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240 comments

I made a move... (1)

Bad Move (774329) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249860)

A bad move.

first post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249861)

OR DOES ANYONE care?

Ad Dot (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249866)

Spam for nerds. Stuff that's commercial.

Re:Ad Dot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249906)

haha - the only thing missing was a link to ThinkGeek(TM)

Re:Ad Dot (3, Funny)

funkdid (780888) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250121)

I was just thinking that I like slashdot and it's ok if they put a well placed ad here or there if it keeps up the high quality of this site. Maybe they'll be able to make it even better. Maybe they'll start to patent some of the features of slashdot, and trademark some of the slashdot esque things about it. Maybe they'll pick up some closed source companies that make a nice product and then open source them. Maybe they'll become a portal for all types of news, not just "news for nerds". Then perhaps they'll start to consider spinning Slashdot off of OSDN, take it public. Then they'll sell stock in some odd dutch auction, and offer 1 Terabyte of storage in the new "slashmail" beta free e-mail service.....

Seriously all companies (and governments) turn out the same eventually. Just like with google, we'll be sitting around one day commenting "Remember when slashdot was that indie little "news for nerds" site?

Re:Ad Dot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250250)

"Just like with google, we'll be sitting around one day commenting "Remember when slashdot was that indie little "news for nerds" site?"

Huh? Slashdot will always be "indie" since all the serious people will be reading and posting elsewhere. Geekdom will never even come close to overtaking the business tech media. Slashdot will always be a geek-wankery site since that's all it's driving force lets it be.

1st post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249867)

1st post 1st post

what about when you go under a bridge? (3, Interesting)

LazyPhoenix (773952) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249870)

makes me think of riding around in the AM radio days and going silent when going under an overpass.

Re:what about when you go under a bridge? (3, Interesting)

lukewarmfusion (726141) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250008)

...for those of us lucky enough to live close to Chicago (I'm just over 100 miles away), we can continue to experience the wonderful long-range AM radio while we listen to Pat Hughes and Ron Santo cover the Cubs game on radio 720.

It comes in great on my car, but hardly at all on any of my other radios. Of course, there are a few spots I avoid because they kill the reception. I'll even drive five miles out of the way just to avoid that patch.

Re:what about when you go under a bridge? (1)

Apollo Jones (673555) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250034)

Wow AM radio? You must be old, we are already on XM radio! Ya ya, I know. But interesting point. If AM or FM can be impacted by everyday electronics (smart tag transmissions) or concrete structures, I would guess that these modems are also subject to all types of interference. I would be curious to see what the optimal conditions are for use...

Re:what about when you go under a bridge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250071)

they did that, already.

Optimal: Line of "site" (sight)

Re:what about when you go under a bridge? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250123)

You do realize that XM Radio is also affected by some bridges, tall buildings etc ?

Re:what about when you go under a bridge? (1)

BrookHarty (9119) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250208)

makes me think of riding around in the AM radio days and going silent when going under an overpass.

Reminds me of a customer we had to support, his radio wouldn't work on his vending machine. We knew we had coverage in his area, and we drove to the building, perfect. Finally the guy walks down the basement to show us the vending machine......

YA, we couldnt stop laughing either.

These are more for stationary devices like, hvac, meters, pumps, vending machines, cash/pos machines, etc. Its amazing how many things have remote readers now. Who wants to walk all over just to read numbers off an analog device? Exactly...

Maxstream wrote in.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249872)

So now you're admitting that you're plugging peoples products? How much money did they Paypal into daddypants@slashdot.org for the placement?

Denial of service attack! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249873)

+++ATH0 on a cloudy day. With a repeater.

Karma whore (-1, Redundant)

Reducer2001 (197985) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249877)



MaxStream, Inc. introduces the 9XTend OEM RF Module that provides unprecedented performance in a low cost radio modem. The 9XTend is MaxStream's longest range (up to 40 miles in RF line-of-sight), low power OEM RF module. This affordable RF module is smaller than a credit card and allows for robust performance in North America, Australia and Israel.

The 9XTend outputs 1-Watt (30 dBm) of conducted output power while consuming only 780 milliamps at 5-V. This makes the 9XTend one of the most efficient 1-Watt 900 MHz modems in the industry. The 9XTend can output 4 Watts radiated power allowed by the FCC. The RF module also provides security through data encryption. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available. This makes the 9XTend ideal for secure applications including automated teller machines, point-of-sale terminals, and keyless/remote access systems. No time penalty is incurred during AES encryption or decryption.

MaxStream also offers its Interference Immunity Technology introduced in its 9XStream modems. The hardware/software solution creates wireless systems that are immune to RF interferers such as cell phones, pages, and other wireless systems.

The transceivers provide -110 dBm receiver sensitivity enabling users to receive 900 MHz transmissions up to one-half mile in urban environments, as well as 15 miles line-of-sight, and 40 miles with high-gain antennas. Data throughput of the module is 230 kbps and has a high sustainable data streaming rate 115.2 kbps.

The company offers a 9XTend Development Kit that lets users communicate wirelessly in a matter of minutes. For many modes of operation, including networking nodes, no configuration is necessary. Advanced networking features allow for easy configuration of transparent peer-to-peer, point-to-point, point-to-multipoint and multi-drop network topologies.

Range specs summary
* Up to 40 mile range (RF line-of-sight, @9600 RF data rate)
* Up to 3000 feet range (Indoor/Urban environments, @9600 RF data rate)
* 1 Watt Power Output (1 mW -- 1 W, software selectable)
* -110 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 9600 baud)
* -103 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 115200 baud)

Advanced Networking and Security
* True Peer-to-Peer (no "master" required), Point-to-Point and Point-to-Multipoint
* Retries and Acknowledgements
* 10 hopping channels each with over 65,000 network addresses available
* AES Encryption (Highest Encryption Standard Available)

Ease of Use
* Standard AT commands and fast binary commands for changing parameters
* Native RS485/422 (multi-drop bus) protocol support * Multiple low power modes including shutdown pin, cyclic sleep and serial port sleep for current consumption as low as 1 A
* Host interface baud rates from 1200 to 230400 bps
* Signal strength register for link quality monitoring and debugging
* MaxStream XII Interference Immunity
* FHSS (Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum)
* 2.8 to 5.5 V power supply

9XTend Modules are available with a standard MMCX or RPSMA connectors (required by the FCC for customers using SMA-type connectors).

9XTend RF module data sheet

MaxStream, Inc., 355 South 520 West Suite 180, Lindon, Utah 84042. Tel: 801-765-9885

www.maxstream.net

Re:Karma whore (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249917)

Yes, you certainly are.

Here we go (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249880)

It's the size of a credit card, one watt, and can transmit 40 miles line of site

Its not the size of credit card, doesn't transmit power and is spelled in a dictionary

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=sight [reference.com]

first post (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249883)

First post ever from a radio modem

Why do we even need the Internet? (4, Funny)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249884)

If everyone bought one of these and ran them in peer-to-peer mode, we could all dump our ISPs!

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249914)

Go ahead, you all can share the peak bandwidth of 230Kbps. What does that work out to, like .001 bits per second over the population of the US?

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (5, Funny)

Anita Coney (648748) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249932)

Damn, I knew I should have actually read the article!!!

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249976)

It's OK, I was just teasing. Although that data rate would suck big time. We could transmit using smoke signals faster than that!

Filesharing the Monty Python way: The smoke signal version of "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes", or even better, "Julius Caesar" on an Aldis lamp...

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249923)

Bandwidth.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (2, Insightful)

drewbradford (458480) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249925)

I'd rather keep mine. The article says that the max speed is 230kbps, and the max sustainable is 115.2 kbps. It won't be too long that you can get that with a cellular modem.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

Veridium (752431) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249961)

Yeah and the far range is at 9600. If you live in the relative boons like me, you're better off with cable.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

CodeMonkey4Hire (773870) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249991)

Of course you won't have to pay cell minutes for this modem. Two of these modems could talk for free (just like wireless modems). Of course, if you wanted to get on the internet you would still have to pay your provider the standard fee.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

BrookHarty (9119) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250175)

I'd rather keep mine. The article says that the max speed is 230kbps, and the max sustainable is 115.2 kbps. It won't be too long that you can get that with a cellular modem.

I'm getting 2meg on my UMTS ATTWS Nokia phone. :)

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

Veridium (752431) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249930)

I don't know, 9600 baud? I remember those days, I don't want to go back.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

whittrash (693570) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250182)

I don't know, 9600 baud? I remember those days, I don't want to go back.

We could end up starting WWIII. I saw war games, I know what a WOPR can do. These modems can cause global thermonuclear war.

On the flip side you could go on vacation without your boss calling you on your cell phone to ask stupid questions.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (1)

3terrabyte (693824) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250271)

It only sucked because we were trying to download 50k jpegs of porn. They were just fine for most other things of the time.

yeah but who would host slashdot? (0, Offtopic)

leav (797254) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249950)


the radiation emitted by hosting slashdot (because of all the traffic, obviousley) would give you some form of cancer (most likely prostate if you have a laptop)....


any volunteers?

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (4, Insightful)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249984)

If you could live with a shared media with a peak throughput of 115 kbits, sure.

I do not want to rain on anyones parade, but ISM band FHSS FSK modems are kinda cool-for-1997 ...

That being said, if maxstream had a reasonable price for onesey twoseys, (Their web site [maxstream.net] has a promotion for what appears to be this series at USD 90 for qty ten) there could be some cool hack value for moderately low speed stuff in portable projects.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250126)

Their web site has a promotion for what appears to be this series at USD 90 for qty ten

That is 90 dollars EACH, if bought in a quantity of 10, so make that $900 clams.

Re:Why do we even need the Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250145)

Imagine a beowolf cluster of wireless modems!

Re: One-Watt Wireless Radio Modem Reaches 40 Miles (5, Funny)

Scoria (264473) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249898)

Additionally, rumor has it that this device will burn a hole in your pocket. (Thank you, I'm here all week.)

In case of slashdotting (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249900)

RF module requires no configuration, offers 40-mile line-of-sight range
By Paul O'Shea, eeProductCenter
Aug 24 2004 (12:00 PM)
URL: http://www.eeproductcenter.com/showArticle.jhtml?a rticleID=30000302

MaxStream, Inc. introduces the 9XTend OEM RF Module that provides unprecedented performance in a low cost radio modem. The 9XTend is MaxStream's longest range (up to 40 miles in RF line-of-sight), low power OEM RF module. This affordable RF module is smaller than a credit card and allows for robust performance in North America, Australia and Israel.

The 9XTend outputs 1-Watt (30 dBm) of conducted output power while consuming only 780 milliamps at 5-V. This makes the 9XTend one of the most efficient 1-Watt 900 MHz modems in the industry. The 9XTend can output 4 Watts radiated power allowed by the FCC. The RF module also provides security through data encryption. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available. This makes the 9XTend ideal for secure applications including automated teller machines, point-of-sale terminals, and keyless/remote access systems. No time penalty is incurred during AES encryption or decryption.

MaxStream also offers its Interference Immunity Technology introduced in its 9XStream modems. The hardware/software solution creates wireless systems that are immune to RF interferers such as cell phones, pages, and other wireless systems.

The transceivers provide -110 dBm receiver sensitivity enabling users to receive 900 MHz transmissions up to one-half mile in urban environments, as well as 15 miles line-of-sight, and 40 miles with high-gain antennas. Data throughput of the module is 230 kbps and has a high sustainable data streaming rate 115.2 kbps.

The company offers a 9XTend Development Kit that lets transvestites communicate wirelessly in a matter of minutes. For many modes of operation, including networking nodes, no configuration is necessary. Advanced networking features allow for easy configuration of transparent peer-to-peer, point-to-point, point-to-multipoint and multi-drop network topologies.

Range specs summary
* Up to 40 mile range (RF line-of-sight, @9600 RF data rate)
* Up to 3000 feet range (Indoor/Urban environments, @9600 RF data rate)
* 1 Watt Power Output (1 mW -- 1 W, software selectable)
* -110 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 9600 baud)
* -103 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 115200 baud)

Advanced Networking and Security
* True Peer-to-Peer (no "master" required), Point-to-Point and Point-to-Multipoint
* Retries and Acknowledgements
* 10 hopping channels each with over 65,000 network addresses available
* AES Encryption (Highest Encryption Standard Available)

Ease of Use
* Standard AT commands and fast binary commands for changing parameters
* Native RS485/422 (multi-drop bus) protocol support * Multiple low power modes including shutdown pin, cyclic sleep and serial port sleep for current consumption as low as 1 A
* Host interface baud rates from 1200 to 230400 bps
* Signal strength register for link quality monitoring and debugging
* MaxStream XII Interference Immunity
* FHSS (Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum)
* 2.8 to 5.5 V power supply

9XTend Modules are available with a standard MMCX or RPSMA connectors (required by the FCC for customers using SMA-type connectors).

9XTend RF module data sheet

MaxStream, Inc., 355 South 520 West Suite 180, Lindon, Utah 84042. Tel: 801-765-9885

www.maxstream.net

Okay, I'll do it (5, Funny)

koreth (409849) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249901)

Someone's going to, so it may as well be me...

"Site" - a location.

"Sight" - something visual.

"Line of sight" - a line along which you can see (i.e., an unobstructed line.)

"Line of site" - evidence that what you've written matters so little to you that it's not worth the effort to proofread. You don't care; why should we?

Re:Okay, I'll do it (2, Funny)

joranbelar (567325) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249920)

Don't look now, the Slashdot editors actually EDITED something! And they got it right!

Quick follow-up (5, Funny)

joranbelar (567325) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249948)

Apparently, the editors are hedging their bets on this one: I keep hitting reload, and the submission text alternates between "line of sight" to "line of site".

Re:Okay, I'll do it (1)

Mod Me God Too (687245) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249937)

Nice.

Re:Okay, I'll do it (1)

KingFatty (770719) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249945)

Yeah I mean, damn, they could have just copied-and-pasted to get the line of sight correct.

If you don't put forth the effort to proofread your own paraphrasing, why not be a complete lazy-ass and copy/paste? At least that way you can blame any errors on the original.

Calling Long Distance (5, Funny)

grunt107 (739510) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249905)

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available.

The real question is, did they use Lexar programming techniques?

Re:Calling Long Distance (0)

Captain BooBoo (614996) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249953)

I wonder if you can disable the security? If its enabled will your "line of site" distance be less than if its enabled? Like when you set up 128 bit wep on your home wireless and you get slower speeds than advertised.

Re:Calling Long Distance (1)

caino59 (313096) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250199)

why would the distance the device is capable of change by disabling security?

yes, your wireless get slower when you enable WEP....but it doesn't decrease the distance that the devices function at.

how did you get insightful for that comment?

encryption takes up bandwidth, shared with your data.

nothing to do with distance.

Re:Calling Long Distance (1)

SagSaw (219314) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250262)

There is no reason why encrypting the data would decrease the range of the device. To the radio link, bits are bits. The details of the encryption method may require additional computation or may require sending additional bits, both of which would reduce the apparent speed of the connection.

Re:Calling Long Distance (1)

poot_rootbeer (188613) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250111)

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available.

A 257-bit key would have been even stronger.

20/40miles vision (1)

uodeltasig (759920) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249909)

...40 miles line of sight... I wonder what poor longsighted kid they found to confirm this.

Wireless... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249910)

My Grandma loves all this talk of 'Wireless' again..

Did anyone else read this... (5, Funny)

Ignignot (782335) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249911)

Using the AT command to set a fire 40 miles off? Or has it just been too long a day at work? My office has been regularly swept for mines.

Re:Did anyone else read this... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249959)

My office has been regularly swept for mines.

Translated: all we do at the office is play minesweeper

What kind of antenna?? (5, Interesting)

ARRRLovin (807926) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249912)

What kind of antenna did they use? "High gain" isn't all that descriptive.

Re:What kind of antenna?? (5, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249968)

What kind of antenna did they use? "High gain" isn't all that descriptive.

A thin, copper one, 40-miles long. :-)

Re:What kind of antenna?? (2, Funny)

ARRRLovin (807926) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249993)

Nice.......UUUULF. :-)

Re:What kind of antenna?? (4, Informative)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250096)

Do the math ...

Po = +30 dBm
path loss over 64km at 915 MHz: -130
Pr = -100 dBm ... let's see ... at 9600 bps it requires -103 so that gives you 3 dB of fade margin even with isotropic radiators.

Put a +6dBi yagi (I think that is the maximum allowed on ISM under Part 47 anyway) at each end and you've got 15dB of fade margin, which should give you a couple of orders of magnitude of BER performance (the datasheet was notably lacking a BER / EbNo chart ).

do not mod up!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250249)

anyone with a high-school diploma knows this is just gibberish. give your karma to someone who deserves it!

Credit Card Sized? (4, Funny)

icekillis (777986) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249915)

Do you mean PCMCIA-sized?

Re:Credit Card Sized? (1)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250033)

I think you were trying to make a joke (although I'm not sure exactly what .. that so few slashdot readers know what a credit card is, but do know what formfactor PCMCIA is?)

I think the reason they avoid using that acronym is to avoid confusing their potential customers -- saying something is PCMCIA-sized might lead people to leap to the assumption that it has meets PCMCIA interface specifications.

Yeah but... (1)

flinxmeister (601654) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249916)

Where's the coupler?

Speed (4, Interesting)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249919)

The speeds indicated look too slow to be useful except for remote low overhead / slow data acquisition stuff.

9600 baud is pretty darn slow, even with compresion.

Re:Speed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250004)

Well it does say...

Range specs summary
* Up to 40 mile range (RF line-of-sight, @9600 RF data rate)
* Up to 3000 feet range (Indoor/Urban environments, @9600 RF data rate)
* 1 Watt Power Output (1 mW -- 1 W, software selectable)
* -110 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 9600 baud)
* -103 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 115200 baud)

So it's not too terribly bad... I can live. I'm a 56k junkie.

Re:Speed (2, Insightful)

wg0350 (753504) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250115)

This is ideal for certain applications. Environmental monitoring and remote metering are two technologies where dial-up modems are still used at speeds similar to this. These are prime candidates for upgrading to wireless. Despite their lack of publicity there are still thousands of low data rate products in use today. You could have 10s - 100s of these devices reporting to one local substation with a broadband connection to a main monitoring station somewhere else in the world.

Not everything has bandwidth requirements comparable to todays average internet connection.

It seems like the selling point of this product is its power consumption. Remote monitoring stations will have very limited power sources. Low power / Long range and high reliability are often more of a concern than high data rate.

Re:Speed: defense of 9600 baud (4, Insightful)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250118)

Although 9600 could never handle today's internet and web activities, it is amazingly fast for TTY and CLI type applications. Having started with 110 baud mechanical TTY and 300 baud acoustical coupler modem on a green screen, I well remember my first experience with a 9600 baud hardwired Lear Siegler terminals [old-computers.com] -- WOW very fast.

9600 baud is good enough for modem-to-modem chat, e-mail via pine, text processing with vi or emacs, or almost any *nix command. Thinking about this reminds me of how terribly bloated everything has become with verbose formatting and styling of pages. Pictures may be worth a 1000 words, but they require 10 to 100 times the bandwidth of those words.

Re:Speed: defense of 9600 baud (1)

caino59 (313096) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250267)

but...but...i cant do anything without a GUI!!!

heh

Re:Speed (1)

BrookHarty (9119) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250130)

9600 baud is pretty darn slow, even with compresion.

Not for straight stats, pumps, hvac, meters are very low bandwidth, you could get by with 2400 without compression. Now if its XML based with pretty pictures or microsoft powerpoint, yes, 9600 is slow.

Re:Speed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250243)

heck, even an MSOffice2k word document with a bold underlined arial font "hello", 56k is slow (file size: 19456 bytes)

Friends of SCO (2, Funny)

MikeMacK (788889) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249922)

MaxStream, Inc., 355 South 520 West Suite 180, Lindon, Utah 84042

Lindon, Utah is sure a happening place.

MaxStream RF modem (2, Interesting)

mknewman (557587) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249936)

Anyone notice the 9600 baud bit rate? Marc

Testimonial (2, Informative)

TheVampire (686474) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249952)

Our company uses the MaxStream RS485 modems, and I can attest that they do work very well.

Not very impressive (5, Informative)

jandrese (485) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249957)

Wow, that's some marketing. The "40 miles" claim is when you're in deep space and using high gain antennas. Actual performance will be less than a mile. Also, in case people want to compare this with 802.11 (which is difficult because they are in different bands), a typical 802.11b card radiates 30mW, instead of the 1W these guys are apparently claiming. The data rate is nothing exceptional either, 115.2kbps (and these are 1000 bits/kb sized), which pales in comparison to 802.11g at ~55000kbps. This technology would have a much higher "wow" factor 5 years ago, but nowadays that kind of range for that kind of throughput just isn't all that new or special.

Re:Not very impressive (3, Interesting)

javaxman (705658) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250239)

From TFM :
* Up to 3000 feet range (Indoor/Urban environments, @9600 RF data rate)

We're talking about this thing for what reason?

CmdrTaco, please, drink some Jolt and wake up. That's twice in one day you've made me want to smack you around for wasting my time. 9600 baud? Really, why would we want to use this?

To compare this to 802.11b, they have what looks like a version [maxstream.net] that operates in the 2.4GHz band, guess what? 1500ft range, at 9600 baud.

While I'll admit this thing might have some very specific uses, like remote data collection where you don't have a lot of data, but you want it delivered at regular intervals over a distance where it'd be hard to put in relays or run a real link... but the damn thing costs more than $400 [google.com] , so if you *can* use 802.11g instead, you'll probably want to!

How much does this cost? (1)

McFly777 (23881) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249965)

Perhaps I missed it but did anyone else find a price (even in oem qtys) for this device?

Re:How much does this cost? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250029)

$409 USD for their devlopment kit. On their site.

Re:How much does this cost? (1)

sharkman67 (548107) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250256)

OEM less than $39 for 1000 units. Development kits for $199

wow, I learn something new everyday (2, Interesting)

Chuck Bucket (142633) | more than 9 years ago | (#10249979)

I'd never heard of this, but after some reading: Wireless over modems [hp.com] it's out there, and well supported. I can see it being a less touchy solution in that it's old school analog, but 40 miles? THat's hard to believe.

CBSD

Re:wow, I learn something new everyday (2, Informative)

BrookHarty (9119) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250149)

I can see it being a less touchy solution in that it's old school analog, but 40 miles? THat's hard to believe.

Thats where the external directional antennas come in. Works for bluetooth and wifi.

9k6 (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10249992)

And the awesome radical speed of... 9600 bauds.
You might want to share some movies with your friend... 40miles away... you'll have your 700MB downloaded in just about... 580000 secs. (not bad.. 7 days)

Re:9k6 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250105)

"(not bad.. 7 days)"

Handy. My Gentoo machine will have xine compiled by then...

RF distance can be surprising (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250006)

For what it's worth, I once used a 5 watt HF radio to contact the Canary Islands from Atlanta, GA. The signal was not strong, but we had no trouble carrying on a brief conversation. RF is pretty amazing stuff when the conditions are right.

9600 baud 'em (4, Funny)

phyruxus (72649) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250012)

Mordac: I am Mordac, preventer of information services! I deny your request for specifications! In retribution for disturbing me, I sentence you to one month without email!

Dilbert: okay.

Mordac: What?! No engineer gives up email so easily. Assume the position!

Dilbert (at home, to Dogbert): So, he found the modem strapped to my ankle, but he missed my wireless pen modem.

Nothing amazing here (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250020)

Amateur radio operators have been doing this for years. The higher the antenna, the better. Put up a tower, say 50-60ft, put the antenna on top using good feedline and fittings, and you will get out to good distances. Better yet, take your laptop up to a mountain location, and you will be able to tx and rx for easily many times that distance. Hams do this routinely.

PT Barnum says... (1)

Captain BooBoo (614996) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250038)

Is this like a prehistoric form of Bluetooth? Well he did say there is a sucker born every minute.

What's it do? (1)

nxtr (813179) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250045)

Am I the only one here to not know what this does? What exactly does it do? The website makes so many great claims about it, but I have no idea what it's for. Sorry for my ignorance!

Wow! (3, Funny)

Guano_Jim (157555) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250055)

I'm using one of these right now and it's gr345l;@!@*!bbg

NO CARRIER

In the army (in Finland) (4, Interesting)

Aggrajag (716041) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250056)

Our radiolinks (which are like wi-fi) were sending line-of-sight transmissions, 9600 baud, with about 3 milliwatts. I cannot remember the frequencies we used but they were in the microwave range so I'm not sure it's comparable with the radiomodems mentioned in the article using 900 MHz band. Cool stuff anyway!

no time penalty (4, Interesting)

airConditionedGypsy (703864) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250061)

From the article:

No time penalty is incurred during AES encryption or decryption.

That's pretty interesting. Perhaps they meant to say that there is no additional processing overhead beyond that which is introduced by performing the full number of rounds for a 256 bit key in hardware.

It seems you still need a shared secret. I assume it isn't doing any authenticated Diffie-Hellman to establish a session key.

Sorry, it's just kind of irritating when you hear things like "security through encryption." Great. You get integrity protection and data confidentialy while the data is in trasit. There are many other opportunities for an attacker to get your data besides when it's flying around in mid-air.

it's 900MHz (3, Informative)

Koyaanisqatsi (581196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250075)

40 miles alone is not impressive, HAMs talk all over the world on less than a watt (QRP) routinely, on HF bands off-course

But than I read this modem works on 900MHz, so that's quite a feat, worthy of a "Pringles can award"

To those who didn't read carefully. (1)

samberdoo (812366) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250077)

* Host interface baud rates from 1200 to 230400 bps. OK no barn burner. For what it does it is impressive enough.

/.ed (3, Funny)

TarlCabbot (778401) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250087)

Looks like their web server went under a bridge.

the article (1)

master0ne (655374) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250226)

RF module requires no configuration, offers 40-mile line-of-sight range Paul O'Shea eeProductCenter (08/24/2004 12:00 PM ET) Email This Print This MaxStream, Inc. introduces the 9XTend OEM RF Module that provides unprecedented performance in a low cost radio modem. The 9XTend is MaxStream's longest range (up to 40 miles in RF line-of-sight), low power OEM RF module. This affordable RF module is smaller than a credit card and allows for robust performance in North America, Australia and Israel. The 9XTend outputs 1-Watt (30 dBm) of conducted output power while consuming only 780 milliamps at 5-V. This makes the 9XTend one of the most efficient 1-Watt 900 MHz modems in the industry. The 9XTend can output 4 Watts radiated power allowed by the FCC. The RF module also provides security through data encryption. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available. This makes the 9XTend ideal for secure applications including automated teller machines, point-of-sale terminals, and keyless/remote access systems. No time penalty is incurred during AES encryption or decryption. MaxStream also offers its Interference Immunity Technology introduced in its 9XStream modems. The hardware/software solution creates wireless systems that are immune to RF interferers such as cell phones, pages, and other wireless systems. The transceivers provide -110 dBm receiver sensitivity enabling users to receive 900 MHz transmissions up to one-half mile in urban environments, as well as 15 miles line-of-sight, and 40 miles with high-gain antennas. Data throughput of the module is 230 kbps and has a high sustainable data streaming rate 115.2 kbps. The company offers a 9XTend Development Kit that lets users communicate wirelessly in a matter of minutes. For many modes of operation, including networking nodes, no configuration is necessary. Advanced networking features allow for easy configuration of transparent peer-to-peer, point-to-point, point-to-multipoint and multi-drop network topologies. Range specs summary * Up to 40 mile range (RF line-of-sight, @9600 RF data rate) * Up to 3000 feet range (Indoor/Urban environments, @9600 RF data rate) * 1 Watt Power Output (1 mW -- 1 W, software selectable) * -110 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 9600 baud) * -103 dBm Receiver Sensitivity (@ 115200 baud) Advanced Networking and Security * True Peer-to-Peer (no "master" required), Point-to-Point and Point-to-Multipoint * Retries and Acknowledgements * 10 hopping channels each with over 65,000 network addresses available * AES Encryption (Highest Encryption Standard Available) Ease of Use * Standard AT commands and fast binary commands for changing parameters * Native RS485/422 (multi-drop bus) protocol support * Multiple low power modes including shutdown pin, cyclic sleep and serial port sleep for current consumption as low as 1 A * Host interface baud rates from 1200 to 230400 bps * Signal strength register for link quality monitoring and debugging * MaxStream XII Interference Immunity * FHSS (Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum) * 2.8 to 5.5 V power supply 9XTend Modules are available with a standard MMCX or RPSMA connectors (required by the FCC for customers using SMA-type connectors). 9XTend RF module data sheet MaxStream, Inc., 355 South 520 West Suite 180, Lindon, Utah 84042. Tel: 801-765-9885

How can you tell if someone is a complete geek? (4, Funny)

Omega1045 (584264) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250125)

Q: How can you tell if someone is a complete geek?

A: If they say, "Something about using the AT command set to fire off a command 40 miles through the air amuses me."

At least an interesting use of... (1)

-ing AnonymousCoward (810651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250128)

...all those big ears: http://perso.club-internet.fr/bastien.lopes/photos .htm [club-internet.fr]

On one hand, you have a small and efficient 1 watt wireless radio modem. It just works. Now, you wanna listen to the signal. You look around and find that the SETI antennaes are still in use, so you fell deseperate because you cannot borrow them right now...

But all those nice countries (http://www.hermetic.ch/crypto/echelon/echelon.htm [hermetic.ch] ) made you a gift: huge HUGE HUGE antennaes that can even receive the signal of your 1 watt modem 40 miles away!!! I just hope they will provide me a truck to help me borrowing them to my home...
Thank you, America!

THEY ARE SUPER SLOW Aprox 14.4 Modem. (1)

liquidzero4 (566264) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250139)

These modems have been around for years. Motorola makes one called the PRM240 that's the similar but does almost 2 watts. Although on the specs they use baud rates like 19200 & 115200 these are not throughput rates. These are serial link rates which have nothing to do with sending data over the air.

The data rate in real life is less then that of a 14.4 half-duplex modem.

115k (1)

ctime (755868) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250142)

This product is already old and busted. It's maximum sustained throughput is 115k.

http://www.wifi-shootout.com/
This is the new hotness, 55 MILES. I imagine it's running at atleast 1mbit.

problems (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250163)

Let's see, hmmm

1 Watt ... 40 miles
2 Watts ... 80 miles
3 Watts ... 120 miles
4 Watts ... damn you mountains!

umm, line of site at 40 miles? (2, Interesting)

the_2nd_coming (444906) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250212)

is the world flat?

40 miles?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250227)

I have a 40 watt fm transmitter sitting right next to me and I can barely get it to go five miles, with an eight foot antenna at 60ft height. There is no way you could consistently get 40 miles on a one watt radio device.

1000 Miles per watt award (5, Interesting)

leighklotz (192300) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250230)

In ham radio, there's a 1000 miles per watt [qrparci.org] award that's not particularly hard to get....I made 1842 miles per watt [wa5znu.org] (Palo Alto, California to Sakhalin Island in Russia) using a data modulation called PSK-31 [wa5znu.org] and a wire antenna on my roof, and just over 1000 miles per watt [wa5znu.org] from San Luis Obispo, CA to Estonia using CW [netwalk.com] : 5700 miles with 4.5 watts to a 28 foot wire thrown from a second-story window into a small tree, running on a pack of AA batteries.

AES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10250232)

"The RF module also provides security through data encryption. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is used with a 256-bit key, the highest encryption standard available."

Lets just hope they don't XOR the password! http://slashdot.org/articles/04/09/14/1855232.shtm l [slashdot.org] :-)

Distant Horizon. (1, Interesting)

DunbarTheInept (764) | more than 9 years ago | (#10250266)

On earth, the horizon is about 5 miles away if you are in a totally flat plain or ocean, and you're eyes are 6 feet up off the ground. Stand on top of a 100 foot tower and the horizon becomes 36 miles away. So, what planet is this 40-mile line of sight transmission designed for?
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