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The Latest And Greatest Console Applications?

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the oggenc-sure-works-nicely dept.

Software 618

An anonymous reader writes "While the 'Linux on the desktop' battle has yet to be won, KDE and Gnome are making great progress. There are too many apps to list on the cutting edge of software development for the X environment. But what about those of us stuck with old machines? Or who just want to work with the console? What console-based apps, that are undergoing just as much development as their X counterparts, do you use? Things like instant messengers and bittorrent clients, for example..."

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Taco to Neal (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511867)

To: CowBoy Neal From: CmdrTaco Subject: Man to Man Dear CowBoy Neal, Most of the time, a man can't keep his yap shut longer'n a pack-mule takes to do its business. Other times, he knows exactly what's on his mind but the words just don't seem to come. That's a little old-west wisdom my granpop used to say to me, and I figured it'd strike a chord since, you like him, have the dementia-inspired idea that you're a cowboy. Of course your dementia comes from advanced venereal disease rather than Alzheimer's, but I think you can see where I'm going with this. As you know, my life is a mess. Academically, I was unable to meet even the modest requirements set by the Christian school for handicapped children to which my long-suffering parents shipped me off in a short bus, my youthful head nuzzled in the warmth of my hockey-helmet. Professionally, I'm reduced to filtering out penis-bird ASCII art for a firm that's moved from swindling venture capitalists to supporting offshore outsourcing. Even in the low-expectations circle-jerk that is the Open Source Software world, my list of contributions is lamer than Eric Raymond's, and I don't even have the self-adulatory published rants to show for it. My only solace is my sweet, sweet Kathleen; and I fear before long she too may be lost. So that's why I have to ask you the most important thing I've ever asked anybody in my whole life, man to man. CowBoy Neal, I need you to fuck me in the ass. My life has become so self-serving and pathetic that only the painful, masculine jolt that a brutal ass-rooting can give could possibly help me. In order to save my job, my marriage, and my life, you must pound some sense into my pale, flagging body - anally, with minimal lubrication. Before you get all homophobic on me, I have three things to say. First, I *need* this, I need it badly, and you know it. Second, it's a beautiful thing for one straight man to fuck another up the ass. You think _Oz_ won an Emmy for nothing? Third - come on, who are you fucking kidding? Please consider my proposition carefully. I (and my rectum) await your reply. Sincerely, CmdrTaco

Don't lose your head (0, Flamebait)

Hot Summer Nights (771962) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511868)

Like he did [ogrish.com] .

One word . . . (5, Informative)

micromoog (206608) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511876)

Nethack [nethack.org] .

Re:One word . . . (5, Funny)

Draoi (99421) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511994)

Thank you for re-introducing me to NetHack. It took me five years to wean myself off that, and now I've found a MacOS X version. There goes *my* working day ... :-)

As they say on the site;

Thank you for the latest release of gradewrecker. My GPA just went in the corner and shot itself.
-- USENET posting, author unknown

Re:One word . . . (4, Funny)

Ricwot (632038) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512074)

Due to a combination of Beer, Coffee and NetHack, lectures were missed, assignments lost in the darkness, and I failed the year by 0.1 marks :'(

Because so many of you wrote us at JabberKatz(tm) (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511882)

Here's your daily article:

Ridley Scott's Hannibal has all the elements of a classic -- a creepy story, gorgeous cinematography in beautiful locales, and one of the most popular social and political issues in America. Because computing is on the rise in recent years, from pinball systems to console wars raging between Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft, videogames are important culturally. In these games are the stories of the year from the best movies and TV shows and over-analyzed films like "The Haunting" and "Deep Blue Sea," that use technology brilliantly, if minimally, in their typically idiosyncratic and unpredictable way to attract mystics and seekers along with techies, nerds, Goths, and game-crazed geeks.

"The confusion about the protestors' political goals is understandable," wrote a New York Times columnist Thursday. This is the first part of a negotiating process, but like so many technologists before him, he never quite accepted that the future was to be dangerous, and potentially violent characteristics are being distributed to school administrators. A "ghost" student was allowed to stay in his dorm and attend classes, but not to have sex. By pandering to so-called moral guardians and adopting useless and quixotic rating systems, we are imposing ticket booth interrogations of kids and films. Loopy but true.

As usual, the government has tended to be freer than offline culture. Music, the spark for a surprising percentage of the Net's legal battles, has become the prime ideology, the golden rule of corporate life. Companies and organizations -- especially those which spring from sexual harassment legislation -- have combined to make privacy nearly obsolete before most Americans have barely blinked as their tastes, habits and preferences have been routinely tracked online. That apathy might be changing. The more crime drops, the more one delves into the machinery and content of the excerpt that was unrelated to a technology site and movies shouldn't have to be an escape from reality. It's not a science. If there's a bright spot to the arrest, it's the toll paid for participating in participatory democracy.

This profound emphasis on work, says Ciulla, who has himself told interviewers he knows little about the issues involved and believes there are good grounds to appeal his ruling. The movie points out that it's still often difficult for young women to show open interest in science and technology to create a paradise lost. Needless to say, or safer yet, they don't speak at all.

"But the Net is a giant Xerox machine for the underclass," writes Beck. The technology is important because it enables us to compute more simply and powerfully, two very different ideas. For some reason, just leaving primitive humans alone is never an option for long. Can anything destroy the network? Will it be almost instantly out-of-date?

Last week, MSNBC.com reported that the most reliable manifestation of the hacker ethic is that almost all hackers are actively willing to share technical expertise, programs, software, and hardware. This is new media in which the Time's cover stories include those such as "Who Was Moses?" This is new research, said the official. This raises free speech issues as we live in a world where people have wants and needs, and we also live in a world that is most hostile.

But the campaign for BWP was tailor-made for this particular movie. For all their faults, journalists are accountable for the things they've made and sold and won't help people to close a frozen window without calling an online tech support line. Or the real jaw-dropper: to go to the library for Net access. The town boasts a progressive school, hospital and high-tech infrastructure. Some of the animation in the dream/nightmare sequences is terrific, sometimes with the help of a small number of ground forces. In a scene near the end, Jet Li says, "There can only be one of them." Their sites offer more potential for continuing conversations about technology, including a fundamental change in culture and society.

Modern corporations - Microsoft comes to mind - are not intrinsically evil, because they have lots of company. Like so many others, Microsoft was transformed from one man's powerful vision into a global media and entertainment conglomerate with properties and interests too numerous to remember.

As with the Yankee's ticket software, they could see pictures of penguins dying in Antarctica. The software also reports that skin cancer rates are rising.

Unlike more abstract scientific issues like genetics (which may become a highly visible political issue), the local school budget and town highway repairs represent breakthroughs in everyday life. On a grander scale, such discussions might eventually foster progress including models for resolving intractable national issues like impeachment.

first post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511890)

first post

First! Prizes? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511891)

First!

mp3blaster. (5, Interesting)

Slayk (691976) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511893)

It's a slick little console mp3 player with playlist support. It is quite nice to have when I do something to b0rk X.

playlists, sounds over complicated (4, Funny)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511965)

isn't that what stdin is for ?

Re:playlists, sounds over complicated (0)

stilwebm (129567) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512100)

Or on some hardware, stdout:

cat sound.au >/dev/audio

Re:mp3blaster. (4, Interesting)

keesh (202812) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512006)

orpheus [thekonst.net] is also good, and has a less confusicating interface.

One Word: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511895)

emacs

Re:One Word: (0, Flamebait)

gralem (45862) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511939)

emacs...What a dork... the one-word answer is (of course) "vi"

Pico! (-1, Troll)

DaHat (247651) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511990)

I guess I'm lazy as I'm a pico person... I just can't handle trying to remember the umpteen million possible commands in vi.

Re:Pico! (-1, Troll)

turgid (580780) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512062)

pico is teh evil sux0rs! You must use GNU nano [freshmeat.net] !

Re:One Word: (3, Insightful)

JWW (79176) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512091)

vi

I know, I know someone else got modded as flamebait, but its just not right to list emacs without vi.

fortune! (4, Funny)

blunte (183182) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511899)

that was too easy. was this a trick question?

Re:fortune! (5, Funny)

Ricwot (632038) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511934)

It's a program that is viable for enterprise systems, we just rename it to fortune-500

--

Any spare gmail invites could do better than ending up at rjw16@st-and.ac.uk

Mr. T sez... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511905)

I PuTTY tha Fool!

Re:Mr. T sez... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512029)

I think you may have misunderstood the question.

BitchX (5, Informative)

TypoNAM (695420) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511907)

When it comes to IRC gotta love BitchX [bitchx.org] . :)

Re:BitchX (5, Informative)

Juanvaldes (544895) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511973)

irssi [irssi.org] is where it's at ;)

Re:BitchX (3, Informative)

concatenation (647741) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512096)

Yeah, definitely. Irssi has all I need: Easy handling for multiple ircnets and servers, SSL support, support for Perl plugins, and it's themable and easy to use.

Re:BitchX (1)

name773 (696972) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512094)

you mean ircii [eterna.com.au] , right?

Screen. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511909)

Man, how many times has screen [gnu.org] saved my butt? Multiplies the usefulness of any console appplication by five.

Re:Screen. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511993)

Propz. Scrizzle is the fizzle shizzle.

Bleeding Edge (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511913)

The version of ls that comes with Fedora Core 2 is 5.2.1. Incredible software! Would use again! A+++++!!!!

Re:Bleeding Edge (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511981)

What the hell... is this ebay feedback.
GREAT SELLER, FAST SHIPPER, A++++++++++!!!!!!

I'm adding a whole bunch of regular text to circumvent the slashdot filters.

ircII (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511914)

nuff said!

Screen.... (5, Interesting)

deadmongrel (621467) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511919)

One of the most under used console app is Screen. http://www.gnu.org/software/screen/ [gnu.org] I am not a sys admin but Screen is still pretty handy.

Re:Screen.... (5, Interesting)

FullyIonized (566537) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512111)

And one of the most underutilized features of screen is multi-user sessions. I have used this to do XP-style programming with a colleague who was working 900 miles away

The way I did it:
Start up screen with a temporary screenrc file that contains:
multiuser on
addacl other_username
detach

Note that I have the screen session detach. Type "screen -ls" to get the screen session name (for the other person), then type "screen -r" to reattach. The other person ssh'd into my machine and typed "screen -x session_name". It is possible to script all of this to make it easier.

We then talked over the phone (headphones highly recommended) while we could simultaneously edit in a vi session. It was hilarious because we'd start yelling at each other "No,no, let ME type." Still, these sessions are always among my most productive programming sessions because we catch each others mistakes and program the parts of the program that we have expertise in.

Irssi (2, Informative)

miike (770833) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511920)

Not exactly under development but a mature and good irc-client. http://www.irssi.org/

Why? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511922)

I asked this on the Gentoo forum a while ago and never got a straight answer, so I'll ask it again here: why? Why, except in a few rare cases, would you regularly use a command line IM client in favor of a graphical one? It seems terribly inconvenient.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511975)

Because I can take old parts, stick them in a box, install linux, hide the box under my desk (or wherever) and ssh into it.

All my gruntwork, downloading, bittorrents, etc, run on that old box, never to bother my good machine.

Taking the time to type 'screen btorrent blahblah.iso.torrent' is more convenient than having my main machine slow to a crawl after torrent opens 9 billion connections.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511982)

But what about those of us stuck with old machines?

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512003)

It has to be pretty damn old if it can't run X and Gaim. I'm betting even a Pentium 200 could handle that.

Re:Why? (2, Informative)

Zardus (464755) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512093)

Among the teenager crowd, and I'd imagine even more so outside of the US, old laptops are pretty common (think Pentium 100 w/ 16 megs of ram). X does not run extremely quickly on them (although its not too bad), so console apps are convenient.

Re:Why? (1)

Tarantolato (760537) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511997)

Why, except in a few rare cases, would you regularly use a command line IM client in favor of a graphical one? It seems terribly inconvenient.

Why? Because you wouldn't be able to see "buddy icons". 99.999% of IM is text-driven anyways, and a command-line client would allow you to do all sorts of perverse things with pipes and scripting and awk and sed and all of those other lovely-horrible unix tools.

Thanks for the idea. I've found some links to these creatures here [freshmeat.net] , and am excited to give them a whirl.

One wonders if there's one for Emacs....

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

SeederGOD (665109) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511999)

because you can leave IM session in screen :) and log out

Re:Why? (2, Funny)

NeoFunk (654048) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512005)

Because there IS no better way to show that you care than by using a batch file to flood "net send" messages.

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512020)

Why, except in a few rare cases, would you regularly use a command line IM client in favor of a graphical one? It seems terribly inconvenient.

By command-line I assume you mean text-based (curses/whatever)...

Text based interface can be much more usable, even if it os often less learnable. learnability != uasbility. There is certain amount of "control" in simple text interfaces that you don't have with GUI's which pop subwindows everywhere, have annoying MDI interfaces etc.

Text interfaces also have a distinct technical advantage - they can be detached from the controlling terminal (see 'screen', 'dtach').

Also check out this [ratpoisonsourceforge.net] :-)

Sorry, broken link, correction. (2, Informative)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512085)

I meant to say this link [sourceforge.net] .

I guess you could deduce it, but anyway.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512025)

Why, except in a few rare cases, would you regularly use a graphical IM client in favor of a command line one? It seems terribly inconvenient.

The irc client is just one of many applications running in screen. It can be totally controlled from the keyboard (no annoying mouse trips). It just seems to work better.

Re:Why? (5, Funny)

mattrumpus (677024) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512032)

I've got one good reason. At some places of work IM clients are banned and its easier to pretend a text based client is real work...

Re:Why? (1)

bhaputi (217816) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512035)

Well, I run naim with screen support, so I can keep myself logged in all the time, detach my session, reattach from home, etc.

Kinda serves as an answering machine for me nowadays.

Re:Why? (4, Informative)

quantum bit (225091) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512045)

I use naim [ml.org] a lot for one reason: I can run it inside screen [gnu.org] , detach from one computer and re-attach on another without ever going offline (or missing messages while I'm walking somewhere else). If I'm moving around a lot, screen also lets me have multiple connections to the same session, so I can read & reply from wherever I happen to be at the moment.

The other reason is that next to my main desktop at home, I have a nice little text-based LCD terminal (actually a partially disassembled 486 laptop) that I IM on -- saves screen real estate and I don't have to get offline when I'm doing stuff like kernel driver debugging that requires me to shut down X...

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

keesh (202812) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512055)

Because command-line clients can be screened. X apps can't.

Re:Why? (3, Interesting)

Zardus (464755) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512058)

Combined with screen [gnu.org] , Naim [ml.org] is really nice for idling on AIM (to avoid missing IMs from people who are only awake when you sleep and such), and for switching computers without having to disconnect. The same convenience can be achieved using screen with an IRC client for IRC (I use Irssi [irssi.org] ).

Its much more convenient than GUI stuff when you switch computers a lot during the day. I can leave naim and irssi running in screen while I drive home from work and people can still IM me if they need to for those 30 minutes.

Because.... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512083)

I'm a linux newbie really, but even I can answer this...

1. I might not have a 256M+ of RAM on my system needed to make the current linux GUIs run well.

2. I might have 256+MB, but since my linux box runs as a webserver, I might not want to bog it down with a GUI.

3. I might just PREFER CLIs.

4. And finally, I am a 1337 h4x0r and don't want to use anything that you n00bs might be able to understand.

I'm being serious so if you were going to mod me funny, don't mod me at all!

A small SQL analysis app... (3, Interesting)

tcopeland (32225) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511923)

... that I wrote - PQA [postgresql.org] - runs only from the console. I could write a Ruby/Tk or a WxWidgits GUI for it... but why bother? As it is, I can feed in all the necessary parameters at the command line and not have to click around a GUI.

At the same time, it's best to write the code in such a way that a GUI could be put on top of it... but for me, a console interface is good enough for now.

Naim (5, Interesting)

primal39 (409681) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511925)

naim [ml.org] is a great, free, GPL'd instant messaging client. Very featureful, intuitive, and in my opinion one of the best examples of ncurses programming out there.

centericq (3, Informative)

vijaya_chandra (618284) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512052)

is quite good as well with support for icq000, yahoo, aim, irc, msn, gadu-gadu and jabber

CenterICQ [konst.org.ua]

How do you take a screen shot of tty1 !?!

screen (3, Informative)

Deagol (323173) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511927)

For me, working over a modem line as a telecommuting Unix admin over ssh, I can say that screen is the killer app for me.

gnut, a console nutella app which appears to be a dormant project these days, was pretty cool as far as real applications.

Console never dies! (3, Informative)

jayminer (692836) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511928)

web: links or lynx
ftp: ncftp
media: mplayer, mpg321

And the mighty fdisk & cfdisk pair cure all wounds.

Well ... (5, Funny)

mios (715734) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511929)

... some folks start X from the command line, soo ...

naim + mp3blaster + links (2, Interesting)

bhaputi (217816) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511932)

Well, I do not quite use console, but since switching to ION (http://modeemi.cs.tut.fi/~tuomov/ion/ ) I have been much more productive in my dual display environment. I run unclutter to hide my mouse, and use naim for instant messaging, links for some browsing, and mp3blaster for music. Oh, and of course xdaliclock to tell me the time.

Lynx (3, Informative)

afriguru (784434) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511933)

I maintain a fedora-based server which of course is much better connected than my home machine. At times I browse remotely with lynx to get to sites that require registration before making downloads.

Nmap (5, Interesting)

sharp-bang (311928) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511935)

This continues to be my port scanner of choice; although it has a pretty front end, it really doesn't need one.

good one! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511936)

While the 'Linux on the desktop' battle has yet to be won

Ha ha haha haha haha hah!
Oooooooh, hahahahahahahahahha!!!

Oh, okay. Carry on.

favorite console programs... (2, Interesting)

theJerk242 (778433) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511940)

NAIM = (AIM for the console and it uses 128bit encrytion too) and of course...the one that EVERYONE knows.....emacs emacs rocks! I do all my coding in emacs.

Well... (0, Troll)

th1ckasabr1ck (752151) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511944)

nmap is the best app for hacking.

centericq (5, Insightful)

ultrabot (200914) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511947)

Centericq rocks. I use it for icq, and occasional peep at irc channels. No need to stress the mousehand, and it also has a very small footprint. It's apt-gettable, so there's no excuse to not try it :).

One advantage of text based apps is the fact that no window management is required, so minimal keyboard driven window managers like ion and ratpoison can be used optimally.

Re:centericq (1)

BinLadenMyHero (688544) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512101)

It's useful for being multi-protocol, but I don't like the user interface, and you have to close one conversation to go to another..

I much prefer the mICQ [micq.org] command prompt style, I find it more intuitive and easier to master (since I only no other IM.. for irc I use BitchX).
You can even use it's script capabilities to show an OSD when receiving new messages.

Bittorrent clients (5, Informative)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511951)

My old linux text-only boxes exist do do my bulk downloading for me.

Bittorrent itself is the best client, the btdownloadcurses.py script. Building just the ncurses app without needing the bloat of X to link against was a bit annoying. Thankfully emerge can pull it off with "-qt -gtk -gnome" use flags.

Another good client is called ctorrent, written in C, a console app. It segfaults when the d/l is > 2gigs (I think thats why), and sometimes doesnt redownload failed segments.. I had to drag some downloads to a windows box and finish them up with the real client. Shame about the bugs, it's a very light and fast app, I hope it's finished.

An old P200/MMX, a big hard drive, and all my downloading is done via ssh, and my real computer is never bogged down with such tasks. wget, bittorrent, ncftp, etc..

Also, it makes throttling it easy. At the gateway, I just throw all traffic from my "grunt boxes" IP's into a lower queue. Torrents no more grind my connection to a halt, it's much more effective than trying to mark packets for other reasons (size, etc).

dircproxy is a cool lil app too, I can keep connected to IRC and bounce from machine to machine. It doesn't handle DCC's all that well, it always seems to clip them.

Grep (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511954)

Grep still has my vote

plugins for lynx... (5, Funny)

rivaldufus (634820) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511960)

I'm working on a Java plugin, a Flash plugin, and a google bar - as well as a popup blocker and an anti-spyware plugin.

Somme little utilities I can't live without... (3, Interesting)

Taurim (622805) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511964)

cd, ls, cp, rm, mv, ln, head, tail, tee, grep, find, awk, sed, cat, more, vi, ps, kill

Gnome is fine to watch pictures or lauch some useful apps like FireFox, Thunderbird and the like but my most useful graphical app is XTerm... lots of XTerm :-)

One application to rule them all: (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9511967)

VI


Really with suitable macro you can make vi to do all these things like e-mail, IM, bittorrent and web surfing. Really a great editor.

abcde (1)

LordShryku (622607) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511970)

mp3blaster and abcde

overnet (1)

i621148 (728860) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511983)

using overnet with screen is really good

ETTERCAP! (1)

cerebralsugar (203167) | more than 10 years ago | (#9511996)

Fast, clear graphical interface. It's great. It's what all windowed applications should be.

nohup (2, Informative)

SpaceTux (453664) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512009)

One of my favorite tools taking care of things when I'm not around! ;-)

Instant messaging - jabber (1)

zdzichu (100333) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512010)

There is some very nice console jabber client, it is called EKG2 [ekg2.org] . I'm using it all the time for the jabber communication - instant messaging with friends, news notification (rss), remote systems monitoring and so more. But there is one very annoyind downside - it hasn't been translated to languages other than Polish ;-). Yet.

Well (1)

Enlarge Your Penis (781779) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512012)

I've found console based emule to be very good for getting porn, I mean, fine art.

Vim (1)

Ricwot (632038) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512022)

The only program I really use in console mode has to be vim, purely because in a gui, the menus are cluttersome, and late night hacking requires coloured text on a black screen, not for any practical purpose, but it makes this script kiddy feel 1337 (well, slightly)

That's strange (1)

Metteyya (790458) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512023)

I haven't seen a comment mentioning Midnight Commander! And this app is great, show me a Linux geek who hadn't used it at least once.
Nautilus and Konqueror can go away in shame when you start seriously using xterm+MC ;).
(don't take sentence above as flamebait, just kiddin', using Konqueror myself)

Lynx (2, Funny)

Draoi (99421) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512024)

Lynx [browser.org] , of course!

Hey - who you calling a Luddite? :-)

elm and tin (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512026)

I've always liked elm and tin for email and news.

Certainly, there are much better products, but these two applications work exactly the way I want them to. What I especially like with console based email applications is that there is no way HTML sites will send a message back to the sender.

wget (3, Insightful)

NeoFunk (654048) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512038)

The world's premier pr0n-leeching tool.

To be fair, I'm not sure how much development is happening with this tool. How can you improve perfection?

emacs -nw (2)

totierne (56891) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512041)

And then use the 101 glories of emacs,
multiple screens, shell buffers, getris,
web browser, doctor, oh and editing text.

I am not sure what the most worked on emacs extensions are, or where new ones sprout from,
maybe I should just look for new .el files
between releases.

Maybe it is already perfect and complete.

Well, (1)

noselasd (594905) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512044)

how much development there is on it I don't know, but
slrn [sourceforge.net] is very nice newsreader.

Nethack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512051)

Nethack [nethack.org] hands down.

Hey, JOE (5, Interesting)

robslimo (587196) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512053)

Pardon me, I'm a WordStar cripple from way back in the early '80s. Got my start coding asm in WordStar on a CP/M machine for a while, then cut my teeth on Turbo Pascal and Turbo C.

The main draw of the WordStar keystrokes? Your hands never have to stray far from home row. It's incredibly sane.

Joe's Own Editor (JOE) perpetuates the sanity in the 'nix world.

Does... (1)

BiggyP (466507) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512054)

Cursed GTK [sourceforge.net] count?

a few (1)

wobblie (191824) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512065)

centericq - nice Im client, does just about every protocol

cdcd - console cd player
aview - ascii image viewer
mp3blaster - media player
mutt - MUA
slrn - newsreader
w3m - web browser (does CSS and tables)
screen
snd
emacs ... to name just a few ...

giFTcurs (3, Interesting)

mkro (644055) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512067)

For P2P, the giFT frontend giFTcurs [nongnu.org] does the job well. Look, pretty screenshot [nongnu.org] . All-in-one package for OpenFT, FastTrack, Gnutella and OpenNap.

How about.. (1)

Rhesus Piece (764852) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512068)

Umm.. apache?
I imagine there a few database apps and
other servers too. Just a guess.

X is for desktop and workstation stuff.
Things that a user interacts with at the screen.
It gives the option of the console also, so the user tends to loose nothing.

Applications that run on servers and daemons don't need a bunch of clicky buttons, and are often not connected to a monitor.

But, I guess you were asking for console desktop apps. There are a few, but as a user interface,
text only is mildly crippled. The only time I use console desktop stuff is when I bork X or when all I've got is SSH (at least once a day).

Other than that, pork is probably my favorite IM client. It's patterned after ircII.

Console is ruled by OS, editors, and code (2, Insightful)

burrows (112035) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512073)

A quick check through my history, and a look at open terminal windows, tells me that most of what I do with the command line is directly related to what I would consider the Operating System. I see a ton of ls, cd, more, dig, tar, gzip, etc. I also see myself using ssh to do OS-type things on other *nix machines. The second place for frequency, though probably first for amount of time using, goes to all of those vim sessions. Lastly, I see a lot of Perl and gcc.

Essentially, I don't use a lot of newly developed tools - or even, for that matter, tools that are still being heavily developed. I don't use the command line to browse, and I don't use it to check mail (though there are a few pines in there). The core of my user experience still feels like it's commands, but in fact, the mindless things that take most of my time are done in a graphical environment (like typing this post). The only tools I see myself using that aren't older than me are tools used for security work (a wonderful list of which you may find here [insecure.org] ), and the occasional bout of StreamRipper [sourceforge.net] .

Somehow, after this post, I feel less like a console jockey than I thought I was. A better question might be: what do console users need?

Not console, but text based (1)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512076)

Console is different than a terminal.

I regularly use 2 kinds of gui apps, web browsers and the MacOS finder.

I prefer the power of the commandline and I can do the same things with the same commands on just about any OS beit my Mac, Linux, or Solaris.

For torrents I use Bittornado [bittornado.com] . I have a better question, how do you run a program that is determined to be run from a tty in the background? Bittornado in the background says something like "tty suspended" or somehting when I background it. Please provide any insights into this.

I have burned CDs for years using cdrecord under Linux, Windows, and my Mac. To me its the best way to burn a cd.

Ghesh, I could go on for hours with all of the little terminal apps that I use, including my aliases, shell functions, and scripts.

mc (2, Insightful)

Tribbin (565963) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512086)

Midnight Commander...

When doing some rough copying stuff or space-cleaning. I intuitively remembered the commands from 'Norton Commander' from many years ago.

Best Console App Evar (1)

bucketoftruth (583696) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512088)

tload. Marvel at it's ascii glory.

sed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9512092)

There are so many countless things you can do with sed when it comes to running jobs and processing files... it gives me a woody.

Some of the Apps I use... (4, Informative)

enyalios (686291) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512097)

screen - to keep lots of applications running that i can access from anywhere.
pork - a console aim client
w3m - a sweet console web browser with optional image support
bittorrent - the standard bittorrent client runs on the console
mutt - powerful and configurable email client
giftcurs - command line client for gift which can share files on the kazaa network
mplayer - console/graphical media player that can play anything
ncftp - an ftp client with tons of features

lame (1)

i621148 (728860) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512103)

lame is also my favorite for
converting recordings into mp3
lame file.wav file.mp3

emerge (0, Troll)

LMCBoy (185365) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512106)

Gentoo rules. Say goodbye to dependency hell.

Grep and wget (4, Interesting)

philipx (521085) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512107)

I always keep a shell window open and no matter how good the editor/IDE I work with, I could not live without grep. Especially as I can pipe output from one grep to the next and refine (-v) the results till I locate some specific result.

And for all my downloading needs I use wget. Besides being way out useful for downloading movies (annoying pages that embed movies and controls that don't allow you to save those movies for later enjoyment), flash animations, PDFs, being able to see the dialog with the server (-S) helped me more than once to figure out what was I doing wrong with my web apps.

browsing logfiles? (1)

flok (24996) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512109)

When it comes to monitoring logfiles, I prefer my own program MultiTail [vanheusden.com] big time. It took quiet a lot of effort to develop it, but I think I included all functionality that I could think off.
I use it always and install it everywhere. But then, I might be a little biased :)

mutella (2, Informative)

EatAtJoes (102729) | more than 10 years ago | (#9512113)

along the whole "ssh to the home linux box to do things they won't let me do at work", mutella [sourceforge.net] is a kickin' gnutella client. it also has a nice web interface which is a bit easier to use ... perhaps it could use the ncurses treatment, but it still rocks.

speaking of consoles -- i wish Ximian would enable a console-only mode for Evolution, which they say is doable. if they did it would be THE killer app on this list.
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