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Tor: A JAP Replacement

CowboyNeal posted more than 9 years ago | from the trust-no-one dept.

Privacy 266

kid_wonder writes "Wired is running an article describing an answer to this previous /. story. Packets are sent through a network of randomly selected servers each of which knows only its predecessor and successor. Packets are unwrapped by a symmetric encryption key at each server that peels off one layer and reveals instructions for the next downstream node. As a 'connection-based low-latency anonymous communication system,' Tor seems to be the answer to JAP to allow anonymous networking activities of all kinds."

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gnaa frist porst (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895667)

ald wins again!

Dork (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895671)

Nothing to see here.

Re:gnaa frist porst (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895723)

fisted prostate lol
GoatSE.cX [goat.cx]

goatse goatse

Re:gnaa frist porst (-1, Offtopic)

xmorg (718633) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895815)

What does this have to do with the evils of microsoft or how horrible SCO is? what a worthless news story....

Too bad (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895669)

The DoD will just block such methods.!

Re:Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895728)

Tor Tor Tor and August 5th. The app and date, respectively, that will live in infamy.

Hmm too far for too little? I think so.

First post?! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895672)

Wooot!

Before you know it... (5, Insightful)

cytoman (792326) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895677)

... the RIAA and the MPAA will be all over this, denouncing it and crying foul!

sigh...

gnaa frist porst (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895694)

gnaa first reply

Lets get this out of the way... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895679)

Perhaps Koreans?

Re:Lets get this out of the way... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895688)

Or Chinks. Those motherfuckers sure know how to build a railroad.

Dont forget them awesome restaurants (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895730)

or dry cleaners.


Them fuckers are more useful than them niggers and their shoeshine and pro sports (except hockey of course))!!

Talk about politically incorrect (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895684)

We are REPLACING japs now??!?!?

Re:Talk about politically incorrect (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895741)

The new version will eventually be called ARAB. One of the security improvements is sandboxing, and when a process begins to misbehave, it's quickly killed.

After Pearl Harbor we shoulda exterminated them (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895824)

Now they are everywhere... like fucking ants.
I hope we don't make the same mistake with the sand niggers. Nuke that fucking sandbox back to hell. It will make the world a better place!!

Re:After Pearl Harbor we shoulda exterminated them (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896094)

hmm, just a thought, not that i condone what you just said... but if lightning can make glass fingers in sand, what would a nuke do? anybody need a cheap and effective way to make some more glass? lol

Re:After Pearl Harbor we shoulda exterminated them (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896153)

They should have started with sterilizing your mom and cutting off your dad's balls. What an asshole!

Re:Talk about politically incorrect (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896079)

Yes, the cry of "Tor! Tor! Tor!" has historically been the beginning of the end for Japs.

Re:Talk about politically incorrect (1)

julesreid (571093) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896135)

Yes. [starbulletin.com]

Freenet? (4, Insightful)

pope nihil (85414) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895687)

Isn't this onion routing thing exactly what freenet uses?

Re:Freenet? (5, Informative)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895743)

That's exactly what I thought (and I believe that we're right). What's interesting here though is that it claims to be low-latency, a quality rarely associated with Freenet and probably the primary reason that Freenet remains largely used by people who need/want _extreme_ anonymity rather than your average movie downloader wanting to avoid one of those nasty lawsuits.

Re:Freenet? (1, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895814)

Freenet remains largely used by people who need/want _extreme_ anonymity rather than your average movie downloader wanting to avoid one of those nasty lawsuits.

Paedophiles trade movies too you know.

The extreme anonymity provided by Freenet is exactly why I'm avoiding it like the plague (and also because it's a Java thing, but that's another problem): unless you live in some dictatorship like China, the only real reason you'd need that much anonymity is for kiddy pr0n...

Re:Freenet? (4, Informative)

elleomea (749084) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895829)

As far as I'm aware Freenet stores encrypted content on each node, not just routing requests through nodes.

Re:Freenet vs onion routing (5, Informative)

complete loony (663508) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895841)

Onion routing does just that, it is a method for picking an anonymous route. Freenet is a distributed database.
In onion routing the client picks N nodes from the list of servers and encrypts using each servers public key. Then sends the data to the first server. In onion routing each packet of data contains the entire routing list, though it is encrypted in such a way that each node can only tell what the next node is.
Each Freenet nodes caches data blocks based on demand. When a request arrives looking for a data block Freenet forwards the request to a node that has similar information until the correct block is found. Each freenet node only knows about the next and previous nodes, and the route is determined by the key you are searching for.

Re:Freenet vs onion routing (2, Informative)

dfelznic (8812) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895912)

currently N=3 on tor...

hmmm (4, Insightful)

SinaSa (709393) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895693)

Tor - The internet onion!

No, but seriously, the blurb says this is low latency, how that's the case, I fail to see. First client wants to send a HTTP GET or something similar via Tor, so every packet involved needs that info, plus a little bit extra to get it to the next node, plus a little bit more so the end node knows where it needs to be in the end on the return. So that's two extra little bits, then the stuff gets sent one node across which takes its info off and puts new info on.

Where is the low latency here? All this peeling/adding layers to peel off must be fairly time consuming. I'll admit I quite like the idea, and as soon as I click Submit I'm going to download and try it, but I fail to see how this can be faster than say, InvisibleIRC (IIP) was.

Re:hmmm (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895765)

*drool* mmm..... onion rings...

Re:hmmm (4, Informative)

dfelznic (8812) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895951)

I am using tor right now to read slashdot as well as IRC and GAIM. Tor is not supposed to be as low latency as your normal connection. Security is a trade off the slight degradation in latency is worth the improved anonymity...

Re:hmmm (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895986)

I am using tor right now to read slashdot as well as IRC and GAIM. Tor is not supposed to be as low latency as your normal connection. Security is a trade off the slight degradation in latency is worth the improved anonymity...

Yes, anonymity is truly worth it... DFELZNIC! ;)

Re:hmmm (1)

Wannabe Code Monkey (638617) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896110)

Where is the low latency here? All this peeling/adding layers to peel off must be fairly time consuming.

Well for what it's worth, the internet already has to work through 7 layers of padding on top of the actual data and no one seems to complain about that too much. Just think about a normal http response at the hightest level, you've got several lines of headers before you even get to the content. And each packet, each frame, each [insert-your-favorite-level's-term-for-chunk-o-dat a] has extra bits wrapped around it.

Now that I think about it, it even goes further: if you think about html itself, all the tags are just meta information, the actual content is much smaller than that. It's kinda frightening when you think about much data other than your content is necessary for everything to work.

Of course with the added encryption, this would be a bit more cpu intensive I suppose. But because of layering in the past I don't see that as a reason alone to not like this model.

Re:hmmm (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896154)

Tor is low latency compared to Mixmaster, which has a latency of around 24 hours.

My Advice (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895700)

If you're currently driving a Chevy or a Ford, trade it in for a JAP replacement!

I would imagine (5, Funny)

AbbyNormal (216235) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895704)

our East Asian readers, will readily endorse this new standard...Honestly, I guess not many people think about their acronyms before they are released to the public.

Re:I would imagine (3, Funny)

new account for mod (787682) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895720)

Why would East Asians have a problem with an acronym that also refers to Jewish American Princesses?

Re:I would imagine (1)

edsterino (742447) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895849)

# of Japanese that know what the term "Jap" means *
# of Japanese that will ever hear of "JAP" *
# that are actually offended = a real small number (probably)

After all, that story about Woody the Internet Pecker is true, isn't it?

Re:I would imagine (2, Insightful)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895958)

# of Japanese that know what the term "Jap" means *
# of Japanese that will ever hear of "JAP" *
# that are actually offended = a real small number (probably)

#sarcasm# Hey, maybe only a really small number of black people are reading this, so let's call it NIGR! #/sarcasm#
Honestly, what you said is very stupid. I'm not a fan of PC, but the argument "maybe they'll never know it" is wrong. Have you heard the term World Wide Web?

It's about time... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895706)

That japs get replaced.
The society is so fucked, 99% of japs are
sheep who have no common sense and follow any
orders.

Nobody does bukakke like them japs (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895788)

i sure don't want to see no nigger with a face load of cum!!!


Also you gotta love a race that has 18 year old women that look like they're 12!!!

hmmmmmm tasty japs!!!

Not Like Freenet (5, Insightful)

gclef (96311) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895708)

Wow. Lots of DefCon related stories.

Anyway, for those asking, no, this isn't quite like Freenet. In TOR, you decide which points you want to send traffic through (and negotiate encryption keys with each one individually), and, unlike FreeNet, you can tunnel existing protocols over it (like, say http).

There's a lot of promise here, but in his talk, he was looking for sites that had at least 1Mbps up & down speeds for nodes. This isn't quite like Peekabooty, in that right now they're not looking for everyone to run a middleman node.

Re:Not Like Freenet (4, Interesting)

X (1235) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895747)

What it is very much like is Freedom.net from Zero Knowledge Systems. Those guys already provided the patches to Linux to implement it, and had way more sophisticated protections (things to prevent discovery by timing and packet size analysis). Unfortunately, not may people used it, so it went bust. Now ZKS mostly does firewall software. :-(

Re:Not Like Freenet (3, Interesting)

gclef (96311) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895785)

Yeah, he mentioned ZKS in his presentation. Their disappearing, and taking the network with them, is one of the reasons that he's BSD-licensing the code for this.

Interestingly, one of the other reasons is that he managed to convince the Navy that others would use and trust the code (therefore making the Navy's use of it more difficult to detect) if those others could read the code and implement it themselves. I'm honestly kinda surprised (but happy) that the Navy agreed to it.

talk about racist (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895710)

If I called my project NI**ER, it'd never get accepted. Why JAP?

Why was this modded down? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895966)

JA* is a well-known racial slur used against the Japanese people. It was very insensitive of Slashdot to do this and very unprofessional.

Re:Why was this modded down? (0, Troll)

aderkach (701980) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896000)

FUCKING NIGGERS

Onion routing (5, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895711)

to help Internet users surf the Web anonymously and shield their online activities from corporate or government eyes. The system is based on a concept called onion routing.

I've just tried to set www.theonion.com:8800 as http proxy but it doesn't work...

Re:Onion routing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895779)

"Interesting"?

Somebody's browser doesn't process humour tags...

Re:Onion routing (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895852)

Mods don't read the posts they moderate. That's why the grandparent, which is meant to be funny but appears serious at first glance, is modded interesting. That's just Slashdot for you, that's based entirely on random dummies moderating their peers...

How about some cock for your whine bitch (1)

Mike Hock (249988) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895866)

You know you want it!!!!

YEs you do!!!

Re:Onion routing (4, Funny)

Hard_Code (49548) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896037)

Nurse we need the defibrillator stat! We're about to lose this joke!

Re:Onion routing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896067)

Wrong port, try again.

Re:Onion routing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896115)

uh, you set that proxy then what next? you're still not encrypted up to that proxy unless its an ssl tunnel.

Why would the government fund something... (4, Interesting)

hadesan (664029) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895737)

which is completely open source and avaialble to anyone who want's to download it?

If the Navy is funding this project, don't you think they have already found a way of monitoring it?

Re:Why would the government fund something... (1)

nz_mincemeat (192600) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895816)

The fact that it requires at least a few servers in its chain would mean that there are central points of failure.

Any good encryption system is difficult to be snooped, but it's often easier just to deny access to it (the internet equivalent of air superiority). For example, an "arms race" of blocking IPs and new chains of nodes (for totalitarian nation-states), or even just DDoS attacks.

Re:Why would the government fund something... (3, Insightful)

tacarat (696339) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896023)

Sure, monitor one of the known ends and dumping the packets to file for cracking later. Of course, the main question is how practical would it be to do? If the encryption has a good algorithm, then it could be too computationally expensive to decrypt meaningful amounts of data. If the algorithm is weak, then near real-time monitoring might be practical. Besides, reading the article, it's being set up more to help intelligence spooks do research without tipping everybody else in the world off. Not including terrorists and foriegn goverments, lots of entities would love to know what the US intelligence community finds interesting.
Mind you, it's doubtful the average user would be doing anything that interests the military. If you're seriouly worried about the military/goverment monitoring your home internet sessions, you probably need medication (or a lawyer). With everything else going on in the world, I'm sure even Big Brother needs a reason to focus his all seeing eye towards you...

Re:Why would the government fund something... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896025)

Like a road.

Re:Why would the government fund something... (2, Informative)

dfelznic (8812) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896041)

To quote Paul Syverson from his PET talk:
"The man needs your cover traffic just as much as you need the man for his cover traffic.."

How many do you think... (-1, Flamebait)

Kirby-meister (574952) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895757)

How many /.ers won't even bother to read the previous /. article linked?

Been around for awhile... (5, Informative)

shadowmatter (734276) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895786)

Schemes like this to make p2p anonymous have been around for awhile. The problem is that such systems have very high end-to-end latency, so in practice it's not really ideal for a constantly evolving network -- like peer-to-peer. A scheme similar to this, using mixes, is Tarzan [mit.edu] . From its ACM paper:

Tarzan is a peer-to-peer anonymous IP network overlay. Because it provides IP service, Tarzan is general-purpose and transparent to applications. Organized as a decentralized peer-to-peer overlay, Tarzan is fault-tolerant, highly scalable, and easy to manage.Tarzan achieves its anonymity with layered encryption and multi-hop routing, much like a Chaumian mix. A message initiator chooses a path of peers pseudo-randomly through a restricted topology in a way that adversaries cannot easily influence.

Such systems right now have too high a latency and too much overhead (such as a peer sending "noise" into the network when not having the need to send any real data, just to deter packet analysis) that they aren't terribly practical... for now. So you most likely won't see the technology bundled in the next KaZaA, BitTorrent, etc., but we'll see what the future holds.

- sm

too bad... (2, Funny)

night_flyer (453866) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895790)

we did have this back in 1941

lessons from cp remailers? (3, Insightful)

astrashe (7452) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895799)

What happens when people start doing bad stuff with the tor system? You know it's going to happen...

The model is bad, because the people running the servers (like the old cypherpunk remailers) are supposed to provide services for free, out of the goodness of their hearts, and take the heat when people do malicious stuff with the network.

It seems to me that it's not a bad technical system, but that it fails when you start to think about the social and economic realities of the net.

Re:lessons from cp remailers? (3, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895983)

like spammers taking advantage of a fairly open email system?
sorry, couldn't resist.

still, email works.

these systems are mostly meant for distributing the possible heat anyways.. and making it impossible to pinpoint it on anyone spesific(because you don't even know what you're routing). the problem is when there's some naive people running these that start crying once they figure out what's anonymity mostly needed for(like freenet, they make a system that's practically meant for distributing banned materials and start crying when they realise that the materia had reasons to be banned in the first place..)..

for a normal user though these just mean assurance of that if RIAA/MPAA starts being veeery aggressive about p2p people will switch to some more advanced version of p2p even if it comes with severe performance(speed) hit.

You missed some points. (5, Interesting)

Positive Charge (592093) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895810)

(I know because I submitted this article too.)

1. The Navy is bankrolling the development, presumably to allow government employees to surf around without leaving ".gov" and ".mil" ip addresses in logs.

2. JAP supposedly has a German Government implanted backdoor that this one shouldn't because it's open source.

I think that the US Government is bankrolling it to piss off the Chinese.

a few more missed points (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895971)

Anonymity works both ways, and just because something is official government doesn't mean it's always "whitehat". In fact, so far I'd give government at best a 50/50 score on color of chapeaus going way back. The current regime I'd give an 80/20 black to white ratio and heading darker by the minute. Don't trust them, or what they claim in public.

Think "disinformation" "plausible deniability" and take a google gander at "Directive 3600.1: Information Operations"

Re:You missed some points. (3, Interesting)

mjbkinx (800231) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896080)

2. JAP supposedly has a German Government implanted backdoor that this one shouldn't because it's open source.

you can get the sourcecode for JAP here [tu-dresden.de] .
they were told to record access to a child porn site, which they did (visible in the source). they cought one access to that site, but the data had to be deleted after another court ruling which declared the surveillance illegal.

Apparently there's a Japanese version as well.... (3, Funny)

flimflam (21332) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896102)

called KRAUT.

It's About Time! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895817)

It's about time someone replaced JAP with something more P.C.! Poor Asian folks.

An Important Message (4, Funny)

Gannoc (210256) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895821)


This technology will certainly become a favored tool of terrorists trying to avoid the justice of the Bush administration.

Sincerely,

The MPAA.

Re:An Important Message (2, Funny)

Maxhrk (680390) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895888)

since what relate between MPAA and terrorist? :) wait... you mean those cam-recorder terrorists who capture the movies in threater?

Re:An Important Message (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895979)

ugh cam distibutors are terrorists, think about all the time people spend downloading a movie to find out it is a cam, divide by life span and that is how many "people" they have killed by making that shit.

Nice Acronym (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895826)

Sorry, I'm too busy updating my NIGGER and KIKE networks to worry about a new protocol.

Who the heck thought JAP would be an acceptable acronym?

Probably some JEW (1)

Mike Hock (249988) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895880)

At least that what i heard...

You are welcome!!

Re:Nice Acronym (1)

trckjunky (761468) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896013)

Who the heck thought JAP would be an acceptable acronym?
Someone who's native language isn't English!

Re:Nice Acronym (1)

jcenters (570494) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896030)

I'll never understand why "Jap" is considered a racial slur. Why isn't "Brit" a racial slur?

If I call our illustrious /. editor Michael "Mike," have I slurred him?

And don't even get me started on why "Canuck" or "Yank" is acceptable.

Re:Nice Acronym (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896068)

World War II.

Re:Nice Acronym (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896034)

kinda late on bitching aren't we, taking that this tor system would be to replace the jap?

it's just 3 letters.

Re:Nice Acronym (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896132)

and it only take two letters to describe your mom >>> starts with an H and ends with an O and nothing in between.

idiot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896039)

FYI, j-a-p are the first three letters in "japanese". I know 'jap' was used connotatively when we were in war against them, but I think most people have moved on. That wasn't neccessary, or funny, or cute. cunt.

Re:Nice Acronym (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896058)

Considering it is replacing JAP they should have named it TOR-a TOR-a TOR-a...

Re:Nice Acronym (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896140)

Jap isn't racist.

My New Algorithm (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895827)

I'm not sure yet what it does, but I'm thinking of calling it the Heuristic, Orthogonal, Non-Knuth-approved, Yielding algorithm.

HONKY, for short. I guess that name won't be a problem, will it? I mean, since JAP seems to be okay...

I believe suicide would be a great option for you! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895936)

It would be a great day for humankind when you end... bitch!

Re:I believe suicide would be a great option for y (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896076)

Why, are you a HONKY?

Or perhaps a pissed off JAP, still feeling bitter about Hiroshima?

You certainly aren't a NIGGER, cause they're all too dumb to use a computer.

Oh wait, I know: you're just a BITCH.

Right hand, talk to left hand please! (3, Funny)

putaro (235078) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895851)

I think it's great that the Navy is funding this. Now, where are the wire tap hooks? [slashdot.org] I always enjoy the way the government exempts itself from its own rules.

Is there anyway (-1, Offtopic)

foidulus (743482) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895915)

to get an & in a slashdot comment/sig without /. forcing it to be a &?

Nothing new (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895916)

Something named "My own private Idaho", an anonymous remailing software from 1996-1998, did (and is still doing) exactly the same thing, with PGP integration, and server key publication.

Is the route preselected? (4, Insightful)

brett42 (79648) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895931)

From the couple of days I spent actually working in my highschool cisco class, I remember each router in a path is supposed to be able to optimize the route a packet is sent on by using local information and the packet's final destination. From what I gather from the limited technical details in the article, this protocol would require knowledge of the entire route at the initial node to handle the 'onion layer' encryption.

Is there some way of optimizing a path through a given number of nodes without keeping huge amounts of information about latency on every two nodes, or is this just bouncing the packet around for a while for anonymity and accepting the added latency, plus possibly the time it takes to detect and resend packets when one node in a path suddenly goes dead, making the custom-encrypted packet worthless?

Private Idaho (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9895941)

not "My own private Idaho", but "Private Idaho"
URL :
http://www.eskimo.com/~joelm/pi.html

JAP replacement? (-1, Troll)

Shant3030 (414048) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895960)

I live in a town where some JAP replacements would be very welcomed!

I've been doing this since August 2003. (1, Insightful)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 9 years ago | (#9895975)

Why is this so tough for people to "get" ?

Re:I've been doing this since August 2003. (2, Interesting)

cuzality (696718) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896074)

> Why is this so tough for people to "get" ?

Maybe because you say right on your website [24.125.12.101] , "Don't post this to slashdot. You will murder my cable modem."

Who knows how many truely brilliant ideas have languished in obscurity because their author was afraid of a slashdotting... Surely thousands -- no, millions...

Mixmaster for TCP? (2, Insightful)

kinema (630983) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896003)

This sounds a lot like an implementation of Mixmaster [sourceforge.net] for TCP.

Anonymous mailer technology (5, Interesting)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896010)

This sounds like a reinsertion of all the technology that has gone into anonymous mailers over the years (see MixMaster [sourceforge.net] .) I hope that they aren't re-inventing everything and repeating the same mistakes. The existing technology should be mostly portable from the application layer to the session or layer.

I was at a presentation by the guy behind MixMaster and was impressed by all the thought that has gone into the various generations of the application. They even had it generating fake messages so you can't do traffic analysis.

Re:Anonymous mailer technology (1)

KillerCow (213458) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896021)

grr... reinsertion = reinvention ... which isnt a real word anyways.

Re:Anonymous mailer technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896052)

I reinserted into your mother. MOTHER FUCKER

This is great news for linux users (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896028)

The child porn will still flow like a mighty river.

Goodness me (2, Funny)

TheKingOfTorts (793076) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896085)

No one can replace the Jewish American Princess, what with her snooty attitude and come-hither glances. Come on.. baby needs a new BMW

More Useful Acronyms (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896113)

NIGGER = Network Interface for Generalized Graphic Engine Rendering
HEBE = Heterogeneous Encapsulation of Binary Executables
SPIC = Software Patterns for Internet Computing
KIKE = Kilohertz Interrupt in Kernel Execution
WOP = Wireless Operations Point
POM = Processor Overheating Minimization
CHINK = Componentized Hardware Interface for Networked Kernels

Re:More Useful Acronyms (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896138)

NIGGER = black
HEBE = hebrew (jew)
SPIC = mexican
KIKE = jew
WOP = italian
POM = ????
CHINK = chinese

wtf is a pom?

Onion Routing (5, Interesting)

dachshund (300733) | more than 9 years ago | (#9896117)

Onion Routing [onion-router.net] has been around for several years. Tor is an effort to make the original protocol more practical. It replaces several nice features from OR, specifically the notion of "reply onions", which allowed message recipients to route replies back to the sender without learning the sender's identity. Instead, TOR recommends a form of "rendezvous point" where receivers send messages to be routed back to the sender. It's not as elegant, and the security is not necessarily as strong, though it is more practical.

It's important to note that there are some statistical attacks on both of these systems, and none of them are very secure for long communication sessions when group membership churns, as in a peer-to-peer network.

A JAP Replacement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#9896127)

A JAP Replacement? What about CHI? They're cute, too.
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