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Transmeta TM8800 And Ultraportable Announced

timothy posted more than 10 years ago | from the smaller-than-a-breadbox dept.

Transmeta 116

yerdaddie writes "The just-released Transmeta TM8800 has been integrated into a new ultraportable from Sharp. The smaller 90nm variety clocks and performs better than the older 130nm TM86XX Efficeons. It also seems the Orion Multisystems personal clusters discussed earlier on slashdot will be built around this processor variant. Hopefully Transmeta will be releasing a developer kit soon for eager hardware hackers."

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Awesome (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228726)

I love press releases. What's the current rate to get mine published? Or do I have to know someone?

Re:Awesome (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228892)

You could always get Trolland [slashdot.org] to post it on his blog and then submit it to Slashdot. Michael will put it on the front page right away.

almost first post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228728)

so transmeta sucks

... darn 20 second rule ... probably 20th post

Well (5, Funny)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228740)

Since the new product is in Japanese, I can't really comment except to ask about Beowolf Clusters...

Re:Well (1)

burns210 (572621) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229498)

Yes, but these Beowolf Clusters would be much smaller, and less energy intensive, then their Opteron or Itanium counterparts.

Re:Well (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10230024)

hummmmm. imagine a cluster of goys? just kidding.

Re:Well (1)

wwwillem (253720) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232657)

At least you have improved your Japanese a little with the knowledge that "$*#!*&$*#@&($ Microsoft Windows XP Professional" surely means "Sharp recommends Microsoft Windows XP Professional". :-)

George W. Bush Statements = He's insane (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228765)

The last Bushism was "OB/GYNs will no longer be able to love their women." Thank you, W for endorsing sexual harassment on the job.

I may be risking my life by telling you this, but George W Bush's helpers compress Bush's manifestos into brief, highly reductive, definitive-sounding phrases, easily memorized and easily expressed. Here's a quick review: To say that we should be grateful for the precious freedom to be robbed and kicked in the face by such a noble creature as Bush is uneducated nonsense and untrue to boot. In a tacit concession of defeat, he is now openly calling for the abridgment of various freedoms to accomplish coercively what his damnable convictions have failed at. The first lies that Bush told us were relatively benign. Still, they have been progressing. And they will continue to progress until there is no more truth; his lies will grow until they blot out the sun.

To Hell with him! He has become so morally and ideologically degraded, so acclimated to jujuism and antidisestablishmentarianism, that he wants to rescue pauperism from the rubbish heap of history, dust it off, slap on a coat of cheap sophistry, and market it as new and improved. From this anecdotal evidence, I would argue that time cannot change Bush's behavior. Time merely enlarges the field in which Bush can, with ever-increasing intensity and thoroughness, numb the public to the ethnocentrism and injustice in mainstream politics. Bush, as usual, you prove yourself to be wicked. Unlike him, when I make a mistake I'm willing to admit it. Consequently, if -- and I'm bending over backwards to maintain the illusion of "innocent until proven guilty" -- Bush were not actually responsible for trying to perpetuate myths that glorify barbarism, then I'd stop saying that Bush insists that sin is good for the soul. Sorry, Bush, but, with apologies to Gershwin, "it ain't necessarily so." His pleas may not be traditional for all hideous boneheads, but I am certain that if I asked the next person I meet if he would want Bush to use every conceivable form of diplomacy, deception, pressure, coercion, bribery, treason, and terror to impede the free flow of information, he would say no. Yet we all stand idly by while Bush claims that he can change his effete ways.

As I have indicated, it's his belief that my letters demonstrate a desire to rifle, pillage, plunder, and loot. I can't understand how anyone could go from anything I ever wrote to such a perfidious, disaffected idea. In fact, my letters generally make the diametrically opposite claim, that Bush has -- not once, but several times -- been able to hold annual private conferences in which power-drunk, out-of-touch racketeers are invited to present their "research" without anyone stopping him. How long can that go on? As long as his truculent op-ed pieces are kept on life support. That's why we have to pull the plug on them and speak up and speak out against him. Much of the noise made on his behalf is generated by unrestrained carpetbaggers who seem to have nothing better to do with their time. And here, I think, lies a clue to the intellectual vacuum so gapingly apparent in his recommendations. I hope that Bush's opinions were intended as a joke, although they're not very funny if they were. Bush's rodomontades need to be reassessed with Bush's ulterior motives in mind. This position, in large part, parallels civil libertarianism, but with particular emphasis on the fact that Bush is absolutely determined to believe that the laws of nature don't apply to him, and he's not about to let facts or reason get in his way.

As for the lies and exaggerations, in order to shatter the illusion that it's perfectly safe to drink and drive, we must put inexorable pressure on him to be a bit more careful about what he says and does. And that's just the first step. Remember, I shall return to this point in particular. To cap that off, if Bush truly believes that he is beyond reproach, then maybe he should enroll in Introduction to Reality 101. Bush claims that the most valuable skill one can have is to be able to lie convincingly. This is a very quasi-disloyal and unconstructive view and moreover, is wrong in many ways. How can he live with himself, knowing that he profits from human suffering? You know the answer, don't you? You probably also know that he suffers from a pathology of delusion. In fact, I have said that to Bush on many occasions, and I will keep on saying it until he stops trying to spread hatred, animosity, and divisiveness. The poisonous wine of vigilantism had been distilled long before he entered the scene. Bush is merely the agent decanting the poisonous fluid from its bottle into the jug that is world humanity.

There is a proper place in life for hatred. Hatred of that which is wrong is a powerful and valuable tool. But when Bush perverts hatred in order to force square pegs into round holes, it becomes clear that for the nonce, he is content to undermine the current world order. But within a short period of time, he will turn back the clock and repeal all the civil rights and anti-discrimination legislation now on the books. He, like many other surly pickpockets, has joined in with the chorus of furies who have been tearing away at the remains of rationality since the dawn of Derrida. At the risk of sounding a tad redundant, let me add that of particular interest to me is the way that he continuously denies that his idea of a good time is to terrorize our youngsters. An equal but opposite observation is that some deplorable thought police actually feel that his opinions represent the opinions of the majority -- or even a plurality. This is the kind of muddled thinking that he is encouraging with his sermons. Even worse, all those who raise their voice against this brainwashing campaign are denounced as recalcitrant, vainglorious so-called experts.

Although Bush has repeatedly denied charges of attempting to create a climate of intimidation, I cannot compromise with him; he is without principles. I cannot reason with him; he is without reason. But I can warn him, and with a warning he must certainly take to heart: I have a New Year's resolution for him: He should pick up a book before he jumps to the snotty conclusion that he should use both overt and covert deceptions to capitalize on our needs and vulnerabilities because "it's the right thing to do". He is trying to brainwash us. He wants us to believe that it's pertinacious to investigate his self-serving principles, ideals, and objectives; that's boring; that's not cool. You know what I think of that, don't you? I think that Bush hates you -- yes, you, because you, like me, want to expose Bush's malversation.

There is a format he should follow for his next literary endeavor. It involves a topic sentence and supporting facts. Although it requires risk, commitment, and follow-through to protect innocent, little children from stinking moochers like Bush, some people think it's a bit extreme of me to do something good for others -- a bit over the top, perhaps. Well, what I ought to remind such people is that we've all heard Bush yammer and whine about how he's being scapegoated again, the poor dear.

All I can tell you is what matters to me: He says that he is as innocent as a newborn lamb. That is the most despicable lie I have ever heard in my entire life. Bush always tries to shift blame from himself to garrulous bullies, but what makes matters completely intolerable is knowing that even Bush's goombahs are afraid that Bush will give voice, in a totally emotional and non-rational way, to his deep-rooted love of hedonism quicker than you can double-check the spelling of "sphygmomanometric". I, hardheaded cynic that I am, have seen their fear manifested over and over again, and it is further evidence that my general thesis is that inimical, crotchety four-flushers serve as the priests in Bush's cult of insane plagiarism. These "priests" spend their days basking in Bush's reflected glory, pausing only when Bush instructs them to spawn delusions of paternalism's resplendence. What could be more ugly? Whatever the answer, his hypocrisy is transparent. Even the least discerning among us can see right through it. I'll talk a lot more about that later, but first let me finish my general thesis: He should take all the bull-pucky he's been throwing at us and fertilize his garden with it. End of story. Actually, I should add that his lies come in many forms. Some of his lies are in the form of ballyhoos. Others are in the form of solutions. Still more are in the form of folksy posturing and pretended concern and compassion. Before I knew anything about Bush, I was once an onlooker at a few of his mass demonstrations, without possessing even the slightest insight into the mentality of his comrades or the nature of his actions. The best example of this, culled from many, would have to be the time he tried to shatter and ultimately destroy our most precious possessions.

I might add: He doesn't want us to know about his plans to institutionalize scapegoatism through systematic violence, distorted religion, and dubious science. Otherwise, we might do something about that. If you've read any of the soporific slop that Bush has concocted, you'll surely recall Bush's description of his plan to reinforce the impression that avaricious windbags -- as opposed to Bush's co-conspirators -- are striving to bring about a wonderland of separatism. If you haven't read any of it, well, all you really need to know is that I've heard of harebrained things like imperialism and vandalism. But I've also heard of things like nonviolence, higher moralities, and treating all beings as ends in and of themselves -- ideas which his ignorant, unthinking, hypersensitive brain is too small to understand. Snobbism and neopaganism are not synonymous. In fact, they are so frequently in opposition and so universally irreconcilable that I will never give up. I will never stop trying. And I will use every avenue possible to improve the physical and spiritual quality of life for the population at present and for those yet to come.

Bush pompously claims that society is screaming for his ebullitions. That sort of nonsense impresses many people, unfortunately. Brown-nosing calumniators generally insist that he has no intention to take a condescending cheap shot at a person that most petulant, infantile troglodytes will never be in a position to condescend to, but Bush's often-quoted tirades belie this notion. In my view, my cause is to reveal the nature and activity of his bootlickers and expose their inner contexts as well as their ultimate final aims. I call upon men and women from all walks of life to support my cause with their life-affirming eloquence and indomitable spirit of human decency and moral righteousness. Only then will the whole world realize that a great many of us don't want Bush to portray what I call wrongheaded sad sacks as pamphleteers. But we feel a prodigious societal pressure to smile, to be nice, and not to object to his power-hungry stances. His thralls tend to fall into the mistaken belief that arriving at a true state of comprehension is too difficult and/or time-consuming, mainly because they live inside a Bush-generated illusion-world and talk only with each other. I would like to digress here. I'd like to finish with a quote from a private e-mail message sent to me by a close friend of mine: "George W Bush's degeneracy has permeated the whole stratum of society".

What the fuck just happened? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228772)

Slashdot's been fucked up for several hours.

Re:What the fuck just happened? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228871)

Well, at least the front page (which was quite fucked for a while) seems to be ok now. There didn't seem to be anything wrong* with the rest of the site, though.

* Anything abnormal, that is.

Re:What the fuck just happened? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228906)

Slashdot's been fucked up for several hours.

s/hours/years/

Interesting but (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228773)

someone wake me up when Sharp decide to build an ultraportable that runs Linux.

Repeat after me. Winmodems are not modems.

Re:Interesting but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228789)

BAH, I use to think this as well, but now-a-days, who the hell cares, about modems?

ahem

Broadband has tripled [slashdot.org]

and there are hotspots everywhere these days as well

Re:Interesting but (5, Informative)

brilinux (255400) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228828)

Actaully, sharp's PDA [zaurus.com] is Linux powered, the first widely successful Linux PDA made availiable, I believe. I have one, and I use it as an X server so that I can ssh into my FreeBSD box at home and run programs. It has a WiFi card, built in keyboard, and all around is very nice. There is also an alternative Linux distro [openzaurus.org] availiable for it.

Re:Interesting but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228959)

Yep. Zaurus is cool kit. Nice PDA.

Its not an ultraportable laptop though...

Wake up!Sharp does build a ultraportable for Linux (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228889)

EmperorLinux offers the Sharp Actius MM10, MM20 with various distributions of Linux available (pre-installed). The Sharp features full Linux hardware support for: X, sound, USB, PCMCIA, WiFi, networking, hibernate, and more. They include a 56 Kbps PCMCIA modem.

I have dual partition with Fedora Core 2 and Debian Sarge installed on my MM20. Check out the web site for more details.

Welcome back from your deep sleep.

http://www.emperorlinux.com/meteor.php

Re:Wake up!Sharp does build a ultraportable for Li (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228937)

Yawn...

Half opens an eye. MM20 is nice. Hmm. 2 Hrs battery life.
Thats like a UPS isn't it? Not cheap.

Thanks for the coffee

Re:Wake up!Sharp does build a ultraportable for Li (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10231283)

I also own a MM20 but I am using Slackware Linux. The battery life is actually between 3 and 4 hours of use. Remember that this is a ultra-portable. Only approximately 1.9lbs. That is an excellent battery life and form factor for this price. There are two additional batteries available from Sharp that provide 6 and 9 hour charges but add additional weight. It makes my IBM X series laptop look like a luggable.

The Sharp MM20 is in my opinion that best ultraportable available outside of Japan for linux.

Wake up! Sharp died for your sins! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229070)

EmperorLinux is BUTT-ASS NAKED, parading his puerile charms in the sick wasteland of casuistry -- killing your monsters after they breed, the very least effective way!

WAKE up and SIN NOT FOR SIN EARTHFINISHENDMENT FINALTIMES AT HAND!

Re:Interesting but (3, Interesting)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229074)

I had linux running on my Sharp Actius 100 about 4 years ago. There was even a driver that worked with the modem, as I recall. Let's see.... yeah, here's the archive of my install experiences [archive.org] .

Re:Interesting but (3, Informative)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229268)

Actually, if you are into LinuxMobile IBM thinkpads are really good choices.

I own a small Thinkpad X31 and Linux couldn't be happier on this machine than any other. At least I can just imagine what will happen if I run Linux on my friends' Toshibas, Fujitsus, Dells, HPs, and what-nots.

IBM's the real deal, no poppycock Win-anything!

Re:Interesting but (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229453)

IBM's the real deal, no poppycock Win-anything!


Except the Win-dows you are required to purchase with the machine, with profits sent to Microsoft. That's the deal-breaker for me.

Re:Interesting but (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10230765)

If you claim to disagree with the Windows license you should be able to get a refund on the operating system (because the Windows license says so).

I think this is still the case, although it is more hassle than not having to do it at all.

Re:Interesting but (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 10 years ago | (#10230910)

Doesn't it say that you get a refund for the entire computer, as opposed to just the OS? I'm pretty sure that Microsoft has lawyers who can write EULA's

X31-too heavy, no trackpad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10230964)

I never understood why IBM uses accupoints, which are awful, the trackpad is the best mouse in the world, I even use a trackpad with my desktop.

Besides, IBM does not know how to build small, X31 is much heavier than mm20.

mm20 works great under linux and weighs only 1.99 pounds.

An ultraportable must be light enough so that can be comfortably held with a single hand. mm20 has the right weight, X31 is too heavy.

Re:X31-too heavy, no trackpad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10232092)

Some people prefer different things. I like the Accupoints, I find them very easy to use and accurate. Trackpads drive me crazy - not very accurate and most trackpads are way too small to be really useful. I've been known to carry around an optical USB mouse just to avoid using trackpads.

Battery life (2)

Schreckgestalt (692027) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228775)

Could anyone who is gifted with the knowledge of japanese please tell me how much battery life it has?

Re:Battery life (4, Informative)

fidget42 (538823) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228799)

According to the fish [altavista.com] , it gets 5 hours.

"With the economical electrical design, approximately 5.0 hours* actualizing the long haul drive. In addition, if the MOBILE switch was changed to MOBILE mode, CPU throughput and picture brightness were held down, it becomes setting of electric power consumption concern."

Re:Battery life (1)

Huogo (544272) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232065)

5 Hours claimed doesn't seem like all that much for a so called ultra effeciant chip. My laptop is an Acer with a Pentium-M 1.5 GHz, and it claims 5.5 hours battery life. I've used it for about 3.75 hours while keeping the screen brightness up, using the wireless networking components, and burning some CDs before it finally hit the critical battery warning at 10% and I pluged it in, and this is a standard laptop w/ dvd burner, 60 GB HD, and a 15" screen.

Re:Battery life (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232355)

While with the AMD and Intel chips, 5.5 would be a long stretch, Transmeta has a long history of getting 10+ hours of battery life with their chips. (I've even seen a report or two with over 20 hours of battery life.) I would expect that the battery life would be at least 10 hours, probably around their mean of 11, at least with the Crusoe. I doubt they would release a processor with extremely less battery life for the Efficeon line. So, 5 hours would probably be way too low, unless the system was being utilized at full usage the entire time, under the heaviest of applications.

Check their website for more details - http://www.transmeta.com/efficeon/efficeon_tm8800. html [transmeta.com]

Re:Battery life (4, Funny)

CdBee (742846) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228806)

I tried babelfishing it, turns out that page is all about Dirty Schoolgirls who like hot sausage. That or I didn't get the right URL.....

Another Link (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228776)

http://www.engadget.com/entry/5844163416339364/

Another Link provides some extra info.

Enthusiasts? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228786)

I know that Mini-ITX boards using VIA low-power chips have a strong following of hobby SFF projects. Is there something similar for the Efficion?

Re:Enthusiasts? (3, Informative)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228911)

Yes. [ibase.com.tw]

Re:Enthusiasts? (1)

chill (34294) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229619)

VIA is better. The VIA Mini-ITX have hardware support for MPEG-2 (CN266) and AES, and the new CN400 boards also have hardware support for MPEG-4. They even release some custom stuff for Xine to support hardware acceleration of MPEG-2/4.

This way you low-power, low-heat VIA CPU can focus on other stuff than video decode/encryption.

transmeta cpus (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228808)

why is it that i still can't buy transmeta cpus easily to stick onto also easily available motherboards? these days low power, running cool and reliable are more important than high performance (24/7 devices).

Easy (2, Insightful)

Erect Horsecock (655858) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229545)

Transmetta chips are small so that they can fit into tiny ass enclosures like notebooks, those orion things, and OQOs. If it had to be socketed (instead of a BGA) it would be thicker, the ceramic packaging would be larger and more expensive due to the use of pins...

Etc...

Its a space/size thing... I'm sure they could make one if they wanted but I doubt the demand would be enough to warrant the manufacturing costs (don't forget Transmeta pays TSMC or UMC to make the chips for them).

FWIW

Re:Easy (1)

Atomic Frog (28268) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232698)

Generally solder down gives better performance than socketed.

Yes, the chips are small. But it is possible to make them support a socket (how do you think they get tested?). I advise you to wait. If enough people want them, it'll happen. The first 1.6GHz Efficeons are only a few weeks old, you don't stock-pile 100,000 chips before you let loose to market!

FYI, the new 90nm (it's no secret) are fabbed at Fujitsu, not TSMC or UMC. It's never been UMC. IBM was one of the earlier ones.

The thing that saves you is just that little less wattage from the Efficeon, enough not to need a fan, which saves you space and power.

In comparison, my Thinkpad runs a Pentium-M 1.6GHz (same clock), and the fan often comes on. The Sharp Mebius with 1.6GHz Efficeon, I believe, doesn't use a fan. I know for sure the predecessor from Sharp (a slower Efficeon at 130nm) has no fan.

Wait for benchmarks. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. A 1.6GHz Efficeon should be performance competitive with a 1.6GHz Pentium-M.

Re:transmeta cpus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10232792)

you can't buy them to stick onto easily available motherboards because they cannot share the same socket or pin outs of existing cpus. they have a northbridge and agp controller built into the chip so you don't need that on the mobo, etc.

you'll see them in boards designed for them. but its not possible to make them drop in replacements ala what used to be possible in old socket 7 systems with amd or cyrix.

get used to it. all cpu manufacturers will have their own packages and pin outs now.

transmeta is so cool but.. (5, Interesting)

John_Allen_Mohammed (811050) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228813)

How can I buy a transmeta chip and build a system from one ? I checked pricewatch [pricewatch.com] but they dont list transmeta chips... and what sort of motherboard do they clip onto ? It seems to me, at least, they're cool factor (linus a former hacker) is very high but in reality it's very ambigious when it comes to the real world.

Love to put to get a mythtv box with a transmeta chip at its heart but I guess that's not possible so far :( :( :(

Re:transmeta is so cool but.. (2, Informative)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228926)

I hope these [ibase.com.tw] boards will be available soon. And hopefully also with 90nm Efficeon.

Re:transmeta is so cool but.. (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229290)

Efficieons aren't socketed, so you have to buy an Efficeon motherboard. Which, for some reason, seem to be really scarce.

From what little I can gather from the article... (4, Interesting)

Tuxedo Jack (648130) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228815)

It looks to have the following abilities/specs:

1.26 kilograms (2.772 pounds)
1.6GHz Transmeta processor
Wireless B/G using an Atheros device
CD/DVD drive
Some kind of hyper-brightness ability for the screen
Windows XP SP2 (NX flag support)
ATI Mobility 7500 (probably at least 64MB RAM, since it says the laptop can play FFXI, and that's kinda video-intensive)
A switch to convert from normal-power mode to mobile-power mode (thus changing processor efficiency and other things)
Some kind of remote control a la the iPod Remote

I can't read kanji and hiragana, so I'm quite out of it.

I assume that Linux support will be forthcoming from the community for this, as Sharp states that they recommend XP Professional SP2 for this device at the top of the page.

Re:From what little I can gather from the article. (1)

Panaflex (13191) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229028)

Hrm.. it appears to be 32MBytes of vram (http://www.sharp.co.jp/products/pcmp70g/text/p6.h tml)

10.4" screen (Do they use inches for screen size in Japan??)

I know next to nothing about Japanese, so grain of salt for us all!

Pan

Re:From what little I can gather from the article. (1)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229292)

1.6GHz Transmeta processor

Does anyone know if the new Transmeta processor is any better than the older ones?

If AMD vs Intel has thought us anything, it certainly proves that clockspeed does not equal to performance!

While Transmetas are really great power-wise (even predating the Pentium Ms), I really wonder if they can hold their own speedwise when compared to a 1.6Ghz Centrino processor.

Anyway the Pentium Ms are pretty good.

Linux support for Sharp Mebius/Actius (2, Interesting)

suranyip (25422) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232574)

I own a Sharp Mebius MM20 (Japanese model of Actius MM20) with a 1GHz TransMeta Efficeon TM8600. I managed to get almost everything working in linux, except for one thing: power saving modes (sleep/suspend). Actually, sleep did work with some versions of the kernel (2.6.6 maybe) but after resuming the wireless LAN would stop working (not sure if this is a problem with the ACPI or the Prism54 drivers). Unfortunately, as my main use of this notebook is to work on the road, this forces me to use it in Windows most of the time.

More info (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228825)

More Information from Gizmodo [gizmodo.com]

Japanese Stats

What I would like to see.. (1)

FluffyWhiteBunny (771314) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228826)

I want someting about the size of one of the old Sony picturebook, running on either a transmeta or via low power processor. It should have a color screen, although it doesn't have to be too fancy even older dual scan technology would be fine. It would need wireless, and should have decent (4+ hours)battery life. All for under $700USD. It wouldnt need all the bells and whistles that the Japanese like to stuff in their ultraportables, it just need to be able to browse web pages and run a word processor.

Re:What I would like to see.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228968)

My NEC mobile pro 780 running netbsd fits the bill at only 200$.

NEC mobile pro on ebay : 130$
Cisco aironet wireless card: 20$
512mb cf card for netbsd: 50$

Running netbsd on a handheld? Priceless!

Re:What I would like to see.. - Exists! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10232822)

look at the Sharp Mebius CV model. Its also an efficeon system but is much closer to picturebook size.

How about releasing a mini-itx mobo? (1)

solidhen (642119) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228827)

Or in fact any mother board that takes a TM8800 that is sold retail?

Nah, that would mean selling more processors so they won't do it.

Re:How about releasing a mini-itx mobo? (2, Informative)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228901)

You mean like this [ibase.com.tw] ?

Re:How about releasing a mini-itx mobo? (2, Informative)

fnj (64210) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229006)

That is not a TM8800 board. The processor it comes with has truly pathetic performance.

Re:How about releasing a mini-itx mobo? (1)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229053)

They are pin compatible, so the board can probably be upgraded. And the TN8600 is still better than a VIA CPU.

That's awsome!!! (1)

solidhen (642119) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229014)

Do you know where I can buy one? I can't seem to find a URL on the ibase website.

Use as external hard drive (4, Interesting)

BWJones (18351) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228836)

and a Dirrect HDD function which lets you hook it up to another PC over USB and use it as an external hard drive (if only this were standard on every laptop).

I have been wondering how long it would take the Windows world to adopt this feature. Of course it has been shipping with every Powerbook since the very first one (I believe the Powerbook 100 back in 1990 or 1991). Of course back then it was with SCSI and now it is with Firewire leading me to wonder why they used USB?

Re:Use as external hard drive (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228999)

They used USB because it's a lot more common than Firewire on things that aren't Macs.

Re:Use as external hard drive (1)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229301)

"I have been wondering how long it would take the Windows world to adopt this feature. Of course it has been shipping with every Powerbook since the very first one (I believe the Powerbook 100 back in 1990 or 1991). Of course back then it was with SCSI and now it is with Firewire leading me to wonder why they used USB?"

Yeah, this feature is really good to have. Just like cars, you can actually use one laptop to bootup another dead laptop and put a OS back inside.

Except that MacOS doesn't crash so easily...!

If only the Wintel world would adapt this. Easy installation for all!

Re:Use as external hard drive (2, Informative)

mrklin (608689) | more than 10 years ago | (#10230391)

... and iBook too.

Pressing the letter "T" while booting will boot the computer into "target disc mode". From the mode, you can connect that laptop to any Mac with firewire and it will automatically mount and be available as an HD on the desktop.

Re:Use as external hard drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10230871)

I have been wondering how long it would take the Windows world to adopt this feature.

In the Windows world we could always use the hundreds of dollars left over from buying equivalent-performing hardware to buy actual USB drives. As many as we wanted, really...

mm20-hard disk mode-poor implementation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10231448)

In order to use the computer in hard disk mode you need to use a cradle which is HUGE, heavier than the laptop itself, in order to keep the balance. It does not make sense to use the cradle on the road, I did not buy a 1.99 pound laptop in order to carry 5 pounds around!. In addition, knoppix does not recognize the cradle as a high speed USB device, transferring data under knoppix takes forever.

In never use the cradle, for making backups of my linux installation and transferring data, I boot the laptop under knoppix from an external pocket DVD writer and save the data on an external firevire drive connected with a PC card. It works much faster than with the cradle.The pocket dvd writer I use is much smaller and lighter than the cradle and can be easily moved around.

Re:mm20-hard disk mode-poor implementation (1)

suranyip (25422) | more than 10 years ago | (#10232493)

no you do not need the cradle, at least here in japan you can get a directhdd cable and connect it directly.

Other Links. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228848)

More Information from Gizmodo [gizmodo.com]

Japanese Stats [sharp.co.jp]

Page Translation Courtesy of Systrans (5, Informative)

iamatlas (597477) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228850)

My first time karma whore-ing!

Approximately, it builds in the thin-shaped DVD drive of 9.5mm, lightness approximately 1.28kg (PC-MP50G approximately 1.26kg)* 1 scantness approximately 28.8mm (the most thin section) actualizing the light weight compact body. With business and it can carry about lightly with private, shows the high performance of completeness ahead going out.

Due to the CD/DVD drive of built-in, the pleasure of DVD spreads e.g., you look at the movie software and the original work DVD with the business trip return and the coffee. It is the front tray system which taking in and out the disk is easy to do. In addition, if PC-MP70G of DVD multiple drive loading, it can compile television program and the image etc. of the digital video camera which were videotaped with the DVD recorder easily, can draw up original DVD. All you base are belong to Sharp

From state of power source off, the button of the substance one touch just is done, Windows(R) without starting INSTANT PLAY which start * 1it is possible DVD and CD* adopting 2. Furthermore, using the remote control headphone where volume setting and chapter operation etc. belong, because it can do, it can enjoy in portable DVD player feeling.

Letter and the picture clear vivid. It can enjoy with the image where also the DVD software and the broadband contents are beautiful brightly.

* 1 When the DVD software and the CD software are enjoyed with INSTANT PLAY, it is necessary to set the disk to drive.

* 2 It actualizesInterVideo (R )withInstant ON TM.

Low adopting the trance meta corporation make Efficeon TM TM8800 1.6GHz which is proud of the electric power consumptionhigh performance to CPU. High operational frequency is actualized without increasing electric power consumption with adoption of 90nm process.

Trance meta corporation makeEfficeon TM TM8800 strengthens also security performance. The safety for virus attack such as the cord/code execution with buffer overrun is raised.

(C) 2002- 2004 SQUARE ENIX CO. and LTD. All Rights Reserved. Title Design by Yoshitaka Amano

Indicating the 3D game and streaming image etc. insmoothly with the ATI corporation make MOBILITYTM RADEON TM 7500 which corresponds to 3D. High throughput It requires "FINAL FANTASY(R) XI for Windows(R) ", it is appointed to the official operational recognition personal computer.

* 3

The game software is selling separately. With the economical electrical design, approximately 5.0 hours* actualizing the long haul drive of 4. In addition, if the MOBILE switch was changed to MOBILE mode, CPU throughput and picture brightness were held down,* 5, it becomes setting of electric power consumption concern.

* 4 It is the time when it measured Corporation electronic intelligence technical industrial association "JEITA battery methods-time measurement (Ver.1.0)" of on the basis. You can verify detailed measurement condition, in the support page classified by type of Mobius home page.Http://www.sharp.co.jp/mebius/ and actual drive time differ depending upon use environment.

* 5 The operational frequency of CPU is held down low, in initial condition display intensity from under 2nd is changed in. There are times when occurs scene falling with such as animated picture playback.

Maximum 54Mbps* 6 (standard value) building in the wireless LAN of the IEEE802.11b/g conformity which corresponds to high-speed communication. The Super G TM mode which raisestransfer rate* it corresponds to also 7. The other personal computer and the data can share "radio de chat" and network setting can be changed "entrusts Internet" and so on, can use automatically smoothly with the wireless.

* 6 Numerical value of indication is maximum with respect to theory of wireless LAN standard, is not something which shows actual data rate.

* 7 SuperGTM is the wireless LAN high-speed technology which the Atheros Communications corporation developed. SuperGTM function is used, it is necessary also for the wireless LAN equipment aheadconnectingto correspond to Super G TM.

Re:Page Translation Courtesy of Systrans (4, Funny)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229042)

at the end of the 2nd paragraph:
...videotaped with the DVD recorder easily, can draw up original DVD. All you base are belong to Sharp
Well, now we know where the Zero Wing guys got their translation! "Courtesy of Systrans," indeed!

Re:Page Translation Courtesy of Systrans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229337)

Goddamm you're right, ..I always pictured a bunch of japanese devs adlibbing over coffee and cigarettes, during an all-nighter to ship the intl. version. This proof makes it a little less funny (as if the joke wasn't stone dead already).

Re:Page Translation Courtesy of Systrans (1)

Compuser (14899) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229635)

If you do the Fish (same as systrans) you see that
this was added by Iamatlas, presumably for a laugh.
This statement is not on the original page.

Re:Page Translation Courtesy of Systrans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229861)

duh... the post you replied to was a joke pointing this out.

...but Transmeta may not survive. (3, Interesting)

reporter (666905) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228888)

The "technology" that Transmeta developed is essentially a VLIW processor that can be micro-programmed to interpret the IA32 instruction set. By removing the hardware for direct decoding or execution of the complex IA32 instructions, the Transmeta chips save power.

Unfortunately, for Transmeta, this "technology" is neither new nor hard to duplicate. The Opteron (AMD) and the new Pentium IV (Intel) are both VLIW processors microprogrammed to execute the IA32-64 instruction set.

Both AMD and Intel have an R&D budget that dwarfs the annual revenue stream of Transmeta. It has had several years of losses [smartmoney.com] and will likely head into bankruptcy by the end of next year.

AMD and Intel are in a fierce battle that will destroy lesser players like Transmeta. Unfortunately for Transmeta, the IA32 processors are rapidly becoming commodities with shrinking margins.

Is there a white knight for Transmeta?

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (2, Informative)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228975)

Well, code morphing software and microcode are a big difference and I doubt that Intel or AMD can do it without violating Transmeta's patents. They also have the long run 2 (LR2) technology which they have successfully licensed to NEC, so with the Efficeon business picking up and more LR2 licenses, they may yet survive. Or they will get bought by Intel or AMD because they both can't do 90nm with 1.6 GHz at 7Watts.

FUD-thought (2, Insightful)

repetty (260322) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228993)

"Both AMD and Intel have an R&D budget that dwarfs the annual revenue stream of Transmeta. It has had several years of losses [smartmoney.com] and will likely head into bankruptcy by the end of next year."

Intel and AMD stockholders must be wondering what the fuck their company's have been blowing their R&D budgets on.

Smaller companies are almost always way more productive with a buck than big companies. That's why I would withhold publishing their obituary if I were you.

Remember, Apple has been going out of business every year for two decades.

--Richard

Re:FUD-thought (1)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 10 years ago | (#10230333)

"Intel and AMD stockholders must be wondering what the fuck their company's have been blowing their R&D budgets on."

AMD has been putting out good tech after good tech lately.

On the other hand, Intel is in some serious (steaming brown substance) if they don't buck up. Seems like they are the ones playing catch-up now.. the Pentium architecture really needs a good overhaul.

By that I meant GOOD! Our current P4s are really just extensions of the old P3 design, except they had a longer pipe line on it to make it scale better for those nice Ghz numbers.

With the Pentium-M they actually went back to the original P3 design and tried to make it more efficient instead of making it clock so fast.

In all... nothing new to see from Intel, move along..

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (2, Informative)

Yokaze (70883) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229054)

> The Opteron (AMD) and the new Pentium IV (Intel) are both VLIW processors microprogrammed to execute the IA32-64 instruction set.

Neither the Opteron nor the Pentium IV are VLIW processors. Both translate x86 code to micro-ops, not VLIWs. From those both companies, the Itantium is the only VLIW processor. But none of them does code morphing, unless you run a VM on it.

Both Opteron and Pentium IV are VLIW. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229107)

Instead of listening to the Intel marketing department, I suggest that you look at the block diagram of the Opteron. Each IA32 instruction is converted into a wide instruction or a sequence of wide instructions. This instruction then drives, potentially, multiple functional units (e.g., addition and multiplication) in parallel. If that behavior is not VLIW, then what is VLIW?

You say "tomato". I say "tomatoh". You say "RISC". I say "VLIW".

Re:Both Opteron and Pentium IV are VLIW. (2, Informative)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229209)

I'm not seeing much in the Prescott internal block diagram to sugest that it is VLIW. Are all the micro-ops really attached in parallel?

I'm not sure why the grandparent post said opteron had VLIW, because it should have basically the same micro-op core as the Athlon64.

Besides, AMD technical doc 24112.pdf (Software Optimization Guide for AMD Athlon(TM) 64 and AMD Opteron(TM) Processors) doesn't seem to suggest that it is a full-on VLIW. The macro op might have one load-store with one compute (int or float), but it is still broken down again to single-op micro-ops:

Internal Instruction Formats
The AMD64 instruction set is complex; instructions have variable-length encodings and many
perform multiple primitive operations. AMD Athlon 64 and AMD Opteron processors do not execute
these complex instructions directly, but, instead, decode them internally into simpler fixed-length
instructions called macro-ops. Processor schedulers subsequently break down macro-ops into
sequences of even simpler instructions called micro-ops, each of which specifies a single primitive operation.

A macro-op is a fixed-length instruction that:
Expresses, at most, one integer or floating-point operation and one load and/or store operation.
Is the primary unit of work managed (that is, dispatched and retired) by the processor.

A micro-op is a fixed-length instruction that:
Expresses one and only one of the primitive operations that the processor can perform (for
example, a load).
Is executed by the processor's execution units.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229063)

I wonder if it would be a good idea for them to get bought out by Via, and merge the technologies of the Efficeon and the C3/Eden.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229065)

Intel and AMD will have to cater to the low-power market to drive Transmeta out of business. This is a good thing, because power usage on current mainstream CPUs is out of control.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (1)

repetty (260322) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229362)

"...power usage on current mainstream CPUs is out of control."

Amen.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (1)

anubi (640541) | more than 10 years ago | (#10231346)

Power consumption - this has been of great concern to me as well. Not just the power, its also the resultant heat.

With the geometries constantly getting smaller, yet the physics of diffusion being the same, and the power consumption/heat dissipation rising at what seems to be a neverending inexorable rate...

Gee, guys, how long do we expect a processor to be in service these days before the inexorable laws of diffusion render the processor inoperable?

Worse yet, I suspect its degradation is probably a statistical thing: that the processor will succumb to bit-pattern sensitivities long before it plain quits, with the resultant apparent random crashes making it appear to be a software problem.

I knew when I was designing with the old 386SX machines, that I could reasonably expect the processor to run for 100 years easily. They were so confident of the processor reliability that it was customary to not use a socket for the processor, as the socket itself had a far higher rate of failure ( corrosion ) than the processor.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (1)

imgod2u (812837) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229110)

[I]The "technology" that Transmeta developed is essentially a VLIW processor that can be micro-programmed to interpret the IA32 instruction set. By removing the hardware for direct decoding or execution of the complex IA32 instructions, the Transmeta chips save power.[/I] A separate firmware layer lies there to interprete the x86 instructions. The VLIW processor core can only understand VLIW instructions given to it by the firmware. [I]Unfortunately, for Transmeta, this "technology" is neither new nor hard to duplicate. The Opteron (AMD) and the new Pentium IV (Intel) are both VLIW processors microprogrammed to execute the IA32-64 instruction set.[/I] They're not. While both the K8 and Netburst do decouple decoding, they decode into internal micro-ops which are more RISC-like than VLIW. Although Banias and K8, with micro-ops fusion, do resemble a bit of VLIW, but can hardly be called that.

Re:...but Transmeta may not survive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10231331)

It's <I> and not [I], stupid.

bolony! (4, Informative)

khrtt (701691) | more than 10 years ago | (#10231605)

The "technology" that Transmeta developed is essentially a VLIW processor that can be micro-programmed to interpret the IA32 instruction set...

Not INTERPRET, but rather TRANSLATE IA32 to native VLIW. The word "translate" means "compile binary to binary" here. The translated result is cached, which makes the whole thing run at a more acceptable speed.

Intel and AMD do the same thing - IA32 is translated to an internal RISC-like code. They also cache the translated code. Only they do the translation in hardware, while Transmeta does it in software.

The extra translation hardware drains extra power. The extra translation software uses up extra CPU clocks, effectively slowing down a Crusoe (or any transmeta CPU) compared to a Pentium (any recent Intel/AMD CPU) at the same clock rate. If you slow down the clock on the Pentium so that the performance equals to that of the Crusoe, you reduce the power consumption to the same level as the Crusoe as well. Or better.

So, all in all, it's a wash. All mobile CPUs throttle down the clock when possible. The maximum speed for the Pentium is higher than for a Crusoe with the same clock. The die of the Transmeta chip is smaller. That's all the difference.

Surprisingly, where Intel (not AMD) gets its edge with Pentium M has nothing to do with CPU core. It's the way they handle the L2 cache. They have a large L2 cache, but they only clock the block of it where there is an access. This saves a lot of power, while allowing for a larger L2 cache. Which has more effect on the CPU speed and power consumption than all the tricks with the core architecture.

The original idea that made Transmeta chips so attractive had nothing to do with the core architecture either. The idea was that they would not only slow down the clock, but also reduce the supply voltage accordingly, which squared the power savings compared to Intel SpeedStep. Of course, by now both Intel and AMD do the same thing, so Transmeta doesn't have an edge there any more.

AMD and Intel are in a fierce battle that will destroy lesser players like Transmeta
Not necessarily. Transmeta is in a niche market, ultra-mobile IA32 devices. As long as they stay in a niche market, they have a chance. But I doubt they could make it into the mainstream CPU market in near future.

Is there a white knight for Transmeta?
Is there an SS1 for Transmeta? Wait, wrong topic...

No benchmark results for TM?? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228896)

I did a big search for Transmeta benchmark results a couple days back when Orion was announced and found nothing of consequence.

What's up with that?

Sure, it is probably 'fast enough', but I want to know how fast.

Re:No benchmark results for TM?? (1)

mocm (141920) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228947)

The 90nm CPUs are not commercially available and Orion gave some LINPACK results. Here [ibase.com.tw] are some results from a Japanese article about the 130nm Efficeon.

Re:No benchmark results for TM?? (2, Informative)

dave_t_brown (447547) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229361)

Van's Hardware has done some Efficeon benchmarking here [vanshardware.com] .

Save Betamax! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228899)

Americans: do your patriotic duty! http://www.savebetamax.org/ [savebetamax.org]

Development kits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228924)

Development kits for this chip start at $445 and increase sharply from there. That is a problem for my students who are trying to do projects. The good news is that they can often, but not always, get donated evaluation kits.

You can usually buy a chip on some kind of commercial board for less. Does anyone have any experience using boards that weren't intended as development kits?

Given another poster's comment that the company may not be there next year, is it worthwhile (educationally) to develop for these chips? ie. Will the knowledge gained by doing a project with this chip be transferrable to other low power chips?

Re:Development kits (1)

hpavc (129350) | more than 10 years ago | (#10230327)

the transmeta kit can include all sorts of nicities like longrun dc power hardware as well. not sure if other packages are so nice.

Re:Development kits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10231894)

They are no longer offering Efficeon development kits to the public like those for Crusoe. You have to settle for the 3rd party IBASE MB860 single board computer, which basically has no where near the level of internal access and documentation of the previous Crusoe kits available to board manufacturers.

Question: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10228934)

When will it be available in the USA, like the mm10 and mm20?

CPU Efficiency Comparison (5, Interesting)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 10 years ago | (#10228956)

I am curious; is there any comparison chart of the efficiency (MIPS/Watt) of various CPUs?

I wonder how the Transmetas really score...compared to PowerPCs, for example.

Re:CPU Efficiency Comparison (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10230029)

Pentium M will win. At 1.3GHz you can run it at around 8 watts (peak). And the performance is phenomenal (basically equivalent to a 2.2GHz P4)

At 2GHz it's up around 20W (higher voltage) and the performance is astounding: MUCH faster than a 2.5GHz PPC970 at integer work (for less than half the power), and faster than even a 3.4GHz Pentium 4...

Re:CPU Efficiency Comparison (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10232751)

contrary to what the other response to this said... Transmeta Efficeons -do- have the highest work/watt of any x86 CPU. The Pentium M is a bit faster but draws a lot more power overall, especially when idle or running workloads that don't need 100% of the cpu performance.

hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229203)

Are you sure that's not an iBook?

Devkits? Transmeta is too closed. (4, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | more than 10 years ago | (#10229329)

Transmeta is too closed to hackers. That's part of the reason it's failing. Few hackers are going to buy one of their $1000+ devkits when they can get a mini-itx board for $200. Yeah, the 'meta board can supposedly peform better without a fan, but so what? Transmeta has no clue. They could have started a revolution, instead they tried to push disruptive technology through channels that didn't want disruptive technology.

Transmeta is too closed? Don't be so sure... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10229935)

> Transmeta is too closed to hackers.

Don't be so sure of that. I'm involved with the group that's reverse engineering the Efficeon and CMS right now.

This is from the same people who brought you the Crusoe Exposed series of articles, but the Efficeon version will be *much* more detailed. As you'll see, Transmeta should not have relied on trade secrets in lieu of more patents. There are many smart people out there and this chip can and will be exposed.

Besides, Transmeta is no longer releasing a full Efficeon devkit to anyone with cash, supposedly to avoid another "incident" like with Crusoe. Notice how only a 3rd-party SBC is available to the public in lieu of a real "development kit" this time. Unfortunately they were too late; the analysis effort is already well under way.

Re:Transmeta is too closed? Don't be so sure... (3, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | more than 10 years ago | (#10231300)

Well, you've sort of proved my point. 'meta is just a VLIW chip with some special firmware on it. The real magic is in the firmware. Now, I'm not suggesting that they should open source the firmware, but when you can't socket the thing into a PC MoBo, when you can't even buy the mini-ITX board at a reasonable price, when people have to reverse-engineer basic technical data, it's DOA for any real hacker (except hackers who like to reverse-engineer!). It's for "corporate partners only". It's closed. It's dead, and that's a shame.

Re:Devkits? hey look, a mini-itx efficeon system! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#10232766)


http://www.ibase-i.com.tw/mb860.htm


its "only" the 1Ghz model but thats what counts for getting into people's hands. the faster ones will follow.

Not too impressive (3, Interesting)

Deslock (86955) | more than 10 years ago | (#10231274)

What major advantages does this have over the 18-month-old Panasonic W2 [dynamism.com] other than a slightly better video card and smaller footprint? The W2 weighs 2.8 pounds, has a DVD-RW, 12.1" screen, big keyboard, 1.1 GHz CPU, and its battery lasts over 7 hours.

In the USA, we get the older version [panasonic.com] of the W2, but it's still some-tasty.

On a side note, some tips for running Linux on the W2:
- Red Hat [pragmatic-c.com]
- Debian [uq.edu.au]
- leog forum [leog.net]

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