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SGI & NASA Plan 10240-Processor Altix Cluster

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the like-a-cluster-of-grapes dept.

Linux Business 202

green pizza writes "NASA has announced plans to cluster twenty 512-processor Silicon Graphics Inc Altix supercomputers connected to a 500-terabyte SGI InfiniteStorage SAN. The Altix uses Itanium2 CPUs running Linux atop an Origin 3000-derrived architecture. NASA and SGI scaled Linux to 512 CPUs late last year. There are also strong hints that SGI plans to bring its clustered ATI graphics to Altix in the near future. Lots of neat big iron project on the horizon!"

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nothing for me to see eh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822109)

Move along, eh?

Pee Pee in Vagina (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822110)

It's fun!!!
It's fast!

It's Neat!!!

LOL DUDES!!11!! BOMB!1!1! ME am BRAZIL!!!1

mmmm... cluster (-1, Troll)

DustyCase (619304) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822111)

Obvious troll? Thanks!

What would this be used for? (4, Insightful)

notbob (73229) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822113)

What would you do with 10k processors hooked up to 500 terabytes? Sounds like you could replace every machine Nasa has with an account on this thing.

Sounds quite insane, I'd love to see the practical reasons for this.

Re:What would this be used for? (4, Funny)

turgid (580780) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822157)

Sounds quite insane, I'd love to see the practical reasons for this.

With the heat given off by all those itanics, I'm sure they could do some pretty good real-word research into heat shield materials and rocket engine nozzles.

Re:What would this be used for? (4, Informative)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822174)

NASA has picked computer maker Silicon Graphics Inc. and chipmaker Intel to develop a major supercomputer based on Linux to simulate space exploration and conduct other research, SGI announced Tuesday.

Read it here [com.com]

Re:What would this be used for? (5, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822351)

For the conspiracy theorists who believe the moon landings were faked a collaboration between NASA and SGI on simulated exploration will just provide a basis to think that the Mars missions will not only be faked, they wont even use real actors next and the whole mission will be CGI.

So when we do 'land' on Mars, if the astonauts burst into a song and dance extravaganza during the planting the flag ceremony then the job was probably outsourced to India. If the ceremony involves a 10 hour trek up a mountain and is interrupted by hordes of attacking Martians that must be defeated by the 6 astronauts then they probably got Peter Jackson to do it. If the whole mission is really lame and not quite what you were hoping for, look no futher than George Lucas.

Re:What would this be used for? (1)

onyx pi (689409) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822551)

SGI was founded around 1983. Moon landings faked by Nasa and SGI?

MY THEORY (1)

castlec (546341) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822669)

They are doing special research for part of our new mars initiative. here [btinternet.com]

Re:What would this be used for? (2, Funny)

christophersaul (127003) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822229)

Calculating things very quickly maybe? Just a thought. 500TB? I've never seen the need for more than 640k.

Re:What would this be used for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822234)

They'll compile Gentoo on it of course. Everyone knows TEH GENTOY IS TEH GRETAST!!!!111!!one

Re:What would this be used for? (1)

wwest4 (183559) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822258)

For an aerospace org, a cluster of this type would be used primarily for aerodynamical analysis work.

Re:What would this be used for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822590)

For an aerospace org, a cluster of this type would be used primarily for aerodynamical analysis work

Yes, for an aerospace org, a cluster of this type would be used primarily aerospace type stuff...

Re:What would this be used for? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822314)

Put windows me on it and see how many times you can open and close Photoshop before you run out of memory.

Re:What would this be used for? (3, Informative)

RPI Geek (640282) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822318)

RTFA:
By boosting its computing capacity ten-fold through Project Columbia, the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Facility (NAS) will be able to more effectively handle such critical projects as simulating future space missions, projecting the impact of human activity on weather patterns, and designing safe and efficient space exploration vehicles and aircraft. The present collaboration builds upon the highly successful 8-year partnership that last year developed the world's first 512-processor Linux server - based on standard, "off-the-shelf" microprocessor and open source technology - the SGI Altix at NASA Ames Research Center named 'Kalpana' after Columbia astronaut and Ames alumna Kalpana Chawla.

Modeling and building on a business relationship.

Re:What would this be used for? (1)

SpermanHerman (763707) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822459)

They are getting ready for the release of Longhorn

Re:What would this be used for? (2, Funny)

Stephen Samuel (106962) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822815)

What would you do with 10k processors hooked up to 500 terabytes?

It can do realtime hologram movies, and pop the popcorn while you're watching it.

Re:What would this be used for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822817)

Obviously, they want to be really ready when Doom 3 ships!!!

Just imagine.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822115)

... a beowulf cluster of these things!

Good News for intel (4, Funny)

turgid (580780) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822116)

This is great news for intel. They will double the number of itanics shipped in a single deal!

Re:Good News for intel (3, Insightful)

Agent Green (231202) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822162)

Good news for Intel indeed, but wouldn't the same deployment with AMD Opterons been cheaper AND faster??

Re:Good News for intel (3, Funny)

musikit (716987) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822171)

aye but they most likely would have spent the saved money on air conditioning.

Re:Good News for intel (2, Informative)

ajlitt (19055) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822386)

Really? Considering the Opteron 850 maxes out at 89W while the Itanium 1.5 is 107W, by each vendor's own datasheets.

Re:Good News for intel (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822500)

I propose a new measure of chip perfomance Specfp_base_2000/Watt thermal load. That should give you a good idea of a chips potential for use in massive supercomputer applications. Sadly the Opteron does worse than both the Itanium 2 and the PPC970 in this measurement.

Re:Good News for intel (1)

fitten (521191) | more than 10 years ago | (#9823034)

I propose a new measure of chip perfomance Specfp_base_2000/Watt thermal load.

The embedded world (embedded as in Mercury, CSPI, Sky, etc.) has been using FLOPS/Watt (FLOPS per Watt) and FLOPS/m^^3 (FLOPS per cubic meter) for a long time as they have always had to compromise heat vs. computational performance vs. volume.

Guess you haven't been keeping track of CPU's... (1)

Phoenixhunter (588958) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822443)

Because as of late, it has been the Intel CPU's with the gigantic fans ;)

Re:Good News for intel (3, Insightful)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822211)

Itanium has better floating-point performance than Opteron, although the price/performance is worse. There are no 512-way Opteron systems; maybe NASA likes to write shared-memory parallel applications.

Re:Good News for intel (4, Informative)

turgid (580780) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822720)

There are no 512-way Opteron systems; maybe NASA likes to write shared-memory parallel applications.

Not yet, but Cray is working on it in something called Red Storm.

Itanium's "better" floating point performance than Opteron is confined to some pretty specialised benchmarks. Over all, Opteron is a more efficient design, runs cooler than itanium, has better compilers, better software support, is cheaper and had more room to scale to much higher clock speeds.

Re:Good News for intel (1)

cide1 (126814) | more than 10 years ago | (#9823048)

Isn't Cray just a division of SGI now? It seems that they are moving more and more in the direction of the old Cray.

Re:Good News for intel (4, Informative)

cnkeller (181482) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822248)

Good news for Intel indeed, but wouldn't the same deployment with AMD Opterons been cheaper AND faster??

Well, until the final numbers come out, we aren't speculating on performance. Needless to say we hope to claim the top slot in computing power. Also, keep in mind that parts availability is a major concern. We are assembling the system to be fully up and running by SuperComputing '05 in November. Intel has fully committed to delivering all 10K CPU's with no problems. Also, perhaps the biggest reason for Intel, is SGI was chosen as the vendor and they use Intel.

Re:Good News for intel (3, Informative)

cnkeller (181482) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822268)

Sigh, that's Supercomputing '04 in November. Of this year. Sorry about that.

Re:Good News for intel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822457)

Now that is impressive. Congrats on the project management well done if it all comes together nicely!

Re:Good News for intel (3, Interesting)

Shinobi (19308) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822701)

Agent Green:

Cheaper? Not likely, you'd have to buy the high-speed interconnect to make it worthwhile. And the Opterons perform fairly poorly in larger clusters, since they have the NUMA latency penalties locally on each node. Checking the Top500 list, a cluster of 256 Opteron 246 using Infiniband will perform worse than a cluster of 256 Xeon 2.8GHz using Infiniband. The scariest example is that a cluster of 256 P4's@3GHz using Gigabit Ethernet outperforms the Opteron cluster.....

Important to note is that the Linpack test doesn't stress the interconnect that much. The more a task stresses the interconnect, the more the Opteron cluster will be penalized. There's one exception though, and that's the Cray Octiga Bay systems.... And if you go that route, it costs _at_ _least_ as much as an Altix system

Re:Good News for intel (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822963)

SGI and Cray have been working on I2 systems for at least a year or two before Opteron was released. People dismiss Itanium2 but it does perform pretty well, much better than the original Itanium.

I think Itanium has some features not available in Opteron. One I know for sure is available lock-stepping for extra fault tolerance, according to an AMD engineer I asked, AMD has no plans for it.

Re:Good News for intel (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822329)

This is great news for intel. They will double the number of itanics shipped in a single deal!

yes, for sure. they bought a congressman to make this happen. (no joke, trust me.)

and as usual, real science at nasa is going to suffer for a waste money on unneeded computing capacity just so the US can prove we have a bigger dick than the japanese.

-pissed off nasa worker

Doom (2, Funny)

Klar (522420) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822117)

Wonder if that thing could play Doom3?

Re:Doom (1)

akeyes (720106) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822269)

It could run it for your entire LAN party.

All you would need is a slightly larger scale of this [slashdot.org] or this [slashdot.org] .

This joke is just plain dumb! (1)

NEOtaku17 (679902) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822957)

Doom 3 is not "that" hardware intensive. The latest beta plays just fine on a Radeon 9800 Pro that has been out for quite some time. These jokes are getting so old!

Imagine... (0, Redundant)

mikiN (75494) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822127)

a Beowulf cluster of those...err, never mind.

Re:Imagine... (1)

Xpilot (117961) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822304)

Yeah but can it run lin...errr... damn.

SGI & NASA Plan 10240-Processor Altix Cluster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822134)

So that brings the number of Itanium users to 7.

Pre-renderd concept art of the cluster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822161)

clicky [img55.exs.cx]

above link is kiddy porn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822462)

Too young

Link of photo of a young girl, not cluster! (1)

wiggly-wiggly (682254) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822491)

Not a render of the cluster! (I don't even want to guess how old she is.)

Honest question: Why Linux? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822175)

I really do wonder, why did SGI and IBM invest so much time and money on Linux, instead of e.g. NetBSD [netbsd.org] ? I understand IBM is currently using Linux to push their middleware and J2EE stuff, but they could as well use a BSD and not even need to give stuff back to the community.

Mike Bouma

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (5, Insightful)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822260)

The reason? The License. While BSD License really is the most free, it would allow IBM to put a lot of effort into it, and then have MS swope in, modify it, and sell with a sorts of closed APIs, etc.

In essence, the BSD license would allow the creation of another Unix model where the core is identical or just similar, but the APIs would be used to lock users in. How would that solve IBM's problem? Or for that matter any Hardware vendors problem? It would not.

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (2, Interesting)

mrm677 (456727) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822413)

The reason? The License. While BSD License really is the most free, it would allow IBM to put a lot of effort into it, and then have MS swope in, modify it, and sell with a sorts of closed APIs, etc.

In essence, the BSD license would allow the creation of another Unix model where the core is identical or just similar, but the APIs would be used to lock users in. How would that solve IBM's problem? Or for that matter any Hardware vendors problem? It would not.


Finally an answer that doesn't involve ranting and raving about GPL/freedom/blah blah blah. Thanks for the simple common-sense answer to this question I wondered myself.

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822583)

Your welcome.

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (1)

Karzz1 (306015) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822445)

Not to mention the hassle of supporting multiple platforms. NASA (as well as IBM) currently has a lot of expertise with Linux not to mention the installed base. If there is no good reason (price? no, performance? no, security? I doubt this thing would be on a network that is publicly accessible, so no, etc..) why change?

Example: Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822736)

Apple taketh plenty from open source but giveth back little.

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822763)

The REAL question should be:

Where's the source?

Isn't this stuff supposed to be GPL or do I not see the link?

Re:Honest question: Why Linux? (1)

powerlinekid (442532) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822474)

NetBSD is hardly the OS you'd want running on one of these machines. If you had to pick a BSD I suppose it would be FreeBSD. However, I think Linux scales further which would help explain why you see it on the big clusters instead of BSD.

NetBSD for portability.
OpenBSD for security.
FreeBSD for well I'm not actually sure, I use Linux instead.

That's impressive, but .. (2, Funny)

stinkyfingers (588428) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822182)

Can it run a JVM running on a Windows box and still be able to refresh the graphics?

Doom 3 and 10240 Itanium2 processors (4, Funny)

levram2 (701042) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822184)

I'm guessing that NASA found out Doom 3 has a software renderer and are buying the minimum specs.

I miss irix (0, Offtopic)

chegosaurus (98703) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822206)

Please mod me down.

Re:I miss irix (1)

flok (24996) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822253)

If you would like a shell-account for openssource software development on an IRIX system, feel free to contact me: folkert@vanheusden.com

ovit (-1, Redundant)

ovit (246181) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822225)

Imagine a beowolf cluster of those!

Tony

Surviving, but stock in a free-fall (3, Interesting)

Ars-Fartsica (166957) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822287)

I commend SGI for finding a way to survive in a brutal post-workstation, post-proprietary-unix world - for a bit there it looked like they were going to be a candidate for an office furniture auction....but the stock is about to enter the penny range. It will be hard for SGI to attract serious capital if they go sideways in a range under $1, and they will once again court delisting.

Good luck SGI, the Valley is rooting for its former star, and so are a lot of stock speculators.

Re:Surviving, but stock in a free-fall (2, Informative)

swb (14022) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822504)

I'm not a market whiz by any means, but how does a low stock price (assuming other, positive indicators) influence whether a company can survive or not? Once the stock is sold by the company, they don't make any further money on its continued sale.

A stock whose price continues to climb can allow the company to essentially print money by issuing new stock (if the price climbs fast enough existing shareholders don't generally notice or care that you're diluting the pool), but beyond that, how does share price influence the company's actual operations?

Going further OT, I think Apple should have bought SGI. They could have gained credibility in the scientific visualation and industrial sectors and had a tidy little OS and GUI that could have spanned from the receptionist desk to the research machine room, in addition to gaining some high-end server solutions far beyond their XServes.

Somehow it seems that something like this could have develped into a really cool desktop solution that would allow users to run applications locally and remotely on big iron (yes, X-windows style) but with the ease of use and friendliness Apple's known for.

Re:Surviving, but stock in a free-fall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822852)

If there is low/no demand for the stock (as evidenced by the low price), then it is difficult for them to issue new stock (via splits etc) to raise more cash. In the worst case if they are delisted, they lose the ability to generate cash using this technique at all, forcing them to go the more difficult route of securing funding from banks, other tech firms, etc.

SCO's Licensing fee (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822305)

$699 * 10K... hmm this could be more expensive then we first thought....

hahaha! (-1, Redundant)

manavendra (688020) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822306)

for once no one here would say, "now imagine a beowful cluster of those!" haha! oh...damn!

Well, actually, ... (1)

Corpus_Callosum (617295) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822429)

I was just contemplating the fact that this will be a cluster of clusters. I find that fact deeply satisfying, actually, as it models complex natural computation systems quite well.

Our brains work very much like that (networks of networks of networks of ... you get the point)...

So while you are making a joke, in this case, it is sorta... well... applicable!

Hope they don't forget to pay the licensing fees (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822309)

10k CPUs? Geez, that's like, 7.1 million bucks (10240 * $699) straight into SCO's bank account! Sweet.

Big plans at NASA (3, Funny)

pixas (711468) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822326)

So NASA is planning to upgrade to Longhorn then?

Re:Big plans at NASA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822586)

640 CPUs should be enough...

This should be enough power... (3, Funny)

SunPin (596554) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822343)

to fake a human settlement on Mars.

Re:This should be enough power... (1)

djeaux (620938) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822594)

to fake a human settlement on Mars.

Or an election, for that matter.

My grandpapppy believed that rasslin' was real but that NASA faked the moon shot.

Homo Zapiens (2, Interesting)

xenostar (746407) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822345)

In a wonderful book "Homo Zapiens" by Victor Pelevin, the leaders of the world are rendered on clusters of SGI machines by a secret organization. Makes you wonder when you hear about these clusters :)

Psuedocode to be President (1)

sexylicious (679192) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822621)

while(1)
{ get(info);
if (info=true)

goto(war_with_iraq(info));
elseif (info=false)

goto(war_with_iraq(info));
else
do_monkey_subroutine(bush_iq); }


Wonder if this would work?

Everquest2? (1)

_14k4 (5085) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822376)

So... I hear these are the new minimum sys requirements for EQ2... we know where our NASA dollars go. VAK!

How about... (-1, Redundant)

steveb964 (727054) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822394)


a beowolf cluster of these?

...oh, wait!

Is their graphics really ATI? (1)

dcavens (178673) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822412)

There are also strong hints that SGI plans to bring its clustered ATI graphics to Altix in the near future.

I thought that SGI sold a lot of their graphics IP (including many of their top graphics engineers) to NVIDIA a while back, and still have agreements with them. Their IRIX systems sell with VPRO graphics cards, which I believe are repackaged NVIDIA chips with a few extras..

Or did I miss something?

d.

Re:Is their graphics really ATI? (2, Informative)

Bo Diddly Squat (688214) | more than 10 years ago | (#9823069)

The MIPS/IRIX systems have VPro graphics, yes. But those are not from NVIDIA. VPro for MIPS/IRIX is the last chipset to be developed inhouse.

The confusion comes from the fact that Sgi marketing thought it would be a good idea to give both the PC and Irix graphics cards the same brand: VPro.

They currently don't have anything newer for their workstations, but their newest Onyx (visualization system) computers use a couple of Ati cards for their graphics. It's called the UltimateVision [sgi.com] .

Im going there (1)

nukem996 (624036) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822420)

Im here in San Jose at the NYLF conference. The head of the NASA AIMS center talked about that yesterday. It was pretty impressive. All the stuff there doing is pretty impressive. Within the next week I am going there so I may be able to see it. Maybe even setup an SSH server hehehe.

Hints? Nah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822427)

SGI phoned me up today to ask if I would be interested in purchasing an Altix with ATI graphics, so I think we can upgrade it from rumour...

How much did they pay for this thing? (3, Interesting)

DeathPenguin (449875) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822439)

Just curious. My guess is that Intel keeps pumping money into SGI to get Altix systems out and those who have them (LLNL and ...?) got them at practically no charge to run Linpack and look good on the Top500 [top500.org] list.

55 million (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822725)

Approximately 55 million, according to the press release. Equivalently, a bit more than half of the 90 million dollars that Red Storm (10,000 Opterons) is costing. Looks like NASA got a good deal. SGI and Intel obviously made a good penny, too.

At over 50 grand per processor, a PC or workstation cluster would have been a lot cheaper. Presumably the high speed interconnect and 2048 processor shared memory system images (with SGI promising all 10,240 in a single system image once they have some more improvements to Linux worked in) is worth 40+ millions of dollars to them.

Re:55 million (1)

ksheff (2406) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822804)

I think you missed a decimal place. At that price, it's actually about $5400 per processor. That's not much more than what some of these processors cost.

What's really depressing... (0)

CdBee (742846) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822442)

...is that by current progress, in 10 years you'll be able to get a consumer desktop with this much power.

Still.. just imagine how much SETI@Home you could do on a beo.. err, on one of those!

Mmmmm.... more like 30+ (1)

DumbSwede (521261) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822727)

This system should be 1,000 to 10,000 times faster than your fastest desk top. The real trend the last 40 years or so has been about a 10x increase every 10 years on the desktop. Sure my desktop is faster than a Cray from the 70s, but not faster than any top contender from the 90s.

We have had a huge bump-up in GFLOPs for supercomputers this last decade. In 1993 the top system was about 60 Gigaflops vs about 40 Teraflops today (see top500.org) while a top of the line pentium 4 today is at about 5 Gigaflops. I don't think another 10 years will quite close the gap.

The only real way to close in on massive parellel systems of today is for multicore chips to start appearing on the desktop (massively multicore).

Down 20% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822452)

Good day to pick up some SGI stock on the cheap

After it's built.. (2, Funny)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822471)

It whirs and clicks and sputters..

Finally, the following cryptic message mysteriously appears on it's console:

42

AYIEEEE!! Not *another* HHGTTU reference (1)

geomon (78680) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822625)

Please.

SGI was supposed to be dead (3, Interesting)

geomon (78680) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822518)

I'm glad to see that SGI has regained its legs and is back in the high-end computing market again. The gamble they made in embracing Linux has paid off. Other folks had counted them dead because they came to the WinNT game late and were, therefore, fated to be high-priced integrators. Their days were numbered by the low-end market forces like Dell and HP.

Now we see that there is a market for high-priced integrators as long as the underlying technology fits the market segment you target.

This could mean the end of civilization... (2, Funny)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822529)

Doesn't NASA know that Linux is national security threat [slashdot.org] ??? And 10240 cpu cluster no less? Don't they know that such concentrated evil will create a singularity? This could be the end of our civilization.

Imagine a Beowulf Cluster of these (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822540)

Just think, we could find E.T. before he eats all the reeces pieces

I'd love them to reliably bring ATI's graphics... (-1, Troll)

rokzy (687636) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822548)

to a SINGLE CPU, let alone 512.

ATI's linux drivers are a complete joke so it looks like I'm going to be forced to nvidia despite them being the biggest twats this side of SCO.

[clears throat]... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822827)

Matrox.

Why Linux? This is PERFECT for Longhorn (1)

elinenbe (25195) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822574)

Finally someone can beta test the new longhorn minimal configuration. See benchmark test results up at www.nasa.gov/longhorn.html

10240-Processor Altix Cluster vs IBM Blue Gene? (3, Informative)

cdc179 (561916) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822698)

I have always liked SGI hardware. And congradulations are in order for them to have a single Linux kernel running across 512 CPUs.

In SGIs press release they state that they hope to get the top spot on the 500 list. As all know IBM is expecting Blue Gene http://www.research.ibm.com/bluegene/ to take the top spot in 2005.

It looks like SGIs architecture for the Altix is better than the Blue Gene, but 10,240 intel CPUs is just going to be outpowered by the 65,536 PowerPC CPUs in Blue Gene.

Now the ultimate machine would have SGIs architecute (memory) and #CPUs per node using the PowerPC CPU. We know that IBM and SGI would never colaborate on something like this, but can't a geek dream!

More blue gene specs: http://sc-2002.org/paperpdfs/pap.pap207.pdf

Re:10240-Processor Altix Cluster vs IBM Blue Gene? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822792)

Why does their page say 8,000+? 65k is just what it's possible to scale to.

Re:10240-Processor Altix Cluster vs IBM Blue Gene? (1)

a3217055 (768293) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822860)

8000 is what is in one rack

Re:10240-Processor Altix Cluster vs IBM Blue Gene? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#9822862)

Forgive the naive question, but can you elaborate on the architecture of the Altix versus the IBM systems (e.g., p690)? Thanks.

Worst. Joke. Ever. (1, Redundant)

paintballluvr (411103) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822805)

I'd like to see a beowulf cluster of those.

Worst. Joke. Ever.
I stand by my decleration.

All this hardware just to keep from getting /.'ed (1)

IronChefMorimoto (691038) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822857)

Sounds to me like they're having to put this cluster together to keep us from bringing down their website/servers/network whenever one of us posts a news item to /. about the photo a space probe took of a methane cloud on Venus, supposedly caused by a single gassy Venutian 35 million years ago -- before they moved to a better neighborhood.

IronChefMorimoto

I think I speak for all of us when I say... (1)

rewt66 (738525) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822863)

I want one!

Someone at NASA... (2, Funny)

TWooster (696270) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822921)

... was reading too much Slashdot.

I knew nothing good could come of all those beowulf cluster ideas!

Imagne a..... (0, Redundant)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822939)

oh wait... nevermind...

I wonder how fast this sucker can run a spell check on the word "derived."

damns..makes no sense (1)

Nexcet (792231) | more than 10 years ago | (#9822964)

why would you need all that for...i mean we can only move things fast as speed of light..damns all this, tss tss. They just like playing with big toys like always.
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