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203 comments

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673308)

and this is the first post on the smallest slashdot article ever.

in 1990 it ended because (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673311)

electronic music stopped being cool, and was replaced with rave music

Re:in 1990 it ended because (3, Insightful)

thrash242 (697169) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673375)

Far from all electronic music is rave "music". There is a lot of innovative stuff being made today. But, it's just like mainstream rock, rap, whatever...the most visible 90% of any music genre sucks. Of course, "electronic music" isn't a genre per se, it's the way it's made. Anyway, my point is: not all electronic music now is rave "music", just like not all electronic music in the 80s was New Wave.

I'm wondering why they didn't make it until 2000 and make it 130 years of electronic music? Well, the article is actually about instruments, not the actual music (from what I saw, anyway). But plenty of cool isntruments have come out since 1990; both software and hardware.

And I realize that your post was probably intended as humor, but I thought I'd point this out anyway.

Re:in 1990 it ended because (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673691)

i want to make techno music on my PC. is there any software that will help me do this? how do the big name djs actually create their music? lots of hardware? thanks!

Re:in 1990 it ended because (0)

suso (153703) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673975)

Maybe you're being sarcastic, but you should check out the software "Reason" by Propellerheads Software.

Re:in 1990 it ended because (1)

WoodenRobot (726910) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674039)

Abelton Live is an AMAZING piece of sequencer software - very powerful and very, very easy to use. Used in combination with a good soundcard, this is all you'll need.

I also recommend FruityLoops for making drum loops, if you feel like it.

hehe (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673313)

and it still sucks

Why 1990? (3, Insightful)

alexatrit (689331) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673320)

Why end at 1990? Did 120 years sound more rounded then 130? Haven't there been several advances made in recording technologies since then? MiniDisc, MP3, widespread adoption of compact discs, SACD. Fourteen years is a long time...

Re:Why 1990? (5, Insightful)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673350)

As I suspected, the site is fairly old, click on "Introduction":
'120 Years Of Electronic Music' is an ongoing project and the site will be updated on a regular basis (currently v3.0 feb 1998).

Regular basis ..

Wow. 6 years ago. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673382)

Slashdot: News for God Knows Who. Stuff from the Very Distant Past... or from Yesterday's Slashdot.

Re:Why 1990? (2, Funny)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673507)

Sure it's updated on a regular basis. Once a decade is regular.

What is doesn't say is that it will be updated frequently...

Re:Why 1990? (2, Funny)

tsa (15680) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673762)

Well, in a time span of 130 years once a decade is frequently.

Re:Why 1990? (2, Insightful)

TehHustler (709893) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673360)

I expect that the jump from 1990 to 2004 will take a considerable amount of writing, when you think of all the technological advances we have had in such a short amount of time. And as someone else has pointed out, it does say "regular basis"

Re:Why 1990? (0)

Allen Zadr (767458) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673664)

Generally speaking - as far as the actual intruments go - there really hasn't been anything exciting or new in the last 14 years though.

There's new software, and keyboards have more computer intigration, but most boards still come in two basic models - PCM digitized signal processors (and samplers) - or Synthesized Wavelength Processors.

They sound better each year, but those basics haven't changed much.

But who cares about such old history? (1)

vivekg (795441) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673363)

Sorry but I'm not intrested in it... this is not geeky stuff at all! Please correct me if I'm wrong :-)

Re:But who cares about such old history? (3, Insightful)

thrash242 (697169) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673442)

To me, electronic music is the geekiest kind. At least some (ie: not rave crap or piano music played on an electronic keyboard) electronic music. What other kind of musician other than a geeky one sits around staring at a computer screen and in front of boxes with oodles of knobs making bleepy noises? It's not as "cool" or socially accepted as playing guitar, piano, etc. Guitarists and drummers and the like don't have to worry about all the very technical aspects of synths, sequencers, samplers, etc that electronic musicians do. Plus, if you like computers and technology, it seems like you'd want to make or listen to music made possible by computers and technology.

Most people on Slashdot don't seem to be that much into electronic music, which kind of surprises me. Or maybe I'm guessing wrong.

Re:But who cares about such old history? (2, Insightful)

WoodenRobot (726910) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673596)

There's little geekier than the IDM scene, which seems to thrive on how obscure your tastes can get. There's an immense number of 'bands' that have popped up out there thanks to people using their computers to make the music they want to hear. Although there's a lot of crap out there, there are also some real gems.

It's a shame that people, especially in the US, it seems, think electronic music = bad chart 'techno', and therefore discard an immense amount of cool music. (

Re:Why 1990? (3, Insightful)

thrash242 (697169) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673395)

I agree that they shouldn't have stopped at 1990, but what do MiniDiscs, MP3, etc have to do with electonic music? It's about instruments, not ways of storing music electronically. Country music can be stored in MP3s, but it's certainly not electronic music.

You're right that there have been advances since then, but not about what kind. I think the widespread use of software rather than hardware is the biggest change in the last few years. Modern software synths, samplers and effects now are comparable in sound quality and usually more flexible than their hardware equivalents.

Re:Why 1990? (2, Insightful)

Emperor Igor (106953) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673806)

Right. Electronic music is evolving along the same lines as the computer did. It's becoming more and more accessible to the average person to make really complex music tracks at home.

Software synths (2, Informative)

CausticPuppy (82139) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673491)

Maybe they update the page every 10 years or something. In 2008 they'll have coverage up through 2000 perhaps?

If they can cover up through 2004, probably one of the most important developments is software-based synthesizers, which either use totally new methods of synthesis (example: Antares Kantos [antarestech.com]) or emulate many of the older models on that list.

So there have been improvements in electronic music and synthesis in recent years, but nowadays everything is so electronic anyway that we don't hear anything and think "oh that's groundbreaking."

An analogy can be made with computer special FX. It's kind of like how the dinosaurs in the original Jurassic Park movie blew everybody away and were revolutionary back then. Now, over 10 years later, CG effects are 100 times better, but everybody is so used to CG effects by now that not a lot of it is revolutionary any more.

Re:Software synths (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673709)

If they can cover up through 2004, probably one of the most important developments is software-based synthesizers...

They do have software synthesizers on there, starting with Music I [obsolete.com], which was developed in the 50's. Sure, it's a breakthrough that it is now possible to do this in realtime. There are also new software synthesis algorithms being developed all the time, as you mentioned. But the idea of software synthesis itself is not new.

Re:Software synths (1)

proj_2501 (78149) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673892)

it looks like kantos can be successfully emulated by an appropriate Max/MSP program, so it's not really new technology.

however, unlike max/msp, it is possible for mere mortals to actually use!

Re:Why 1990? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673666)

as the author i guess i can respond...synthesisers got a bit boring after 1990 - what is there to compare apart from different presets and so-on. audio synthesis sodtware, now that's another story. just never got round to finishing it...

ta

crab

120 years? Bah... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673321)

And this web page [google.com] has a list of music from the beginning of music to the present day. So what...?

The story title is wrong (2, Informative)

the_raptor (652941) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673322)

Its a list of electronic Instruments (according to the Fscking Article). Slow news day?

Re:The story title is wrong (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673348)

how is it wrong you fagget

Re:The story title is wrong (0, Offtopic)

the_raptor (652941) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673428)

You spelt faggot wrong.

Re:The story title is wrong (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673681)

and i fucked your mom last sunday and your dad on tuesday. whats your feckin point fagget?

Greatest instrument ever! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673326)

would Doctor Who, and bad Sci-fi movies have been without Where one of these [obsolete.com] for the sound effects?

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673338)

doh! Need to actually read when I preview.

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (3, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673439)

The Theremin is hardly obsolete. Moog makes them and it is still being composed for. Led Zepplin, among others, have used them in modern recordings.

No, it isn't as popular as the guitar, or even the recorder, but then it never was in the first place.

If you want an example of an "obsolete" instrument that would the violin. The Theremin supercedes it.

KFG

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (3, Insightful)

proj_2501 (78149) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673915)

what model of theremin sounds just like a violin?

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673952)

what model of theremin sounds just like a violin?

None, of course.

KFG

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (1)

Emperor Igor (106953) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674163)

WTF. The violin is by no means obsolete.

The violin is one of the awesomest insturments ever. It will be a sad day when it is obsolete.

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674217)

The violin is one of the awesomest insturments ever. It will be a sad day when it is obsolete.

As it happens I concur fully.

KFG

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (1)

gilgongo (57446) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673449)

Is it true that some of the sounds used in the original theme music for Dr Who were made by slowing down a recording of a nail being hammered into a piece of wood?

My music teacher once mentioned that, but I've never been interested enough until now to know if it was true.

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (4, Interesting)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673474)

Possibly, but most of the original "lead" of the theme music was done with a sine oscillator, careful tweaking of the frequency knob, and lots of cutting and shutting on tape.


The TARDIS sound effect was made by running a key down the bass strings of a gutted piano, and a bit reverb. Lots of BBC Radiophonic Workshop sound effects were made by bashing, bending and otherwise abusing fairly common objects, then speeding up, slowing down, and reversing the sounds on tape. The "laser gun" effects in Blake's 7 were apparently made by gaffa-taping a microphone to an electricity pylon, and bashing one of the other legs of the pylon with a big spanner.

Re:Greatest instrument ever! (1)

Evil Grinn (223934) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674071)

The "laser gun" effects in Blake's 7 were apparently made by gaffa-taping a microphone to an electricity pylon, and bashing one of the other legs of the pylon with a big spanner.

They used the exact same thing for Star Wars, and Ben Burtt claims to have invented it. Don't know much about British TV - which came first, Blake's 7 or Star Wars?

No, (3, Interesting)

dysprosia (661648) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673331)

it's 120 years of electronic musical instruments... For example, Steve Reich's Pendulum Music [wikipedia.org] is pretty much electronic music, but doesn't involve an electronic musical instrument.

Re:No, (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673883)

Except for the microphone and amplifier... Those are electronic... so I guess the person wasn't a robot?

Modern Electronica and House.... (1, Informative)

millahtime (710421) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673333)

Modern Electronica, House, Techno, etc actually came from Detroit, Michigan, USA. THe Motor City. Every year there is the Detroit Electronic Music Festival. [movementfestival.com]

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (1)

mccalli (323026) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673349)

Modern Electronica, House, Techno, etc actually came from Detroit, Michigan, USA. THe Motor City. Every year there is the Detroit Electronic Music Festival.

Yeah, but if you keep quiet about it we'll try our hardest to forgive you.

Cheers,
Ian

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (1)

gilgongo (57446) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673358)

Although if you ask many early Detroit house and techno artists, they will cite European influences such as Kraftwerk and Depeche Mode. The Wire Magazine [thewire.co.uk] had some interviews with some of the people on the early Detroit scene.

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673424)

I'm not sure you can point to any one location as the origin of electronica. Many of those European artists will point to Yellow Magic Orchestra (Japan) as one of their influences, then there's early Pink Floyd and other 1960's experimental stuff that predates all those (though Kraftwerk may have been around that long, I'm not sure).

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (1)

thrash242 (697169) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673532)

Musique Concrete is commonly looked at as the precursor to electronic music as we know it today. It was made (in the 40s and 50s) by taking electronic lab equipment that produced tones, recording them to tape (along with sounds occuring in nature) and then splicing that tape creatively to make music. The first "loop" came from this era also and was an physical loop of audio tape that played endlessly. Very tedious, obviously, but at the time it was the only way to make music electronically. This was before synthesizers as we know them today (ie: noise-making boxes with keyboards or some kind of control input) existed.

The history of electronic music and its precursors is pretty interesting if you care to look into it.

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9674102)

Detroit was big for the techno scene - house began in Chicago and New York.

The best book on the history of electronic dance music is "Last Night a DJ Saved My Life". It's a really interesting genre to read about.

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673447)

And I would like to thank the British Media for bigging-up the whole Acid House scene in 1990, 1991 and 1992. You did more to promote the scene than we could ever have achieved by ourselves. The way you portrayed everything in the scene as evil was just what teenage lads like myself wanted to get into.

Top one, nice one, get sorted.

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673728)

Techno did indeed have its origins in Detroit, however, House and Acid House were born in Chicago. The British claim to have started Jungle/Drum n' Bass, but I read somewhere that there were tracks with the Amen break popping up at underground clubs in Detroit (or maybe it was Philly) as early as '87.

Re:Modern Electronica and House.... (0)

EnderWiggnz (39214) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673890)

philly does have a hand in the happy-house scene, with josh wink and nigel at the head ....

Puristic (1)

jm.one (655706) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673337)

Is the short form and the puristic style of thsi article inspired by a certain electronic song ("the robots")?

What about NI (5, Informative)

slashflood (697891) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673341)


They list Steinberg, but ignored Native Instruments [native-instruments.de], the producer of Reaktor. Very incomplete.

Re:What about NI (1)

madprof (4723) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673374)

Were they around before 1990? This web site only goes up to then.
Steinberg were ve influential before 1990 hence they clearly deserve to be mentioned.

Re:What about NI (4, Informative)

tulimulta (769091) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673380)

I don't think that NI existed in the 1980s. Do correct me if I'm wrong.

The beginning of the list was fascinating, but from the 1970s onwards the list has glaring omissions. Where's the ARP synths? Not to talk about the 1980s list. They should remove the last 20 years from the list, since other sites manage that part way better, eg. synthmuseum.com [synthmuseum.com].

Hmm... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673347)

Might make a nice addition to the Wikipedia page on the same topic [wikipedia.org], with the author's permission, of course. Dunno why this is on the front page of Slashdot, though...

Stockhausen? (4, Insightful)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673369)

120 years of electronic music, and no mention of Karl-Heinz Stockhausen? How could they leave him out?

Re:Stockhausen? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673739)

aha! there is:

http://www.obsolete.com/120_years/machines/elect ro nium_pi/index.html

and various other bits as well. i wrote it as a list of instruments not really as a list artists...

Re:Stockhausen? (3, Insightful)

iLEZ (594245) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673944)

Seems like they have concentrated on the instruments themselves. I reacted to this myself as i expected to see Kraftwerk mentioned somewhere around 1970.

On a side note, i am going to a Kraftwerk concert this week. I am very much looking forward to it. =)

Lifted from Bash.org (3, Insightful)

The-Bus (138060) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673372)

c-rock: Whatever happened to sex drugs and rock n roll? Now we just have aids crack and techno.

Re:Lifted from Bash.org (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673746)

Huh? The latter is pretty much a result of the former. Too much casual sex, and drug needles, led to aids. Crack is a drug or is it the implication that their drugs are nobler than crack? Finally, techno and rock 'n' roll are in the same league. They are a generation's form of expression. Unless, again, is the implication that techno is crap but rock 'n' roll is some high form of art right next to classical music?

My message to the aging rockers: fuck you.

My message to techno handbaggers. (1)

turgid (580780) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674009)

My message to the aging rockers: fuck you.

Wash your mouth out with soap and water, sunny Jim!

Rock is proper music played on musical instruments.

Techno handbag disco music is just a noise that comes out of machines. And just look on your local high street on a Friday or Saturday night and see the barely-clad, drug-crazed, orange, under-age youngsters queuing up to get into over-priced night-clubs to techno handbag disco the night away and possibly later surrendering their bodies to the nearest sentient being wearing the right brand of training shoes.

Zombies.

Give me some good old-fashioned guitar-based rock any day. Slayer, Voivod or even Metallica if things get desperate.

Remember kids, God gave Rock'N'Roll to you.

Re:My message to techno handbaggers. (1)

Damek (515688) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674239)

Have you watched any rock concert documentaries from the 60s and 70s? Most of the rock kids back then look like zombies if you ask me.

And it's funny that you define rock as "proper music played on musical instruments". As if a computer can't be a musical instrument. As if "rock is proper music" isn't a recursive definition...

If you ask me, rock and techno and hip-hop are all great. And if you ask me, the world will start being a little better place when age stops resenting youth and when youth stops disrespecting age.

Re:My message to techno handbaggers. (1)

Emperor Igor (106953) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674241)

Hey, do aging rockers remember when people older than them told them that Rock n' Roll was just noise and was sinful?

Re:My message to techno handbaggers. (1)

turgid (580780) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674300)

Don't you know that the Saxophone is the instrument of the Devil, young man?

Re:My message to techno handbaggers. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9674293)

Techno handbag disco music is just a noise that comes out of machines. And just look on your local high street on a Friday or Saturday night and see the barely-clad, drug-crazed, orange, under-age youngsters queuing up to get into over-priced night-clubs to techno handbag disco the night away and possibly later surrendering their bodies to the nearest sentient being wearing the right brand of training shoes.

Dear me. Do you seriously think that's all electronic music is? Meat Market Music is obviously going to be pure crap - and absolutely nothing to do with people who have some real talent.

How about folks like Autechre, Coil, Eno, Aphex Twin, Orbital, Jeff Mills, Peshay, Basic Channel, Ritchie Hawtin - many of whom MAKE their own instruments...

Give me some good old-fashioned guitar-based rock any day. Slayer, Voivod or even Metallica if things get desperate.

Mmmm. Officially Rebellious Music(TM).

I remember I had a friend who loathed the notion of anything but metal, thinking what you see on MTV represents in any way electronic music - he changed his mind when I dragged him to some of Leeds' underground Acid Techno nights. Do yourself a favour - get a clue about what's out there, there's many excellent things to find....

List of instruments, yes, influence, no. (1)

JazzXP (770338) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673387)

Interesting link, but it doesn't show how influcencial on electronic music each one was. That would be a very interesting stat. Eg. In most peoples minds, the Dr Who theme was the start of mainstream electronic music, but what inspired that?

Re:List of instruments, yes, influence, no. (3, Interesting)

Nosher (574322) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673603)

There's an interesting article about the creators of the Dr. Who theme, the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop, here [glias.org.uk] (especially the section entitled "early days"). The Workshop is indeed often credited with introducing electronic music (influenced to a degree by the French "Music Concrète" school) into the mainstream, at least in the UK. There were all sorts of cool tales about the hacks they used to create their effects, for example tape-loops that were so long the tape would be fed out of one room, down the corridor and back through another office.

Theremin! (4, Informative)

Random_Goblin (781985) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673417)

The Theremin Leon Termen Soviet Union 1917


This looks to be the oldest electronic instrument that is still regarlly used today... of particular note is the artist Goldfrapp [goldfrapp.co.uk] who plays a theremin in a MOST provocative manner during her live gigs!

87 years is quite a respectable age. I can't see a date for electric guitar anywhere on the site.

also just got to love
Dr Kent's Electronic Music Box Dr Earle Kent USA 1951


do you think he had an advertising jingle?

Stylophone! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673462)

Stylophone Rolf Harris Australia 1967

"Can you tell what it is yet?"
"No! It's just a fucking annoying buzzing noise!!"

Don't think he ever played it in a provocative manner though...

Re:Stylophone! (1)

Random_Goblin (781985) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673699)

although quite a few people wanted him to stick it...[edited for good tase (unlike mr harris)]... which is of course what ms goldfrapp does with the rather larger theremin... and keeps it in tune too, the love.

Electric guitar is missing (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673430)

The list has plenty of keyboard instruments but no mention of the electric guitar. The keyboard or the fingerboard are the input device. The sound is basically created electronically.

Yes, I know that the guitar strings vibrate but the sound is nothing like my acoustic guitar.

Re:Electric guitar is missing (2, Insightful)

MBAFK (769131) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673727)

I noticed this too, but after a bit of googling I found out probably why it's not on that list:

Source [campusprogram.com]
An electronic musical instrument is a musical instrument that produces its sounds using electronics. In contrast, the term electric instrument is used to mean instruments whose sound is produced mechanically, and only amplified electronically - for example an electric guitar.

Electric Guitar is not an electronic instrument. (1)

Zen Punk (785385) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674236)

I know that the guitar strings vibrate but the sound is nothing like my acoustic guitar.


Have you ever heard of an Acoustic/Electric guitar?
That is an acoustic guitar with a pickup. You can hook it up to an amplifier, and the sound coming out of the amp will be pretty much the same as that coming out of the soundhole, just louder.


An electric guitar generates sound by the same mechanism as an acoustic - the vibration of strings induces a corresponding vibration in the body of the guitar via the bridge. The body of the guitar moves air, a.k.a makes sound waves. In the case of an electric guitar, the vibration of the strings also induces a current in the electromagnetic pickups, which is fed to an amplifier where it is translated into sound.


The reason your electric guitar sounds different than your acoustic is the same reason a mandolin sounds different than your guitar - they are shaped differently, have different densities, and are made of different materials, which affects the way sound moves through them.

Theremin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673444)

http://imdb.com/title/tt0108323/

many manufacturers (1)

0xbeefcake (672592) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673574)

As this is only a list of manufacturers of synthesizer hardware, it's leaving out an enormous amount. Not only artists, but manufacturers of other important equipment both hardware and software used in electronic music production. There's no mention of sequencers, mixers, storage media, MIDI and the plethora of related items that have evolved alongside, and complement, the synth (the intro does exclude them from the scope of the article though).

I couldn't see any entry for Jarre's laser harp. Or modern 'software synths', many of which emulate 'old' dedicated hardware and substite for their antiquated predecessors.

vocoder (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673577)

Interesting that the vocoder, invented in 1940, is still being used to distort the vocals in some pop songs today.

Re:vocoder (1)

zalas (682627) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674296)

That's because a lot of pop artists can't sing, and distorting their voices will make them sound cool and distract you from their singing or the artifacts created from pitch matching.

Ok then - who here plays? (3, Interesting)

mccalli (323026) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673646)

Interesting one for me this - I got into keyboards and computers at roughly the same age (about nine), and have been using one to help with the other ever since.

This mushroomed when I got an Atari ST - still the most influential machine for me. I got it for the games, but also spent time learning C on it and got into Steingberg Pro 12 - I bought the excellent for its time mono monitor, and never looked back.

Main inspiration for learning electronic music as a kid would be the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Always remembered for their Dr Who work, it's often forgotten that they did an awul lot more than this - the incidental music for the nature series Life On Earth was superb, and it's a track called The Astronauts (Through A Glass Darkly album, Peter Howell) which finally made me decide I wanted to play.

I've since decided to try learning piano as well as keyboard (very different - left hand work especially), but I'm essentially a keyboard player dabbling with piano, not a pianist dabbling with keyboards.

So, who else then? Any links to music? I've barely put online anything I did, but there's some really early teenage stuff from me and also a couple of ~1999 tracks available here [eruvia.org]. Don't laugh too loudly please...I've written better. Honest.

Cheers,
Ian

I wonder why it died in the 1990's? (1, Funny)

digitalgimpus (468277) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673730)

Hmm... could it be because Rock & Roll with a guy on a CASIO is just awkward?

Ugh, I hated that stuff.

One liner? (2)

Freon115 (672518) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673828)

What with the one liner? No link, no cheap stab at MS or Linux?
There should be a minimum lenght for news and comments, otherwise this place will look like a cheap blog... oh wait!

Fender Rhodes (1)

wwwillem (253720) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673837)

Nice overview, but why is the Fender Rhodes missing? It is an icon of its time (1970s).

missed the tr-909 too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9673889)

they don't have the tr-909 on the roland link! this drum machine along with the tr-808 and tb-303 have been and still are THE most important instruments in most acid and techno tracks.

the instrument..and the musicians? (3, Informative)

cabazorro (601004) | more than 9 years ago | (#9673917)

For the site to be truly complete
it should provide famous music/musicians that
made the sound of some of this instruments
popular. The likes of:
Tomita
Jean Michelle Jarre
Kitaro
Vangelis
Mike Oldfield
Philip Glass
and of course
Tangerine Dream.

Re:the instrument..and the musicians? (1)

WoodenRobot (726910) | more than 9 years ago | (#9674074)

How could you forget Brian Eno?! :^O

The guy essentially invented ambient music!

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