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Mozilla Foundation Seeking Switch Success Stories

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the it-rawks-it-stomps-cities-it-purees dept.

Mozilla 537

maggeth writes "mozillaZine has a story about how the Mozilla Foundation is looking to know if any organizations have switched to Mozilla products. Is your organization among them?" Can anyone point out an example of a library system switching? Lots of public libraries use PCs set up as kiosks running a web interface to their catalogs, and they all seem to use IE -- so, no tabbed browsing.

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Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (5, Funny)

SeanTobin (138474) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734851)

I'm writing to share a tragic little story.

My Dad has a webbrowser that my sister and I used to use for our homework assignments. One night, I was browsing a website on it, when all of a sudden it went berserk, the screen started flashing, and some really weird pictures just appeared. Lots of them. And I was at a good website! I had to reboot and find it again really quickly. Needless to say, my rushed webbrowsing wasn't nearly as good, and I blame IE for the trouble I got into when my Dad checked the cache.

I'm happy to report that my sister and I now share Mozilla Firefox. It's a lot nicer to work on than my dad's webbrowser was, it hasn't let me down once, and my cache has been really clean.

Thanks, Mozilla.

Question (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734863)

Is your sister hot?

Re:Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (1)

wheels4u (585446) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734907)

Your dad blames you for his actions?
Learn him to clear the cache :)

Re:Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (0)

DarkHelmet (120004) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734924)

it was kind of....... ..... a bummer.

Hi, I smoke pot^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H use a mac^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H, errr run firefox!

Re:Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734985)

So you and your sister share those same websites? Thats just distrubing...

Semi-OT (but still funny) (2, Funny)

Talisman (39902) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735102)

Can you ever really get enough of Ellen [slashdot.org] ?

Re:Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (4, Funny)

xmas2003 (739875) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735107)

OK - how many /.'ers use mozilla products because this way their significant other (who uses IE) won't see the history bar or the cache showing the sites they were looking at.

I.e. I see a variety of comments about p0rn so I gotta believe this might be a factor for some of you! ;-)

Re:Courtesy of Ellen Feiss (2, Funny)

mroch (715318) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735111)

now you can't look at porn and blame it on popups...

oh wait, it's impossible to remove IE. Maybe monopolies are good for something...

My story (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734853)

My story [technewslive.com]

DO NOT CLICK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734872)

DO NOT CLICK

Re:DO NOT CLICK (1)

FunWithHeadlines (644929) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734930)

I didn't, and I cannot thank you enough for that warning! Phew...

Re:DO NOT CLICK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734946)

If you didn't, how do you know that the warning was needed?

Re:DO NOT CLICK (1)

Ianing (715094) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735109)

Well I thought that Firefox's security was much better then IE. But this link changed my mind. (Javascript default settings are now changed)

apple (3, Funny)

xOleanderx (794187) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734854)

Hope they dont make it like that annoying apple switch campaign...

Re:apple (5, Funny)

Finuvir (596566) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734949)

There's no chance of that [switch2firefox.com] .

Re:apple (1)

Orne (144925) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735056)

Yeah, this one really makes you want to switch [speckz.com] ... ;)

This is just toooo easy! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734861)

Lots of public libraries use PCs set up as kiosks running a web interface to their catalogs, and they all seem to use IE -- so, no tabbed browsing.

and they would be real useful if anyone could actually see what they are browsing past all the pop-ups and ads!

Unfamilliarity (2, Insightful)

toetagger1 (795806) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734865)

The reason why you only see IE on public computers is b/c it is the most compatible browser in terms of usability (I mean in the case of it actually functioning, even so that is rare). I bet that any library with public computers that uses mozilla would have to hire an extra person to show people the advantages. Now if some people from the /. crowd would volunteer an hour every week and do this, I'm sure you will find some open arms somewhere in your community. What a great way to spread open source!

Re:Unfamilliarity (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734987)

The reason why you only see IE on public computers is b/c it is the most compatible browser in terms of usability.

I very much disagree that IE is more usable than Moz or Fox. Most people I've converted don't even know they're using a different browser, and on a kiosk the user isn't going to have to worry about the differences like downloading or configuration because they will probably just be surfing anyway. Is it work trading security for a tiny bit of perceived usability?

The Advantage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734992)

... is that when the latest IE threat comes out every month, you don't have to go to every goddamn computer and clean up the mess.

We're all success stories (1)

FunWithHeadlines (644929) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734868)

Success stories? Hey, just grab anyone who switched to Mozilla and you'll have a success story: No more pop-ups, tabbed browsing, hardly anyone targeting your browser for attack. Ah, the sweet smell of success!

OK, OK, I get what they are trying to do, and it's a great idea. Shouldn't be hard to find organizations that have had great success that could fit in a study better than what I said, but what I said is true. It's like a breath of fresh air leaving IE behind whether you are a school, an organization, a corporation, or even an individual.

Re:We're all success stories (0, Troll)

Maestro4k (707634) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734961)

  • Success stories? Hey, just grab anyone who switched to Mozilla and you'll have a success story: No more pop-ups, tabbed browsing, hardly anyone targeting your browser for attack. Ah, the sweet smell of success!
I've tried to switch multiple times and I still cannot stand Mozilla's UI at all. I don't use plain-vanilla IE either (I use the browser wrapper Maxthon (used to be called MyIE2)) but what I do use makes Mozilla's UI look pathetic.

Frankly the Mozilla project needs to take a serious look at the UI and improve it. If a member of the /. crowd (who remembers using Netscape when it was called Mozilla the first time before IE came around) can't stand the UI, how can we expect your average joe to? How can we honestly expect business, libraries or anyone else to switch?

Make Mozailla's UI at least as good as IE and the browser wrappers out there for it (I really recommend Maxthon) and THEN you'll have tons of success stories. Until then Mozilla's going to be the province of the highly technical users who don't mind the UI.

And no this isn't meant to be a troll or flamebait. Too many people are happy to expouse "switch to Mozilla it's great and more secure" without considering that a lot of people think Mozilla's a step down. We really need folks to work on the UI and improve it. I'd like to see it improved myself so I can finally stand to switch.

Re:We're all success stories (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735084)

Most businesses, libraries, etc. aren't using some non-default UI with IE anyway - except for all those extra toolbars, etc. If you think you can design a superior UI, why nto do it? The Mozilla/Firefox source is there for you to do it with, ain't nothing stoping you.

Locking down Mozilla? (5, Insightful)

propellor_head (668863) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734873)

For a site running Active Directory, IE can be locked down completely through group policies. Does anyone know if it is possible to do similar thing with Mozilla (ie. Default start page, proxy setttings, etc)?

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734901)

Sun's Java Desktop System can do this for many apps including Mozilla. It's absolutely beautiful - central administration of gnome, desktop, browser, etc (if you want it that is...)

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (2, Interesting)

propellor_head (668863) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734926)

That sounds good, though it means it'd have to be a Linux network yes? It is more likely that organisations would do an upgrade to browsers before a full commitment to Linux on the desktop, so is there a way to do it on a Windows network?

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735042)

That sounds awesome, what do I have to do to get this Sun Java Desktop System again? Oh yes, that's right, take the check I'm currently writing to Microsoft, cross out Microsoft and enter Pay to the Order of "Sun", and agree to the same restrictive EULA. I'm all over it.

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (1)

Logicdisorder (686635) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734937)

I do not think you can. I have been using Mozilla for years and have never ran across anything like that.

I guess what you could do is download the source and build a custom version for you company - L33T H@x!!!!

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (4, Informative)

vox_gabrieli (250873) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734974)

I work in a large AD environment (10s of 1000s of users), and the group policies are unreliable at best. We get several problem tickets per week of users whose browsers have missing proxy settings. And "locked down" is a bit of a misnomer as well. Any idiot with Notepad can create a .reg file to un-"lock down" most of the settings.

That said, the best I've found is to use SMS (another unreliable technology) or login scripts to set the various things in prefs.js. This kind of scripting is a little more difficult than the equivalent IE scripting, I suppose.

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735016)

Any idiot with Notepad can create a .reg file to un-"lock down" most of the settings.....the best I've found is to use SMS (another unreliable technology) or login scripts to set the various things in prefs.js

I think it is a little easier for any idiot just to cancel the login script.

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (1)

Asprin (545477) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735019)


Also, doesn't AD + Group Policies require Win2K or better on the desktops? Doesn't do you much good if you are still primarily Win98.

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (1)

propellor_head (668863) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735059)

Yes, Group Policies does require Win2K or better. However, you can use the pre-2000 method of using policy templates:
1) Open System policy editor on a 98 machine (with the required templates installed)

2) Lock off the settings and save the .pol file.
3) Upload the .pol script to the NETLOGON share on the Domain Controller

I administer a mixed network of 98/NT/2000 and XP machines. This method seems to work best.

Re:Locking down Mozilla? (4, Informative)

altp (108775) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735091)

Lock out the registry tools and they can't import a registry setting.

My Library (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735031)

All I do is overwrite the home directory with the prototype home directory after the user logs out (or times out) of KDE. That way the user can set Firefox however he wants, but it'll be back to normal for the next patron.

The same is true for KDE, although I do have kiosk mode locking down some features. Most notably, any kind of shell/command line access is disabled... NO reason to have that can of worms open!

Slightly Off-topic (1)

Biff78 (694374) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734874)

Does anyone know if there is a way to set-up Mozilla so that tabs that were open last session re-open next time the program starts? Opera has this functionality, but I haven't been able to find it in Mozilla. Thanks.

Re:Slightly Off-topic (4, Informative)

partiallynothing (734311) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734917)

You can use the "tabbrowser extensions" extension available from update.mozilla.org. It allows tabs to be dragged and droped, duplicated, auto-reloaded (usefull if you have your e-mail page open), named, colored, and saved upon exit. Overall it is *very* usefull.

Re:Slightly Off-topic (2, Informative)

Akaihiryuu (786040) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734948)

Mozilla does this if the browser or computer crashes (like a power outage) suddenly...it'll offer to restore the tabs you had open before when you restart the program. I don't know about having it *always* do that, but apparently the functionality is there.

TabBrowser extensions (5, Informative)

purplepaste (759606) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734957)

TabBrowser extensions
http://extensionroom.mozdev.org/more-i nfo/tbe

Probably one of my top 3 favorite extensions. Gives you a lot of control over tabs, saves your last sessions, allows you to reorder tabs, group tabs with the tab they were linked from, and a lot more.

Re:TabBrowser extensions (1)

Maestro4k (707634) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734977)

  • Probably one of my top 3 favorite extensions. Gives you a lot of control over tabs, saves your last sessions, allows you to reorder tabs, group tabs with the tab they were linked from, and a lot more.
In my tests of it TabBrowser extensions won't restore the tabs in the original order. It would remember the order of the first 1-3 tabs (at random, sometimes only one, sometimes 2, sometimes 3) but the rest weren't even in alphabetical order. That made it fairly useless since I use a lot of tabs (around 20) and they're in a particular order on purpose.

Re:TabBrowser extensions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735043)

If it's a standard set of tabs, you could make it into a bookmark group, and then open that at start... Maybe?

Before you close mozilla... (1)

zogger (617870) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735051)

... set all those 20 tabs as your home page group, then they will open back up exactly the same on restarting mozilla.

Sessionsaver ... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735018)

..."Remembers loaded tabs and their history items when Firefox is manually closed, then restores the tabs and history items when next started. The saved session can also be manually restored or updated at any later time via the items in the File menu"

http://extensionroom.mozdev.org/more-info/sessio ns aver

It can also reload tabs after a crash automatically. I can't live without this plugin.

Enjoy =)

Re:Slightly Off-topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735029)

Hop into the extensions manager and get yourself some plugins. They can add some increadible functionalty to Mozilla. Also, there is another browser called Avant, which is mostly an overglorified overlay to IE that adds all the wonderful functionality that IE is missing by default when compared to Mozilla. Still has all the inherent security flaws that IE does, though, so watch your butt.

And then . . . (2, Funny)

vegetablespork (575101) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734877)

. . . maybe Microsoft will counter with some people who switched from Mozilla to MSIE, a la the infamous Windows switcher ad [aroundcny.com] .

Re:And then . . . (1)

empaler (130732) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734998)

Funny that the picture has also disappeared from linked article... ^_^

Well, it's part, but not all of my plans. (1)

Bold Marauder (673130) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734880)

I'm not sure if this counts or not. I volunteer at a treatment center which has a computer lab. They are running windows 98 and office 2000. I'm waiting for permission to bring in a stack of knoppix cds to use as an upgrade path (meaning, instead of shelling out $ for 15 XP licenses). If I get a green light, that will be 15 computers running OO.org--and, of course, Mozilla (which I'm planning on using during the pitch. you know "and, on top of everything else, the default browser is immune to IE security flaws")

Libraries are English-only, in my experience (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734881)

Most libraries around here disable the Start/Programs/Accessories, and also disable the IE options, and use the US/English keyboard, so any of us wanting to search for non-English titles are screwed -- no access to non-English letters (except by searching the Internet and then copying & pasting them in one at-a-time, which is horribly slow).

Plus, because the IE options are disabled, I fear to ever check work email or do any such thing, as I have no way to clear the IE cache afterwords -- that also sucks.

The Switch has been Made (4, Interesting)

ironwill96 (736883) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734883)

I switched to Mozilla 6 months ago and have been enjoying it ever since.

When I got home for the summer and started work back at a Jewelry Store in my hometown, I was able to switch three of the people at work over to Mozilla FireFox. The biggest thing they were impressed with is that 99% of the spyware/ad-ware just doesn't work on it because the coders of those products only code for the dominant browser (IE crap-ola). They also love the Tabbed browsing, the nice clean interface, and the easy access to all your privacy controls (cache, cookies, history etc.). Overall, it's been a great experience with FireFox except for the occasional VBScript-using site with which we have to open up the evil IE to use. I look forward to switching more people over to the dark side of th....never mind.

Re:The Switch has been Made (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734913)

The biggest thing they were impressed with is that 99% of the spyware/ad-ware just doesn't work on it because the coders of those products only code for the dominant browser (IE crap-ola).

Each time you convert someone you're bringing Firefox one step closer to being the dominant browser. Then what?

Re:The Switch has been Made (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735076)

Then worry about that then. In the meantime, have years of good browsing.

To summarise your argument (with fallacious holes kindly highlighted by moi):
"I'm not going to switch from IE to (Opera, Firefox, whatever) even though IE is making my life a living hell because ONE DAY in the future someone MIGHT target Opera, Firefox, whatever."

If you wish to stay in the shit for ever, rather than haul yourself out of it because you might end up back in it sometime in the future, then your an idiot. However you are allowed to be an idiot. Just keep your idiot arguments to yourself. While they merely make you look idiotic here, they may actually convince the technical ignorati who may be sick of IE's serious flaws and shortcomings.

Tabbed Browsing for Libraries? (4, Interesting)

__Maad__ (263535) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734884)

Having dealt with friends' Windows PCs lately and the sheer volume of destruction spyware, IE, and all the rest have caused, I would think that -- at this point -- tabbed browsing would be the least of anybody's worries in "library IT".

Why does tabbed browsing keep rising to such prominence as a must-have feature more than simple standards-compliance and reasonable security does?

Re:Tabbed Browsing for Libraries? (0, Flamebait)

Atmchicago (555403) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734994)

Why does tabbed browsing keep rising to such prominence as a must-have feature more than simple standards-compliance and reasonable security does?

You see, with tabbed browsing, you can keep all the popups and annoying spyware in separate tabs, while you focus on what you want to do. Productivity at its best!

Re:Tabbed Browsing for Libraries? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735070)

My thoughts exactly. Tabbed browsing is pretty lame- why waste time and development into duplicating a windows manager? That's all what you're really doing when you implement a tab-based browsing. Tabs save you absolutely nothing except some cryptic keyboard shortcuts that you can accomplish with the already existing window manager anyway. The amount of system resources that a new window consumes over a new tab is so nominal that suggesting that tabs will save huge amounts of resources is really absurd. All tabs are is another way to display and organize information and a way to confuse users.

From IE to Firefox, personal usage: (4, Informative)

halo1982 (679554) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734888)

Since Firefox came out all of my friends have ridiculed me for using IE, and I had played around with it a bit but was not impressed. I've been a faithful IE user since 2.0 (I know =P) and wasn't about to change.
However lately I had been working on a website and in the cross browser testing I've been using Firefox 0.8 and on for Mozilla compatibility. Its taken extensive use of Firefox but I've almost completely switched. I love the tabbed browsing and it renders so much faster on my computer. I've also found it seems to handle some websites better than IE, especially with unknown extensions. I just wish it had Windows integration, but maybe someone will figure that out. Microsoft has a lot to worry about for IE 7. Firefox is improving with every version and I have fewer and fewer reasons to use IE.

Might want to check this out... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734889)

I believe some departments of Monash University (www.monash.edu.au) are using Mozilla on staff desktops. If true, that would count as a serious deployment. Surely there are other university departments switching over?

I switched (2, Funny)

mfh (56) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734890)

Well, I switched a few years back and I must say Mozilla and I keep telling my organization that it's the same as Netscape but without all the extra AOL crap. They just look at me sideways... *sigh*

It's always the same, I say, "Hey guys look at {technology A}," and they look at me sideways. That's what I get for working for computer peasants.... *sigh*

Maybe if Mozilla shipped standard on IBM computers it'd be easier? (that's all they'll buy)

Re:I switched (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735075)

I hope you're joking. But if you're not, maybe you should consider printing this [linuxmyths.org] out and showing it to whoever makes the decisions there?

Public Library in Melbourne Australia. (1)

tpgp (48001) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734891)

An organisation named ComputerBank [computerbank.org.au] has set up a thin client network of linux computers running Mozilla Firefox, Openoffice, etc etc alongside an existing network of Windows PCs at the Footscray Library.

It's still on trial at the moment - but from all accounts has been enormously successful - with all linux PCs constantly being used - often in preference to the more complicated windows PCs.

Libraries (5, Insightful)

JoshuaDFranklin (147726) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734894)

Lots of public libraries use PCs set up as kiosks running a web interface to their catalogs, and they all seem to use IE -- so, no tabbed browsing.

Having just been looking into setting up one of those library kiosks, I can tell you that's it's because all the easy-install products are built with IE. There are lots of websites about how to set Mozilla up in a kiosk mode, but they invariably involve hacking JavaScript and messing with lots of configs. That takes too much time for anyone but the largest library systems. It's much easier to buy a $30 product like Fortres or Cybrary.

We need an easy download and install kiosk Mozilla, preferably also with an OS lock-down tool to make the catalog PCs as maintainence-free as possible.

A minor story (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734906)

At work I've been relying on the Google Toolbar on IE to block annoying popups. Within the last two months, the ad spammers have figured out how to write a webpage to beat the Googlebar. So I burned a copy of Firefox, brought it to work and installed it. Popups are gone, though I doubt the admins will be happy that I did.

Why I switched? Window spam sites (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734914)

Sites like (safe proof-of-concept)this [members.shaw.ca] can exploit and bother IE users, but FireFox protects me!

Re:Why I switched? Window spam sites (1)

JoeShmoe950 (605274) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735099)

MOD PARENT DOWN! Shock Site Refrenced!

Those bastards.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734918)

They got me hooked like a tweaker or a heroin junkie. First it was just one, then a few more, and now i can't even see all of them! *sob* there you have it! I'm adicted to tabs! /not really recovering tabbie.

Library (4, Interesting)

XanC (644172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734920)

I'm the administrator at a medium-sized independent public library in the Austin area. Several months ago I switched all our public access computers to Firefox (and Linux, and KDE).

There were some sites that wouldn't work, although we haven't run across that problem recently. And with the systems set up this way, we can guarantee patrons' privacy from each other (wiped home directory every logout), we can easily synchronize the machines with a central image at night, and we're immune from 99%+ of software exploits on the 'Net. It also means I can spend my time creating new programs and systems for the library, rather than dinking with Windows all day.

Not long ago, every public access computer in the Austin library system was paralyzed for several days by a wandering Windows virus. We were sitting pretty at that point! :-)

Re:Library (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735037)

How do you syncronize machines with a central image? You mean the computers all update themselves automatically from a central server, or is it something else? Just asking because I was wondering if anything like that existed just the other day.

Re:Library (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735088)

Right, they all sync with the image server at night. Well actually, the image server SSHes to each in turn and issues the sync command... To make sure they don't all hit it at once. We've got 25 of these things.

I'm using SystemImager [systemimager.org] and it works great. It's basically rsync with extra trappings to make this easy.

Re:Library (1)

sl0ppy (454532) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735089)

You mean the computers all update themselves automatically from a central server, or is it something else?

have you checked out Ximian's RedCarpet [ximian.org] ?

Re:Library (1)

HungSquirrel (790165) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735067)

Is it me, or is Austin one of the most tech-savvy and open source friendly cities in the US? :)

Re:Library (1)

XanC (644172) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735074)

I do what I can. :-)

Re:Library (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735116)

It's just you. Stay away. There is nothing of interst in Austin.

Just in case... (2, Funny)

Mard (614649) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734932)

In case you didn't get the memo, this month is Mozilla month on slashdot. Please post accordingly.

My only begottend kidney, rejuvenated! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734933)

[Picture Attachment: CuteFrayleOldeGrandmaWithBannanaBread_wichhappenst obethesamepictureusedeverywhereelseevengreetingcar dsandunsackedlammajockiesatMicrosoft.jpg.exe]

I took my Mozilla pills and the doctor gave me a GNU kidney!

(Don't scan the file, just look at it man! Sincerily, Alpha Troll)

Success Story! (4, Funny)

efuseekay (138418) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734935)

I used I.E. for a long time, and it was a terrible terrible time.

Everytime I click on a porn-site, a zillion pop-ups appeared, covering the important pics of naked hot chicks. If nothing else, the pop-ups did a wonderful job lowering my saluting penis. It was horrible.

But then, my girlfriend recommended that I use mozilla! Boy, it was a dream come true. No pop-ups. And the amazing thing called "TABBED BROWSING". Now, I don't have to open multiple windows of I.E., I can have multiple PICS of naked hot chicks in the same browser! I tell ya, nothing turn on my libido then being able to stare at the naked hot chicks in various positions, all at once! !

So, thank you Mozilla! I love you!

My Switch (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734936)

I switched from viagra to cialis. My girlfriend was pleased overall, but the neighborhood dog was not to happy.

Library browser use (3, Interesting)

neutron2000 (409922) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734941)

Most patrons are barely capable of using existing public-access terminals let alone a multi-tabbed browser.

Additionally, the majority of catalog lookups are single-item queries--I'm not convinced that throwing a better browser at them would significantly enhance their library experience.

Library (3, Informative)

Vadim Makarov (529622) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734967)

Trondheim public library [folkebibl.no] is using Mozilla on its public PCs (30 machines). I'm not sure if they switched from IE, however.

Switch if you can (2, Interesting)

KaiSeun (786953) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734968)

Even with the outbreak of security flaws and the whatnot from IE, the organizations that already are too busy worrying about other things won't be switching, unless security is the number one priority.

Why would a library switch? Where I am, the inertia is quite obvious because you can see how old the system is. Sure there are upgrades here and there, but seeing brand new equipment and software side by side makes people wonder.

The switches will probably occur if the organization aren't too caught up in other things, and have the resources to change. Of course, being fed up with IE is also another motivation to switch.

A small success (2, Insightful)

toxic666 (529648) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734970)

We have about 5% Mac users in my organization. All run Firefox as a browser and a few run Mozilla products as IMAP mail clients.

It's an apples and oranges comparison, because the Mac users are a bit more the geek than Windows users; they are capable of understanding a browser interface and I don't have to walk them through the most basic end user tasks. Not a blanket endorsement of Mac, simply because those users are (as previously stated) a bit more the geek.

I'm trying to get all the applications we develop web-standardized so I can eventually ditch the whole MS schtick -- accessible from compliant browsers an linked to open formats.

It ain't easy Ringo, but I'm trying.

HowStuffWorks article on Mozilla (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734971)

Right here [howstuffworks.com]
Mozilla has come a long way since it stomped its way into the Open Source realm. It was awarded "Best of 2003" in the Web browser category by PC World magazine.

Obvious one (1)

LittleLebowskiUrbanA (619114) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734973)

My company uses Bugzilla and it's completely mission essential now. Runs on an old Redhat box and uptime is measured between power outages. I'd be happy to write up a summary.

*cough* *cough* (-1, Troll)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734978)

you mean "seeking any evidence at all that someone has had success with their software" :)

Am I the only one who thinks OSS shouldnt keep trying to encourage people to put all their money on software which is not yet as good as its closed-source competition?

If your key selling point is "it's open-source", you arent getting anywhere. Wait until you have some really great software instead of (basically) misleading people so that they'll be stuck with your software installed on all their systems and will send bug reports and other feedback because it's easier than re-installing everything again. It's dishonest.
There is some great software out there. Mozilla software is potentially mere months away from joining its ranks. Why start building a history of distrust?

Re:*cough* *cough* (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735033)

Mozilla is better than IE.

Somehow, that makes your point moot.

Re:*cough* *cough* (1)

cranos (592602) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735069)

In what way is Mozilla not better than IE?

I ask this as a serious question not as flame bait. Keep in mind that the biggest bug Mozilla has had was actually a Windows problem(shell:// exploit) and the lack of features in IE relative to most other browsers.

Florida State (2, Interesting)

usn2fsu03 (711294) | more than 10 years ago | (#9734984)

Can anyone point out an example of a library system switching?
The computers in the libraries at Florida State University have Mozilla as their browser.

I would love to change the library... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9734996)

that I administer, but fact is IE seems to be easier to change policies on to keep people from messing up settings.

In Canada, may be (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735012)

Yes, in Canada (Toronto in particular), I see Netscape and not IE installed on the old public library computers. I guess when Mozilla is mentioned, netscape is implicitly included.

Canada definately (1)

Jack Action (761544) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735104)

Posted on the Mozillazine site by simonp:

At our central Vancouver library, I noticed recently mozilla had been added to the public internet access points. Whether this was in the last few weeks, I don't know. Vancouver has Canada's 2nd largest library system, and the central branch receives millions of vistors year. It is also understood to be a leader in electronic resources. The staff are great too (no, I don't work there).

My dad recently switched to Mozilla. Does that count as an organization?

My success story: switching from Mozilla to IE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735015)

Finally nearly all websites work perfectly under IE as opposed to maybe 10% working under Mozilla. I urge all of you to try out IE and give it a shot. Thanks.

We didn't switch to Firefox... (2, Funny)

pyrrhonist (701154) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735068)

The Mozilla Foundation is looking to know if any organizations have switched to Mozilla products. Is your organization among them?

No, but we did switch to Acme Lightninggecko. Well, at least until one of us restarts our browser or pops up a new window, anyway.

forget firefox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735073)

Doesn't anyone use Opera?

Scary stories (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735079)

What about horror stories from people that commit the mistake of NOT switching? Not from the point of view of sites looking better or worse, but from the security (maybe with a big economic impact) point of view.

Being very vulnerable to worms (at the very least in outlook html rendering engine), exploits, hiding information, etc IE should have a visible impact in economy in organizations using it. The need of taking security measures just because the browser of choice is IE (i.e. central blocking/scanning from proxy server, antivirus/firewalls with special IE modules/functionality). Or the impact of a large virus/worm infection helped by the browser limitations/vulnerabilities inside a company.

And not to forget people falling in scams (i.e. the Citibank one i'm receiving weekly) because the browser hided information or falled in URL tricks.

Problem with Mozilla ... (4, Informative)

altp (108775) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735082)

... in a public library, or any public place, is its lack of integration into Microsoft's active directory.

I'm a sysadmin at a university library, and we have to run Windows for plugins that professors require for their classes. Mozilla nd Firefox can't be locked down like IE can through the active directory. A security change is a couple clicks in a central location with an Active Diretory and IE.

With Mozilla we would have to visit each workstation.

the switch (5, Insightful)

mastergoon (648848) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735085)

At my school library, I work as a semi-admin (well, I know all the passwords and help out a lot). Most of the stuff I end up doing is removing spyware. I installed Firefox on every box, but nobody was using it, and the spyware continued to pile up daily. As a last result, I replaced the firefox icon with the IE icon, and renamed it to "Internet Explorer." Everyone started using it, and I heard no complaints.

This is probably an evil way of doing things, but people are set in their ways, once they switch they like it, but getting them to not just use their same old browser is difficult.

Tabbed browsing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735092)

is hardly Mozilla's number one selling point. It's just a feature, people. And it's a feature that many people (including myself) could care less about. I am very comfortable with right-click + open in new window, and that's how I like it.. being able to see both sessions at once.

Let's emphasize the positives. Security and efficiency.

Re:Tabbed browsing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735114)

The general population doesn't care about those things.

SUNY (2, Interesting)

Aero Leviathan (698882) | more than 10 years ago | (#9735094)

The college I go to, a SUNY I won't bother naming, has both IE6 and Netscape 7 on every computer. Does that count? Probably not I guess...

I always found it interesting, and a tad odd, how at school I see almost as many people using Netscape as IE (especially adults like professors and my boss). I guess to some people, 'Netscape' still is synonymous with 'The Internet'.

And then there were people like my comp sci professor, who would use one IE one day and Netscape the next... that always grated on my nerves. I couldn't figure out if he didn't know the difference between them, or just didn't care, or what...

Firefox my old buddy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9735100)

I've been faithful to you since Phoenix 0.2, but now it's time to leave the nest and fllyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy! .....FLY!
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