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330 comments

eh? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240486)

yoper who?

Re:eh? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240581)

yo.per - n. One who yopes. See "yope" yope - v. slang term from 1980's era to describe slow communication with poor diction. Warning: mysql_connect(): Too many connections in /usr/local/apache/vhosts/linuxforums.org/www/forum /db/mysql4.php on line 49

Re:eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240820)

to be distinguished from 'yooper', which denotes a denizen of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

for the dense: 'yoo pee' is the phonetic pronunciation of U.P. 'yooper' follows accordingly.

yooper linux would have more to do with beer than operating systems, is my guess

Competion for what? (5, Insightful)

I_Love_Pocky! (751171) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240497)

The first serious competion for what? The coolest new distro? That statement seems to imply that Gentoo is clearly the best around right now. I really like Gentoo, but I don't think I could dismiss all the other distros that easily.

Re:Competion for what? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240738)

I really like Gentoo, but I don't think I could dismiss all the other distros that easily.
Heretic.

ha (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240498)

Yeah right Gentoo cannot be beaten.
Look at all the other things that came out.

Too many Distros (-1, Flamebait)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240501)

Come on, everyone is constructing their own distro just to add more confusion to the linux name. We don't need 100 distros. Damn, we don't even need 10.

We can settle for Debian, Suse and Redhat. Though I'd prefer seeing ALL distros unite (without SCO) and call it "Final Fantasy Linux".

Re:Too many Distros (4, Funny)

Laebshade (643478) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240538)

Though I'd prefer seeing ALL distros unite (without SCO) and call it "Final Fantasy Linux".
Do you really want a Final Fantasy Linux 8?

Re:Too many Distros (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240579)

If it's half as good as Final Fantasy Linux 7, I'll be happy.

Re:Too many Distros (5, Insightful)

pnatural (59329) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240571)

We don't need 100 distros. Damn, we don't even need 10.

Yes, we do need them.

The thing you're missing is (as Agent Smith would say) purpose. Many of these distros exist purely because they meet a specific purpose. For example, there are distros used for desktop computers, distros for firewalls, distros for embedded devices, distros for clustering, distros for servers, etc.

Put another way: choice is good!

Now, had you said "we don't need 100's of desktop distros" I might have agreed.

Re:Too many Distros (1)

Chrax (782154) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240632)

Agreed. What I see as one of the great things about Linux is that it can be customized in so many ways. Of course nothing will fit your needs exactly like an LFS, but having a lot of distros means you're more likely to find one that is pretty close to what you need.

Re:Too many Distros (2, Interesting)

mgrassi99 (514152) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240669)

Care you elaborate? I've toyed around with Slackware, Redhat, and Debian (in the form of Xebian and KnoppMyth - a Knoppix re-package) and it seems that if you install the right packages any one could be made to function as well as another (of course my experience may be limited). What distros are better than others at what specific tasks? -Mike

Re:Too many Distros (4, Interesting)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240741)

Maybe what you need is a metadistribution [gentoo.org] (see first paragraph), then. That way, your firewall, desktop, and cluster can all be managed the same way and and you don't have to go through special effort to change a piece of software to work with all of them.

Re:Too many Distros (2)

nizo (81281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240791)

Why not a few good distros with kickbutt installers that let you install EXACTLY what you want? Instead of everyone wasting their time working on 100+ piddly distros? A few distros (light version=as small as possible, general version=bloat to the max, and maybe a newbie friendly version). Don't get me wrong, choice is a great thing, but at what point are people just wasting their time making YAD (Yet Another Distro)? And if I were creating software, which distro should I pick? Technically software should work great on any distro, but with so many distros/libraries out there, "out of the box" installs seem to be getting less and less common, which is a huge deal to linux newcomers.

Re:Too many Distros (1)

BinLadenMyHero (688544) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240609)

We do need more than 10 distros, just as we need many languages. The best for you is not the best for me, as there are thousand ways to use Linux for, and each distro can be better for a specific need. There are distros good for low resource computers, others for embeded systems, others for firewalls and simple servers, others for the end-users migrating from Windows, others that compiles everything from source, etc.

I, for one, prefer Slackware: it's simpler, and it makes it easier (for me!) to maintain.

Re:Too many Distros (3, Insightful)

Bungopolis (763083) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240661)

There's nothing wrong with variety here. The more diversity there is, the more likely natural consumer selection is to result in the dominance of truly better software for everybody.

Not as good (3, Funny)

shfted! (600189) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240504)

Obviously this is not as good as Gentoo. If they were running Gentoo, they would have spent 14 hours messing with USE tags so the poor server could keep up with a slashdotting ;)

Too Many Connections... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240516)

/. already 8-(

From the FAQ (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240519)

Linux is a fine DOS-like operating system with many uses, the number one of which is compiling the Linux kernel itself.

Compiling the kernel is an activity that must be accomplished time and time over again, sometimes several times per day. It is recommended that the Linux kernel be recompiled at least once per day on the most critical systems. Doing otherwise would likely result in system instability.

Since compiling the kernel is such an important activity, Linux users often benchmark and compare machines solely based on kernel compile times. Most distributions provide the source code of the kernel to the users in an effort to ease the learning curve of the unfriendly environment.

There are many reasons to compile the Linux kernel. Here are a few:

-Installation of new hardware such as a USB mouse
-Application of daily security patches
-Training towards RedHat Certified Systems Engineer certification
-Impressing friends, mates and family
-Avoiding SCO lawsuits
-etc

Please be careful when compiling your Linux kernel. You could hose your system.

forums running on yoper? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240522)

..... because I'm upset I can't RTFA. :)

*begs to differ* (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240530)

Yoper Linux really does look like it could be the first serious competition Gentoo has had in a long time.

don't you mean Debian [debian.org]??

Confusion... (0, Redundant)

j3110 (193209) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240618)

I should go ahead and post to clear that up since people are saying it /.'d already. Yoper is built to be fast, and is supposed to be faster than Gentoo by what looks like 50% or more. A serious speed advantage.

I was thinking the same thing until I read the article. The blurb is a bit confusing. I think it supports apt as well.

It gets performance by pre-linking the binaries. Somewhere between dynamic and static there must exist "prelinking".

Looks like a fun idea that should be applied to VM languages dynamically if it isn't already.

Re:Confusion... (2, Informative)

oudzeeman (684485) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240894)

It's called prebinding and it isn't a new idea. OS X has (had, this has been fixed in Tiger) a huge penalty for non pre-bound apps. I saw some tests that showed apps like photoshop were over 10 times slower starting up when it was not pre-bound. The difference in tiger is minnimal thanks to (if I recall correctly) a complete re-write of their ld (the linker). Instead of forcing prebinding why don't the Yoper guys put some work into makeing gnu ld more efficient?

Re:*begs to differ* (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240959)

Yeah, but debian is the fanboy distro. Some of us actually want to get work done without all the politics of debian.

Oooo! Talk about stuff no one cares about (5, Funny)

Ridgelift (228977) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240541)

Yoper Linux really does look like it could be the first serious competition Gentoo has had in a long time.

In other obscure news about competition that no one cares about, Bob's Fatburger is launching a new ham & swiss sandwich that may prove to be stiff competition against Arby's in the war of the cold cut sandwich arena.

if their webserver is any indication.. then no.. (2, Funny)

joeldg (518249) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240543)

I am gonna say "no" ..

but then, the article is slashdotted..

Re:if their webserver is any indication.. then no. (1)

starphish (256015) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240647)

Yoper's website works fine for me. Or are you refering to linuxforums.org?

Re:if their webserver is any indication.. then no. (2, Interesting)

extra the woos (601736) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240678)

except its not the yoper web site (which is up and running just fine)... thats like saying debian sucks because a site that posted a review of debian got /.'d...

btw, yes, this is being typed from yoper right now, been using it for a few days, its awesome. Yoper for desktops, debian for servers, thats my story and i'm stickin' to it.

And yet another.... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240554)

Wow! this is something! i mean never mind the other 56432 flavors of linux.... THIS one is REALLY REALLY special! all hail...oh....wait... never mind, its already outdated.

Full Text (2, Informative)

nuclear305 (674185) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240556)

Introduction
Ok, this is my first review and the kickoff to Linuxforums.org's Editorial Content Section, so lets get started. Yoper Linux is built around the idea of light, compact and wicked fast distro that is available to the average Linux user. Its 100% GPL compliant and the full ISO is free to anyone with an Internet connection. Yoper's popularity has absolutely skyrocketed with the release of v2.1 and is currently sitting at #18 on the distrowatch.com Page Hit Ranking.

Yoper's claim to fame is the speed at which it runs, out of the box. Yoper is a distro that targets the desktop Linux user from a brand new convert to the legendary guru. The latests release (2.1) improves upon the the installer, making it more user friendly and now includes non-destructive partitioning.

Speed applies to every aspect of the system. The install was completed, start to finish, in under 15 minutes. Once the system booted, the kernel took little time to load. It may seem little slow as compared to a custom kernel (like one created in a Gentoo install), but thats to be expected with a universal build. Once KDE started to load I noticed the speed kick. It was loaded in less than 10 seconds - which is good compared to my lovingly tweaked Gentoo system. Applications opened almost instantly and the overall feel of the system is similar to that of a fine Italian sports car, suave and fast.

The Yoper team accomplished this with the use of several methods that have always been available to those with enough experience, but generally beyond the average user, They include, but are by no means limited too:

Several performance enhancing patches to the kernel
All packages compiled specifically for the i686 against the latest and greatest of the gcc
All the binaries were 'stripped' (ie. all the debug symbols and other nonessential data are removed.) in order to create an even faster base system.
Prelinking

A short description of prelinking:

Due to Yoper's success, the process has been getting a lot of talk recently, and I was intrigued by the mechanics of this intriguing little utility. The results are readily evident: incredible startup times, even for massive applications. Basically whenever you start a program it has to find all the libraries that it will draw upon and link them to the correct location in the program. Prelinking does this when you run the Prelink, so when you start the program, 1/2 of all the startup work is already completed. Now should you be a developer, you will need to re-run the prelink code (a simple command available on their website) more frequently. They recommend it after major upgrades (such as KDE 3.2 to 3.3).

Installation
After downloading the single ISO and burning it, I booted into a BASH prompt. This might sound intimidating to those newer to Linux, but wherever a user is required to type something in there are directions included. In this instance it indicated 'type Yoper to begin setup'. A little fiddling reviled that the prompt had a few basic commands such as mount and access to Vim. Ready to begin the install, I typed Yoper, pressed enter and was greeted by the installer. Overall the feel of the install was similar to that of Slackware and comfortable enough for any user: even a Linux 'newbie'. While some may frown on the lack of a GUI installer, the Yoper team wanted to keep this all on one CD, resulting in a GUIless install. After a few simple steps (the installer holds your hand through the entire process) you arrive at qtparted, a graphical partition tool. The best part of this is that it not only makes the hardest part of the install possible through a simple GUI, but allows for non-destructive partitioning.

After that I hopped through the selection of a few mount points, selected a file system from ext2, ext3, reiserfs, and reiser4 then the install started. No progress bar or indicter of any sort was present, but the installer notified you that it would take 5-15 minutes. The lack of a package selection menu was a little surprising as that has almost become a standard feature, but the install went off without a hitch. Another feature worth noting is the inclusion of the new reiserfs4 format. This is really indicative of the bleeding edge options that Yoper includes; they are also the first major Linux distribution to ship with KDE 3.3. After the selection of either LILO or Grub, it took only a few simple administrative tasks for me to get to a working system.

Other install notables include out of the box Nvidia support (ATI support is not there yet), but after speaking with the development team I understand it is high on their To-Do list. Also SuSE's X configuration utility Sax2 handles initial X configuration and does a wonderful job of hardware detection. ALSA support is also configured during the install. Nothing really notable there, except that it is a new feature that was not included in the previous release.

Now the bad part, If any of you were paying close attention you will notice that I am using an ATI card, and I just mentioned that ATI support is weak. Yoper claims that Nvidia support is out of the box, and I have heard nothing contrary to that, but getting ATI was a bit of an adventure. It was fine in reasonable base resolutions and color depths, but it took me a good 30 min of fiddling in Sax2 to get 3D acceleration working. I ended up using the 9000 driver on my 8500. While it wasn't perfect, I was getting 2500 fps on glxgears: plenty for my needs, and enough to handle all but maybe Doom 3 (when the Linux Binaries come out). Sound worked perfectly out of the box, which was a treat as the only other distro that it worked on so naturally on was SuSE.

Everyday Usage
Yoper's speed is evident mostly in everyday functions, such a opening a OpenOffice document. I have always found OpenOffice.org to open painfully slowly, but the start time in Yoper was impressive. In most systems it can take 15-20 seconds to start the massive OpenOffice, Yoper manages this in about 10 (on my machine, these are not official numbers from OpenOffice, just mine). Web browsers open next to instantly. The startup for most everything is downright stunning. (This is where prelinking is at its strongest.)

KDE is loaded by default, and I must admit that normally I prefer a much lighter WM. KDE was loaded with such speed and felt so agile overall, I was actualy comfortable in the KDE environment. Should you still want another WM, there are several in the apt repositories (we'll talk more about apt-get in a moment). Unfortunately changing the WM or default desktop will be a but of a chore, as a plug in to control this is not yet included in Yoperconf.

The change that I found to be most dramatic (even more so than the installer) was the addition of a graphical configuration utility by the name of Yoperconf. While it's not quite as all encompassing as YaST2, it allows modification and changing of a few simple/common options that a casual user would like to implement without getting involved in the manual configuration. An example of this would be samba.

Screenshot of Yoperconf and Desktop

The default theme is the standard KDE theme, though the background, splash and icons were all quite smooth and pleasant. Easy access to several key tools via the desktop was a thoughtful addition and only goes to show how much the team listens to feedback that users are providing.

Another feature that throws Yoper into the ring with the heavyweights of the industry is apt-get, Debian's package management system that makes installing packages simple and painless. It not only retrieves the packages from prescribed FTP mirrors but also handles all dependences. Included by default is Synaptic, a GUI front end for atp-get, giving the distro a stronger desktop feel that will comfort most users. It is also this desktop "ease of use" feel that leads me to believe Yoper would not be a strong server choice, bringing me to my next point.

I was under this impression at first, so I poked around the apt-get repository, finding a surprisingly large amount of server packages. While the performance boost seen by a server configuration is not as impressive as that of a desktop, its still there. I think that with more mainstream acceptance, hosting services may start advertising with a 'Yoper Powered' logo.

Documentation seemed a little weak, consisting of little more than an FAQ. A few cursory posts on their forums were greeted by knowledgeable staff. Several members of the development team personally addressed problems that I was having, and on several occasions told me of plans for future features and bug fixes that were in the works. In fact the head developer is involved on a very personal level with the entire community, making it a point to listen to input from anyone.

In Conclusion
I have to say that Yoper is a system that will truly surprise you. If the speed isn't enough to sell you on the idea, the default package selection will. It is comprehensive but not encumbering like some distros have become in an attempt to become even more user-friendly. Unfortunately while the install is comprehensive and easy to use, the lack of package selection is disappointing and a tad bit surprising. Yoper is a hybrid of the best of each distro, and a big handful of originality. While this is commended, it is also constrictive. Installing RPM's can be difficult and the apt-get repository has not yet grown to the point of something like Gentoo's Portage, which you can rely upon for all your program needs. In fact, Yoper's only true drawback is its age, or more accurately, its lack thereof. While community support is great, once you leave the Yoper community and enter that of the Linux community as a whole, it is difficult to find users familiar with it.

Having been a hardcore Gentoo user before Yoper I feel it is my duty to perform a rough speed comparison on the box below

1.8Ghz P4
512 DDR RAM at 233mhz
1x80GB ATA HD
Radeon 8500 All-In-Wonder
Integrated Sound
52x CD-Rom
8x4x2 DVD-RW

I will assume a vanilla install of Gentoo with the gentoo-dev-sources Kernel compiled with genkernel and Yoper V2.1. The install time obviously goes to Yoper as Gentoo compiles the entire thing from special rebuilds (basically source), whereas Yoper uses prebuilt packages with the most common performance enhancing flags used during their compilation. The boot time is a tricky one to measure, but if you clock the time taken to reach a login prompt, Gentoo wins but not buy much, about a 7 second difference in my test. But once you go to starting X, Yoper leaps ahead and can have me browsing the web, editing an office doc, and chatting in the IRC before Gentoo got me into a GUI. Various CPU benchmarks showed little difference as the core of both systems is minimalistic with not extra processes running. While Yoper's kernel start time is not as impressive as Gentoo's, once you get going, the absolutely incredible startup time will astound you.

All said and done, any Linux user who has a few free gigs on their hard disk should give this newest release of Your Operating System a try and see what the rave is about. Several of you might just notice that Yoper seems to draw you in, especially for daily desktop tasks where this zippy little distro truly excels.

Mod Parent Down (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240594)

a) It's a copyright violation
b) It's karma whoring

Mod Parent Down (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240708)

> a) It's a copyright violation

True, but there's no down-mod for that.

> b) It's karma whoring

Maybe, but there's no down-mod for that either.

c) It's informative

Mod Parent Down (the downmoding one) (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240735)

Links to forum-posts are idiocy. Of course the article is no longer reachable, and wont be the next hours/days.

Re:Mod Parent Down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240772)

some of us live in countries with decent copyright laws so where do you get off claiming it's violation you insensitive clod?

Re:Full Text (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240639)

You mean you can have a fast system without watching gcc output for 18 hours?

This is truly the dawn of a new age.

Re:Full Text (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240796)

Yoper's popularity has absolutely skyrocketed with the release of v2.1

In other words, it went from having 2 users to having 12 users. Most other distros gained only a few percent during the same time period, Yoper's install base jumped sixfold! Statistics are fun.

prelinking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240856)

Sounds like an OS X feature. Funny thing is, in Tiger, the guys at Apple figured out how to make prebinding (OS X "prelinking") completely useless and slower than the new Tiger loader. Nice to see that Linux is ahead of the curve. ;-)

Re:Full Text (3, Interesting)

lytenyn (812870) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240861)

Several performance enhancing patches to the kernel
All packages compiled specifically for the i686 against the latest and greatest of the gcc
All the binaries were 'stripped' (ie. all the debug symbols and other nonessential data are removed.) in order to create an even faster base system.
Prelinking

So I wonder - I've done all that on my gentoo-box .. then why should yoper be noticeably faster?

.. Besides the fact that I love Gentoo for various other reasons (no need to upgrade the whole system once in a while but rather gradual updates/ fine-grained control/ linux experience) ..

different purpose (4, Interesting)

updog (608318) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240568)

It looks like Yoper has been created primarily for maximum performance on x86 machines. Although Gentoo is indeed fast as well, the main differentiating factor with Gentoo is that you build most of your system from source, which has other benefits (disadvantages) than simply execution speed.

I would not jump to the conclusion that it's competition for Gentoo just because it's also fast.

Re:different purpose (4, Interesting)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240798)

Although Gentoo is indeed fast as well, the main differentiating factor with Gentoo is that you build most of your system from source, which has other benefits (disadvantages) than simply execution speed.

This is very true, and I'd like to clarify the reasons. The main one IMHO is that a lot of software options are compile-time. For example I don't use Gnome or KDE, thus I don't want any of the relevant dependencies/bindings compiled into the software I use. Many desktop oriented distros choose nearly every possible binding like this, 'just in case' it is needed. Even when the relevant code is not really used, bigger code is always slower.

The fact that Yoper is compiled for i686 should not make much difference; there are tons of compiler options that go beyond simple i686 capabilities. In fact many compile-time optimizations are due to compiler-independent options as I mentioned above.

It seems Yoper is fast because of prelinking. Gentoo with prelinking should be even faster. But again Gentoo's main point is not that it's fast; it's the ability to control almost every detail of software installation, while avoiding the complications from manual ./configure; make; make install.

Site already very slow... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240572)

Yoper Linux v2.1
Website: www.yoper.com

Introduction
Ok, this is my first review and the kickoff to Linuxforums.org's Editorial Content Section, so lets get started. Yoper Linux is built around the idea of light, compact and wicked fast distro that is available to the average Linux user. Its 100% GPL compliant and the full ISO is free to anyone with an Internet connection. Yoper's popularity has absolutely skyrocketed with the release of v2.1 and is currently sitting at #18 on the distrowatch.com Page Hit Ranking.

Yoper's claim to fame is the speed at which it runs, out of the box. Yoper is a distro that targets the desktop Linux user from a brand new convert to the legendary guru. The latests release (2.1) improves upon the the installer, making it more user friendly and now includes non-destructive partitioning.

Speed applies to every aspect of the system. The install was completed, start to finish, in under 15 minutes. Once the system booted, the kernel took little time to load. It may seem little slow as compared to a custom kernel (like one created in a Gentoo install), but thats to be expected with a universal build. Once KDE started to load I noticed the speed kick. It was loaded in less than 10 seconds - which is good compared to my lovingly tweaked Gentoo system. Applications opened almost instantly and the overall feel of the system is similar to that of a fine Italian sports car, suave and fast.

The Yoper team accomplished this with the use of several methods that have always been available to those with enough experience, but generally beyond the average user, They include, but are by no means limited too:

Several performance enhancing patches to the kernel
All packages compiled specifically for the i686 against the latest and greatest of the gcc
All the binaries were 'stripped' (ie. all the debug symbols and other nonessential data are removed.) in order to create an even faster base system.
Prelinking

A short description of prelinking:

Due to Yoper's success, the process has been getting a lot of talk recently, and I was intrigued by the mechanics of this intriguing little utility. The results are readily evident: incredible startup times, even for massive applications. Basically whenever you start a program it has to find all the libraries that it will draw upon and link them to the correct location in the program. Prelinking does this when you run the Prelink, so when you start the program, 1/2 of all the startup work is already completed. Now should you be a developer, you will need to re-run the prelink code (a simple command available on their website) more frequently. They recommend it after major upgrades (such as KDE 3.2 to 3.3).

Installation
After downloading the single ISO and burning it, I booted into a BASH prompt. This might sound intimidating to those newer to Linux, but wherever a user is required to type something in there are directions included. In this instance it indicated 'type Yoper to begin setup'. A little fiddling reviled that the prompt had a few basic commands such as mount and access to Vim. Ready to begin the install, I typed Yoper, pressed enter and was greeted by the installer. Overall the feel of the install was similar to that of Slackware and comfortable enough for any user: even a Linux 'newbie'. While some may frown on the lack of a GUI installer, the Yoper team wanted to keep this all on one CD, resulting in a GUIless install. After a few simple steps (the installer holds your hand through the entire process) you arrive at qtparted, a graphical partition tool. The best part of this is that it not only makes the hardest part of the install possible through a simple GUI, but allows for non-destructive partitioning.

After that I hopped through the selection of a few mount points, selected a file system from ext2, ext3, reiserfs, and reiser4 then the install started. No progress bar or indicter of any sort was present, but the installer notified you that it would take 5-15 minutes. The lack of a package selection menu was a little surprising as that has almost become a standard feature, but the install went off without a hitch. Another feature worth noting is the inclusion of the new reiserfs4 format. This is really indicative of the bleeding edge options that Yoper includes; they are also the first major Linux distribution to ship with KDE 3.3. After the selection of either LILO or Grub, it took only a few simple administrative tasks for me to get to a working system.

Other install notables include out of the box Nvidia support (ATI support is not there yet), but after speaking with the development team I understand it is high on their To-Do list. Also SuSE's X configuration utility Sax2 handles initial X configuration and does a wonderful job of hardware detection. ALSA support is also configured during the install. Nothing really notable there, except that it is a new feature that was not included in the previous release.

Now the bad part, If any of you were paying close attention you will notice that I am using an ATI card, and I just mentioned that ATI support is weak. Yoper claims that Nvidia support is out of the box, and I have heard nothing contrary to that, but getting ATI was a bit of an adventure. It was fine in reasonable base resolutions and color depths, but it took me a good 30 min of fiddling in Sax2 to get 3D acceleration working. I ended up using the 9000 driver on my 8500. While it wasn't perfect, I was getting 2500 fps on glxgears: plenty for my needs, and enough to handle all but maybe Doom 3 (when the Linux Binaries come out). Sound worked perfectly out of the box, which was a treat as the only other distro that it worked on so naturally on was SuSE.

Everyday Usage
Yoper's speed is evident mostly in everyday functions, such a opening a OpenOffice document. I have always found OpenOffice.org to open painfully slowly, but the start time in Yoper was impressive. In most systems it can take 15-20 seconds to start the massive OpenOffice, Yoper manages this in about 10 (on my machine, these are not official numbers from OpenOffice, just mine). Web browsers open next to instantly. The startup for most everything is downright stunning. (This is where prelinking is at its strongest.)

KDE is loaded by default, and I must admit that normally I prefer a much lighter WM. KDE was loaded with such speed and felt so agile overall, I was actualy comfortable in the KDE environment. Should you still want another WM, there are several in the apt repositories (we'll talk more about apt-get in a moment). Unfortunately changing the WM or default desktop will be a but of a chore, as a plug in to control this is not yet included in Yoperconf.

The change that I found to be most dramatic (even more so than the installer) was the addition of a graphical configuration utility by the name of Yoperconf. While it's not quite as all encompassing as YaST2, it allows modification and changing of a few simple/common options that a casual user would like to implement without getting involved in the manual configuration. An example of this would be samba.

Screenshot of Yoperconf and Desktop

The default theme is the standard KDE theme, though the background, splash and icons were all quite smooth and pleasant. Easy access to several key tools via the desktop was a thoughtful addition and only goes to show how much the team listens to feedback that users are providing.

Another feature that throws Yoper into the ring with the heavyweights of the industry is apt-get, Debian's package management system that makes installing packages simple and painless. It not only retrieves the packages from prescribed FTP mirrors but also handles all dependences. Included by default is Synaptic, a GUI front end for atp-get, giving the distro a stronger desktop feel that will comfort most users. It is also this desktop "ease of use" feel that leads me to believe Yoper would not be a strong server choice, bringing me to my next point.

I was under this impression at first, so I poked around the apt-get repository, finding a surprisingly large amount of server packages. While the performance boost seen by a server configuration is not as impressive as that of a desktop, its still there. I think that with more mainstream acceptance, hosting services may start advertising with a 'Yoper Powered' logo.

Documentation seemed a little weak, consisting of little more than an FAQ. A few cursory posts on their forums were greeted by knowledgeable staff. Several members of the development team personally addressed problems that I was having, and on several occasions told me of plans for future features and bug fixes that were in the works. In fact the head developer is involved on a very personal level with the entire community, making it a point to listen to input from anyone.

In Conclusion
I have to say that Yoper is a system that will truly surprise you. If the speed isn't enough to sell you on the idea, the default package selection will. It is comprehensive but not encumbering like some distros have become in an attempt to become even more user-friendly. Unfortunately while the install is comprehensive and easy to use, the lack of package selection is disappointing and a tad bit surprising. Yoper is a hybrid of the best of each distro, and a big handful of originality. While this is commended, it is also constrictive. Installing RPM's can be difficult and the apt-get repository has not yet grown to the point of something like Gentoo's Portage, which you can rely upon for all your program needs. In fact, Yoper's only true drawback is its age, or more accurately, its lack thereof. While community support is great, once you leave the Yoper community and enter that of the Linux community as a whole, it is difficult to find users familiar with it.

Having been a hardcore Gentoo user before Yoper I feel it is my duty to perform a rough speed comparison on the box below

1.8Ghz P4
512 DDR RAM at 233mhz
1x80GB ATA HD
Radeon 8500 All-In-Wonder
Integrated Sound
52x CD-Rom
8x4x2 DVD-RW

I will assume a vanilla install of Gentoo with the gentoo-dev-sources Kernel compiled with genkernel and Yoper V2.1. The install time obviously goes to Yoper as Gentoo compiles the entire thing from special rebuilds (basically source), whereas Yoper uses prebuilt packages with the most common performance enhancing flags used during their compilation. The boot time is a tricky one to measure, but if you clock the time taken to reach a login prompt, Gentoo wins but not buy much, about a 7 second difference in my test. But once you go to starting X, Yoper leaps ahead and can have me browsing the web, editing an office doc, and chatting in the IRC before Gentoo got me into a GUI. Various CPU benchmarks showed little difference as the core of both systems is minimalistic with not extra processes running. While Yoper's kernel start time is not as impressive as Gentoo's, once you get going, the absolutely incredible startup time will astound you.

All said and done, any Linux user who has a few free gigs on their hard disk should give this newest release of Your Operating System a try and see what the rave is about. Several of you might just notice that Yoper seems to draw you in, especially for daily desktop tasks where this zippy little distro truly excels.

Link to yoper (4, Informative)

jsprat (442568) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240574)

Since the submitter didn't provide a direct link to Yoper Linux [yoper.com], I will.


Does anyone else think it's strange that a story about yoper has no link to their home page, but does have a link to gentoo?

Corel Link (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240583)

Corel Link [nyud.net]

Re:Corel Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240634)

Forgot to post the main site

Yoper [nyud.net]

Re:Corel Link (1)

nuclear305 (674185) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240718)

Unfortunately Corel doesn't help when the server caches the error page...

Warning: mysql_connect(): Too many connections in /usr/local/apache/vhosts/linuxforums.org/www/forum /db/mysql4.php on line 49

Gentoo Competition? (3, Funny)

TheLastUser (550621) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240593)

Yoper Linux really does look like it could be the first serious competition Gentoo has had in a long time.

For what? "The worst installer of all time", or "The most time consuming distro ever".

in case of slashdotting (-1, Redundant)

jacoplane (78110) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240597)

There's a review of yoper 2 [osnews.com] (not 2.1) on Osnews.

The article:

Yoper Linux v2.1 Review
Posted by qub333 at Mon Sep 13, 2004 8:32 pm

Yoper Linux v2.1
Website: www.yoper.com

Introduction
Ok, this is my first review and the kickoff to Linuxforums.org's Editorial Content Section, so lets get started. Yoper Linux is built around the idea of light, compact and wicked fast distro that is available to the average Linux user. Its 100% GPL compliant and the full ISO is free to anyone with an Internet connection. Yoper's popularity has absolutely skyrocketed with the release of v2.1 and is currently sitting at #18 on the distrowatch.com Page Hit Ranking.

Yoper's claim to fame is the speed at which it runs, out of the box. Yoper is a distro that targets the desktop Linux user from a brand new convert to the legendary guru. The latests release (2.1) improves upon the the installer, making it more user friendly and now includes non-destructive partitioning.

Speed applies to every aspect of the system. The install was completed, start to finish, in under 15 minutes. Once the system booted, the kernel took little time to load. It may seem little slow as compared to a custom kernel (like one created in a Gentoo install), but thats to be expected with a universal build. Once KDE started to load I noticed the speed kick. It was loaded in less than 10 seconds - which is good compared to my lovingly tweaked Gentoo system. Applications opened almost instantly and the overall feel of the system is similar to that of a fine Italian sports car, suave and fast.

The Yoper team accomplished this with the use of several methods that have always been available to those with enough experience, but generally beyond the average user, They include, but are by no means limited too:

Several performance enhancing patches to the kernel
All packages compiled specifically for the i686 against the latest and greatest of the gcc
All the binaries were 'stripped' (ie. all the debug symbols and other nonessential data are removed.) in order to create an even faster base system.
Prelinking

A short description of prelinking:

Due to Yoper's success, the process has been getting a lot of talk recently, and I was intrigued by the mechanics of this intriguing little utility. The results are readily evident: incredible startup times, even for massive applications. Basically whenever you start a program it has to find all the libraries that it will draw upon and link them to the correct location in the program. Prelinking does this when you run the Prelink, so when you start the program, 1/2 of all the startup work is already completed. Now should you be a developer, you will need to re-run the prelink code (a simple command available on their website) more frequently. They recommend it after major upgrades (such as KDE 3.2 to 3.3).

Installation
After downloading the single ISO and burning it, I booted into a BASH prompt. This might sound intimidating to those newer to Linux, but wherever a user is required to type something in there are directions included. In this instance it indicated 'type Yoper to begin setup'. A little fiddling reviled that the prompt had a few basic commands such as mount and access to Vim. Ready to begin the install, I typed Yoper, pressed enter and was greeted by the installer. Overall the feel of the install was similar to that of Slackware and comfortable enough for any user: even a Linux 'newbie'. While some may frown on the lack of a GUI installer, the Yoper team wanted to keep this all on one CD, resulting in a GUIless install. After a few simple steps (the installer holds your hand through the entire process) you arrive at qtparted, a graphical partition tool. The best part of this is that it not only makes the hardest part of the install possible through a simple GUI, but allows for non-destructive partitioning.

After that I hopped through the selection of a few mount points, selected a file system from ext2, ext3, reiserfs, and reiser4 then the install started. No progress bar or indicter of any sort was present, but the installer notified you that it would take 5-15 minutes. The lack of a package selection menu was a little surprising as that has almost become a standard feature, but the install went off without a hitch. Another feature worth noting is the inclusion of the new reiserfs4 format. This is really indicative of the bleeding edge options that Yoper includes; they are also the first major Linux distribution to ship with KDE 3.3. After the selection of either LILO or Grub, it took only a few simple administrative tasks for me to get to a working system.

Other install notables include out of the box Nvidia support (ATI support is not there yet), but after speaking with the development team I understand it is high on their To-Do list. Also SuSE's X configuration utility Sax2 handles initial X configuration and does a wonderful job of hardware detection. ALSA support is also configured during the install. Nothing really notable there, except that it is a new feature that was not included in the previous release.

Now the bad part, If any of you were paying close attention you will notice that I am using an ATI card, and I just mentioned that ATI support is weak. Yoper claims that Nvidia support is out of the box, and I have heard nothing contrary to that, but getting ATI was a bit of an adventure. It was fine in reasonable base resolutions and color depths, but it took me a good 30 min of fiddling in Sax2 to get 3D acceleration working. I ended up using the 9000 driver on my 8500. While it wasn't perfect, I was getting 2500 fps on glxgears: plenty for my needs, and enough to handle all but maybe Doom 3 (when the Linux Binaries come out). Sound worked perfectly out of the box, which was a treat as the only other distro that it worked on so naturally on was SuSE.

Everyday Usage
Yoper's speed is evident mostly in everyday functions, such a opening a OpenOffice document. I have always found OpenOffice.org to open painfully slowly, but the start time in Yoper was impressive. In most systems it can take 15-20 seconds to start the massive OpenOffice, Yoper manages this in about 10 (on my machine, these are not official numbers from OpenOffice, just mine). Web browsers open next to instantly. The startup for most everything is downright stunning. (This is where prelinking is at its strongest.)

KDE is loaded by default, and I must admit that normally I prefer a much lighter WM. KDE was loaded with such speed and felt so agile overall, I was actualy comfortable in the KDE environment. Should you still want another WM, there are several in the apt repositories (we'll talk more about apt-get in a moment). Unfortunately changing the WM or default desktop will be a but of a chore, as a plug in to control this is not yet included in Yoperconf.

The change that I found to be most dramatic (even more so than the installer) was the addition of a graphical configuration utility by the name of Yoperconf. While it's not quite as all encompassing as YaST2, it allows modification and changing of a few simple/common options that a casual user would like to implement without getting involved in the manual configuration. An example of this would be samba.

Screenshot of Yoperconf and Desktop

The default theme is the standard KDE theme, though the background, splash and icons were all quite smooth and pleasant. Easy access to several key tools via the desktop was a thoughtful addition and only goes to show how much the team listens to feedback that users are providing.

Another feature that throws Yoper into the ring with the heavyweights of the industry is apt-get, Debian's package management system that makes installing packages simple and painless. It not only retrieves the packages from prescribed FTP mirrors but also handles all dependences. Included by default is Synaptic, a GUI front end for atp-get, giving the distro a stronger desktop feel that will comfort most users. It is also this desktop "ease of use" feel that leads me to believe Yoper would not be a strong server choice, bringing me to my next point.

I was under this impression at first, so I poked around the apt-get repository, finding a surprisingly large amount of server packages. While the performance boost seen by a server configuration is not as impressive as that of a desktop, its still there. I think that with more mainstream acceptance, hosting services may start advertising with a 'Yoper Powered' logo.

Documentation seemed a little weak, consisting of little more than an FAQ. A few cursory posts on their forums were greeted by knowledgeable staff. Several members of the development team personally addressed problems that I was having, and on several occasions told me of plans for future features and bug fixes that were in the works. In fact the head developer is involved on a very personal level with the entire community, making it a point to listen to input from anyone.

In Conclusion
I have to say that Yoper is a system that will truly surprise you. If the speed isn't enough to sell you on the idea, the default package selection will. It is comprehensive but not encumbering like some distros have become in an attempt to become even more user-friendly. Unfortunately while the install is comprehensive and easy to use, the lack of package selection is disappointing and a tad bit surprising. Yoper is a hybrid of the best of each distro, and a big handful of originality. While this is commended, it is also constrictive. Installing RPM's can be difficult and the apt-get repository has not yet grown to the point of something like Gentoo's Portage, which you can rely upon for all your program needs. In fact, Yoper's only true drawback is its age, or more accurately, its lack thereof. While community support is great, once you leave the Yoper community and enter that of the Linux community as a whole, it is difficult to find users familiar with it.

Having been a hardcore Gentoo user before Yoper I feel it is my duty to perform a rough speed comparison on the box below

1.8Ghz P4
512 DDR RAM at 233mhz
1x80GB ATA HD
Radeon 8500 All-In-Wonder
Integrated Sound
52x CD-Rom
8x4x2 DVD-RW

I will assume a vanilla install of Gentoo with the gentoo-dev-sources Kernel compiled with genkernel and Yoper V2.1. The install time obviously goes to Yoper as Gentoo compiles the entire thing from special rebuilds (basically source), whereas Yoper uses prebuilt packages with the most common performance enhancing flags used during their compilation. The boot time is a tricky one to measure, but if you clock the time taken to reach a login prompt, Gentoo wins but not buy much, about a 7 second difference in my test. But once you go to starting X, Yoper leaps ahead and can have me browsing the web, editing an office doc, and chatting in the IRC before Gentoo got me into a GUI. Various CPU benchmarks showed little difference as the core of both systems is minimalistic with not extra processes running. While Yoper's kernel start time is not as impressive as Gentoo's, once you get going, the absolutely incredible startup time will astound you.

All said and done, any Linux user who has a few free gigs on their hard disk should give this newest release of Your Operating System a try and see what the rave is about. Several of you might just notice that Yoper seems to draw you in, especially for daily desktop tasks where this zippy little distro truly excels.

competition (5, Funny)

nocomment (239368) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240598)

Yoper Linux really does look like it could be the first serious competition Gentoo has had in a long time.


uhhhh have you heard of Red Hat, Mandrake, Suse, Debian, Turbo, etc...? First real competition...phht! Gimme a break.

Re:competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240864)

They mean first competition with a distribution beginning with a Y. Neglecting Yellow Dog and Yggdrasil, of course.

Is is LSB 2.0 compliant? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240604)

Well... is it?

Beating Gentoo? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240610)

As someone who runs Gentoo on his home machine, I have to agree with some of the sentiment expressed around here: beat Gentoo at what?

I think Gentoo is a great desktop distribution for someone who has a lot of time on their hands and is capable of doing things manually. However, I wouldn't recommend Gentoo for use on an important sever, nor would I recommend Gentoo to use for someone who doesn't have a lot of time or who is incapable of doing some complex things by hand.

I think Gentoo right now is one of the better hobby/tweaking distributions, but I really don't think that's the usershare Yoper is going after.

Re:Beating Gentoo? (1)

SoCalChris (573049) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240740)

Personally, I learned a lot about Linux from Gentoo. I had installed and used Mandrake for a few months before trying Gentoo, so I wasn't a complete Linux newbie, but I didn't really know much about it.

Going through a complete Gentoo install from a stage 1 tarball taught me a lot, probably more than I could have picked up out of a book or two.

I still mainly use Windows, but that's because I develop Windows apps for a living. I still enjoy messing around with Linux though.

well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240616)

It's worth comparing http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=yope r to http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=gent oo . atleast in the package versions it seems that yoper is ahead of gentoo.

That's great (2, Insightful)

prisoner (133137) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240626)

there's plenty of competition in the linux sector. Now if we could just get someone to make a distro that actually competes with windows we'd be all set. If you want to flame me, please include an answer as to why in the world I would have to edit my yum.conf file to install a dvd player and compare that to the difficulties of installing the same software on windows. If you are stumped as to why I ask this, then employ your sage wisdom and explain why the average user would be excited about spending hours on usenet trying to figure out how to accomplish the most mundane tasks on linux. I love linux - it's my swiss army knife of choice but a desktop replacement? Yeah, I'm off topic, bite me.

Re:That's great (3, Insightful)

Spyro VII (666885) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240753)

Oh, you mean this one [mandrake.org]? Of course, mandrake is not the only "desktop distro" out there right now, but it's the best windows replacement distro that I've found so far. I have set up a number of PCs for friends and family running mandrake and they haven't had any problems yet. Of course, some things can give you trouble (certain hardware combinations), but the fact of the matter is that people like you need to get out of their shells and realize that there are distros out there that are bridging the desktop gap. And you need to either support them or atleast acknowledge their existence.

Re:That's great (5, Insightful)

el-spectre (668104) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240786)

I'm wondering myself why you'd edit yum.conf ... I'd just get the updated one from the Fedora Faq.

We're still getting there. Right now, linux DOES compete with windows, in the 'good with computers' or better class of folks. 5 years ago you had to be much more advanced. Over time, the OS is getting better, but folks (especially linux savvy folks such as yourself) don't help things any by standing around and whining that it's not perfect RIGHT NOW.

Re:That's great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240832)

please include an answer as to why in the world I would have to edit my yum.conf file to install a dvd player

Because you are using yum. If you use Debian or Gentoo installing a dvd player is this easy:

Debian:
apt-get mplayer

Gentoo:
emerge mplayer

no config file editing required.

Re:That's great (0, Redundant)

el-spectre (668104) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240914)

It has nothing to do with yum, and everything to do with legality and what Redhat can distribute w/o getting into trouble. Don't confuse technology with legal issues.

Re:That's great (1)

ShavenYak (252902) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240964)

Don't confuse technology with legal issues.

Pretend for a moment I'm Joe Sixpack. Why do I care whether it's a technology issue or a legal issue? All I know is something doesn't work out of the box, and it worked on Windows. I immediately lose some of my confidence in this new Linux thing.

Prelinking in Gentoo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240635)

So when can I emerge this prelinker yoper is using?

Re:Prelinking in Gentoo? (2, Interesting)

Kristoffer Lunden (800757) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240884)

When do you want it?
# emerge -s prelink
Searching...
[ Results for search key : prelink ]
[ Applications found : 1 ]

* sys-devel/prelink
Latest version available: 20040707
Latest version installed: [ Not Installed ]
Size of downloaded files: 881 kB
Homepage: ftp://people.redhat.com/jakub/prelink
Description: Modifies executables so runtime libraries load faster
License: GPL-2

How Gentoo won the community (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240640)

Gentoo was good at their marketing, and that was by winning over Linux users / newbies by packaging games with their product which most distros don't.

Personally, Gentoo is crap in my opinion.. Sure building from source is nice and all, but the speed difference is barely noticeable comparing between other distros. Them redefining the standard UFS is complete crap and doesn't make sense on WHY?

The LPI cert info they offer through IBM is horrible, incorrect in some areas and based mainly around their distro.

The only thing they got going for them is the multiple architecture support.

Re:How Gentoo won the community (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240731)

"Personally, Gentoo is crap in my opinion.. Sure building from source is nice and all, but the speed difference is barely noticeable comparing between other distros."

I fail to see how that makes Gentoo "crap". I'd run Gentoo even if it ran exactly the same speed as other distributions. It has a lot of up-to-date software available, all of which is easy to install and upgrade.

How does that make it a crappy distribution?

For reference, I've taken my two year old Gentoo installation from running GNOME 2.0 on a 2.4 kernel with devfs to running GNOME 2.8 on a 2.6 kernel with udev. All without ever doing a reinstallation.

That qualifies it as at least a decent distribution in my book.

yoper who! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240656)

hahaha i gotz da first post!! mueeheheheheh! you can suck my yoper!!! hahahaha

Office Speed (2, Insightful)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240662)

Its funny - I haven't really tried open office at all lately, since I use Linux exclusively for server tasks (and we have full MSFT licenses), but this particular snippet caught my eye:

Yoper's speed is evident mostly in everyday functions, such a opening a OpenOffice document. I have always found OpenOffice.org to open painfully slowly, but the start time in Yoper was impressive. In most systems it can take 15-20 seconds to start the massive OpenOffice, Yoper manages this in about 10 (on my machine, these are not official numbers from OpenOffice, just mine).

His machine is a P4/1.8ghz/512mb box. Is it really noteworthy when an office suite opens in <sarcasm>about 10 seconds</sarcasm%gt; on a machine of that class? Really? Wow. That's ... pretty sad.

Other than that, the experience looked promising. Does anyone know if it works as well with apt as Debian does? Or as poorly?

Re:Office Speed (1)

FyRE666 (263011) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240777)

Not only that, but it's pretty simple to speed up OO's load time dramatically just by increasing the memory settings within OO. I'm puzzled as to why they're so low to start with to be honest.

It is still a slug though - my work machine takes a good 15 seconds to load it up (P4 2.6ghz, FC2, 384MB, slowish 40GB HD); I use Gnumeric for spreadsheet work, since OO Calc takes so damned long to get going even once it's cached.

Re:Office Speed (1)

extra the woos (601736) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240927)

"I haven't tried open office at all lately" "Is it really noteworthy when an office suite opens in about 10 seconds"

Unless its pre-loaded with the quick launcher in windows or you got some pretty fast shit, yeah its pretty great (when its open office!, ms office is a LOT faster to start up)...

Let it be said I have a fast a64 with a lot of fast ram and serial ata hdd, and open office still loads pretty friggin slowly. Yet it does load fast in yoper (the distro i've been using since i discovered it last week lol, before i always used debian)...

So yeah, it's pretty sad when stuff loads that slowly, but its not yoper being sad, its the slowness of open office being sad.... which is why if ya got a slow (less than 1ghz) machine I say use abiword WHENEVER POSSIBLE lol it hauls ass...

Also keep in mind someone's 1.8ghz p4 is not that fast of a machine... It's probably one of those cheap black and grey dells or something with a 5400rpm 512k cache slowwww ass hdds...

IMHO (2)

OklaKid (552472) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240668)

1.yoper does not compile from sourcecode for the instalation as Gentoo does.
2.the instalation tools are quite dated and lack features, compared to the detail and abilitys of other major distros like Slackware (my fav) redhat/mandrake/ thier installers.
when i tested yoper-2.1 i had to use the parameter of yos nousb because yoper choked on my usb ports and would not finish booting the CD to start install...

Gentoo isn't neccessarily about speed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240675)

... it's more about picking only what you want/need in your box, speed comes from choosing bleeding-edge compilation flags, if you choose them, as well as lower overhead from running only what you need. As an individual who's built a few Gentoo systems, I can tell you the install is anything but speedy ;)

Re:Gentoo isn't neccessarily about speed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240724)

This is partly true:About Gentoo [gentoo.org]

We produce Gentoo Linux, a special flavor of Linux that can be automatically optimized and customized for just about any application or need. Extreme performance, configurability and a top-notch user and developer community are all hallmarks of the Gentoo experience. Thanks to a technology called Portage, Gentoo Linux can become an ideal secure server, development workstation, professional desktop, gaming system, embedded solution or something else -- whatever you need it to be. Because of its near-unlimited adaptability, we call Gentoo Linux a metadistribution.

Google? (1, Interesting)

bluewee (677282) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240698)

Results 1 - 10 of about 269,000 for yoper. (0.14 seconds)
Results 1 - 10 of about 3,130,000 for gentoo [definition]. (0.11 seconds)

Well there you have it people gentoo is the clear winner...

here are some more for comparison:
Results 1 - 10 of about 11,500,000 for suse [definition]. (0.19 seconds)
Results 1 - 10 of about 26,300,000 for debian [definition]. (0.14 seconds)
Results 1 - 10 of about 122,000,000 for windows [definition]. (0.31 seconds)
Results 1 - 10 of about 3,350,000 for google os. (0.23 seconds) ... o_0

I like it (2, Insightful)

sometwo (53041) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240701)

I've been using Mandrake for over 1 year. But am happy I've changed completely to Yoper. It's much faster; no more 15 seconds waiting for an app to fire. Also being part of a constantly evolving new distro makes it all more personal and significant. Sure there are packages missing. So we always can learn to build our own and add it to Yoper's repository. Rather than just sit back and complain. It's a very friendly and welcoming community there, no power battles or l33t t4lk - pretty cool methinks.

Re:I like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240888)

You had a typo. "Rather than just sit back and complain." should read "Rather than just swith to a proper distro."

Prelinking (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240743)

Something not mentioned in the review: you can also prelink in Gentoo. How do prelinked Gentoo systems stack up to Yoper? I got a big speed kick on startup times when I prelinked my Gentoo system.

Note also, performance != app startup time execlusively.

Not too intimidating... (5, Funny)

mod_parent_down (692943) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240744)

After downloading the single ISO and burning it, I booted into a BASH prompt. This might sound intimidating to those newer to Linux... A little fiddling reviled that the prompt had a few basic commands such as mount and access to Vim.

Oh yeah. If you're intimidated by a Bash prompt, you're gonna LOVE vim.

Ok, Lemme just type--

BEEP!

What the...

BEEP! BEEP! BEEP!

Ah! I just want to edit the--

BEEP! BEEP! BEEP! BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!!!

AHHHHHHHHH!!!!

Re:Not too intimidating... (1)

extra the woos (601736) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240965)

I have no idea how to use vim... if i hafta type something out when i'm not in x i use joe, its simple and behaves like a text editor should (i'm a long time windows user!).....

but the point is that you can use the yoper install cd as a rescue disc very very easily (i have, when grub didn't work right, i just booted it up and ran lilo)

Remembering the Yoper Jerk (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240756)

Does anyone remember the jerk from Yoper who was badmouthing the /. crowd? Yoper wanted $99 for their distro, and they bragged heavily. People started to call BS, and the Yoper jerk went berserk. That was the first time I ever heard of Yoper and the last time I cared. At least they learned what bad PR can do for business (Yoper is free now--ha!).

Re:Remembering the Yoper Jerk (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240972)

He's quoted here [slashdot.org] in an old /. article from when the flamewar was going on in the Yoper forums.

Re:Remembering the Yoper Jerk (2, Interesting)

ananke (8417) | more than 9 years ago | (#10241012)

Yeah, I've been trying to find the slashdot story on that. I remember reading yoper's own web pages, where the developer/developers were basically trashing their [potential] users. Like you said: thanks, but no thanks.

Yoper suspicious (4, Interesting)

ashpool7 (18172) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240782)

Does no-one remember back when Yoper went 1.0 and was on Slashdot? Seemed pretty suspicious [slashdot.org] if you ask me.

Since the site is slashdotted, it's hard to see if anything has changed in a year.

Finally! Competition for Gentoo... (1)

MoThugz (560556) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240813)

It's about time we had another souped up, optimized to the core, compiled from source, fear my USE flags distro to provide competition with Gentoo [funroll-loops.org].

You know what they say... Monopoly is never a good thing ;)

Yeah, but.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240863)

KDE == shit.

I just have to say (4, Interesting)

Mr. Cancelled (572486) | more than 9 years ago | (#10240990)

The hype is justified!

Yoper really is the next best thing to Gentoo for me, as far as Linux goes.
  • It's more optimized than its comptetion (all the other non-enterprise, modern, cutting-edge desktop distros... Ark, JAMD, PCLinuxOS, etc.))
  • It's using some of the best packages avail at the moment, in their latest incarnations
  • It's setup in such a way that it could immediately be used as an office PC (aka as a Windows replacement), it's equally able to handle more "power-user" type people straight out of the box, with additional software available via a point and click GUI (Synaptic)
  • While it's 'dumbed down' to the point that your average PC-based web surfer/emailer/im'er can start out right at home, it's just so fuckin' fast and optimized right out of the box that it'll impress even the most jaded Linux user.
  • It's picking up momentum fast, so more and more of the popular packages (and in my opinion some really obscure ones - There's a lotta stuff 'ported for it' that I'd never expect -or use) are being put out. I'm really just talking compile optimizations and such, but they're all setup for the Yoper structure
  • The hardware support is very nice. In fact, to me, the biggest "ooh!" about the most recent release is that it's the first Linux distribution that correctly identified and setup my Radeon 9600 card, with dual monitors. EVERY other distribution made me hand-edit the config files to make this work, and in some this cases never worked at all


It really is a slick system, and very deserving of the accolades it's starting to receive. To me, it's the distribution to judge others by (With the obvious exception of Gentoo, and other source-based distros).

If they can continue the momentum and build their software catalog (meaning compiled, optimized packages for Yoper), I can see Yoper easily winning the Desktop Linux race.

Oh, and for the record, if you've heard of any problems with their support, or OSS issues, it appears that this is very much a thing of the past. I was there for the beta testing, and I was one of the those who didn't like what happened after the release of v 1.0, and I can safely say that it appears that Yopers seen the light, and has remedied any problems they may have had. The Yoper community is also very good.

Check it out! You know you've installed dozens of Linux distributions already... What's one more going to hurt? It could change your usage of Linux.

It's from New Zealand (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10240993)

It must be ph33red.
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