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Like A Cat, New Robot Lands On Its Feet

timothy posted about 10 years ago | from the pfffthhpt dept.

Robotics 263

eckenheimer writes "Students at the Physics Department at Drury University have developed a robot that uses motions and contortions of its body to orient itself in zero gravity. According to the project site, 'If you've ever seen a cat land on its feet after falling while upside down then you've seen the idea behind our project.' The effort is a proposal for the NASA Reduced Gravity Student Flight Opportunities Program."

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263 comments

Like a...? (5, Funny)

SIGALRM (784769) | about 10 years ago | (#9698367)

If you've ever seen a cat land on its feet after falling while upside down
I'm looking forward to their "like-a-dog" model: word on the street is, licks its own ass.

Now that's using "motions and contortions".

Re:Like a...? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698406)

thats a pretty fun first post. GJ!

Re:Like a...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698660)


I noticed SIGALRM [slashdot.org] gets a lot of first posts. Benefits of being a subscriber I guess.

Re:Like a...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698414)

What are you supposed to do with a robotic cat? Why not use a real cat? This sounds silly.

Re:Like a...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698444)

Put solar panels on it's belly and use it to recharge batteries...?

Re:Like a...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698632)

Cat allergies?

Re:Like a...? (4, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | about 10 years ago | (#9698691)

There are serious applications for this. Namely, being able to orient yourself in space without using propellant is a very valuable ability.

The real surprise is that this is nothing radical; I really don't get why it deserves a press release. Probes have been using momentum wheels, for example, to do the same thing for decades. What is the big advantage of this over, say, a small set of momentum wheels? All I can really say about it is that it's more complex, and seems more likely to wear and have part failures.

Re:Like a...? (5, Funny)

grunt107 (739510) | about 10 years ago | (#9698434)

I would merge the cat/dog projects.

All the loyalty of a cat with the cleanliness of a dog

Re:Like a...? (1)

trentblase (717954) | about 10 years ago | (#9698495)

Twice the pet, none of the mess!

Re:Like a...? (4, Funny)

drtomaso (694800) | about 10 years ago | (#9698726)

Some other "cat-like" behavior they forgot to mention:

  • Robot sleeps 16 hours a day
  • Robot begs for food when scientists are seated around the dinner table
  • Ate robo-bird

Now all we need is buttered bread (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698380)

...to stick on its back and we'll have an antigravity engine.

Where's the beef? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698385)

I see no completed robot, no performance data or even a simulation of how it will perform in the real world. Just a REAAALLY bad web site (No page navigation? Come on!) and some digital photos of these kids and their drawings. The dates in the pages and some photos are from fall of 2003. If these were college seniors (as it says in the "meet the team" section) at the time they have already graduated by now, and abandoned these pages.

How is this newsworthy?

Re:Where's the beef? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698419)

it is not. why you think it should be?

Re:Where's the beef? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698445)

You can tell who actually RTFA instead of trying to post cat jokes. Parent has a good point!

Re:Where's the beef? (5, Informative)

enforcer999 (733591) | about 10 years ago | (#9698536)

Here [drury.edu] you go. It is not a very "pretty" robot but it could have its uses.

Re:Where's the beef? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698576)

Good link! Thanks....

Re:Where's the beef? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698730)

The video doesn't seem very useful. I kept expecting someone to invert the robot on its suspending wire, but all it does is twist rhythmically while upright.

I'm sure it's a brilliant project, but couldn't they get a video that shows what this actually does?

When I throw cats down... (1, Flamebait)

Kjuib (584451) | about 10 years ago | (#9698400)

They don't land on their feet. In fact they don't even crawl out of the crater they made on impact.

So if... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698401)

..you put a buttered microprocessor in its head.....

Oh forget it.

Like a Cat (1)

skarps (688370) | about 10 years ago | (#9698405)

Will it come with a scratching post and shit all over in the house when your gone?

Catwoman! (0)

mfh (56) | about 10 years ago | (#9698408)

Just in time for Catwoman [imdb.com] ! Now she can have a true nemesis to do battle against!! (Robocat)

Butter side up? (2, Funny)

decipher_saint (72686) | about 10 years ago | (#9698410)

Can we apply some kind of techno-butter to one side to see if the robot can stay in a constant state of airborne suspension?

Re:Butter side up? Rest of Joke (1, Funny)

Dareth (47614) | about 10 years ago | (#9698709)

Because cats always land on their feet and toast always lands buttered side down, you can construct a perpetual motion machine by simply strapping a slice of buttered toast to a cat's back. When the cat is dropped it will remain suspended and revolve indefinitely due to the opposing forces.

Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1, Funny)

haplo21112 (184264) | about 10 years ago | (#9698423)

Thats where I want to send my kid for some zero grav training...then they can save the word for us....

Re:Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1)

Sielle (785160) | about 10 years ago | (#9698521)

Kinda hard to get into the Battle School though. Your son is going to have to kill the class bully first.

Re:Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1)

cartzworth (709639) | about 10 years ago | (#9698590)

I like playing video games.

Re:Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1)

haplo21112 (184264) | about 10 years ago | (#9698609)

Oh, killing bully's will lesson number 1.

Re:Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1)

haplo21112 (184264) | about 10 years ago | (#9698649)

I am alittle worried about that sexy woman's voice in his head later on though.

Re:Forget that...When do they open "Battle School" (1)

ZeroGee (796304) | about 10 years ago | (#9698555)

E-mail me in twenty years. I'll let the X-Prize competitors do some of the legwork and garner public interest, and then I'll swoop in and provide true orbital tourism, complete with a zero-G gym. Freeze-guns included free with the "Sports" package.

Cats landing on their feet (4, Informative)

thedogcow (694111) | about 10 years ago | (#9698424)

This was explained to me in my physics for engineers class...

Cats reposition themselves to land on their feet because they can sense the change in velocity (dv/dt = acceleration). My professor stated this only works for small height values (less than 20 ft), otherwise, the acceleration due to gravity might result in an unpleasant aftermath.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (2, Informative)

Kenja (541830) | about 10 years ago | (#9698459)

I recall reading a bit about how after the 10th floor, cats cat spread thir legs and "glide" to slow down enough to survive. Statistics show that there are more feline fatalities between floors 3-10 then there are after 10.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698531)

The real "cat"astrophe is there are actual statistics on this.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (2, Insightful)

forrestt (267374) | about 10 years ago | (#9698554)

Statistics show that there are more feline fatalities between floors 3-10 then[sic] there are after 10.

I bet statistics also show that there are more buildings with top floors between 3-10 than there are buildings > 10. But what do I know?

Re:Cats landing on their feet (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698638)

Cats don't just jump from top floors. They also can fall from intermediate floors while trying to grab birds and other critters who wander about on window ledges and push screens out of windows.

I had a cat who almost did this once. He was head-butting the screen so much when he saw me coming I thought he was going to either break the screen or force it out of the tracks.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (5, Funny)

no longer myself (741142) | about 10 years ago | (#9698713)

I'm just having this morbidly funny image of people throwing cats out windows as part of a government study to test that "statistic":

"Damn, Bob... Did you see that? He might have made it if that cab driver hadn't run over him."

"Yeah, Pete. Let's take this tabby up to the 23rd floor. Oh, by the way, did you hear they're working on a robot that mimics this sort of behavior."

"I think I did read something about that, Bob, but tossing an expensive piece of hardware out the window just isn't as satisfying."

"You've never owned a Mac, have you, Pete?"

Re:Cats landing on their feet (1)

dgagley (468178) | about 10 years ago | (#9698738)

One of my cats used to jump out of my 2nd story window to reach the roof when she did fall she would put out her paws and glide untill about the last six feet than straighten out. The other cat I had never went above the height of the TV because she almost never landed on her feet.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (5, Interesting)

Rob Carr (780861) | about 10 years ago | (#9698567)

Cats reposition themselves to land on their feet because they can sense the change in velocity (dv/dt = acceleration). My professor stated this only works for small height values (less than 20 ft), otherwise, the acceleration due to gravity might result in an unpleasant aftermath.

Actually, it's the short falls [uaf.edu] that tend to kill cats. Cats (like skydivers) can assume a position that reduces the terminal velocity and presents the greatest surface area for impact, reducing the force per unit of surface area. It takes a while to rotate and get into the position, so if the fall is too short, the cat will land in an awkward position and is far more likely to die.

This is not to say that the cats that fell from a great height were uninjured - just that they were more likely to have non-fatal injuries.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (5, Insightful)

eunos94 (254614) | about 10 years ago | (#9698765)

I call bullshit. This study has one HUGE flaw in it. I remember in college when this study was brought up in a statistics class. The flaw can be summed up in one clear thought.

"No one brings a clearly dead cat to the vet."

If the fall is high enough, the odds of living decrease and therefore no cats are brought to the vet unless they miraculously survived. The study self-selects for those cases. Ergo...bad stats. Grrr...the bane of my social sci existence.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (1)

hatter3bdev (533135) | about 10 years ago | (#9698781)

The study mentioned in the link above is flawed. If your cat dies instantly from a fall off of your balcony, why would you bring it to a vet? So they can pronounce it?

Re:Cats landing on their feet (1)

slushbat (777142) | about 10 years ago | (#9698633)

Professors can talk out of their asses because everyone expects them to be right. Actually cats can survive falling from any height. Check out this New Scientist article [newscientist.com]

Re:Cats landing on their feet (5, Funny)

captnjameskirk (599714) | about 10 years ago | (#9698647)

the acceleration due to gravity might result in an unpleasant aftermath

Actually, it's the deceleration when meeting the ground that is usually the culprit.

Re:Cats landing on their feet (0)

RainbowSix (105550) | about 10 years ago | (#9698666)

My professor stated this only works for small height values (less than 20 ft), otherwise, the acceleration due to gravity might result in an unpleasant aftermath.

Your professor has obviously never seen the NINJA KITTY!!!
http://www.potgut.com/videos/flyingcat.m peg

Re:Cats landing on their feet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698840)

Actually, cat's survivability in falls goes up over a height of about 30 feet -- they very quickly reach terminal velocity and relax after putting themselves in an optimal position for impact. I suspect the longer the hair, the better the survivability too (longer hair == lower terminal velocity) (I've always wanted to test this by throwning cats out of airplanes, but so far noone has volunteered their cat for this experiment.)

I am not a physicist (2, Insightful)

kilocomp (234607) | about 10 years ago | (#9698431)

But their project is about " a robot that uses motions and contortions of its body to orient itself in zero gravity" but they describe it using a situation caused by gravity "If you've ever seen a cat land on its feet after falling while upside down then you've seen the idea behind our project."

Re:I am not a physicist (2, Interesting)

hopews (450546) | about 10 years ago | (#9698526)

When a cat is falling ( or while anything is falling for that matter ) it is in free fall until there is significant drag from its motion through the air. Free fall is effectively a zero gravity state.

NASA used planes in a dive to simulate zero gravity for astronaught training.

Re:I am not a physicist (1)

manWorkSucks (745760) | about 10 years ago | (#9698533)

in the case of a cat, i don't believe the gravity is working for it, in terms of rotating itself. I believe the principles of rotating (without something external to push against) is what's key here and that should work with or without gravity. But, I to am not a physicist, so I could be wrong.

Re:I am not a physicist (1)

karnal (22275) | about 10 years ago | (#9698545)

So that either means the analogy is false, or their robot will use motions and contortions to orient itself, and then commence spinning and wriggling out of control, since there is no "down" in space.

Net Angular Momentum (1)

ZeroGee (796304) | about 10 years ago | (#9698637)

The cat can orient itself correctly due to changes in rotation without changing its total angular momentum. Angular momentum is a quantity that must be conserved -- if it drops off a ledge with zero angular momentum, it has to land with zero angular momentum. However, by rotating a part of its body in one direction, it can twist another part to line up with the "ground," allowing it to land on all four paws. Thus the net angular momentum of the system has remained zero, but it has repositioned itself.

Neither am I, but (1)

Scorchio (177053) | about 10 years ago | (#9698853)

The article describes how the cat manages to turn by rotating parts of its body without actually pushing against anything, or breaking any laws of physics. I think NASA would be very interested in this because it would mean a robot in a 0-g environment could alter its rotation without having to resort to firing chemical or compressed gas engines. Which is pretty cool. Has anything else like this been attempted?

I'll admit, though, that my initial thought was that the robot being in a situation where there is no clearly defined up or down, would do nothing apart from declare itself to be the right way up already. This may explain why NASA hasn't invited me to help out on any missions lately.

Yeah, but is it like a pussy cat? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698432)

who always lands on my dick?

A better idea behind the project... (3, Funny)

cloudkj (685320) | about 10 years ago | (#9698435)

...would've been to give the robot 9 lives. If this "cat-like" robot doesnt land perfectly, there goes a few hundred thousand dollars.

Bah! I can do that too.. (2, Funny)

myrdred (597891) | about 10 years ago | (#9698441)

Just make the feet of the robot really, really heavy. Heavier than the rest of its body, then it will always land on its feet!

Re:Bah! I can do that too.. (1)

manWorkSucks (745760) | about 10 years ago | (#9698559)

given a fall far/fast enough for the drag of the wind on it to right it.

Re:Bah! I can do that too.. (1)

tabdelgawad (590061) | about 10 years ago | (#9698760)

Yes, because as everyone knows, heavy objects fall faster than light objects ...

Like toast? (0, Redundant)

_14k4 (5085) | about 10 years ago | (#9698442)

So if you put butter on the other side of the robot, will it hover?

I mean, it works for my cat...

Stupid Web Design (-1, Offtopic)

adavies42 (746183) | about 10 years ago | (#9698443)

Come on, people! "Untitled Document"? Way to impress. (Oh, and KISS is a guidline, not dogma--the unformatted-long-page-of-stuff design was old in '95.)

Re:Stupid Web Design (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698592)

Come on, people! "Untitled Document"? Way to impress.

Oh, give them a break. There going to upgrade soon to "Untitled Document 1".

Re:Stupid Web Design (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698603)

Yeah, have to agree. My little hole-in-the-web will never win any awards but even my pages are layed out much more nicely.

I think the two biggest gripes were the idea and theory pages (both equally sparse) and the team list where you are only given emails. Apparently they can take goofy picures of the team pointing to their 'brilliant' ideas but can't add a picture to each contact.

And no, I'm not giving out my URL for you to decide if my site is fugly or not. I know it is. Especially considering it was all written in Notepad using HTML from who-knows-how-long-ago. I'm just now getting around to using CSS.

Have to wonder how they did their research... (4, Funny)

foidulus (743482) | about 10 years ago | (#9698446)

I can just imagine the papers you would have to fill out
Experiment: "Drop cats repeatedly, observe results for use in robotics..."
See how well PETA would love that one!

Re:Have to wonder how they did their research... (3, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | about 10 years ago | (#9698594)

That research was already done [physlink.com] . Complete with pictures of dropped cats. These guys are just taking advantage of the previous research.

Anyone could do this... (2, Funny)

SlapAyoda (6041) | about 10 years ago | (#9698453)

Just attach a printed list of all the Internet Explorer security holes in the past few months to any existing robot's feet, and the resulting weight should be enough to reproduce this cat-like ability.

is it a better mousetrap too? (2, Funny)

peter303 (12292) | about 10 years ago | (#9698457)

As Ralph Waldo Emerson said "if you build a better mousetrap, the world will beat a path to your door".

Re:is it a better mousetrap too? (1)

justkarl (775856) | about 10 years ago | (#9698570)

As Ralph Waldo Emerson said "if you build a better mousetrap, the world will beat a path to your door."

Are you telling me that this is the beginning of a new millenium of mice-catching?

Imagine...Robo-Tom!

Re:is it a better mousetrap too? (2, Funny)

mopslik (688435) | about 10 years ago | (#9698600)

Or in /.'s case:

"Build a better mousetrap and the world will not just beat a path to your door but will overwhelm your server."

Not sure who said that one.

Re:is it a better mousetrap too? (2, Funny)

Neil Blender (555885) | about 10 years ago | (#9698636)

Or in /.'s case:

"Build a better mousetrap and the world will not just beat a path to your door but will overwhelm your server."


Don' forget "and bitch about the patent."

now... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698464)

what if we glue a piece of pizza to its back?

Air pressure (1)

suffe (72090) | about 10 years ago | (#9698468)

If it's for zero grav, and not acctualy for landing on its feet, then wouldn't "air jets", ie pressure streams generated from compressed air, and a gyro or two be much more simple to generate?

Re:Air pressure (1)

manWorkSucks (745760) | about 10 years ago | (#9698628)

zero gravity is often times found along with something else: a lack of air. sure you could carry a compressed air canister but when it runs out, you're kind of SOL. This could use solar power to keep it going indefinitely.

Cats don't always land on their feet (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698470)

If my cat gets dopped up on nip, he'll roll of the table and land on his back. And I'm talkin 2.5-3 foot fall.

Re:Cats don't always land on their feet (0, Offtopic)

Wally Fenderson (791245) | about 10 years ago | (#9698643)

Your cat's two and a half to three feet tall...wow...

And now for something completely relevant (0, Offtopic)

MECC (8478) | about 10 years ago | (#9698472)

When do they come out with a robot emulating some really interesting and usefull real-life function, like being in heat?

Re:And now for something completely relevant (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698488)

Why? So you can fuck it?

Re:And now for something completely relevant (1)

MECC (8478) | about 10 years ago | (#9698498)

That would depend on on how cute it was...

Re:And now for something completely relevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698530)

Yeah, I suppose if it was CatwomanBot(TM) I would be right there with you!

Re:And now for something completely relevant (1)

MECC (8478) | about 10 years ago | (#9698551)

Mmmmmm - Catwomanbot - Mmmmmm

That's nice (0, Offtopic)

Neil Blender (555885) | about 10 years ago | (#9698507)

But does it have the strength of 5 gorillas?

Re:That's nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698550)

And big chainsaw hands? BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!

Re:That's nice (1)

MECC (8478) | about 10 years ago | (#9698591)

A catwomanbot with chainsaw hands - something for everyone.

Re:That's nice (1)

Wally Fenderson (791245) | about 10 years ago | (#9698717)


A catwomanbot with chainsaw hands - something for everyone.


Un..er...ug...no...bad!!!!

How cool is that? (2, Interesting)

senzafine (630873) | about 10 years ago | (#9698525)

That sounds like a fun project to work on. I can think of all sorts of uses for something like this. We can ensure that all olympic divers enter the water perfectly perpendicular to the surface. likewise gymnasts doing the vault will always land on their feet. Throwing spirals with a football could be automagic. Ok...nothing lifechanging there...but I'm sure someone will think of something.

Re:How cool is that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698616)

...all olympic divers enter the water perfectly perpendicular... ...gymnasts doing the vault will always land on their feet... ...Throwing spirals with a football could be automagic

Why even have sports? If I want to see robots executing perfectly, I'll go to the Hall of Presidents.

Why not just use cats? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698561)

If they could be trained to sort tiny screws in space, we could ditch the robots completely and go with a cheaper program.

The cats I drop never land on their feet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698580)

Of course the high spin and acceleration I give them may have something to do with it. *shrugs*

I wonder... (4, Interesting)

Unnngh! (731758) | about 10 years ago | (#9698608)

...if the robot can survive terminal velocity falls [uaf.edu] like cats. Cats falling from very high heights (i.e. skyscrapers) tend to survive the fall better than those falling from lower elevations.

Read the article and... (1)

feloneous cat (564318) | about 10 years ago | (#9698610)

Woowee! First we start with Newton's equations and... ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ As to what the hell that had to do with cats, feet, and landing... I'll have HALF of what the original poster took!

Getting the Shaft (0, Troll)

artlu (265391) | about 10 years ago | (#9698613)

Dogs always get the shaft. "9 Lives" - Cats, "Land on their feet" - Cats, "Catwoman" - Cats.
Dogs are so much more fun then cats, they deserve some respect damnit.

GroupShares Inc. [groupshares.com]

Re:Getting the Shaft (1)

seaniqua (796818) | about 10 years ago | (#9698727)

What about "doggy-style?" I'd take that over landing on my feet any day...

Re:Getting the Shaft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698729)

Dogs don't get the shaft.

They just aren't, pound for pound, nearly as effective or magnificent a predator as a cat. People are in awe of cats because they are the pinnacle of mammalian predatory evolution.

Legs? (2, Insightful)

Wizzy Wig (618399) | about 10 years ago | (#9698615)

Why would a robot (or human for that matter) designed for zero g require feet? Go back to the drawing board... replace those feet with a couple more arms.

Re:Legs? (1)

CommanderData (782739) | about 10 years ago | (#9698672)

Like the "Quaddies" in Vorkosigan books Lois McMaster Bujold. Genetically engineered humans with a second set of arms where their legs should be, specially adapted to life in space. Good stories by the way, if you're looking for reading material...

Another new breakthrough (2, Funny)

mseeger (40923) | about 10 years ago | (#9698626)

DPA: As professor Fallsonhisface of the chair for human mechanics anounced today, he delivered another breakthrough in robotics. By using a new technology dubbed "artifical clumsiness" he created a robot that appears more humanlike than every other machine today. He stated that "... Most people are scared to death by machines acting perfectly. They will only accept a robot in their daily life if those manage to make mistakes. People want to feel supperior."

He was confident that the first prototype would convince the public once it has been reassembled again.

Regards, Martin

How does it all fit together? (2)

Sean80 (567340) | about 10 years ago | (#9698656)

We tend to see a fair number of these postings coming through here. What I'm trying to get my head around is how all of these fit together.

It would appear that this posting fits in with a robot's ability to manage its own body. I guess other components are intelligence, being able to sense the environment, being self-sufficient, and so forth.

Does anybody have any good thoughts on how everything is fitting together, and how far we are, in total, from a robot that can be truly useful, say, as a human companion, or for other purposes?

Story Musgrave (5, Interesting)

Ferante (309529) | about 10 years ago | (#9698752)

In grad school one of my physics professors wrote a paper on orienting onself in zero g with no net angular momentum. One student was just convinced it was impossible. Soon thereafter we were visted by Story Musgrave (one of astronauts who fixed Hubble) and the professor told him of the paper. Story immediately sat down on a swivel chair and demonstrated the motion necessary to turn in zero g without grabbing on to anything. It's interesting how a concept that caused some interesting debates among the students suddenly became obvious when it was directly demonstrated.

Thinking of human companion applications ... (1)

sosuke (789685) | about 10 years ago | (#9698756)

I am sure that the ability to balance and rotate could be quite useful in a female companion...

Re:Thinking of human companion applications ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698795)

Sosuke, meet MECC [slashdot.org] . I'm sure you two could do much to advance the field of Fembotics...

Fuck you gentoo zealots (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698780)

It's been 6 days and this shits still compiling!

On a 2.4ghz celeron with 512megs of ram. In a distcc environment shared with two 3.06ghz P4s, 4 1ghz P3s and a couple more celerons, no less!

Holee shit! I typed emerge openoffice last night around 10, the mofo is STILL compiling.

It takes at least a week to build a usable gentoo desktop. What a fucking joke! You people seriously must have no lives, nothing to accomplish all day. Anyone who types "emerge -u world" has nothing constructive to do with his time.

If nothing else (1)

earthforce_1 (454968) | about 10 years ago | (#9698784)

He has a great contender for "Robot Wars".

Zero G? (4, Funny)

Shabbs (11692) | about 10 years ago | (#9698807)

Just curious... how does something "fall" in zero g? Doesn't falling imply gravity?

What would a cat do in Zero G? Would it continously try to adjust itself.

Now THAT would be funny to see.

Cats in spce... the next fontier.

liek a ween (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#9698810)

thsi roebit lands on teh poot~`

Finally perpetual motion! (3, Funny)

Prince Vegeta SSJ4 (718736) | about 10 years ago | (#9698828)

Like A Cat, New Robot Lands On Its Feet

Now they will finally be ble to create a perpetual motion machine, which not only works, but is environmentally and feline friendly as well.

PETA had this to say:

  • the desperately needed, perpetual motion machine can now be achieved, that does not conflict with our interests, The long controversial Buttered Cat array [flippyscatpage.com] is now available without the cats, it is indeed a great day for humanity
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