows (all versions), and IBM OS/2 , so you can drop it onto almost anything with a modern CPU ( system requirements )

The Mozilla Firefox 0.9 browser

What's new in version 0.9?
This is the last preview release before Firefox comes of age at milestone version 1.0, so what new features have been implemented? Well, at first glance all you will notice is the interface has been redesigned with an updated theme. At first I didn't quite know how to take it, but now that I've used it for a while it's grown on me. The new look is very minimalistic, clinging tightly to the focus of the browser itself. Anyway, here's a more complete listing for those of you who are skimming:

* New default theme - Like I said, it sports a new sleek skin (seen in the screenshots of this review).
* Redesigned theme/extension managers & SmartUpdate - Newly redesigned interfaces make it even easier to manage your browser, as well as keeping it up to date with smart notifications .
* Installer updates - Linux now has an installer for GTK2, and the Windows package has gotten smaller - to the tune of 4.6MB.
* Easier migration - Migrating your important information and settings from other browsers has never been easier. Firefox can now import settings from previous versions, Internet Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, and Opera. This includes favorites, settings, cookies, history and saved passwords.
* Help - An updated online help system is now available. This is in addition to the wonderful Firefox Forums and existing help material .
* Linux look and feel - Much work has gone into the UI, making it adhere better to GTK2 themes. Menus now look like they belong in the desktop scheme like they were meant to be.

Not only were new features added to this release, work continues to keep bugs squashed, past and present, so the browser feels far more stable than it has in the past. Don't get me wrong, this browser has always been ahead of its time in terms of vision and scope, but it has had its fair share of bugs, but so far as I can tell by running this release constantly for the past week or so it looks pretty solid. It hasn't crashed once, and let me tell you this is a definite improvement over the previous versions. For instance, the biggest annoyance from previous versions involved tabbed browsing. Every so often (and I could almost set my watch to this) when clicking on an existing tab or opening a new tab the browser would simply exit. No complaints, no errors, just a silent stage left . The new version hasn't done this to me yet and I've been using it constantly.

Importing settings from other browsers is a snap

Redesigned management and update utilities

On the browsing side of things, Firefox couldn't be faster. It hums along at top speed, never hesitating on pages that other browsers might hang on. One good example of this is Vonage.com , which seems to load notoriously slow on any browser, and even though it's still slow, it's a far sight better than other browsers. This, among others, serves as one of my benchmarks... the sites I go to immediately to see if a new browser is going to sweep me off of my feet. So far none of them have, but Firefox comes closest in terms of raw speed. This is after installing the latest Macromedia Flash Player , which loaded flawlessly into Firefox. Of course, with a few tried and true tweaks , you can nudge the browser even closer to the edge (some of these 'enhancements' might come at the expense of stability and broken standards of course).

One small thing that I'd like to point out is that the home directory has changed since the last release. This info might help to relieve a little stress as you struggle to find out where exactly the browser placed all of your personal files. These are the new locations of Mozilla Firefox files:

Linux - ~/.mozilla/firefox/
Mac OS X - ~/Library/Application Support/Firefox
Microsoft Windows - C:\Documents and Settings\ username \Application Data\Mozilla\Firefox (wow! now that's a mouthful)

This is actually a much better layout than what was previously used if you ask me. If all Mozilla products follow this same standard, then all we need to be concerned with during backups is one directory. This also goes a long way for organization, especially on Linux. As we all know, our home directories quickly get cluttered with a new .packagname for every package we install, and sometimes a new directory for updates to those packages. I've seen it many times. While on that subject, wouldn't it be nice to see a standard put in place which would force apps to categorize themselves and place their data in appropriate directories. In example, Gaim and Kopete would be placed in ~/.messaging/gaim and ~/.messaging/kopete respectively. In that same light, OpenOffice.org and KOffice preferences and user data would be located in ~/.productivity/OpenOffice.org and ~/.productivity/koffice respectively. This way, application data would be found quickly when it was needed, and the overall filesystem structure would be more organized. If anyone would like to discuss this topic further, please feel free to email me and we can chat.

Managing bookmarks in Mozilla Firefox

Using the browser
Like I was saying earlier, using this browser was pretty much without fail. I've been running various stages of the build for over a week now and it's been smooth sailing for me and my browser. There are only a couple of things that stood out as troublesome, but I imagine that either it's just me having this issue, or they are known bugs and will be addressed soon. The first problem I came across was with the installation. I installed the browser on Fedora Core 2 using the 'installer' version (Firefox comes in a 'flat' install and a version that is packaged with an installation utility) as root into a directory I created called /opt/firefox . The installation was flawless as far as I could tell. Still logged in as root, I tested the browser to make sure it would launch without error. It did, so I tested it under my normal user account.. and this is where I found the problem. Immediately Firefox informed me that my profile was already in use, and to either choose another or create a new one. This was odd since I'd never used the browser before, so I investigated a bit further. The problem was easy to identify: I had read only access to the ~/.mozilla/firefox directory and to the mozver.dat (contains component version information. Not sure if this should be read only, but I changed it to be sure) file in the same root directory. Not only were these locations set to read only , but my user account had no rights to change the attributes, so I had to sudo over to change the permissions. After this was complete, Firefox launched every time it was invoked without a hitch. Like I said, I'm not sure if this was a problem with my installation or a common bug, but at least it was easily cured.

Another issue I found was with the 'Save As' dialog. The buttons used for Go up a level , Go home , and Create new directory were lacking icons (see screenshot). They were rendered as simple gray blocks. No big deal really, since the rollovers still work fine and I already know what these buttons are used for from other applications.

L to R: Granular popup control, read only file issue

Missing button images in the 'Save As' dialog

Overall, I give this browser a 4.5 out of 5 stars. Currently there are no 5 star browsers in my opinion, but Firefox is the closest thing to perfection we have going. It's slim, fast, and handles almost anything you throw at it. In addition to that, it supports almost all of the standard Mozilla plugins available today. The reason I say almost is because I've had great success with plugin support in this browser but this isn't to say that someone else has had problems with one plugin or another. I'll play it safe here. Stability has gotten 100% better on my equipment over the previous versions, and this goes a long way to making this browser #1 in my book. We are close to having a perfect browser here... as a matter of fact, as Firefox gears up for landmark version 1.0, I fear we will see miracles before us in the form of an Internet browser. Firefox is that good. It really is. Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle.

Until next time my friends....

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Reviewed by Adam Doxtater - Co-author of Snort 2.1 Intrusion Detection 2nd Edition, Snort 2.0 Intrusion Detection and MCSE Designing Windows 2000 Directory Services by Syngress/Osbourne/McGraw-Hill. Adam is the founder and Chief Technology Editor of Mad Penguin. He is available for business consultation for Linux implementation and Open Source software support on a first-come/first-serve basis, and can be contacted here for rates.

PARENT IS A TROLL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424449)

work continues to keep blacks squashed, past and present,

Mad Penguin? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424399)

Look out IE, a person named "Mad Penguin" is out to bring you down!

RTFA once again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424419)

There is a link on the page to where you can get the latest .9 release. Here you go

http://www.mozilla.org/products/firefox/releases /0 .9.html

Good lines :) (5, Funny)

Lord Graga (696091) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424424)

'Look out Internet Explorer... your days have been numbered for some time now, but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle'

What about:

Internet Explorer, your pitiful life is soon to be ended by my completion. My mercy will allow you to die quickly and rot away. Your miserable "browser" functions is a thread against the race of the free, and you deserve the greatest and most horrible deseases known to man.

Anyway, Firefox cannot beat IE off the top rank. It's simply becaues IE comes with Windows, and no smallwited user would know that there's alternatives, at all.

Re:Good lines :) (1)

Cyb3rBull3ts (779853) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424499)

That is why we must help new users and uneducated public and inform them of the good news about alternative, free and stable software. I sound like a bible salesman.

Re:Good lines :) (3, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424526)

It's simply becaues IE comes with Windows, and no smallwited user would know that there's alternatives, at all.

Sigh. I've noticed this. People don't even realise it's separate from Windows (come to think of it, a lot of them think Word and Windows are the same thing).

Even some of my friends who are aware that you can have another browser seem reluctant to change for bizarre, and really quite stupid reasons. It's difficult to convince them of the delights of tabbed browsing and gestures.

But it's so easy... (1)

erockett (784008) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424433)

Many people use IE just because it's easy and it works well enough for them. Unfortunately, I doubt Firefox will take care of these people's usage of IE unless it becomes the default browser on new computers. I would guess that many people who are actually attentive enough to features to dislike IE will probably already _not_ be using IE anyway.

So now what. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424434)

What do they still have to do before declaring 1.0?

Re:So now what. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424494)

Change the name to Internet Explorer

Well... (3, Insightful)

jonfromspace (179394) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424441)

As a recently converted and quite happy Firefox user, First off, yay!

However, I just don't see IE going anywhere, ever. Not while Windows is on 90+% of mainstream desktops. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong, but just because a product is better, does not mean it will be successful.

I am all for Mozilla/Firefox, but I just can't see it ever landing on my fathers Dell, or my aunt's HP.

unless, of course, I put it there, but they call me enough already with stupid user questions... I ain't giving them a new piece of software.

Re:Well... (5, Insightful)

chuonthis (715628) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424504)

unless, of course, I put it there, but they call me enough already with stupid user questions... I ain't giving them a new piece of software.

Firefox might actually be a solution to your problems. Think of all the adware/spyware/popup issues that could be resolved by getting them to switch from IE.

Re:Well... (1)

WarehouseCU (655929) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424568)

unless, of course, I put it there, but they call me enough already with stupid user questions... I ain't giving them a new piece of software.

I've pretty much had the opposite experience. I've put Firefox on quite a few of my friend's and family's machines and have received positive feedback. From the lack of popups (I set that part up) to the tabbed browsing they love it.

I am all for Mozilla/Firefox, but I just can't see it ever landing on my fathers Dell, or my aunt's HP.

This I have to agree with, I work at a university of reasonable size and have seen the results of processing the logs to give information about the browsers used. The top 3 spots are IE. With IE6 Leading by about 4x's over any other version. Users stick to what is there as long as they can use it, in the case of IE they have a lot of past experience.

Re:Well... (1)

scmason (574559) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424578)

"but just because a product is better, does not mean it will be successful"

This has, of course, been shown to ba a fact since the beginning of software. If Windows had came preinstalled and marketed with Opera over the last couple of years, we would all be fighting against the evil opera empire. It is about marketing and status quoe.

Remember the Nash?

Jesse's list of "what's new in FF 0.9" (5, Informative)

david_reese (460043) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424452)

Since the release notes aren't public yet [mozilla.org]

...take a look at Jesse's more detailed and informative list [squarefree.com]

It's ok. (4, Informative)

ninti (610358) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424465)

I have been using the 0.9rc since the day it came out. It's ok, maybe a bit better than 0.8, but hardly this amazing new day for Internet browsing. They squashed some bugs, but some long term bugs and annoyances still remain, and unfortunately it appears they have added one or two. Pesonally, it does not seem any more or less stable, but about the same. Regardless of all that, like 0.8 before it, it is still a hell of a lot better than IE.

It's not light-years ahead of IE (1)

john_smith_45678 (607592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424467)

I've been using Firefox/Firebird/Phoenix since 0.6 or 0.5. Great for the most part, buy it still doesn't work right on enough sites that I still have to fire up IE. Certain sites like bluelithium's publisher interface have sections that don't work at all. Problem appears to be mostly javascript related.

Re:It's not light-years ahead of IE (2, Interesting)

cyfer2000 (548592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424610)

I believe they are DOM related javascript, there is a "document.all" to refer an object in IE, and KHTML either, correct me if it is not, and many web developer simply use it rather than the W3C standard "document.getElementById()" function. And unless gecko get enough marcket share, I don't think those lazy web developers will change "document.all" to "document.getElementById" And I believe this will happen eventually.

Stability (1)

MisanthropicProgram (763655) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424481)

According to the reviewer, there's a lot to be thankful for, as this release is far more stable than its earlier versions
I've been using 0.8 since it came out (You guys got me hooked on it and I've been recomending it to all my non-tech, Windows using, friends) and I haven't experienced any unstability. Is there certain functionality that I'm not using that's more unstable?

Another note, since using Firefox, I haven't experienced the hang on /. that you get with I.E.
Firefox 0.8 rocks! I love it the way it is! I'm not sure I want to upgrade to 0.9.

Firefox is great (5, Interesting)

TheRealFixer (552803) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424483)

After a miss-typed URL sent me to one of those wonderful cyber-squatting "search" sites, which then proceeded to automatically install all sorts of nasty spyware and SMTP zombie malware, I banned IE from my house and removed all shortcuts and Program Menu options from all PCs. I made the decision to go with Firefox, and I can honestly tell you I haven't missed IE one bit, and there's not been one reason that I've had to open up IE again. My wife's been happy with it as well. It's clean, fast, renders pages great, much more informative about page loading status, and best of all it doesn't attempt to install software without my permission. I've encouraged everyone I know to give it a try.

Mad Penguin misses one MAJOR regression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424484)

Between 0.6 and 0.9, Mozilla Firefox has implemented the Gnome HIG, making Firefox totally inconsistent with every single Linux GUI except Gnome.

I'm afraid even IE running under WINE is better than Firefox 0.9 in this respect...

Re:Mad Penguin misses one MAJOR regression (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424511)

every single Linux GUI except Gnome.


theres another linux gui besides gnome? news to me.

Download your favorite flavor here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424487)

http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/rel eases/0.9rc/

/.ed already (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424510)

mirror [wouldyouhitthis.com]

I'm a Firefox fan... (1)

MoThugz (560556) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424516)

but I seriously doubt that this is a "review" per-se... It sounds more like a marketing hype for 1.0, which the last time I checked, is roughly a point release away (a new point release of Firefox goes gold at about once every 4 months).

I did my own mini review [heritage-tech.net] of 0.9, however, in contrast with the linked article, I find that there's not much (if any at all) changes in the preferences settings that warrant a point release.

Hopefully, there will be some tweaks and toys added to 0.9 before it goes gold.

Firefox 0.9 to be released later tonight. (1)

The Old Burke (679901) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424519)

From the mozillazine.org forum from some user named bengoodger:
bengoodger
Joined: 04 Nov 2002 Mountain View, CA Posted: Jun Mon 14th 2004 10:39am hao2lian wrote:
Quote:
Go for a walk or something.

2:35 PM and the bus still isn't here.

11:40AM PDT and still no 0.9!!!!

... oh wait.

:p

I still haven't checked in the version string change.... or one or two other last minute goodies... so it's not going to be until tonight PDT.

So no release yet.

Why (3, Interesting)

NineNine (235196) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424528)

As with every other Mozilla/Firefox/Firebird/Whatever-They-Call-It-Thi s-Week browser story, my question is... "So?". The review in no way mentions a single thing that makes this browser "better" or makes me want to take time to download and install a new program. Why? Give me a good, solid reason why I should download a new program, complete with potential problems, headaches, etc. to replace a perfectly good, functional program? I can't seem to think that the Mozilla developers are kind of like people developing new and better pencils. Except this special pencil is hard to find, takes time to figure out how to use, and does what, exactly, that a regular pencil doesn't do? "Come one and all! See our amazing new pencil! It'll revolutionize the hot, exciting pencil industry!! It'll change the way you use pencils! The lead is softer and the wood is harder! Can you imagine how much more work you could get done with this new pencil? " It's just silly.

Visceral Emotion Plug (5, Insightful)

4of12 (97621) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424529)


but Firefox 1.0 will surely leave you shaking on your already shaky foundations and standing in a small warm puddle'

Firefox is an excellent browser; I've been using it happily since 0.6.

But while IE can claim that it "came with My Computer" Firefox cannot overcome it but very slowly and only among those who appreciate its superiority and have enough patience to download and install it.

AOL was the last distributor of millions of CDs who were in a position to bundle Mozilla and deliver it to the majority audience that will just take what they get.

Buggy Release (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424547)

Take a look over at bugzilla on the bugs still remaining in .9. Bugs Nominated to block .9 [mozilla.org]

You can see there is a bug there that firefox when uninstalled wipes out non-firefox folders!!

*BSD is dying (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424553)

It is official; Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be a Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

Make Firefox Even Faster! (5, Informative)

john_smith_45678 (607592) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424554)

I tried these changes, and Firefox is noticeably faster:

There is an interesting post on WebMasterWorld, on how to decrease the loading/rendering time of Firefox. I have tried the settings, and have noticed a mild improvement. Just wanted to share the information.

http://www.webmasterworld.com/forum21/8007.htm [webmasterworld.com]

Edit: Updated Instructions:

open about_:config (without the underscore).

1.) network.http.pipelining = true
2.) network.http.pipelining.firstrequest = true
3.) network.http.pipelining.maxrequests = (the poster says 32, but suggest 8 is the limit)
4.) network.http.proxy.pipelining = true

Don't do number #5.


http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1 73568&highlight=pipelining [sitepoint.com]

As i try to click on the review with IE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424557)

i can almost hear a discrete laugh coming from my browser as their webserver gets veeery shaky...

more stable (2, Insightful)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424559)

"According to the reviewer, there's a lot to be thankful for, as this release is far more stable than its earlier versions..."

Isn't that the way things are usually done, to try to improve a product?

Re:more stable (3, Insightful)

thebatlab (468898) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424571)

You're confusing "are usually" with "should be" ;)

IE here to stay... for now. (2)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424563)

As long as enterprise level business app suppliers write enterprise level web based business apps that require IE plug-in compatibility, and big-business continues to buy these apps either because they are already heavily invested in the particular app, or they are MS shills, Internet Explorer will continue to be the standard browser of choice on Windows machines at enterprise level businesses. But Firefox is quite nice, a huge step in the right direction. I use it almost exclusively except at work.

We all have to click on the Microsoft Ads (3, Interesting)

outofpaper (189404) | more than 10 years ago | (#9424575)

The article that this story is linked to has Mircosoft ads. So I started thinking ...

I have a simple way for us to get rid of or at least reduce the impact of thoughs stupid get the facts adds. CLIC ON THEM. This will cost microsoft money and if we feal like the extra effort we might as well ask for the free stuff that they are willing to send.

Great browser (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9424581)

According to the reviewer, there's a lot to be thankful for, as this release is far more stable than its earlier versions and sports some new features along with a new interface.

Hmmm.. 0.9rc is far from stable, and strangely enough, 0.8 was more stable for me. Anyhow, I just can stop loving this browser :)

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