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Gnomoradio: Creative Commons Music Sharing

michael posted more than 9 years ago | from the share-the-love dept.

Music 147

An anonymous reader writes "I just stumbled upon Gnomoradio, a file sharing jukebox based on Creative Commons licenses. This program looks like a garage band's dream come true! It recommends songs based on each user's ratings, and has the capability to share them. Announced less than a year ago, the program has already made a great deal of progress, as can be seen from these screenshots. I downloaded the Debian package, and aside from a few interface quirks, the program works flawlessly. Is this the future of digital music, or should we be looking for something less centralized?"

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similar to irate (5, Informative)

iamplupp (728943) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213290)

This seem to be based on the same concept as irate [sourceforge.net]

Re:similar to irate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213964)

and audio scrobbler [audioscrobbler.com] .

Sounds like email limited to a single domain (-1, Offtopic)

ScottMacVicar (751480) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213294)

You can only contact users who have a dmail account.
There is no external way to send a message apart from through their system...

Sounds like offline instant messaging

How long will this last? (5, Insightful)

nizo (81281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213302)

This looks awesome, but how long before the RIAA starts feeding copyrighted music into the system and then gets it shut down? Things like this have to be their worst nightmare.

Re:How long will this last? (4, Insightful)

bizpile (758055) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213378)

This looks awesome, but how long before the RIAA starts feeding copyrighted music into the system and then gets it shut down? Things like this have to be their worst nightmare.

Even for /. that statement seems a bit paranoid. I doubt that the RIAA would try to entrap people that are legally trading music the RIAA doesn't own when they have plenty of people actually illegally trading music they can go after.

Re:How long will this last? (3, Insightful)

tolan-b (230077) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213436)

It threatens their ditribution monopo^H model.

Re:How long will this last? (2, Funny)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213564)

Yeah, because I'm sure that use of Gnomoradio is going to cut a huge dent in the number of people listening to RIAA music. After all, if history has shown us anything, it's that when given the choice, the teeming masses have always chosen to listen to free independent music rather than illegally downloading the latest Britney song.

Re:How long will this last? (3, Insightful)

tsg (262138) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213439)

Even for /. that statement seems a bit paranoid. I doubt that the RIAA would try to entrap people that are legally trading music the RIAA doesn't own when they have plenty of people actually illegally trading music they can go after.

Unless their primary goal is to protect their obsolete business model, but they wouldn't do that....

Re:How long will this last? (5, Insightful)

gcaseye6677 (694805) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213552)

The RIAA has a history of trying their hardest to stop ALL online music distribution. Remember the early suits against the makers of Diamond RIO MP3 player? The thing couldn't even copy music, but they sued simply because they wanted to stall digital music. Then there were all of the lawsuits against MP3.com which didn't even carry RIAA music, but it was theoretically possible that it could be used for copyright infringement, so their lawsuit said. Like I've said all along, the record labels aren't so much bothered by kids downloading Britney Spears songs; what scares them is a digital distribution model so efficient that a band decides to use it rather than sign over their souls to a record company.

Re:How long will this last? (1)

LittleGuy (267282) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213584)

Even for /. that statement seems a bit paranoid. I doubt that the RIAA would try to entrap people that are legally trading music the RIAA doesn't own when they have plenty of people actually illegally trading music they can go after.

It's not a matter of legal; it's a matter of might.

RIAA can pour money and resources into shutting it down and going after users, as long as they insinuate that there *must* be some copyright material being traded.

Re:How long will this last? (3, Insightful)

Chaotic Evil Cleric (622653) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213690)

I would think this is worse for the RIAA, if it catches on. Like Microsoft, who turns a blind eye to widespread piracy but has secret Hallowe'eny-type meetings on how to covertly kill One-Percent-Of-The-Market Linux (through SCO, etc.), the RIAA knows that piracy of their music is not as bad as people ditching them completely to pirate OTHER people's music. Irrelevancy is their greatest worry right now, not piracy. And rightly so; they're easily replaced. At least piracy means they're still relevant.

Re:How long will this last? (-1, Flamebait)

nizo (81281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213448)

Who modded this flaimbait? The RIAA does stuff like this all the time [theregister.co.uk] . Do you seriously think they will just sit by while artists find other ways to distribute their music (and make money) that leaves them out of the loop? If not, feel free to post a reply!

Re:How long will this last? (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213670)

The article describes something very different than what is being claimed. The RIAA "poisoning" specifically combats people who are downloading their copyrighted material (by posting files masquerading as the copyrighted music.) That's a completely different thing, both in goals and in implementation, from what the poster was claiming. Rather, his scenario was just a knee-jerk "Big Bad RIAA wants to shut us down!"

Only time... (5, Insightful)

StevenHenderson (806391) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213304)

Sure this is fine for the garage bands, but it will never catch on with the "mainstream" bands. This is for one reason. No money.

Just as mp3.com used to be a great resource for me to find bands, the bigger artists tried to get in on it, but would never allow songs for download. Especially with the widespread adoption of "legit" music stores, I doubt this will catch on outside of indie groups (which is where I will continue to get my music).

Make it airborne, as in radio (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213512)

It's great as an "incubator". It can serve the same purpose as local gigs with small audience, which is still a major step in order to become mainstream.

Bands could publish here not complitely polished versions of their songs to test audience reaction and feedback.

However, the major breakthrough could be to get a P2P filesharing system "airborne/wireless" so that people could listen to the song with the same way as they do it now with FM radio.

It's still really the FM radio - beside MTV and clones - which gets an album moving or die.

We need OpenRadio...

Re:Only time... (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213531)

Well, it certainly won't fly for me, because it won't play on my Deb unstable default config.

Re:Only time... (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214033)

I was already pissed that it was going to be so tightly tied to GNOME, and I tried to build it anyway. No go, even after installing *every* package it requires. Something's wrong somewhere, obviously.

What I'd like to see is their backend factored out into a cross-platform library (note when I say cross-platform that does not mean it can require GNOME on Linux and still be cross-platform, because GNOME is a platform and depending on GNOME libraries means you're tied to a platform). It would be trivial at that point to build a wxPython client using their backend, and I might well do so just to avoid locking into GNOME. GNOME is as predatory as Microsoft in their lockin tactics, and I'd just as soon not use it. ;)

Re:Only time... (1)

clenhart (452716) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213871)

Sure this is fine for the garage bands, but it will never catch on with the "mainstream" bands. This is for one reason. No money.

Some bands would like to share music freely ( == advertisements) and make money on concerts.

OMFG Stephen Hawking just died!!!11! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213306)

NN is just reporting that Stephen Hawking has died. This is a terrible tragedy for all of dorkdom...

first post... (-1, Offtopic)

johnkqfg (525399) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213311)

Bragging rights, etc. ensue.

Centralized is good if content is legal (4, Interesting)

jonesboy_damnit (773676) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213312)

As per topic: it seems to me that centralization is a good thing when no copyright violations are taking place. It allows easy sorting/searching/etc. based on data that is easy to find (the central server) - I think this is a great thing for indy/garage/etc artists looking for another place to promote themselves.
-Matt

Re:Centralized is good if content is legal (2, Insightful)

gosand (234100) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213534)

As per topic: it seems to me that centralization is a good thing when no copyright violations are taking place. It allows easy sorting/searching/etc. based on data that is easy to find (the central server) - I think this is a great thing for indy/garage/etc artists looking for another place to promote themselves.

Funny how now we now assume something is illegal unless proven otherwise, instead of the opposite.

From a guitarist in a 'garage band'... (1)

diss3nt (811387) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213313)

...yes, this does sound pretty cool. Maybe we'll finally be able to make it out of the garage!

Asked and answered (5, Interesting)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213336)

Is this the future of digital music..?

No, because few people want to listen to indy music.

The future of digital music is giving the RIAA another buck, via Apple or Napster or whoever, to listen to your favorite songs in yet another proprietary format. One for your portable player, one for your PC, one for your car.

That's just the way it is, like it or not.

Re:Asked and answered (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213368)

Explain your sig please. The phrase and the selected italics does not seem to make any sense.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213459)

number one in the hood, G

Re:Asked and answered (1)

siliconjunkie (413706) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213946)

You apparantly don't know Carl [about.com]

Actually, its free p2p (1)

ellisDtrails (583304) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213388)

Thats the future, and it is here. Just because Uncle Tim and Aunt Martha buy iTunes for .99 a song, doesn't mean I can't still get all of my music free from eMule, BitTorrent, etc. The p2p community will always be a step ahead.

Re:Actually, its free p2p (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213710)

Mod down stupid iPod troll. Go spew your drivel some place else.

Re:Actually, its free p2p (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10214043)

Bank robbers will always be one step ahead of the police. Bank robbery is the future!

Re:Asked and answered (4, Insightful)

Thunderstruck (210399) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213402)

History is nothing if not cyclical. I've often lamented that local music is so hard to find now-a-days, and I honestly can't believe I'm the only one. For all but the last 200 years of human history, music was played live by local talent. Now, we have better technology and more people... there should be more local music rather than 10,000 radio staions all owned by clear channel with the same 35 song playlist. I for one welcome our new music source.

Re:Asked and answered (0, Flamebait)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213569)

So do I, and I'd rather go to the local bar and get drunk while listening to the local band on a Saturday night.

But, like I said, most people are only interested in artists that they're told to listen to by the E! channel or MTV. And those are RIAA artists.

Americans want corporatized boardroom approved crap and thats the way it is.

Any "alternative" music scene of any popularity is quickly assimilated into the mainstream these days. They absorbed punk, metal, hip-hop, country, ska/reggae.. Anything artists come up with, they absorb like the Borg and package and polish into MTV crap.

Because that's what the majority wants. We can bitch but we can't change it.

That's why, as I've said before, I hate music and have all but eliminated it from my life.

Re:Asked and answered (3, Insightful)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213645)

I should say it's not just Americans, it's everyone.

People want to listen to the same songs and music because it helps them identify with each other. If you're the only fan of unknown band X, then you can't use that to link yourself to a particular crowd or lifestyle.

Which is what the RIAA really sells, prepackaged "lifestyles".

Want to be a non-conformist? Buy these CDs, and wear these cloths, pierce this, so you fit in just like every other non-conformist. (Yeah, the ass-backwardsness of that remark is on purpose).

Re:Asked and answered (1)

sgant (178166) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213786)

Songs are more than this though...they're also great memory flags.

I'm 42 right now..and when hear a Led Zeppelin song or a Beach Boy's song, it instantly takes me back when I was like 20 riding around with my friends and being a general goof-off. Those were good times and it's nostalgic to think back on your life and see how far you've come etc etc...

At least it is for me. It's a simple pleasure. Lifestyles? Yeah, can see that now adays. People wanting to fit in as well as people not wanting to be social at all, so they listen to the unknown band then declare how mis-understood they are.

Now it appears a new trend is to not like music at all. Watch this little movement grow until it peters out as they all do.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

sgant (178166) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213724)

I love how you generalize everyone into the same mass genre.

American's dont' want corporatized boardroom approved crap...no one wants that. Only the coporatized boardroom thinks this and THAT's why it's out there. Are you one of those people that looks down their noses at someone that likes Brittney Spears? So what if someone likes her. Your world will not come crashing down you know.

Also, what is wrong with alternative music becoming popular? Again, are you one of those (since you like sticking people into catagories I'm feeling free to reverse it upon you) that cry "sell out" when a band tries to generate a little coin for the effort?

Music is music...it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you like it, if it brings up an emotion in you...so be it. Who cares if Wayne Newton does it for you or Black Flag?

Also, not sure when the last time you watched MTV or E! but they talk about anything but music. MTV is all "Real World" or "Road Rules" or _____(insert reality show here) and E! is just True Hollywood Stories and Gossip. Hey, some people like that...are you saying you're better than they are?

Look, people like different music. I like music because I like music...not because someone told me to like it. I stand alone on many music choices, but what do I care? And how can someone "hate" music? Is this the new thing for hip young cats like yourself to show how you're above it all? Lol...kids never change I guess and yeah, if I was 19-22 or so, I'd be doing the same thing more than likely...it's always the same I guess.

Re:Asked and answered (2, Interesting)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213795)

Music is music...it doesn't matter where it comes from. If you like it, if it brings up an emotion in you...so be it. Who cares if Wayne Newton does it for you or Black Flag?

Your peers care. That's what I'm getting at. If your friends are into Black Flag, listening to Wayne Newton makes you an outsider.

They sell lifestyles. You can choose from goth, ska-punk, country redneck, hip-hopper, headbanger..

Many many people don't go to Best Buy and pick up CDs so much as they have songs they want to hear, but because it supposedly earns them "status" with their chosen crowd. Especially younger people seeking acceptance. You can't deny that this is true, Maslow hierarchy of needs... Psyche 101.

There are true music lovers out there, but they don't make up the mass markets.

Re:Asked and answered (2, Interesting)

sgant (178166) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213835)

I'll agree with you there about younger people seeking acceptance...but this is nothing new of course as I saw it all through the '70's. Hey, it's tough being a kid...in the past and now. Conform or be cast-out.

But you get older. Hip friends matter less and less and being part of a crowd matters less and less as that old devil time wears on.

Then the music that you most cherish happens to be the music you liked as a youth when you look back. Yes, I like new stuff coming out...but it usually has to brew for about a good 5 years before I start to enjoy it...because it brings back memories for me. Hard to explain really. But you get my drift.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

hb253 (764272) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213822)

Nothng to add except Amen Brother!

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Thunderstruck (210399) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213958)

So your position is that the problem lies not with the RIAA so much as with the population. On that I agree, but I think the population currently demands the MTV Crap (Do they even show music videos anymore?) because of habit rather than preference.

For the past 2 decades, there were only national channels to get music information. There were only national radio corporations to play the songs, and there were only national commercial distributors to buy your own copy (whatever rights you still get if you do.)

Can we not hope that the masses will stop viewing themselves as one big group of "Americans who listen to American popular music" and start using the new tools to re-invent local identity and local music?

Can we not at least hope that FREE, good, music within 3 clicks of your ergonomic mouse can compete with the multibillion dollar advertising budgets of the entertainment industry?

If we can't, well... that sucks.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

stefanlasiewski (63134) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214046)

They absorbed punk, metal, hip-hop, country, ska/reggae.

But "They" haven't absorbed 100% of the scene. For each of these genres, there are numerous non-mainstream bands which haven't been completely assimilated by the beast and which will never been shown on MTV.

There is still plenty of good music in these genres, and much of it is in your local scene. If you live in culturally deprived suburbia or some other place that doesn't have a vibrant scene [culture snob] and maybe you should think of moving.[/culture snob]

So do I, and I'd rather go to the local bar and get drunk while listening to the local band on a Saturday night.

I have kids, so the bar isn't really an option for me (I'd much rather play with the kids). Internet radio is a great solution for people in my situation

Re:Asked and answered (1)

nmos (25822) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214054)

I think popular music is "popular" for basically the same reason McDonalds is popular. It's not that everyone (or even anyone) thinks it's the best but it's familiar and fairly consistant. If you walk into a music store you can't possibly make an informed choice in an hour or two so people just tend to choose something by an artist they've heard of. Wheather having thousands of additional choices freely/quickly available in hundreds of nooks and crannies on the internet will make things better I don't know.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213640)

"I for one welcome our new music source."
You forgot "loverlords"

Re:Asked and answered (1)

cthrall (19889) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213740)

http://www.localband.net/

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Wordsmith (183749) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213931)

Actually history goes through periods of being cyclical, then periods of not being cyclical, then periods of being ...

Re:Asked and answered (5, Insightful)

Ignignot (782335) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213455)

I think a better way to look at this is to say "is this the future of radio." Instead of the broad sweeping "...future of digital music." Ultimately the RIAA doesn't like things like this, but clearchannel must be sweating hard. They can see the chopping block, and maybe someday their head will go on it. Same thing goes for virgin records stores, sam goody, etc. The whole distribution network is getting beat up.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Paulrothrock (685079) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213628)

ClearChannel is already shaking because of a new radio format with disc jockeys who don't scream, who actually know about music, don't talk over songs, don't play songs on top of one another, play 5 minutes of commercials an hour, and have 2000+ song playlists.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213799)

You listen to KLBJ too? ;)

Seriously, the two interesting complaints I've seen are "Not enough local bands" and "ClearChannel". Try living in Austin sometime. KLBJ has a good, solid mix of local bands, and they aren't clearchannel and never will be. (If they become clearchannel, expect rednecks to develop suicide bombing tactics)

The soul of a Texan is independence.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Paulrothrock (685079) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213831)

You listen to KLBJ too? ;)

Actually, I'm in PA. I heard a story about them on NPR. The sample playlists they gave sounded like they had hacked into my computer and stole my iTunes library, so I was intrigued. A true 'driveway moment.'

Re:Asked and answered (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213933)

:) KLBJ is awesome. They had an internet stream at one point, you might be able to find it if you hit their website. My only real caveat with it is that it required internet explorer to work.

Ok, I checked, and they don't stream over the internet any more. :( Sucks, but you can at least visit their website [klbjfm.com] . Naturally I recommend visiting their lame website so you don't promote excessive usage of flash.

And a slight political word: KLBJ better represents Texans than the president. In fact, you can consider KLBJ authoritative, and the president, well, let's just say we voted him *out* of Texas, if you catch my meaning.

Re:Asked and answered (3, Interesting)

joabj (91819) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213539)

>No, because few people want to listen to indy music.

Hate to say it but there is something to be said for this. And for good reason.

Part of popular music's appeal is that it is, duh, enjoyed by a lot of people. That is the *primarily* purpose of the major labels, with their huge marketing budgets. They buy consensus along the lines of "Yes this is a song that we, the people, like."

This allows a sort of cultural bonding to take place over certain songs--the producers of "Garden State" can put Cold Play's "Don't Panic" in the begginning of that movie and we'll all understand its shared meaning. It becomes a generational thing.

Music companies buy consensus, and we all need that consensus to build a music community. (Whether we need this done in the way that music companies now do this is another matter entirely--I'd rather have 100 world music bands sell 100,000 copies each of their songs than Fleetwood Mac sell 10 million copies of their latest tired joint. But I digress).

I noticed this back in the early 90s when I was a reviewer for a heavy metal mag. We got *lots* of fantastic CDs in (Along with loads of dross) that, over time, became some of my favorite music. But I feela loss because no one today would know what a great band, say, Antic Hay, was. The music is just as good as what was popular, but something is lost nonetheless.

So Yay! for the major labels!

joab

Re:Asked and answered (1)

bubba_ry (574102) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214073)

Part of popular music's appeal is that it is, duh, enjoyed by a lot of people. That is the *primarily* purpose of the major labels, with their huge marketing budgets. They buy consensus along the lines of "Yes this is a song that we, the people, like."

Gee, where do you think all that popular music started? Every nationally known band was a local band somewhere at some point...

Re:Asked and answered (2, Insightful)

plasticmillion (649623) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214104)

I don't think you're taking into account the effects of new technologies, some of which are already exploited by Gnomoradio (the internet, for example).

Why do music companies market inane girl and boy bands instead of good indy music? Because their business model is based on the idea of high marginal costs for distribution. If there are 10,000 people in the world who will like a song enough to pay $1 for it, and it takes me two days in the studio and other two on my Mac to make the song, at a total cost of say $2,000, then it's a profitable enterprise and I should do it (ignoring opportunity costs but you get the point). The hitch is the cost of actually distributing the music. I can't really send 10 copies to 100,000 different stores in the hope that a few stores will sell a copy.

Therefore it's more profitable for big music to concentrate on megabands that will justify the expense of creating a CD in X copies, shipping it to a bunch of stores and having to deal with unsold merchandise and returns. This is all changing now with the iTunes Store and the rest. Two things are still missing IMO:

  • A really good recommendation system that helps me find music that isn't backed by an enormous marketing budget.
  • A micropayment system.
(Notice that I didn't mention DRM.)

Personally I think the web, P2P technologies and micropayments are going to result in a renaissance of indy music.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214130)

This allows a sort of cultural bonding to take place over certain songs--the producers of "Garden State" can put Cold Play's "Don't Panic" in the begginning of that movie and we'll all understand its shared meaning. It becomes a generational thing.

...or a radio station can play a song by SoulHat every Friday at 5pm and we all understand it's the weekend, time to party down, woo hoo!

Um, oh yeah, er, what was I saying?

I noticed this back in the early 90s when I was a reviewer for a heavy metal mag. We got *lots* of fantastic CDs in (Along with loads of dross) that, over time, became some of my favorite music. But I feela loss because no one today would know what a great band, say, Antic Hay, was. The music is just as good as what was popular, but something is lost nonetheless.

As a longtime fan of Wrathchild America, Anthrax, Skid Row, and a smattering of other now unpopular bands, I can honestly say I don't give a fuck if no one else likes what I listen to. They're all dumb anyway, right? ;)

Speaking of "don't give a fuck", there is that one song that goes "I don't give a fuck, I don't give a shit, I don't give a fuck, I don't give a shit". True art, brother. True art. ;)

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Paulrothrock (685079) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213727)

I give Apple one buck, and I can play a song on any device that supports the format an unlimited number of times, burn it to unlimited CDs (10X for the same playlist), and store it on five different computers, or stream it to unlimited computers on my network, or stream it to an Airport Express and play it on my home stereo, or listen to it on my iPod.

I don't know where people come up with the idea that Apple's DRM is in any way more restrictive than, say, a CD. Sure, it's not supported by *every* MP3 player out there, but that's because it's a loss-leader for the iPod. It's the opposite of the Gilette razor principle; sell the songs below cost, and make it up on the iPod. You *own* the song (as much as a song can be owned), you're not renting it.

If they try to make it more restrictive, I'll just burn a CD of all my purchased songs and re-rip them, and never give them another cent.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214158)

Not as long as your player has to contact Apple (or whoever) to find out if you can play it still.

DRM is completely and irrevocably incompatible with copyright law due to the fact that copyright is supposed to expire, and DRM makes it possible to prevent that. Or rather, the copyright may expire, but DRM makes it possible to require you still pay for the song.

Whatever rights DRM may leave intact, it's still wrong unless it can completely conform to copyright law. In my not-so-humble-but-completely-honest opinion, anyone that uses DRM to "Manage their copy rights" should have their copyright immediately revoked and the work placed immediately into the public domain. You can have DRM only in the absence of copyright. Otherwise, the two don't play together.

Re:Asked and answered (1)

Chaotic Evil Cleric (622653) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213797)

I agree with your prophecy about the future of music, I can't see the RIAA lockin going away any time soon, but I take minor exception with your statement that "few people want to listen to indy music." I remember a kickass indy band from Florida I discovered one time called Marilyn Manson that I really liked, and another called Nirvana. Later, of course, they were picked up by the majors, but at the time, they were just like the bands on Gnomoradio... The next big star is probably playing on there right now, the only thing they're lacking is widespread promotion on MTV.

Offtopic: The RIAA convinces you to listen not with your ears, but with your eyes, if that makes any sense. How else can you explain Britney?

iRate (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213351)

looks a lot like,
http://irate.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]
which is really fun, but you have to wade through an awfull lot of crap for a few gems.

Coincidental Distribution Opportunity (1)

firefarter (307327) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213361)

What a coincidence - I've just teamed up with a friend a few weeks ago to make some electronic music. Right now we're in the getting gear/arranging things stage.

I can't believe it - we have a distribution channel already before we even have gotten a song finished!

Re:Coincidental Distribution Opportunity (1)

fucksl4shd0t (630000) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214191)

You already had a distribution channel, silly. It's called OpenNap, Kazaa, GNUtella, Grokster, Audiogalaxy, and a whole slew of others.

As a musician, don't shy away from the P2P that the RIAA hates. As a matter of fact, if you want to see those places survive, use them. Give your permission on your recordings to be distributed over them, don't hold anything back. Every single musician that puts up files on their P2P app of choice and gives permission to distribute them does more to legitimize those networks than any combination of rhetoric will ever accomplish.

Also, take public domain music and record it and stick it up there. Take public domain books and stick them on there. C'mon! Lots of work to do...

This be good. ting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213371)

I've known 3 bands in the past 4 or 5 years looking for exactly this type of thing. 2 of them ended up with websites that tried, unsuccessfully, to sell their music.

The name (3, Insightful)

MikeMacK (788889) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213390)

Perhaps the biggest stumbling block to wide-spread adoption - the name, "Gnomoradio". Come on guys, we can be a little more creative than that - not everything that is created for Gnome needs to use "Gnome" or a derivative there of in it's title.

Re:The name (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213450)

It sounds good though... that is, until the person you just told about it can't spell it.

Re:The name (4, Insightful)

MaestroSartori (146297) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213454)

I quite like the name - "No More Radio"...

Re:The name (2, Interesting)

Damek (515688) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213837)

So why not just call it "No More Radio"? "Gnomoradio" is far from clear, especially for people who might never have heard of "Gnome" the destop environment.

It may be clever in context, but unless the goal was to create a new program so they could give it a clever name, they're really just undermining their own efforts.

kho's kuilty of that? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213503)

k3b kaboodle kaddressbook kaffeine kalarm kalzium kamera kandy kappfinder kapptemplate kaquarium karamba karbon karm kasteroids kate katomic kaudiocreator kbabel kbabel-dev kbackgammon kbarcode kbattleship kbear kbiff kblackbox kbruch kbugbuster kcachegrind kcalc kcd kcdlabel kcharselect kchart kcmlinuz kcoloredit kcontrol kcpuload kcron kdat kdbg kde kdeadmin kdelirc kdepasswd kdepim kdeprint kdesktop kdessh kdetoys kdetrayproxy kdevelop kdewebdev kdf kdict kdirstat kdm kdvi kedit keduca kenolaba keybled kfax kfilereplace kfind kfish kfloppy kfocus kformula kfouleggs kgamma kget kghostview kgoldrunner kgpg khangman khelpcenter khexedit kicker kicker-applets kiconedit kid3 kig kile kimagemapeditor kitchensync kiten kivio kjots kjscmd klaptopdaemon kleopatra klettres klickety klines klipper klipsi klog klogic kmag kmahjongg kmail kmailcvt kmenuedit kmessedwords kmid kmilo kmines kmix kmoon kmousetool kmouth kmplot kmrml kmymoney2 knapster2 knetload knewsticker knoda knode knotes knutclient kodo koffice kolf kolourpaint komba2 kommander kompare kompose konq-plugins konq-speaker konqueror konquest konserve konsole konsolekalendar kontact konversation kooka kopete korganizer korn koshell kpackage kpager kpat kpdf kpercentage kpersonalizer kpf kphone kpilot kpoker kpovmodeler kppp kpresenter kprof kpsion kpsk krdc krec krecord kregexpeditor kreversi krfb kruler krusader ksame kscd kscreensaver ksensors kshisen ksig ksim ksimus ksirc ksirtet ksmiletris ksmserver ksnake ksnapshot ksocrat ksocrat-data ksokoban kspaceduel ksplash kspread kspy kst kst-bin kstars kstreamripper ksvg ksync ksysguard ksysguardd ksysv ktalkd kteatime ktexmaker2 ktimer ktip ktnef ktouch ktrack ktuberling ktux kugar kuickshow kuiviewer kuser kvdr kverbos kview kviewshell kvim kvirc kvlc kvoctrain kwalletmanager kwave kwavecontrol kweather kwifimanager kwin kwin4 kword kworldclock kxmleditor kxsldbg ksetisaver ksubtitleripper

Re:The name (1)

snol (175626) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213606)

It's probably a much bigger stumbling block to widespread adoption if it doesn't have a Windows port.

Re:The name (3, Funny)

fritter (27792) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213769)

You should try my KDE-based music sharing service for hip hop, K-Rapper.

P2P radio (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213854)

It should be just the opposite: it should really act like, smell like a radio - driven by real user popularity and not payola lists.

Sounds Like A Bad Joke... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213429)

Police Officer - "What happened?"
Me - "The guy stole my radio. As he was running away, he laughed and said: 'You got Gno Mo Radio!'"

Thank you thank you, I'll be here all week.

Wait till the RIAA tries to get it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213430)

I see it now.

In a press release, the RIAA stated that they were to going to sue those using Gnomoradio to distribute their music. An RIAA spokesman said "We have found an extremely large number of musical pieces on this service that infringe on our copyrights. A vast number of songs are using a C note in the music. Many others are also obvious copying our material by stringing notes together to create a melody. This piracy must stop immediately!"

The Classics (2, Insightful)

KrackHouse (628313) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213437)

Correct me if I'm wrong but nobody owns the works of Mozart. Now if all songs were incoded in Ogg format wouldn't it be feasible to create a legitamate radio station or stations based on Classical music that would be totally legal?

Performance is owned (5, Informative)

Otto (17870) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213464)

Correct me if I'm wrong but nobody owns the works of Mozart.

You're right, however the works of Mozart need to be performed. And those performances are owned by the people who performed them.

Re:Performance is owned - Taxpayer is 0WN3D (1)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213863)

"those performances are owned by the people who performed them."

Yes, but why? Most, at least, of the major classical orchestras in the USA are heavily subsidized by federal grants and other forms of funding for the arts. (And I'm only saying "most" because its possible a few privately formed ones like the NBC symphony may be exceptions for at least some of their performing years - EVERY orchestra that has a place name in its title is on the grant system.
Why didn't our tax dollars buy us any rights? WE paid for wider dessemination of great classical works, only to turn over the recorded forms of those works to holding companies which are expected to make a profit for the orchestras, and our only reward is to be told, "That lets the orchestra be more self sustaining, so the government doesn't have to tax you so much", and "No we don't have to justify how the money gets spent, we don't have to keep separate accounts for the practice sessions for a live performance and for a recording session, and we don't have to let the government negotiate our recording contracts to maximize taxpayer return."

Re:Performance is owned - Taxpayer is 0WN3D (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213981)

I hate to nitpick, but a lot of these orchestral performances are available, both live and free, by tuning into things like public radio or TV. At least that's true here in Minneapolis.

Beyond that, I agree 101% with you. When tax money is involved, the people ought to get something for their money other than the oportunity to buy tickets. What's tough here is that with CDs you do need to record, produce, press, and distribute the discs. A lot of classical CDs are dirt cheap, too. So I have to say that's probably not a big con there.

Ditto the problem with providing digital copies of the performances. Perhaps before long we'll find orchestras releasing archival files of their seasons' performances via bittorrent, but until then server space and bandwidth can be very expensive.

But to get back to my first point, if the performance is broadcast, nothing stops us from recording it. And probably the orchestra isn't going to be out suing the public for sharing copies of a performance they gave away for free over the air (but that's conjecture on my part). The key difference between commercial radio/TV and public radio/TV is the commercials. Public radio/TV won't take a "hit" because people are sharing the shows with the commercials removed... because there weren't any to begin with.

(just quick thoughts on the topic)

Re:The Classics (4, Insightful)

Bill_Mische (253534) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213481)

er...only if the orchestra were also long dead. Otherwise they would hold the copyright to their performance. Nice try though.

Re:The Classics (3, Informative)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213574)

oh but that's the beauty! there's OLD recordings that can be transferred to digital in damn fine quality, too.

one of the national stations over here used to play classical music from some 20-30's recordings all night long some years ago, as they didn't have to pay for playing them at all.

now they just play pop.. trying to compete with commercial channels I suppose but whats the point for them(they're not a commercial channel, yet they try to act like one for some weird reason - taking all the bad bits from commercial stations like braindead hosts)..

and in addition to that there's quite many classical orchestras that don't really make the recordings for profit(you can find good classical music cd's in the discount bin always).

Re:The Classics (1)

KrackHouse (628313) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213577)

Well that's a given but couldn't a group of musicians perform it Pro-Bono? I mean it's not like there are only 3 people in the world that know how to play the piano.

You're wrong... (1)

mark0 (750639) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213501)

The performers don't pay Mozart to "cover" his music, but the performances are copyrighted. You have to pay the symphony to play their cover of Mozart.

Re:The Classics (1)

JonnyCalcutta (524825) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213519)

Only if you were listening to the version Mozart recorded himself.

Re:The Classics (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213603)

That's what MIDI is for. Click here for Mozart MIDI files. [midifilearchive.com] Hear exactly what Mozart wrote.

For classical piano works, MIDI is almost tolerable.

Re:The Classics (1)

MarsDefenseMinister (738128) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213972)

This one time, at band camp, I took a MIDI file and ran it through a speech synthesizer. Beethoven was a computer voice saying 'E' 'E' 'F' 'G' 'G' 'F' 'E' 'D' and so on. Very cool.

Re:The Classics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10214044)

That's what MIDI is for.

MINE all mine, yes, yes, my precious.

Click here for Mozart MIDI files. Hear exactly what Mozart wrote.

Thief! Thief! We hates it! We hates it forever!

Signed,
The Archbishop of Salzburg, representing the Association of the God-given Owners of Music Eternal & Worldwide In Nomine Patris Et Filii Et Spritus Sancti.

Re:The Classics (1)

i621148 (728860) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213722)

i may be wrong on this one too but the grateful dead and phish have already given permission for all of their music to be freely shared however you like...

so if you don't want to be a total p2p leech, just rip all of their cd's to put in your shared folder

Re:The Classics (1)

SubV0cal (249183) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213800)

You are correct; no one own the works but they still own their performance. You still need an indy group to perform it and release it.

Re:The Classics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213848)

Yes but someone owns the specific performance of a Mozart piece. I might be willing to record myself practicing piano and give it to the community for free. But you'd much rather hear Vladimir Horowitz or Wladyslaw Szpilman play it than some student.

So basically you'd have to set up a http://www.ibiblio.org/mutopia/legal.html type project. Fist find composers that died over 70 years ago, then get some volunteers to play them and donate to the community, then release on your free network. Not easy for an orchestral piece...

Re:The Classics (1)

dunstan (97493) | more than 9 years ago | (#10214118)

Yes, if performances were created which were themselves unencumbered (or Creative Commonsed).

Now, while there will be a paid for market for top notch polished performances, I would have thought that there are student performers - pianists, violinists, organists, and choirs and orchestras - who would be dead chuffed to have their performances recorded and shared. As a youngling I played in various youth orchestras, and we would give a concert each school holidays to which our parents and friends would come. There is definitely a layer of performers who aren't going to get a recording contract but who are good enough to be pleasing to listen to, and it would surely be possible for their performances to be recorded and shared.

An awful lot of people make music all over the world without being paid for it - for example, each Sunday when I play the organ in church. It shouldn't be beyond us to record and share music which is in the Public Domain

Dunstan

Looks awesome!! (1)

leav (797254) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213441)

i have been looking for something like this for a long time! i have a hard time finding new music that i like..... this is the answer! only problem is that i dont think alot of garage bands would like to give out their music for free, even if it would get them free publicity....

Re:Looks awesome!! (1)

rfelix (587229) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213488)

If you're looking for new independent music that is actually good, i've got to plug zerophase! :) http://zerophase.net/ [zerophase.net]

Good Start (5, Informative)

jim_nanney (757896) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213460)

But really, I prefer http://www.magnatune.com/ [magnatune.com] . Its uses allow for free download of music and yet still promotes licensing music (paying the actual artist for thier creations) It is a perfect blend of free for public consumption, and paying musicians royalties.

Re:Good Start (1)

Rotkiv (807314) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213518)

I agree. I don't go on there alot, but I've found a few good artists on there.

Re:Good Start (1)

Chapium (550445) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213965)

Took the words right out of my mouth. These people have a nice variety of things, offered for free. And you can buy them if you like it enough

irate is pretty much the same thing (1)

Stalin (13415) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213542)

http://irate.sourceforge.net/

Built with gcj and runs on any (popular) platform.

Don't exclude illegal sites (1)

satchboogie (766736) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213575)

When I manage to be satisfied with material I have written and recorded I will share it on all of the sites. The idea is to get the songs out there and acquire as much feedback, both positive and negative, as possible.

I highly doubt the RIAA would even attempt to stop me from distibuting my own works. If they did I would have no problem holding fundraisers to cover the legal cost of lawsuit against them. Clearly, if the indies own the rights then they can distribute it any way they like.

We can't all be rich like U2, but at least we can all have the opportunity to be heard.

lunix (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213590)

it only runs on lunix... so a total of about 12 people will use it. and any garage band that uses lunix probably doesn't make very good music.

it will die to its own popularity (4, Interesting)

Agrippa (111029) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213762)

From my experience from being a programmer at MP3.com from 1999 until its sale to CNET in 2003, the independant artist community is one of the biggest bunch of cheating assholes I have ever witnessed. Not all, but enough independant artists will utilize any number of underhanded ways to boost their exposure on a network. I see nothing in this system that prevents what artists did at MP3.com - user ratings are a joke, because many artists will do anything possible to whore themselves out among their community to get a higher rating. What you will end up seeing is that if this get popular enough, it will become fully corrupted by crappy music being highly rated , which will then turn off the average user, and become yet another circle jerk for talentless artists and basically a waste of time for legitimate ones.

.agrippa.

Re:it will die to its own popularity (2, Informative)

NereusRen (811533) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213857)

If it's anything like iRate, it doesn't use absolute rating to decide whether artists are "good" or "bad." It uses your ratings to find people who have SIMILAR interests to you, and gives you songs that THEY rate highly. Problem solved.

Can't handle large playlists? (1)

thisfred (643716) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213834)

Hmm, it looks nice, at least in theory, but I haven't gotten it to play anything yet. Every time I add my music directory, it slowly builds up to 100% CPU and then seems to crash. I have only 5000 or so files in that directory (and 3000 on another partition, but I haven't gotten the chance to try to add them yet.) That's not an absurd amount for a normal playlist to handle IMO.

Also it took me a while to see how to add a directory. You have to take te file-browser inside the directory to add it. Kind of counter intuitive.

Shame I can't get it to work, because it's a good idea. Especially if an Audioscrobbler [audioscrobbler.com] plugin could be written. I'm kind of addicted to having my music listening stats at hand and being able to compare them with others.

Nice start, but does this really save me time? (1)

alienprotocol (163384) | more than 9 years ago | (#10213880)

It's nice that people are out there building platforms for artists to get their music out to the masses. But doesn't this just increase the signal to noise ratio? The problem with every artist-centric solution means that us music appreciators have to wade through bad tune after bad tune before we find a good one. I don't have much time to waste when i am looking for new music, but I enjoy new music more than anything. So for now, I am sticking to MP3 4U [mp34u.com] , mp3jackpot [mp3jackpot.com] , and my other miscellaneous favorite mp3 blogs because all of these sites are built on the exchange of songs that at least one person has said are GOOD. The indie artist looking for exposure still wins, and I get to save my time.

Alternate Spelling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10213910)

"I quite like the name - 'No More Radio'"....

Seems like GnoMoRadio would be even better.

...and aside from a few interface quirks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10214207)

and aside from a few interface quirks, the program works flawlessly


And in other news:

...and aside from my poor performance, I was a perfect employee...

...and aside from the 12 pack at the game, I haven't had a drink all night, officer...

...and aside from a few heroin binges, I'm totally drug free...

...and aside from the explosion, the shuttle mission was flawless...

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