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Shrimp-Based Bandages Save Lives

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the and-boy-are-they-tasty dept.

Biotech 65

Roland Piquepaille writes "Unstoppable bleeding is one of the leading causes of death on battlefields. But now, soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan have a way to reduce bleeding when they're wounded. In "War Bandages," ScienCentral News writes that these new bandages contain chitosan molecules, extracted from shrimp shells. These positively charged chitosan molecules attract negatively charged red blood cells, stopping hemorrhage in one to five minutes. As said one of the co-founders of the Oregon-based company behind these bandages, "You can have a hole in your heart and 60 seconds later it's sealed." The Food and Drug Administration approved these bandages for human usage, but today they are exclusively sold to the Army. With a $90 price tag for a 4-inch-by-4-inch single bandage, would you buy them anyway? This overview contains more details and references. It also shows you how the red blood cells are attracted by the chitosan molecules."

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65 comments

Of courese I'd buy one... (4, Insightful)

zulux (112259) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097731)



When you need one to stop a gusher - $90 is going to seem cheap when somebody's life is on the line.

Well depends. How long do they last (2, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097782)

If I can carry one in my wallet for a couple of years then yeah sure. Most people in "civilian" accidents don't bleed to death from open wounds so the chances of being or finding someone else in a accident where this is usefull is remote but then again I also always carry a condom.

Re:Well depends. How long do they last (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10100233)

...but then again I also always carry a condom

Hey! You said remote possibilities....

What? Isn't this slashdot?

Re:Well depends. How long do they last (1)

nusuth (520833) | more than 9 years ago | (#10102727)

By the same line of reasoning, given that typical condoms last four years and even less when carried in a wallet, I don't see how you can justify carrying one.

Problem (1)

Faithman2k (604227) | more than 9 years ago | (#10101867)

There is a problem with them... anyone with a seafood allergy WILL get some sort of allergic reaction, if not full blown anaphylaxis. This is also common in products that have glucosamine as an ingredient. I've had to disuade many an arthritic person from buying glucosamine. (I do work in the medical/pharmaceutical field)

Re:Problem (1)

adam1234 (696497) | more than 9 years ago | (#10108374)

At the point where you need to use a bandage that stops "unstoppable bleeding", I doubt if a small chance of a seafood allergy is going to matter anyway.

Re:Problem (1)

benzapp (464105) | more than 9 years ago | (#10111899)

Doesnt that mean that the pills which are said to include glucosamine in fact contain something else? You can't have an allergic reaction to an amino acid, only to proteins (or organisms which are composed of protein).

This is the reason free-form amino acids are on the market. Amino acids derived from other proteins are never 100% pure and should be avoided as their sources can be quite unusual.

Re:Of courese I'd buy one... (1)

ZeroZen (136166) | more than 9 years ago | (#10117860)

albeit it would suck if the army needed them tho.
let's say they buy, 750,000, 3 for each soldier in iraq (that's a number i got off google somewhere...)

that adds up to $67,500,000. On bandaids. I'm no chitosan molecule expert or anything, but that seems steep to me.

my favourite Judd Hirsch quote (4, Funny)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097816)

from the movie Independence Day:

"You don't actually think they spend twenty thousand dollars on a hammer, thirty thousand dollars on a toilet seat, do you?"

Let's get a dumb question out of the way... (-1, Flamebait)

OneDeeTenTee (780300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097833)

Is there any chance that shrimp will be hunted to extinction to make these?

Re:Let's get a dumb question out of the way... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10097874)

Not really. Shrimp are farmable, very easily (think sea monkeys...). Might as well ask "will cows be hunted to extinction".

Re:Let's get a dumb question out of the way... (2, Funny)

Acy James Stapp (1005) | more than 9 years ago | (#10098677)

Of course, we could fish to extinction the fish needed to feed all of those shrimp.

Re:Let's get a dumb question out of the way... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10111794)

Of course, we could fish to extinction the fish needed to feed all of those shrimp.

You don't have to feed them fish. Most species of shrimp (like their relatives crabs, lobsters, and crayfish) can consume most organic remains. Basically they will eat anything that doesn't try to eat them first.

Re:Let's get a dumb question out of the way... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10098114)

Just because you say it's dumb doesn't make asking it anything other than plain stupid. Are you trying to make things worse here or just really lonely?

Welcome to 10,000 BC (4, Informative)

Julian Morrison (5575) | more than 9 years ago | (#10098122)

Nowadays, we have this thing called "farming". It's rather good at solving the problem of over-hunting (over-fishing, over-picking, etc).

Rural Ambulance Services (5, Insightful)

TykeClone (668449) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097855)

I volunteer as a driver on our rural ambulance service. The closest hospital is about 30 miles away - about a half hour or less driving time.

In the event of a vehicle or farm accident, I'd like to see these bandages available to our EMT's - all they need to do is to buy about 30 minutes.

Re:Rural Ambulance Services (1)

bobbozzo (622815) | more than 9 years ago | (#10113495)

Anyone know what the shelf-life would be on these?

Sure, get one for the car (5, Insightful)

JavaRob (28971) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097899)

I have a feeling that if I had a wound that would *require* this kind of bandage, I'd be incapacitated enough that I wouldn't be able to get to the glove box.

On the other hand, I might be able to save someone else's life. We've all heard about the staggering numbers of deaths in auto accidents... I wonder if a percentage of those might not have been fatalities if the EMT's (or other drivers) had materials like this.

It might also be worth it for people with blood clotting problems, who (without proper care) could bleed to death from a bad papercut. Does it work for them?

"hole in your heart"?! (2, Interesting)

nusratt (751548) | more than 9 years ago | (#10097953)

"You can have a hole in your heart and 60 seconds later it's sealed."

ummm...how large a hole can you have for SIXTY SECONDS without already being doomed to eventual death from shock or brain hypoxia or circulatory collapse?

and how long does it take from the time the hole is created until the time it's realized, exposed, and then treated?

Re:"hole in your heart"?! (1)

Lonesmurf (88531) | more than 9 years ago | (#10101587)

what i'd like to know is how the hell they test that. :S

on second thought, no i wouldn't.

Re:"hole in your heart"?! (2, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 9 years ago | (#10104248)

ummm...how large a hole can you have for SIXTY SECONDS without already being doomed to eventual death from shock or brain hypoxia or circulatory collapse?

and how long does it take from the time the hole is created until the time it's realized, exposed, and then treated?


A .223 round is pretty small. If it passed through cleanly there would certainly be rapid blood loss, but maybe not enough to kill you in 60 seconds.

Of course you bring up the essential point - how is a medic in the field supposed to get the bandage on the heart in the first place? Stick a straw down the bullet wound and pour in the powder? You probabably don't want this stuff winding up in your brain.

Re:"hole in your heart"?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10106493)

For the record... .223 is what we shoot at them. They typically shoot larger calibers. It's sad really.

Re:"hole in your heart"?! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10106714)

Yeah, but in most conflicts (the present disaster in Iraq notwithstanding) friendly fire incidents outnumber hostile forces inflicted casualties.

Re:"hole in your heart"?! (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 9 years ago | (#10118027)

I'd love to see the source for that bit. I have a great deal of difficulty believing that even in the smaller civil wars with largely untrained masses doing the fighting, blue-on-blue incidents caused more casualties. Even in the first Gulf War, hostile fire claimed more coalition lives than did friendly fire.

Just the Army? (3, Interesting)

devphil (51341) | more than 9 years ago | (#10098033)


Weird. I knew a former Marine who talked about using the shrimp-based bandages for wounds. They've been atound for a while, that's for sure.

Re:Just the Army? (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100418)

I knew a former Marine who talked about using the shrimp-based bandages for wounds.

Someone doesn't know the difference between the Army and the Marines. Or didn't ask the pertinent question: "Only the Army???"

Re:Just the Army? (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | more than 9 years ago | (#10101826)

Yes, thats somewhat "old" news as those bandages and other chitosan based treatmetns are around for at least one I think nearly two decades.

The first time I read about it in a science magazine I was still a boy,

angel'o'sphere

Futurama Reference... (3, Funny)

Libertarian_Geek (691416) | more than 9 years ago | (#10108322)

Horray! Ziodberg's popular again!

Would I buy one? Depends on how long they last. (4, Insightful)

topher1kenobe (2041) | more than 9 years ago | (#10098311)

If I could buy one for $90 and throw it in my med kit and leave it there for 4 years, you bet. If it expires after 2 months, no way.

I have sterile bandages in there that are years old, and are still good because I take care of them.

Shrimp and Potatoes (3, Interesting)

displague (4438) | more than 9 years ago | (#10098752)

Potatoes stop bleeding [ksl.com] too. I thought I originally read this on Slashdot, but Google is not being helpful. Actually, it's like dried potatoe flakes or powder. But the story is the same, it near instantly stops bleeding.

Boy (1)

JavaRob (28971) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100329)

Boy, this thread is making me hungry. Shrimp, potatoes... how about some Cajun seasoning? Will that stop bleeding?

Re:Boy (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100438)

how about some Cajun seasoning? Will that stop bleeding?

Gash yourself, then pour salt and cayenne on the would, and get back to us, ok?

Re:Boy (2, Funny)

JavaRob (28971) | more than 9 years ago | (#10105711)

Gash yourself, then pour salt and cayenne on the wound, and get back to us, ok?

Ah... I'd be glad to, but that wouldn't follow the scientific process, now would it? We'll need to set up a double-blind study. Any volunteers?

Re:Boy (1)

Alyred (667815) | more than 9 years ago | (#10120083)

Actually, Cayenne pepper is a great antiseptic and helps clot wounds pretty well too.
No, it doesn't sting like salt.

Re:Shrimp and Potatoes (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100452)

potatoe

Didn't Dan Quayle get in trouble for this?

Re:Shrimp and Potatoes (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 9 years ago | (#10104206)

potatoe

Didn't Dan Quayle get in trouble for this?


Yep. Well, he was character-assassinated by the media for it anyway.

They used it to prove how "dumb" Quayle really was. Sound familiar?

They typically didn't report that he was working off a flash-card with the word pre-spelled for him by whomever had organized the spelling bee.

Of course, we all know that impeccable spelling skills are essential for national leadership, right? People who write copy all day (and thus need to be good spellers) found that it reinforced their preconceived elitist notions and ran with it. Letterman played it up, but that's only fair. What was inappropriate was the coverage by the non-comedic media who didn't say much about Gore's leopard changing his stripes.

Re:Shrimp and Potatoes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10119849)

They typically didn't report that he was working off a flash-card with the word pre-spelled for him by whomever had organized the spelling bee.

Quayle: (reading off next card) "Do-'t press the red button. Hmm, 'doot'? Doo tee? Duty! It's my duty to press the red button!"

(Flash-mushroom cloud-immeasurable inconvenience to morning commuters worldwide)

They used it to prove how "dumb" Quayle really was.

Because, spelling notwithstanding, the man was as dumb as head cheese. Unfortunately for him, he didn't have a vp puppetmaster to tell him when to wipe the drool from his lower lip.

Sound familiar?

Unfortunately. Maybe we can fix this by Nov, tho.

Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (0, Flamebait)

SlashCrunchPop (699733) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099058)

As said one of the co-founders of the Oregon-based company behind these bandages, "You can have a hole in your heart and 60 seconds later it's sealed."

Correction: the said co-owner does not have a heart (otherwise he would not be making such a killing with those exclusive overpriced bandages) and thus his little chest-stabbing PR stunt resulted in only a minor self-inflicted cutaneous injury.

Seriously though, if you want something handy and effective to stop bleeding, try honey or ground coffee.

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10099499)

you are an idiot.

If you read the article the man was an army medic and worked for over a decade to come up with a solution to a problem he experienced first-hand.

If coffee or honey would have been as effective you-bet-your-ass he would have used it instead! As for the fact he's making money from this, guess what.. this is a capitalistic society, he's entitled. Over time the price will come down and more lives will be saved.. even yours.

Just to re-iterate, you are a moron.

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (2, Insightful)

agent dero (680753) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099928)

This kind of leads to a couple ethical questions:

How much is a possible life worth?

How much is the creator/founder/supplier entitled to for creating something that _can_ save a life?

IMHO, i'll shell out $90 in a situation that would be tremendously helped by a situation like this.

Life and death is not a time to be stingy

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (1)

SlashCrunchPop (699733) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100247)

This is definitely a great discovery and well worth the cost, but keeping it exclusively in the hands of the armed forces not only nullifies its potential global benefit to mankind, but also makes it less profitable for the owners. IMHO, they should make these bandages available to everyone at a price that would give them a 10 - 15 % profit margin. They should also allocate a portion of the profits to a special fund for those who cannot afford these bandages because any discovery of such importance to mankind cannot be kept solely in the hands of the few who discovered it.

As for honey and coffee, they are common household items and are likely to be handy in case of an accident at home or even at work.

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (5, Informative)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100524)

Correction: the said co-owner does not have a heart (otherwise he would not be making such a killing with those exclusive overpriced bandages) and thus his little chest-stabbing PR stunt resulted in only a minor self-inflicted cutaneous injury.

You self-righteous, brainless shit.



John Holcomb has been working on this for 12 years, with no big company that has other income streams to fund the research.



Also, do you know how diffucult it is to create these bandages? Neither do I. Maybe it costs $70/bandage to specially refine the chemical and create the bandage. After all, if it were easy, it wouldn't have taken 12 years.



Besides, the Pentagon probably thinks that a $90 silver bullet to reduce the mortality rate by 10% is an incredible bargain. And these bandages will reduce the amount of work that doctors will have to do to repair wounds, meaning that they can treat more personnel, and less blood loss means that there will be less systemic damage, and less need for blood transfusions, people will heal quicker, etc, etc, etc...

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10101259)

I don't see any research comparing this to other available compounds. They just noted that it works better than plain guaze. I doubt that honey or ground coffee would be as effective, but there are already a number of other compounds used to stop bleeding. I wonder how this compares.

Re:Handy and effective way to stop bleeding (0, Troll)

titzandkunt (623280) | more than 9 years ago | (#10105530)


Why don't you read some of the reasons why meds are so expensive [yarchive.net] ?

Apologies for the length of this quote from the above link, but I think it's worth reading (Steve Harris MD on medical costs and litigation):

"...You [correspondent] were complaining about the cost of American medical care not long ago. You are clueless as to the connection here. Drugs cost more here. Medicine costs more here. A lawyer costs more here. An artitect costs more here. Each of these things has reasons. Until you step away from medicine and see the big picture, you'll never figure it out...

... And that's not even the worst part. The worst part is what you don't see. The products that are never developed, or developed too late to help people, because everyone is afraid that somebody will get hurt, and sue. In the case of vaccines it got so bad that without DIRECT government intervention to hamstring the civil litigation process, you would not today be able to buy a dose of vaccine in the United States for love or money. The very last couple of makers were getting set to leave the U.S. market and sell only overseas, before the government stepped in and stopped an out of control civil litigation process...

...For less obvious things than vaccines and aircraft, FYI, the government does not step in, and the product you don't know about simply ceases to exist. If you need a lung lavage of fluorocarbon to save your life if you have lung damage from a fire or shock, you're not going to get it. 3M, which makes most of these chemicals, quite deliberately got out of the medical market years ago, after the Dow Corning Silicone suit. So you're out of luck. You won't know why, but that won't change a thing. If your heart valve fails, you'll never know that it might not have, if the suture 3M made for that purpose, in a little tiny subdivision of the company, was still available. But it's not, since a giant company like 3M has deep pockets, and they don't need the medical market liability grief. Now, it's YOUR problem."


T&K.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10108693)

The moderator is a moron.
(And mod this as "+5 Insightful")

Shellfish! (5, Interesting)

AllMightyPaul (553038) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099183)

Will it work if you're allergic to shell-fish? That's what I want to know.

Re:Shellfish! (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 9 years ago | (#10101236)

Take the lesser of two evils... how allergic to shell fish are you? If its enough to kill you then I wouldn't try. If you get a rash or hives or something, it might be preferable to use one of these bandaids if your at risk of bleeding to death.

Re:Shellfish! (2, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 9 years ago | (#10104228)

Will it work if you're allergic to shell-fish? That's what I want to know.

The clotting should work. Let's hope there's an epi stick in the first aid kit too and you can not die both ways.

I wonder if the low blood pressure associated with anaphylaxis could be beneficial in the case of a gushing wound.

If it's refined enough you'd probably not have to worry in the first place.

Re:Shellfish! (1)

Alyred (667815) | more than 9 years ago | (#10120147)

Well, I would have to wonder what part of the shellfish one is allergic to.

I know for me it's the content of some of them. I can eat shrimp, if they've been well cleaned. Crab and lobster I've never had problems with. I can't eat scallops without swelling and slight difficulty breathing.

Since they are only using a small component of the shrimp in the bandage, I wonder if that's the common part that most are allergic to.

What about allergies? (2, Insightful)

Myself (57572) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099217)

In folks who're allergic to shellfish, which part is it that triggers the reaction? Peanut and shellfish allergies never seem to be mild, and while this is a wonderful lifesaving development, I wonder whether other methods should be kept handy in case this particular one would kill a particular person.

Re:What about allergies? (1)

AHumbleOpinion (546848) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099805)

If the bandage is going to be used for civilian emergencies then perhaps other methods are needed. However in the military a person with such an allergy could be considered medically unfit for service and be denied enlistment.

Re:What about allergies? (1)

ResidntGeek (772730) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099817)

You moron, chitosan is not a shrimp-specific substance, it is a moderately common biological chemical. It's a derivative of chitin, and it's common in exoskeletons of various animals. They just happened to use shrimp to get it for this application, probably because they're easiest to extract it from.

Re:What about allergies? (1)

flewp (458359) | more than 9 years ago | (#10099984)

Also, how does this affect Jewish people or other people who cannot eat shellfish? I understand that you're not eating this treatment, but do the religious teachings prevent you from any sort of shellfish in the body, not just eating them?

Re:What about allergies? (1)

MarsDefenseMinister (738128) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100522)

Jews aren't like Christian Scientists. They will make all sorts of exceptions to any rule to save a life.

Re:What about allergies? (1)

flewp (458359) | more than 9 years ago | (#10101287)

Well, I understand that. I guess my question was more just general, and also could they use this if another option were available? Say another bandage that would still save the life but may not be as good.

Re:What about allergies? (1)

MarsDefenseMinister (738128) | more than 9 years ago | (#10105618)

Don't know enough about it to be more specific. Sorry, IMNAR. (I am not a Rabbi). Also I am not Jewish.

What about the kosher laws? (1)

robbkidd (154298) | more than 9 years ago | (#10111195)

God hates shrimp. [godhatesshrimp.com]

Leviticus 11:9-12 [gospelcom.net] says:
9 These shall ye eat of all that are in the waters: whatsoever hath fins and scales in the waters, in the seas, and in the rivers, them shall ye eat.
10 And all that have not fins and scales in the seas, and in the rivers, of all that move in the waters, and of any living thing which is in the waters, they shall be an abomination unto you:
11 They shall be even an abomination unto you; ye shall not eat of their flesh, but ye shall have their carcases in abomination.
12 Whatsoever hath no fins nor scales in the waters, that shall be an abomination unto you.

Deuteronomy 14:9-10 [gospelcom.net] says:
9 These ye shall eat of all that are in the waters: all that have fins and scales shall ye eat:
10 And whatsoever hath not fins and scales ye may not eat; it is unclean unto you.

The order is given in relation to eating, but YHWH seems pretty unequivocal about the acceptability of scaleless and finless water beasties what with using words like "unclean" and "abomination".

Further interest in the matter [google.com] ?

Re:What about the kosher laws? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10135866)

Those laws are there because before refrigeration and modern sanitary treatment of food, eating shellfish was dangerous.

It doesn't have much relevance to the modern world.

Re:What about allergies? (2, Informative)

bluGill (862) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100336)

Every emergency room I know of would prefer to treat an allergic reaction to treating complete loss of blood. Allergies are serious, but the odds of surviving even the worst cases when you are in the hospital are much higher than the odds of surviving loss of most of your blood.

Re:What about allergies? (2, Informative)

Nutria (679911) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100546)

In folks who're allergic to shellfish, which part is it that triggers the reaction? Peanut and shellfish allergies never seem to be mild, and while this is a wonderful lifesaving development, I wonder whether other methods should be kept handy in case this particular one would kill a particular person.

Allergic reactions get triggered by eating shellfish, not touching them...

I wouldn't, but... (3, Insightful)

Undefined Parameter (726857) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100030)

I probably wouldn't buy one at ninety bucks a bandage, but I would think that hemophiliacs (and their parents) would definitely consider such a cost... well, inconsiderable.

~UP

You can get rid of superficial bleeding... (1)

Transcendent (204992) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100458)

I'm not saying that this is a bad product... it sounds like a great idea, but I just don't want people thinking it's the mericle cure to bleeding. The "hole in the heart" quote (which someone else above me has already commented on) is rediculous. How are you to stop internal bleeding?

If you get shot in the heart... sticking a patch on the hole in your chest won't help. You're dead before this bandage has time to clot your blood.

One reason why they're not on sale to the public (4, Informative)

kgp (172015) | more than 9 years ago | (#10100635)

The rection is very exothermic (generates a lot of heat). In fact enough heat to cause serious burns (an extra complication). The trick for using the version issued to the army in powedered form is to be trained to use just enough powder.

Would anyone have them at home. Sure. Imagine a deep glass wound to the neck, arm or leg without immediate treatment (pressure to the wound or this material) you could be dead in minutes. I think this will find it's way into better First Aid boxes. EMT and other first responders (including the police) could use it now.

These would be life savers if everyone had one. (2, Interesting)

digital photo (635872) | more than 9 years ago | (#10106373)

Imagine a car accident, you drive by and see someone clutching their wrist/arm/etc and is applying pressure to stop the bleeding.

If one of the these patch bandaids can stop hemorraging type bleeding in 60 seconds, that would be a life saver. It means the difference between making it to the hospital or dying on the way.

The same would apply to shootings where the wound itself didn't damage anything life theatening, but did result in a badly bleeding wound. A patch bandaid capable of stopping the bleeding would be a godsend.

As another pointed out, seafood allergies would suck.

These can also be of great assistance in helping people who have "accidentally" cut their wrists or otherwise rendered a life threatening wound where death by bloodloss may result.

At $90 a pop for a 4"x4" bandage isn't cheap, but that is relative. If you just suffered an accident with a sharp piece of metal and are bleeding badly, $90 to stop the bleeding and save your life will be a bargain.

I would imagine that for smaller wounds, the bandage can be cut into smaller sections.

If they can drop the price to $10 per 4"x4" bandage and sell them in packs of 4-5, you would be able to offer them in local stores, to ERT/EMT, and to schools.

This kind of medical discovery is what we need more of. Ways to save lives.

I think $90 is a little steep. (1)

weeboo0104 (644849) | more than 9 years ago | (#10117727)

Why spend $90 when you can just buy these little guys? [sea-monkeys.com]

Entertaining and life saving! And as an added bonus, you can celebrate your recovery by throwing your bandages on the barbie!
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