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193 comments

Warm up the keyboard (4, Informative)

Lord Grey (463613) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001210)

Minimum PC Requirements:
  • ...
  • Windows ME/ 2000/ XP or later version of Windows
  • ...
Boo, hiss. Who's up for some driver coding?

Re:Warm up the keyboard (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001229)

Somebody else. Free software is like that, one million eyeballs and one burnt out developer!

Gimmie gimmie gimme!

Re:Warm up the keyboard (3, Insightful)

Donoho (788900) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001498)

Free software is like that, one million eyeballs and one burnt out developer!

That's the beauty of free software... all it takes is one burn out developer to get the ball rolling, with no allegiance or agenda other than getting the necessary job done.

Re:Warm up the keyboard (5, Funny)

softwave (145750) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001236)

Boo, hiss. Who's up for some driver coding?
by any means, feel free :)

Re:Warm up the keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001281)

include sig: profit

Re:Warm up the keyboard (1)

qmchenry (266894) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001319)

That was my first thought, too. Digital cable decoder under Linux would be very cool. No more open loop, cross your fingers and hope the IR signals change the digital tuner and curse when they don't.

Re:Warm up the keyboard (3, Interesting)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001411)

Why can't this happen, linux "adopts" or "implements" Windows driver model, so that Windows drivers for devices like this can be installed and used?

I know some of this exists for the wireless networking stuff, and nVidia and ATi's linux efforts are pretty much recompiles of the windows drivers..

Hell, even forget Windows driver model.. Come up with a new, universal model. Hardware companies only need to write and test one driver which you go ahead and use under Windows, Linux, BSD, OS/X, whatever..

Thats my idea anyways. Something to take the world one step closer to my dream where the OS installed on your machine doesn't mean shit, since they all implement the same API's, run the same binaries, and use the same drivers. Less glory for the kernel hackers, perhaps.

This is what bothers me about linux' monolithic approach. It's like NIH syndrome to the extreme. Every driver for every piece of hardware has to be rewritten by scratch and approved by Linus to make it into the kernel. It's a longer process than submitting your drivers to MSFT to be "digitally signed" and stuck on Windows Update.

As for this card, there's likely proprietary trade secrets and bullshit in there and the specs will never be released. They're probably under contract to enforce the "no copy" bit and macrovision output and all that BS. That stuff could be changed in an OSS driver, so that driver can't exist. That's why no TV out from ATi for linux - legally they have to ensure that anytime a DVD is played, macrovision on the TV out is enabled..

Re:Warm up the keyboard (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001572)

Something to take the world one step closer to my dream where the OS installed on your machine doesn't mean shit, since they all implement the same API's, run the same binaries, and use the same drivers. Less glory for the kernel hackers, perhaps.

commie

Re:Warm up the keyboard (1)

modge (773928) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001734)

You say that like its a bad thing

Re:Warm up the keyboard (4, Informative)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001640)

Hell, even forget Windows driver model.. Come up with a new, universal model. Hardware companies only need to write and test one driver which you go ahead and use under Windows, Linux, BSD, OS/X, whatever..

Not to sound like a prick, but have you ever written a device driver?

The unix device driver model (or at least it used to; I haven't written a unix driver in years) is fairly simple. The driver defines a few entry points: read(), write(), ioctl(), open(), close(), and select() (am I missing any?). That is pretty much where the similarity ends. The code to actually talk to the device (ie, the register level stuff) is the same between OSes, but the OS stuff is for the most part really OS dependent. This is more complicated now because of kernel threading and other modern kernel techniques.

your sig (1)

bodrell (665409) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001812)

(S(SKK)(SKK))(S(SKK)(SKK))
That looks a lot like unlambda, but with parentheses instead of backticks. I have no idea what it means, though. Could you clue me in?

Re:your sig (1)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001963)

(S(SKK)(SKK))(S(SKK)(SKK)) is the result of applying the S-K abstraction algorithm to the lambda term (\x.x x)(\x.x x). Applying beta-reduction to this term results in the same term, so it is basically an infinite loop assuming an eager evaluation strategy.

Check out lambda calculus [wikipedia.org] and combinatory logic [wikipedia.org] for more info.

Re:Warm up the keyboard (2, Insightful)

sigaar (733777) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001896)

"I know some of this exists for the wireless networking stuff, and nVidia and ATi's linux efforts are pretty much recompiles of the windows drivers.."

Have you looked at any of the linux forums lately? The nVidia, ATi, and ndiswrapper (sp?) are some of the most troublesome drivers.

"Hell, even forget Windows driver model.. Come up with a new, universal model."

Although I agree with the sentiment, it will be a cold day in hell before Microsoft plays along with this, and even if they do, they'll change it, "enhance" it, break it, customise it and screw it up so badly (and the whole industry will settle on Microsoft's version) that it won't work properly on any other OS in any way.

I think when ATi stopped providing specs to the open source developers for their graphics cards, they saw for the first time just how many sales their opensource support secure for them. Hence they started making the drivers. I think if nVidia drop their Linux/BSD driver support, they'll see a fair chunk of their sales disappear.

"Every driver for every piece of hardware has to be rewritten by scratch and approved by Linus to make it into the kernel."

Which is done for the same reason that MS has the WHQL driver program.

I agree with your sentiment, but it will never happen. One by one companies will wake up and start supporting OSS development or provide drivers. And when they do (if they provide quality drivers), they'll see their sales rise.

Re:Warm up the keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001432)

URL below for the Linux drivers of the australian Fusion 3 DVB-T card. There is is another guy working on Fusion 3 QAM drivers.
Australian Fusion 3 DVB-T http://www.itee.uq.edu.au/~chrisp/DVICO-Linux/ [uq.edu.au]
Fusion 3 QAM http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?s=4b 61d124b991cf13fdca49dfd8dac73b&threadid=421385 [avsforum.com]

Re:Warm up the keyboard (1)

ianbnet (214952) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001463)

"For the Linux buffs out there, check out PCHDTV when you get a chance. This company offers a software-based HDTV Tuner Card similar to the original Fusion I design which is exclusively for Linux. It uses the Xine engine for the HD decoding."

-- from the review. I imagine your comp will need some serious power under the hood though.

Re:This guy is (1)

futuresheep (531366) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001733)

Link [uq.edu.au]

I'm sure it would be a great place to start getting information.

Re:Warm up the keyboard (1)

enrico_suave (179651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001880)

I'm still looking for more info, but I think most of the heavy lifting is done on the software side of this card (not that is an excuse for a lack of a linux driver)

but take that for what it is... (kinda like the old winmodems, sorta...)

*shrug*

e.

Please take the digital cable (1)

Try to think about i (661547) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001221)

and strangle yourself.

I'm downloading the demo in the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001232)

Including some of the HDTV samples... I wonder how much I'll get done before they're slashdotted.

pwned (-1, Offtopic)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001238)

The 10,000,000th post, and all I got was the lousy cracker who has control of my account. Maybe I should change my password?

Wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001357)

ObviousGuy's password was too obvious?

Review's Conclusion (plus linux advice): (5, Informative)

BubbaThePirate (805480) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001265)

Quoth the site:

"Conclusion

The Fusion HDTV III QAM can be seen online at specialty stores like Digital Connection for around $170.00. This is around $100.00 cheaper than a similar hardware decoder card by MyHD. However, I'm certain that the MyHD or AccessDTV cards will deliver a far more stable image. What the Fusion has going for it is QAM reception and the included DVD convector software. It also functions with TitanTV for scheduled recording. If you are concerned about possible jerkiness and dropped frames (I assume you are) you should first try out the demo from the DVico website. ATI's card appears to be a software-based card as well from what I can tell. This card retails for $199.00 but I have not had the opportunity to test it. For the Linux buffs out there, check out PCHDTV when you get a chance. This company offers a software-based HDTV Tuner Card similar to the original Fusion I design which is exclusively for Linux. It uses the Xine engine for the HD decoding. Fun Stuff."

T'was wondering (1)

BubbaThePirate (805480) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001342)

I never seem to see conclusions cited in links to reviews. Is quoting them a faux pas?

Re:T'was wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10002208)

consider the posting a trailer or teaser, if you will, for the article. you don't go to a movie and wacth the endings of 8 movies before the feature starts do you? what incentive would you have to read the article if you knew the author's conclusion?

plain and simple.

Re:Review's Conclusion (plus linux advice): (1)

evangellydonut (203778) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001612)

for $100 extra, i bought a MyHD120 w/DVI daughter card, and must say that except the software interface, I've been VERY happy with it... not impressed by Fusion or ATI...

Re:Review's Conclusion (plus linux advice): (1)

timts (766509) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002137)

ati has a HDTV card as well.

Re:Review's Conclusion (plus linux advice): (1)

Ishin (671694) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002203)

Thanks for posting that information as the site has dumped from the slashdot effect.

It should be noted, however, that all of the janus based cards (hauppage, myhd, accessdtv) I tried didn't work worth a damn in windows2000 (and no one seems concerned enough to fix it) and the ATi card ONLY works in windows xp (and apparently won't let you rip transport streams making it much less useful than the other mentioned cards)

This fusion hdtv III card looks to be the most promising of the lot. The fact that it does most of its work through software is even better: it's more easily hackable. :)

Wheee! (4, Funny)

general_re (8883) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001273)

Warning: mysql_pconnect(): Too many connections in /home/virtual/site27/fst/var/www/html/mainfile.php 4 on line 19
Unable to select database

What a great review - now where can I get my hands on this thing? :)

Re:Wheee! (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001316)

Since its slasdotted, I won't even try and go there, but how much you want to be they should be using mysql_connect instead of mysql_pconnect. Persistant connections usually aren't the way to go.

Re:Wheee! (1)

dave420 (699308) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001772)

They can be pretty useful, but most certainly not when called from a web page :) It's a very common mistake, I've noticed. Usually affecting bittorrent trackers...

great (5, Funny)

Nuttles (625038) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001274)

techies already don't get enough exercise, now I won't have to even swival my chair to look from my monitor to my TV. Isn't there a lobbying group for the the support of tech people not gaining any more weight? Where is my representation? Where is my protection from myself?

Nuttles
Saved by Grace

Re:great (2, Funny)

CreatureComfort (741652) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002248)


Yes, but the lobbying group is sponsored by McDonalds and Mt. Dew.

Anyone grab a mirror? (3, Interesting)

ralf1 (718128) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001275)

Prior to the instant server death? Or know the product name since its not referenced in the summary, so I can look for something on it?

you bastards (3, Funny)

MachineShedFred (621896) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001287)

I was really interested in reading this article, as I've been looking for something to do this, and with only 4 comments posted, this is what I get:

Warning: mysql_pconnect(): Too many connections in /home/virtual/site27/fst/var/www/html/mainfile.php 4 on line 19
Unable to select database

Now that AMDPower's servers have melted into a pool of molten plastic and silicon on the datacenter floor, I hope you're happy!

Re:you bastards (2, Funny)

radixvir (659331) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001439)

Maybe if they would have used Intel processors in their servers.

Zing!

Re:you bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001500)

>>Now that AMDPower's servers have melted into a pool of molten plastic and silicon on the datacenter floor

Did the heatsinks fall off? :)

Re:you bastards (1)

teutonic_leech (596265) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002214)

Can you imagine the kind of crap the marketing/sales weenies are going to give the techies running this site? I mean, getting slashdotted is a sales drone's moist dream - and instead of learning about the product we see yet another proof that PHP is insecure and broken.
Anyway, I don't want to be a sysadmin on that site today...

It's all fun and games... (4, Funny)

xenostar (746407) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001288)

It's all fun and games until you delete something important because you were watching the Olsen twins make out with each other in the always-on-top TV window in the corner of your screen.

Re:It's all fun and games... (2, Funny)

Mr Guy (547690) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001395)

I'd be more worried about most people here needing to replace their keyboards after watching something like that.

Re:It's all fun and games... (4, Funny)

Wescotte (732385) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001710)

Uh, if you were watching the Olsen twins making out with each other I doubt you'd have a hand free to accidently delete something

thé dept (1)

Barryke (772876) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001296)

from the dept.
Sounds 007-isch doesn't it?

[offtopic]
But actualy, is this story, like many the past week, actualy -on- topic?
[less offtopic]

Not the holy grail... (4, Informative)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001298)

What is really needed in this space is a decoder card that also has a CableCARD slot. I don't care whether the CableCARD is inside the case or has an external slot, it doesn't really matter to me.

The fact of the matter is that most QAM signals on digital cable are scrambled. Previously, you had to have a set-top box with descrambling chips in it to watch the TV. With cable card, however, these crypto chips are sparated out so the cable company can had you a CableCARD, and you can buy whatever set-top box you want.

So, even if you get this card, you aren't going to be able to watch many digital cable channels with it since they will all be encrypted (at least here in the US). Now, when they release a version with CableCARD, I'll jump all over it (and begin the search/code for Linux drivers).

Is CableCARD even an option yet? (1)

swb (14022) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001525)

Can you buy anything with this and do any cable companies even support it (ie, issuing the cards)? I know it's a real standard, but it's not here yet that I know about.

It would enable a free-standing HD Tivo I could use with my HD cable service, since they could use the DirecTivo trick of recording the raw signal straight to disk, in addition to ditching the hated cable box.

Re:Is CableCARD even an option yet? (2, Funny)

The Salamander (56587) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001746)

TimeWarner in Austin is already issuing the cards.

You can receive all your channels, but no program guide, pay-per-view, or iControl.

Re:Is CableCARD even an option yet? (2, Funny)

swb (14022) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001918)

What devices can current accept cable card?

Re:Is CableCARD even an option yet? (2, Funny)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002073)

I don't have a complete list by any means, but many of the latest HDTVs have CableCARD slots. For instance, the Pioneer PureVision plasma displays do. You can walk into any Best Buy and check them out. Got to the HDTV section and many of the TVs being sold will list CableCARD as a feature.

As of yet, I know of no stand alone set-top box that has CableCARD compatibility. Rumors have it that TiVo once demoed a prototype that did, but if so, it has yet to see retail availablity.

Re:Is CableCARD even an option yet? (4, Informative)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001908)

The FFC requires that any cable operator with over a certain amount of bandwidth on their network give out CableCARDs at the customer's request. As far as I know, the deadline for compliance was July 1st. I could be wrong on the specifics, but I do know the deadline has come and gone, so a majority of cable companies should comply by now. My cable company does.

Who needs the cablecard? (3, Interesting)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001630)

Actually, I've been thinking about modifying a few cable modems to intercept the QPSK OOB signal on digital cable, and spoof it. Have 2 cable modems, with some splitters and filters in between them, so that we can get QAM to the set top box, but the first cable modem could listen/talk to the headend, and the second cable modem could listen/talk to the cablebox.

For instance [24.125.12.101] , docsis cable modems would seem to be able to ahndle this, assuming they have a frequency agile tuner (most do, I believe), and aren't one chip solutions (RCA ones come to mind).

Anyone care to comment?

Re:Not the holy grail... (3, Funny)

bofkentucky (555107) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001757)

As I understand it, the 1st Gen Cablecard spec is pretty crippled, straight decrypt only. For Program Guides/PPV/other, we have to wait for CableCard v2

Re:Not the holy grail... (1)

jared_hanson (514797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001996)

Yep, it's a one-way, downstream only standard right now. If you use it in a TV with built in CableCARD, for instance, you lose some features of the set-top box such as guide listings, ordering PPV, and all that. The two-way standard will be much better, but also is quite a ways away since the technical hurdles are quite large.

However, for devices with external network connectivity, you can get around some of the downsides. For instance, if you had a computer with a CableCARD, you could just download guide listings over the Internet to set-up a PVR type device. TiVo will likely do something very similar if it ever sells a CableCARD device.

Lack of guide listings is, to me, the thing I would miss most about a CableCARD only device. You can get guide listings easily enough off the Internet if you are doing a custom solution.

Re:Not the holy grail... (2, Interesting)

enrico_suave (179651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002055)

>>
What is really needed in this space is a decoder card that also has a CableCARD slot. I don't care whether the CableCARD is inside the case or has an external slot, it doesn't really matter to me.
broadcast flag not withstanding in June 05)...

I'm pretty sure they have something like that in europe where you can slide your card into a Nexus-S and get your legitimate paid for Satellite signals... no such love in the US.

The only other way to go, for PC based HDTV digital signal chain that's NOT OTA DTV, is some sort of shennanigans using firewire port on the back of a HDTV reciever... but I haven't seen alot of that software out there (either legitimately or "underground")...

*shrug* some day they will build it...

e.

Re:Not the holy grail... (1)

enrico_suave (179651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002136)

(sorry for repeat /. ate most of my post)

What is really needed in this space is a decoder card that also has a CableCARD slot. I don't care whether the CableCARD is inside the case or has an external slot, it doesn't really matter to me.


Here, Here! Once I was able to get to the 3rd page, I was dissapointed to see that it only supports unencrypted QAM... and if you are lucky enough to be on a cable company that has unencrypted QAM content, how long do you think THAT is gonna last...

I had my hopes up... now they are dashed...

The poster above nailed it... Looking for a PCI card that has a daughter card/slot/thingie for a CableCARD to legitimately (broadcast flag [eff.org] not withstanding in June 05)...

I'm pretty sure they have something like that in europe where you can slide your card into a Nexus-S and get your legitimate paid for Satellite signals... no such love in the US.

The only other way to go, for PC based HDTV digital signal chain that's NOT OTA DTV, is some sort of shennanigans using firewire port on the back of a HDTV reciever... but I haven't seen alot of that software out there (either legitimately or "underground")...

*shrug* some day they will build it...

e.

Innie, not Outtie (4, Insightful)

grunt107 (739510) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001300)

From the pictures it looks like all connections are inputs, with no TVOut.

It would be nice if this had composite out to TV(A/V), not just the 'Play on PC'. Combine w/PC-based controller (MythTV), and I would not need to add HDDVR and HDTuner to get HD picture.

Re:Innie, not Outtie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001468)

Sorry, but composite connections don't carry an HDTV signal.

Re:Innie, not Outtie (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001471)

You aren't going to get HD picture with composite out anyways.. Or are you talking about component cables?

Presumably, if you had a decent HDTV, it'd accept the SVGA from your videocard..

Re:Innie, not Outtie (1)

grunt107 (739510) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001661)

Sorry, brain methane (compONENT was intended). I'd have to recheck, but the TV (Panasonic 34") has a billion component connections and a few SVid, but not recalling SVGA.

Re:Innie, not Outtie (1)

AnyNoMouse (715074) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002131)

If your video card happens to be an ATI, most of their cards can use a $30 VGA to Component adaptor.

I'm not sure if NVidia has something similar.

Can you cut out the cable modem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001324)

It receives digital cable signals straight in? I wonder if there's a way to have it act as a tuner and an in-computer cable modem, too?

I wouldn't mind having a bit more control over my cable internet hookup...

Picture in picture in picture on the computer monitor would be nice. A little live TV feed in the corner of the second monitor would have been a great way to keep up on hurricane Charlie last weekend.

AJH

Re:Can you cut out the cable modem? (1)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001698)

Zoom makes a PCI docsis modem.

Would this work with UK Digital Cable? (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001331)

I don't care about the HDTV thing myself, but it would be cool if somehow I could receive my digital cable straight into my computer. That or digital terrestrial in the UK. Anyone got any information about achieving this with NTL cable?

Re:Would this work with UK Digital Cable? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001363)

Check out linuxtv.org

Works great with mythtv for both digital cable and freeview

Re:Would this work with UK Digital Cable? (1)

elFarto the 2nd (709099) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001840)

In the UK you'll need a DVB-T card for digital terrestrial, a DVB-C card for NTL, or a DVB-S card for Sky.

The problem with NTL is the decryption. You can get a Nagra Vision CAM and a DVB-C card that'll except it, but apparentely the NTL card is matched to your NTL box, and it will not work in any other.

Regards
elFarto

what about encrypted digital content (5, Insightful)

gordona (121157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001348)

Its fine to have a card that can receive QAM signals from cable. However, as the article states, this card can only receive in-the-clear (unencrypted) content. Since most cable operators in north america encrypt their high value content (HD is definitely high value), the ability of the card to decode QAM signals is of limited value. Additionally, the modulation modes are not evident. That is, can the card decode 64QAM and 256QAM?

Re:what about encrypted digital content (3, Informative)

radixvir (659331) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001477)

That is, can the card decode 64QAM and 256QAM?

it says in the article it can decode both

Re:what about encrypted digital content (4, Interesting)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001519)

What about decrypting it in software?

I know there were tons of software descramblers for Nargavision, or whatever that was called.

Can a digital cable signal be decrypted? How strong is the encryption? As old as it is, I'd imagine the first digital set top boxes couldn't have had too much horsepower, so the scheme must be relatively simple to decode that much data on-the-fly..

Could "decoders" (password hashes?) be bought and downloaded from the cable company?

Re:what about encrypted digital content (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001862)

Could "decoders" (password hashes?) be bought and downloaded from the cable company?
I'd estimate the chance of the cable company agreeing to that to be about, oh, I don't know, zero maybe?

Re:what about encrypted digital content (1)

gordona (121157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002046)

The encoding schemes in north america are those developed by Scientific Atlanta and Motorola. The encryption is rather strong (that is, it has not been cracked yet) and keys are changed every 3 seconds. Additionally, the encryption schemes are proprietary. It is true that the 1st digital boxes didn't have much punch, but they were able to decrypt content and do the mpeg decoding, but not much else. The next crop of digital cable devices, will have removable security modules, but the jury is out about just how secure those will be compared to the embedded security currently being used.

Does anyone need to be told this is a bad idea? (0)

Spoing (152917) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001352)

Unfortunately, it looks like they do!

  1. clue: Don't do this silly stupid $#!7.

Re:Does anyone need to be told this is a bad idea? (1)

Spoing (152917) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001720)

Ignore previous comment...thought I posted this to the RNC DOS thread! :(

The card does not work properly with QAM channels (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001353)

Although I have posted about this before, I have recieved "threats" due to my "misrepresentation" of the card on slashdot. Do a search on http://www.avsforums.com [avsforums.com] and you will see that the software for this card is flaky and Fusion will not release the specifications so independant driver development can take place. If you buy this card, only get it for over-the-air HDTV. Again, do your research before buying this card, it does not work as advertised.

Parent is BS (1)

Farmboy (21213) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001555)

the site is nothing but fake links, mod it down

Re:Parent is BS (1)

Critical_ (25211) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001594)

Actually the site is http://www.avsforum.com and its not BS.

Re:Parent is BS (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001849)

It looks very close to BS to me. It's about one of the ugliest sites (of sites purporting actual practical use) I've ever seen. Hell, they even have a link in a news article on the front page for an Alexa-provided IE toolbar widget (i.e., spyware).

Wrong... (3, Informative)

Critical_ (25211) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001627)

The original post is 100% correct. S/he mistyped the address since its actually avsforum.com

Yup, avsforum(s) is no avsforum (1)

maynard (3337) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001657)

The site we all care about is avsforum [avsforum.com] , not avsforum(s).com. As for the claims of "threats" and such made by the AC, well it doesn't pass my BS meter. Good call. --M

Re:The card does not work properly with QAM channe (4, Informative)

Jack Kolesar (532605) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001739)

Let me clear up a few things about this card. There were several revisions of it and it was very hard trying to get QAM to function properly from overseas. They actually released a version that was supposed to do QAM. It was the Non-Gold version of the Fusion III. The Gold version does function with QAM. And, I have tested it as working at home. As always, with any hardware, YMMV. Keep in mind again that if its encrypted (most content is) you're not going to get a picture. I have included a screenshot in the article of it actually working with a digital preview station.

avsforum 'Fusion Gold III impressions' thread (1, Redundant)

maynard (3337) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001828)

Scanning through the avsforum thread, FusionHDTV III Gold QAM Impressions [avsforum.com] seems to indicate success with the product. The AC links to a bogus site which only appears legitimate, doesn't offer up his name on avsforum to verify his claim of unspecified "threats", and blasts the product with further unverified claims of nonfunctionality. The parent post looks either trollish or astroturfish more than offering helpful advice. JMO though. --M

Re:The card does not work properly with QAM channe (2, Informative)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001831)

I personally found the card to be less than useful. The software included with the card IS flaky. I CAN'T just download new drivers and software because it is 50MB to 60MB, I'm not about to tie up my line for that. (I'm just a few hundred feet too far from any form of broadband)

Despite the Matrox G450 clearly being in one of their compatibility lists, it does not work, even with the latest drivers, unless I only wanted to watch the analog broadcasts.

As for QAM, the older versions didn't work, but the current version is supposed to work with unencrypted QAM.

Obvious Joke (1)

borgdows (599861) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001368)

Well... I don't get it!

What is this fuss all about?

Article Mirror? (0, Redundant)

diagnosis (38691) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001398)

I have included the text of the article below, in case the site gets slashdotted:

Warning: mysql_pconnect(): Too many connections in /home/virtual/site27/fst/var/www/html/mainfile.php 4 on line 19
Unable to select database

---------------------
Freedom or Evil: Freevil.net [freevil.net]
G. W. Bush says, "You decide!"

Summarized Review (5, Informative)

ianbnet (214952) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001414)

This took me forever to put together (F5 F5 F5), so you better like it. This is a very partial selection of the review; note that there are usually chunks missing between paragraphs. Go visit the site and give them ad revenue once they're stable again.

Fusion III Gold QAM Card

It has been nearly three years since I reviewed one of the first HDTV Tuner cards to hit the market. At that time, the Access DTV card retailed for $400.00 and the only HDTV station available in my area was the local CBS. While the adoption of High Definition has improved greatly, I have to admit that it has been slower than I expected. Equally as surprising is the limited availability of HDTV tuner cards. Until recently, there were few players in this market. I am happy to say that this is starting to change. Manufacturers such as Hauppauge, ATI, and Dvico have developed affordable HDTV cards. Today, we are looking at one of these cards, the Dvico Fusion III Gold QAM. What makes this card unique are some very exciting features that others do not offer. Most notably is the reception of QAM modulated streams. What is QAM you ask? Simply put, DIGITAL CABLE.

The Fusion also allows you to adjust the display ratio for virtually any screen. One of the features that we beta testers fought for was the ability to do a Pan & Scan from a 16x9 source. Nearly all HDTV broadcast are in a 16x9 aspect ratio. However, not all content is in 16x9. So, if the local news is being shown on CBS-HD, there will be black bars on the left an right of the screen. This is acceptable for a 16x9 screen. However, if the image is being shown on a 4x3 screen (computer monitor), you end up with a square image inside of a square screen. Luckily, Pan & Scan allows you to fill the entire screen with the image.

A recent feature which was added lately (not shown in this screenshot) is the ability to get analog audio through the PCI bus. Otherwise, you need to use an internal audio jumper cable for analog television. HDTV AC-3 audio is decoded through software and can be output as either 2CH analog, 5CH analog, or straight through the digital SPDIF out of your sound card.

For those of you who have still not seen HDTV up close, stop now and go download the Fusion Demo. HDTV on a computer monitor is quite impressive. I found the image quality to be remarkable on the Fusion and have included some screen shots below. Keep in mind that these are compressed JPEGs. Here you can see analog TV next to HDTV from a real broadcast that I recordeed of the same sitcom. The images speak for themselves. Click for a larger view.

NTSC Broadcast
ATSC Broadcast

While I found the image quality to be outstanding, I cannot say the same for the decoding capabilities. Some broadcasts seem to be quite jumpy depending on which version of drivers and software that I was using. 720P broadcasts were jumpier than 1080i. What is strange is that the CPU utilization was practically nothing using DxVA, around 30%. Still, at some times I saw dropped frames. When speaking to DVico about this, I was told that they are experiencing some problem with nForce based boards. However, I also tested the card on a VIA board with similar results. DvXA did deliver a much better image than pure-software decoding. Using software-only also restricts full-scale decoding. The software decoding option offers quarter, half, and full-scale decoding. Above half-scale was unwatchable on my 3200+. The image shown above is taken from a full-scale DxVA grab.

Analog decoding was exceptional. The software has built-in deinterlacing capabilities which greatly improves the image quality of analog broadcasts. However, a full-out deinterlacer such as DScaler yields better results.

QAM Decoding

Here is where things get a bit tricky. While the Fusion III Gold QAM is capable of receiving and decoding QAM, it CANNOT decode an encrypted channel. That means that it depends entirely on what your local cable company is encrypting for their digital cable service. For me, I could only get preview channels and Music Choice. One Music Choice channel crashed the Fusion program every time it was tuned. This seemed to be the only problem with QAM I encountered. Other beta testers reported getting all of their local HDTV stations with the Fusion through their CableTV provider. I didn't understand why my cable company would be encrypting the LOCAL HDTV Stations. You would think that the local stations would want this to be free to cable users that may not have a digital cable box. After all, most of the newer HDTV Sets can successfully decode QAM modulated channels as well. After calling Wide Open West (my local CATV company) and convincing them that I was not trying to steal cable TV, they explained that since THEY had to pay a separate licensing fee for the OTA digital stations in addition to the same analog stations, they were not going to give that signal away for free. To each his own, I guess. Some CATV companies do not encrypt local channels. I would suggest that again, you make a call to your local CATV company and hopefully you will get a straight answer. For many in rural areas, local HDTV over CATV is a better solution than a roof-mount antenna. I was successfully able to receive all five of my local stations through my attic antenna. So, QAM modulation was not necessarily needed. Still, here is a screenshot of the Fusion III QAM decoding a Digital Cable iN Demand preview station from my cable provider. This is quite an impressive feat. Click for a larger view.

DVD Converting

DVico provides a very handy DVD converter with their line of HDTV Tuner cards. This converter, though very slow, will take a raw HDTV stream and convert it to either Mpeg-2 or DivX video. Another nice feature is the ability to preserve the AC3 stream. I tried the convector out on a short ten second HDTV clip and it worked very well. The image was of very high quality at the 5 Mbps bitrate. However, the converter seemed to have problems when trying to convert a 720p broadcast . I would also like to see the program write the audio as a separate file. This would allow even further DVD mastering possibilities. Keep in mind that this is a relatively new addition to the Fusion package and is still being improved.

Conclusion

The Fusion HDTV III QAM can be seen online at specialty stores like Digital Connection for around $170.00. This is around $100.00 cheaper than a similar hardware decoder card by MyHD. However, I'm certain that the MyHD or AccessDTV cards will deliver a far more stable image. What the Fusion has going for it is QAM reception and the included DVD convector software. It also functions with TitanTV for scheduled recording. If you are concerned about possible jerkiness and dropped frames (I assume you are) you should first try out the demo from the DVico website. ATI's card appears to be a software-based card as well from what I can tell. This card retails for $199.00 but I have not had the opportunity to test it. For the Linux buffs out there, check out PCHDTV when you get a chance. This company offers a software-based HDTV Tuner Card similar to the original Fusion I design which is exclusively for Linux. It uses the Xine engine for the HD decoding. Fun Stuff.

Not the first card. Try the ATI HDTV Wonder (1, Redundant)

CoreyGH (246060) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001451)

http://shop.ati.com/product.asp?sku=2546404 [ati.com] ATI has had this card out for a while. I don't own it, but I do have one of their regular all-in wonder cards. I've got no problems recording and time shifting video.

On another note, many people have been talking about cable companies scrambling their HDTV cable channels. These cards aren't for receiving digital cable HDTV channels; they are for receiving OVER THE AIR HDTV broadcast channels (as well as regular analog cable channels).

Re:Not the first card. Try the ATI HDTV Wonder (3, Informative)

figleaf (672550) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001531)

The ATI card has a chip to handle QAM but unfortunatenly it is disabled.
Therefore it is no use for most Digital Cable in the US even if the signal is not encrypted.

Re:Not the first card. Try the ATI HDTV Wonder (1)

CoreyGH (246060) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002054)

Where did you find this info about "the ATI card has the chip to handle QAM but unfortunatenly it is disabled"? I don't see that on the product page.

And I never said it was of any use for digital cable. I said ANALOG cable. You can still record digital cable with it, just send the rca outputs from the cable box into the ati card and change the channel on the cable box to whatever you want to record.

Re:Not the first card. Try the ATI HDTV Wonder (1)

figleaf (672550) | more than 9 years ago | (#10002128)

See http://peripherals.engadget.com/entry/177121278893 3180/ [engadget.com]

The card isn't without drawbacks; while the ATI chip is capable of supporting QAM modulation (a cable TV delivery system) they've chosen to disable its use for the HDTV Wonder, and it also stores the files in a slightly non-standard manner.

Re:Not the first card. Try the ATI HDTV Wonder (4, Informative)

Jack Kolesar (532605) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001619)

Hi I'm the author of the article. Stupid little virtual server... Anyway, It does receive HDTV QAM. That is what it is built for. It also receives "standard" digital cable. It DOES need to be UNENCRYPTED though.

mySql: Too many connections (1)

mbbac (568880) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001473)

Maybe they should try using PostgreSQL. Maybe even PowerPC instead of AMD. :)

Re: mySql: Too many connections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001578)

Their database server crashed... no looking for now...

Or maybe a real database... (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001766)

...not a hopped up toy that is showing it's roots....

Oh yeah, you might have to *pay* for that. I guess regular DDOSing is a small price to pay for running a popular site on free software.

Link Alternative (1)

pdamoc (771461) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001510)

www.amdpower.com died in front of my eyes.
Maybe some of you could use an alternative link [archive.org] from our beloved internet archiver :D

holy snikeys! (1)

enrico_suave (179651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001602)

Their mysql database just took wretched, so I couldn't get passed page 1... BUT if this is true it's a big boon for the homebrew HDTV, HTPC, PVR, DVR scene (enough acronyms for ya?).

I've got to get my hands on one of these stat!

Anyone who read the whole article know how they are doing the modulated QAM? Is it via CableCards?

E.

Article Text - No karma whoring (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001670)

Introduction
Fusion Box
It has been nearly three years since I reviewed one of the first HDTV Tuner cards to hit the market. At that time, the Access DTV card retailed for $400.00 and the only HDTV station available in my area was the local CBS. While the adoption of High Definition has improved greatly, I have to admit that it has been slower than I expected. Equally as surprising is the limited availability of HDTV tuner cards. Until recently, there were few players in this market. I am happy to say that this is starting to change. Manufacturers such as Hauppauge, ATI, and Dvico have developed affordable HDTV cards. Today, we are looking at one of these cards, the Dvico Fusion III Gold QAM. What makes this card unique are some very exciting features that others do not offer. Most notably is the reception of QAM modulated streams. What is QAM you ask? Simply put, DIGITAL CABLE. This does NOT mean that you can buy the card and get free pay stations. We'll get further into this later. Let me first tell you how I came to know DVico.

A little over a year ago, I became a beta tester for DVico's line of HDTV cards. What started as a stumble across a Google search turned into a year long journey testing various production and pre-production Dvico units. Before Dvico, all HDTV Tuner cards were hardware-based. This meant a dedicated Mpeg-2 decoder and increased cost. Out of curiosity, I started searching for a software-only solution that would offer the same functionality at a reduced cost. After all, the ATSC over-the-air signal is nothing more than an Mpeg-2 stream, albeit at a very high resolution and bitrate. While I was playing around at the AVSForums, I saw that Korean-based Dvico was accepting beta tester applications for a U.S. launch of their HDTV cards. The first card I tested was their FusionHDTV II, shown above. The FusionHDTV II would be their first US available HDTV Tuner card. It was also the first card on the market to use a software-based HDTV decoder. Soon after the release of the card, Dvico started experimenting with the possibility of decoding QAM signals. With the existing tuner chip on the HDTV II, it was not possible. However, after several revisions of cards and input from U.S. beta testers, Dvico delivered the Fusion III Gold QAM. It is the only HDTV tuner card on the market which can successfully decode QAM modulated digital cable stations. Today, we are reviewing that card. Let us first look at the specifications and features.

Specs and Features
The Fusion HDTV III Gold QAM is based off of Conexant's newest signal-decoder chip, the CX23882. Conexant has long been the industry standard when it comes to tuner cards. Their newest line of chips, is what allows the reception of QAM signals. Working together with the decoder chip is a Tecmic tuner chip. Since ATSC signals use standard UHF frequencies, the tuner portion of the card is nothing entirely special. The card has two RF inputs, one is for CATV and one for Over-The-Air. There is also an S-Video port and an Audio input which can be used to capture video from a Digital Cable Box, Camera, Playstation, etc. It can also be used to scale and upconvert video from an S-Vid or Composite source to hi-res. The S-Video port can be made into a composite port with a simple S-Video to Composite adapter. Such an adapter is not currently included in the package. When Dvico released the QAM version of this card, they added a daughter board which can be seen in the third picture below. I'm uncertain as to the exact functionality of this board.

Test System / Decoding Options
Since the Fusion cards do not have a dedicated Mpeg-2 decoder chip, the minimum system specs can be a bit stringent. However if an ATI card is used (8500 and up), the fusion drivers borrow the built-in Mpeg acceleration from the Radeon using DxVA (DirectX Video Acceleration). The Fusion can take advantage of DxVA using several GeForce cards as well. These cards include the MX420, 440, and FX Series. Keep in mind that the nVidia list is very specific. There are certain code operations that the DxVA drivers will need to call upon from the GPU. Following is a list of system requirements compared with my test system.

As you can see, the listed system specifications are not very detailed. After testing the card, it is my opinion that the specifications are a bit underrated. I would highly recommend downloading the demo software before you even consider getting this card. That's right! You can download a demo of the software and an HDTV stream from DVico's website and begin watching HDTV (pre-recorded streams only) today. You can find a link to the demo software here.

Software Interface
The main controller, seen below, is pretty straight forward and resembles that of a DVD player and standard TV Cards. Clicking on the channel number will bring up a list of available channels. Clicking on the sub-channel (the number after the dot) will do the same. One key feature that the DVico has is the ability to record an HDTV stream directly to the harddrive without locking it. DVico has even included an HDTV to DVD converter utility with their software. I'll show that to you later. Another nice feature is the ability to take screenshots. Because of this, it allows me to show you some true HDTV screen shots later in the article.

Controller
After installing the Fusion HDTV, you will be asked to search for new channels. This can be done through an autoscan which will search both Over-The-Air (analog and digital) and cable (analog and digital). With the QAM version of the card, an additional selection is placed at the bottom of the screen. Here is where you need to select either QAM 64 or QAM 256. Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) is what most CATV companies use to transmit digital cable stations. Though it sounds complicated, this modulation technique is just a combination of two existing techniques, phase modulation and amplitude modulation. Binary numbers can be represented by both the "height" of the sine wave (amplitude) and the phase of the sine wave (+ or -). This allows for a more efficient method to transfer data. Without going into details (details which I myself am unsure about) QAM-256 can cram more data into its bandwidth than QAM-64. However, QAM-256 requires a much better carrier to noise ratio than QAM-64. Thus, you should check with your local cable company to see which modulation scheme is being used. Over-The-Air broadcasts use 8VSB modulation as set by the ATSC, Advanced Television Systems Committee. Using QAM modulation for Over-The-Air signals would result in unreliable data reception given the non-controlled environment of the media. While thinking about all of this can start to tie your brain cells in a knot, the main thing to take away is that the Fusion III QAM can decode all of these signal.

Channel Scan
Under the Video tab, you can adjust video settings along with some nice cropping features that will allow you to get rid of any wacky lines at the top or bottom of your screen.

Video Tab
The Fusion also allows you to adjust the display ratio for virtually any screen. One of the features that we beta testers fought for was the ability to do a Pan & Scan from a 16x9 source. Nearly all HDTV broadcast are in a 16x9 aspect ratio. However, not all content is in 16x9. So, if the local news is being shown on CBS-HD, there will be black bars on the left an right of the screen. This is acceptable for a 16x9 screen. However, if the image is being shown on a 4x3 screen (computer monitor), you end up with a square image inside of a square screen. Luckily, Pan & Scan allows you to fill the entire screen with the image.

You will also see a deinterlacing tab which will allow you to select Bob, Weave, or Auto. Obviously, with a 720P broadcast, no deinterlacing is done. However, 1080i will need to be converted to a progressive image that can be displayed on a computer monitor. I definitely recommend Auto, as you can get a bunch of jumping with the wrong setting.

Software Interface
Many options can be selected under the recording tab. You can set the recording directory to a separate harddrive (highly recommended) as well as select the maximum file size for the recording. This allows you to break up your HDTV recordings to span multiple DVD's in their original HDTV format. If you have a firewire port and Digital VHS recorder, you can also record directly to it. Beta testers experienced mixed results when attempting this. So, your mileage may vary.

Record Tab
A recent feature which was added lately (not shown in this screenshot) is the ability to get analog audio through the PCI bus. Otherwise, you need to use an internal audio jumper cable for analog television. HDTV AC-3 audio is decoded through software and can be output as either 2CH analog, 5CH analog, or straight through the digital SPDIF out of your sound card.

Audio Tab
Analog video can also be recorded and converted to Mpeg on the fly. However, I did not find the image quality to be very impressive and this is definitely a resource hog. For quick recordings though, it is a nice feature.

Analog Tab
You can select a couple of extra settings under the On Screen Display Tab. The External TV label is a bit misleading. All this does is place the OSD on your secondary monitor, be that what it is.

HDTV Decoding
For those of you who have still not seen HDTV up close, stop now and go download the Fusion Demo. HDTV on a computer monitor is quite impressive. I found the image quality to be remarkable on the Fusion and have included some screen shots below. Keep in mind that these are compressed JPEGs. Here you can see analog TV next to HDTV from a real broadcast that I recordeed of the same sitcom. The images speak for themselves. Click for a larger view.

While I found the image quality to be outstanding, I cannot say the same for the decoding capabilities. Some broadcasts seem to be quite jumpy depending on which version of drivers and software that I was using. 720P broadcasts were jumpier than 1080i. What is strange is that the CPU utilization was practically nothing using DxVA, around 30%. Still, at some times I saw dropped frames. When speaking to DVico about this, I was told that they are experiencing some problem with nForce based boards. However, I also tested the card on a VIA board with similar results. DvXA did deliver a much better image than pure-software decoding. Using software-only also restricts full-scale decoding. The software decoding option offers quarter, half, and full-scale decoding. Above half-scale was unwatchable on my 3200+. The image shown above is taken from a full-scale DxVA grab.

Analog decoding was exceptional. The software has built-in deinterlacing capabilities which greatly improves the image quality of analog broadcasts. However, a full-out deinterlacer such as DScaler yields better results.

QAM Decoding
Here is where things get a bit tricky. While the Fusion III Gold QAM is capable of receiving and decoding QAM, it CANNOT decode an encrypted channel. That means that it depends entirely on what your local cable company is encrypting for their digital cable service. For me, I could only get preview channels and Music Choice. One Music Choice channel crashed the Fusion program every time it was tuned. This seemed to be the only problem with QAM I encountered. Other beta testers reported getting all of their local HDTV stations with the Fusion through their CableTV provider. I didn't understand why my cable company would be encrypting the LOCAL HDTV Stations. You would think that the local stations would want this to be free to cable users that may not have a digital cable box. After all, most of the newer HDTV Sets can successfully decode QAM modulated channels as well. After calling Wide Open West (my local CATV company) and convincing them that I was not trying to steal cable TV, they explained that since THEY had to pay a separate licensing fee for the OTA digital stations in addition to the same analog stations, they were not going to give that signal away for free. To each his own, I guess. Some CATV companies do not encrypt local channels. I would suggest that again, you make a call to your local CATV company and hopefully you will get a straight answer. For many in rural areas, local HDTV over CATV is a better solution than a roof-mount antenna. I was successfully able to receive all five of my local stations through my attic antenna. So, QAM modulation was not necessarily needed. Still, here is a screenshot of the Fusion III QAM decoding a Digital Cable iN Demand preview station from my cable provider. This is quite an impressive feat. Click for a larger view.

DVD Converting
DVico provides a very handy DVD converter with their line of HDTV Tuner cards. This converter, though very slow, will take a raw HDTV stream and convert it to either Mpeg-2 or DivX video. Another nice feature is the ability to preserve the AC3 stream. I tried the convector out on a short ten second HDTV clip and it worked very well. The image was of very high quality at the 5 Mbps bitrate. However, the converter seemed to have problems when trying to convert a 720p broadcast . I would also like to see the program write the audio as a separate file. This would allow even further DVD mastering possibilities. Keep in mind that this is a relatively new addition to the Fusion package and is still being improved.

Conclusion
The Fusion HDTV III QAM can be seen online at specialty stores like Digital Connection for around $170.00. This is around $100.00 cheaper than a similar hardware decoder card by MyHD. However, I'm certain that the MyHD or AccessDTV cards will deliver a far more stable image. What the Fusion has going for it is QAM reception and the included DVD convector software. It also functions with TitanTV for scheduled recording. If you are concerned about possible jerkiness and dropped frames (I assume you are) you should first try out the demo from the DVico website. ATI's card appears to be a software-based card as well from what I can tell. This card retails for $199.00 but I have not had the opportunity to test it. For the Linux buffs out there, check out PCHDTV when you get a chance. This company offers a software-based HDTV Tuner Card similar to the original Fusion I design which is exclusively for Linux. It uses the Xine engine for the HD decoding. Fun Stuff.

1394 cable boxes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10001693)

I see that cable companies are supplying HDTV boxes with 1394 sockets now. I even have one :-) Unfortunately I've been unable to capture anything from it. Does anyone know what format it is? The older boxes used to be something along the lines of MPEG-TS. I've yet to find any specs for the 1394+HDTV set top boxes :-(

How long before the DMCA .... (1)

GreyGeek (792965) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001737)

is envoked, or an IP lawsuite filed, to get the device off the market? A few days to a few weeks?

Ati also makes one (1)

wpmegee (325603) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001815)

Ati makes a HDTV tuner as well. Linky [hothardware.com]

So what I've gathered so far is... (1)

mustangsal66 (580843) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001843)

The HDTV card is cool...

The website is hosted on Ensim's hosting solution...

The website has been slashdotted...

That about covers it.

Oh and Linux users can use it. There have been reported successes using this card with MythTV.

Not really very useful (1)

gearmonger (672422) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001882)

Doesn't work with encrypted QAM feeds? What's the point, then, since most anything worth watching is either (A) on unencrypted, non-digital (NTSC?) cable or (B) encrypted QAM.

HD feeds are all encrypted, so what we really need is a CableCard adapter for our HTPCs. That would rock. It would rock so much that I don't expect one to come out for at least a couple of years (at least not if the cable co's and MPAA can help it). feh.

This whole "digital content" mess is headed for a meltdown, mark my words. And unfortunately, I don't think we (consumers) are going to come out winners. Media owners have more dollars than we have votes, as sad as that is.

Re:Not really very useful (2, Interesting)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 9 years ago | (#10001978)

I don't have a problem paying for my cable, so a card that will accept a cable company provided solution to encryption and access control (e.g., CableCard) is fine with me.

However, I want to make sure when everything goes mandatory digital, that I have a solution in place that allows me to timeshift without loss of quality and without being encumbered by DRM that would prevent me from skipping commercials and such. Not copy, not redistribute, not share - just timeshift. (I already have the MythTV-based PVR, just waiting for a digital cable solution.)

Experience with THIS hardware ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10002072)

This [pchdtv.com] link has been around for a while. Does anyone have any experience with this card, and the drivers under linux ?

Japanese BS Digital HiVision capability? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10002191)

The specifications for this card on DVICO's website [dvico.com] include:
  • Japanese BS/CS digital stream play including audio(AAC)

Does anyone know if this means I can just jack an IF signal in from a BS dish and be able to watch Japanese BS Digital HiVision on my computer? Somehow I doubt it since this card is designed primarily for 8VSB and QAM modulation of ATSC signals. If I remember correctly, BS Digital uses as standard called something like ISDB-S, which is a Japan-only standard. I've tried contacting DVICO to get an answer this question, but never received a response.

I have been searching for PCI card with BS Digital capabilities for a while but haven't seen anything. I think that lack of BS Digital computer cards has something to do with the requirement for copy-protection measures that are even more strict than the US FCC's "broadcast flag" restrictions. Anyone here knowledgable on getting BS Digital working using a computer/LCD monitor? I don't feel like purchasing a new TV set right now.

P.S. I don't read/write Japanese well (hiragana/katakana only--kanji fries my brain), so searching Japanese language pages for answers has been an exercise in futility.
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