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866 comments

Emergency Calls? (5, Interesting)

SultanCemil (722533) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501390)

How do they allow emergency calls through? Aren't most cell jammers simply frequency based white noise generators?

Re:Emergency Calls? (5, Insightful)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501399)

I think thats the icing on the cake.

Being able to say "Yer sure" and not mean it all in the same breath.

Those wanting to block calls sort of get their way, and those who don't want it blocking get to smile as well.

I think this is the best all round decision.

Re:Emergency Calls? (2, Insightful)

Magickcat (768797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501402)

I quote from the article- "Devedjian specified however that emergency calls and calls made outside theaters and other performance spaces must not be affected."

Re:Emergency Calls? (-1, Redundant)

LewsTherinKinslayer (817418) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501413)

I quote from the article- "Devedjian specified however that emergency calls and calls made outside theaters and other performance spaces must not be affected."

Good quote. Too bad it doesn't answer the question. Fine, good, we want emergency calls to be unaffected. How exactly do they plan on jamming one type of call and not another?

Re:Emergency Calls? (2, Informative)

mirko (198274) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501443)

It does in some ways : we can suspect that the concept is accepted but still requires realisation.
I guess it'll imply some switches set in send only mode along with possible dial limitations (in France, emergency numbers begin with 1, the others begin with 0).

Re:Emergency Calls? (0)

millwall (622730) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501455)

How exactly do they plan on jamming one type of call and not another?

As the article says you won't be allowed to interfere with emergency calls outside theaters, and not inside the theater, it makes me think that maybe what it means is that all calls can be blocked inside the theater, but the blocking won't not allowed to be so strong that it will block emergency calls outside the theater.

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

Magickcat (768797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501548)

I repeated the quote because the Industry Minister stipulated that "calls made outside ...must not be affected. He actually didn't mention inside emergency calls.

- So I'd imagine that the blocking device would be given a limited range and not extend
outside of the actual building's perimeter.

As to inside, I'd imagine that if they were bothered to do so, they differentiate the numbers dialled.

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501426)

Maybe some kind of transmitter/receiver local to that area which over-rides every other transmission?

I'm sure something like that could be designed.

Re:Emergency Calls? (3, Interesting)

imr (106517) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501545)

Devedjian is one of the 3 persons that voted yes to software patents in behalf of France and contrary to every promises Chirac made at the last europeen software patent meeting.
Let him be not forgotten.

Re:Emergency Calls? (2, Insightful)

jrockway (229604) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501403)

Exactly what I was thinking. Where are the technical specs for this system? Oh, there aren't any because it's impossible unless there's some support for it in the phone.

What we "need", is a phone that will switch into vibrate mode when it detects a signal. Easy.

I am actually one who is not bothered by phones ringing. It's like coughing or sneezing. Yeah it's disruptive, but it doesn't really distract me from anything. Cell phone goes off in class. Okay, three seconds later it's off and we can continue. Big deal. Sometimes, people need to communicate with each other (and still be in class). It's part of the über-high-tech-life. (or something :)

Re:Emergency Calls? (5, Informative)

leonmergen (807379) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501461)

No it's not. It's irritating when the same (kind of) people always leave their mobiles running, the hip, young, gadget people having their latest top40 tune as their ring tone... now really, when some kind of polyphonic f*cked up version of Usher or whatever starts blasting at way-too-loud volume through a room, or even a cinema, i'm irritated. I turn my mobile off so I won't disturb anyone, I expect the same from others.

Is it really necessary to be reachable while you're at the cinema ? No. And if it is necessary, you shouldn't be at the cinema.

Re:Emergency Calls? (4, Insightful)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501529)

That is what I like about this new law. It doesn't force anyone to do anything. It does allow movie theaters to implement something, and the public will decide if they prefer going to a theater that allow cells or not.

And while it might or might not irritate you in a movie theater, think about a real theater, a classical concert or any other public performance where live artists are playing.

In any way, this will have a very democratic implementation: If people rush into these "early adopters" theaters that jam cells, more and more will adopt the system, and the mass will be pleased.

Re:Emergency Calls? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501516)

What bugs _me_ is the (&/&"%/%! backlights and )(#/)(/)(! lit keypads.

Re:Emergency Calls? (2, Interesting)

rishistar (662278) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501530)

A mobile going off is not like coughing or sneezing - its more like someone getting up and humming a TV theme song.

And when it goes off in class it usually takes 20 seconds to be turned off as the person hunts around in their bag to find the stupid thing in the first place.

When I was lecturing I had a simple if your phone goes off it gets confiscated until the end of the lecture policy - after week one of that noone left it on.

Re:Emergency Calls? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501547)

Okay, cell phone rings, you are not concerned. If that was all, it wouldn't bother me either. But what about the part where the receiver of the call goes on to yak in a loud or very loud voice for the next five to fifteen minutes? I mean, it would be fine if they managed to use a normal speaking voice, and thankfully many people seem to be learning to do that, but there are always the loud idiots...

Re:Emergency Calls? (4, Interesting)

mmonkey (709004) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501407)

I'm just guessing here, but maybe they could have an on-site picocell or something which the phones will associate with, and then control which calls the cell lets through? Just a thought.

Re:Emergency Calls? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501465)

picocell? so 10^(-15)th of a cell? If you don't mean that, you're an idiot.

Re:Emergency Calls? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501544)

That's what they're called. Get over it.

Re:Emergency Calls? (1, Interesting)

mind21_98 (18647) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501418)

I guess one way you can do it is by setting up a repeater inside the theater, and setting it up to only allow emergency calls. The phones should use the repeater instead of any outside signal because it's stronger. Problem solved.

However, it's probably easier to just use the white noise generator, at the expense of emergency calls.

Re:Emergency Calls? (5, Funny)

weighn (578357) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501457)

i'd say they would use a white-noise generator and have a member of staff monitor slashdot for emergencies at which point they turn off the white-noise.

Re:Emergency Calls? (5, Funny)

pklong (323451) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501509)

Your on to something, but you're not quite there.

Allow the cinemas to install their own Pico Cells in the theatres and jam the outside cells. The pico cell should connect them to the cinema's own mobile operator and charge them 20$ per minute.

They'll think twice next time they get their bill, inconsideratle little twerps ;)

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

ovatto (607617) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501425)

Maybe they can somehow establish their own cell inside the theater so that they can distinguish individual calls and block those if need be..?

However it might difficult to _not_ to "leak" any connections to other cells (the ones outside the theater).

Just a thought.

Re:Emergency Calls? (5, Informative)

famebait (450028) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501439)

No, GSM jammers of this type work by impersonating the local base stations by responding before them, but not actually letting anything through.

The systems have been available for a few years,
and are apparently very good at blocking out only a well defined area. The stumbling blocks have been entirely legal/regulatory.

I don't know if the available equipment handles it already, but there is no technical reason why the jammer couldn't engage slightly more thoroughly in the transaction and forward select calls.

Re:Emergency Calls? (4, Informative)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501463)

The only thing that comes to mind is having a special node at the theatre thats essentially a repeater (but doesn't ring the phone or allow outgoing calls to be made). Calls to anyone with a phone from a certain prefix or list of numbers (given to any emergency responders) is allowed through. Think of it like a cell-phone firewall.

If that's how they're planning on doing it I don't know. But there has to be some way of distinguishing emergency calls, or emergency cell phones from normal everyday calls/phones.

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

NoMercy (105420) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501468)

Matter of public safty really, if your phone goes off in a theater I'm sure a lot of angery frenchmen would probably do worse than blocade your ports ;)

Anyway, the solution isn't to dificult, you simply install those lovely RF absorbtive mats around the preformance space isolating the area from the outside world and install a low power mobile phone mast inside which simply rejects all but emergency services.

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

JanneM (7445) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501474)

I may go out on a limb here, but I believe sites like that generally do have ordinary telephones already. Just go out into the lobby and call.

I REALLY WONDER (4, Insightful)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501498)

how everybody was able to survive 10 years ago, when NOBODY had a cell phone in the cinema or on a concert...

Re:Emergency Calls? (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501525)

Other people have said how it coulkd be done, but that's not really the point.

Even if it is currently impossible, assuming someone does find a solution, it means that it would be legal to use it.

First Post? (1)

LewsTherinKinslayer (817418) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501391)

All I can say is, damn, that's a good idea. I mean, seriously, it should be a law that you can't have a cell phone in a movie theatre.

Although, I can see a downside to this. Such as for individuals who need to be urgently reachable; and use silent means of being alerted, such as vibratration, as to not disturb others and still remain contactable.

Re:First Post? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501420)

If you absolutely need to be urgently reachable, you don't go to a movie theatre in the first place, I guess.

Re:First Post? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501441)

BZZZT! Wrong! Person A goes to movie theatre. God forbid, Person A's sister gets into an automobile accident. Does person A need to be reached urgently? Yes. Is he psychic? No. Cellphones are like everything else in this world, beneficial in moderate quantities....unless we're talking about W, in which case, the less W there is in this world, the safer place it will be (of course, since I think that Internet has no plural, I must be "Against Us".

Re:First Post? (1)

farnz (625056) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501523)

So how is this different from a world before cellphones? Before I had a mobile, if I went to the cinema, you had to wait until I got home to contact me. Are you really claiming that emergency services have lost so many skills in the last 10 years that a two hour delay in contacting the next of kin is lethal?

In any case, the vast majority of calls aren't urgent. If most calls to cellphones were the "your relative is dying, come now" type, I'd maybe be on your side; reality is different.

Re:First Post? (0, Flamebait)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501449)


That's defeatist logic and that's not necessarily true.

For one, I do not know when I would get a call - I get calls from clients all the time, and I really cannot route my personal life around it. It's almost impossible.

So the best thing is to do whatever I do, and if something comes up take it up then and there.

I would personally be quite pissed that just to watch a movie, I would be out of touch for three hours. Not a good idea.

It's far less of an inconvenience to listen to the occasional beep than lose reception altogether.

Re:First Post? (2, Insightful)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501480)

That is exactly why I am glad this law passed. You are exactly the type of person I despise having seating next to me in a theater.

You will now choose a theater where cells are not jammed, and I will choose one where cells are.

The public will decide.

Re:First Post? (3, Interesting)

Poppageorgio (461121) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501482)

If you're life is that important, rent a movie and stay home. Why should I be inconvenienced by your need to take calls? I go to movies because, for two hours, I don't have to deal with real life and become immersed in another time or place. I don't like it when somebody interrupts this for me.

How lame can you get? (5, Insightful)

pedestrian crossing (802349) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501499)

I would personally be quite pissed that just to watch a movie, I would be out of touch for three hours. Not a good idea.

And I would be quite pissed if you took a phone call while I was trying to watch the movie. Your attitude is so frigging self-important. If you cannot be out of touch for 3 hours while you watch a movie, stay at home!

I swear, you see all of these posts that claim, "I must be reachable at all times", I call bullshit. You know what I hear when someone takes a call in a movie theater? I'll give you a hint, 100% of the time it is banal blather. Grow up.

Re:First Post? (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501520)

I would personally be quite pissed that just to watch a movie, I would be out of touch for three hours. Not a good idea.

Then rent the DVD and stop annoying people at the movies if your personal life force you to annoy people at the movies.

Re:First Post? (1)

farnz (625056) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501537)

Do you not have voicemail services in your part of the world? If you're going out of contact for a few hours, let the system take messages, and respond when you leave the cinema. If all your calls are so urgent that a caller can't leave a message and wait until the end of the movie, then rent a DVD, and stay at home.

I have never worked in a situation where I genuinely have to be on call 24/7. I've been in several where people like to assume that you are, but they back down if you guaranteed to answer between (say) 8am-7pm, and possibly available at other times.

Re:First Post? (2, Insightful)

Tiram (650450) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501540)

What the other comments said, and then some. That "occasional beep" may be only a minor annoyance to you, but if it happens smack in the middle of a suspense scene or a romantic moment it's damned irritating to everyone else! If it's that important to you to be in touch all the time, rent a movie instead. Your availability isn't at all important to all the others who paid to watch a movie.

In fact, a mobile beeping is irritating no matter when it happens. And most of them don't just beep, they play beethoven's 5th or Britney Spears' latest "hit". Horrible.

How is this possible techincally? (0, Redundant)

SmilingBoy (686281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501394)

I really don't understand how it could be possible to block mobile phone reception while at the same time allowing emergency calls - either you are connected to a network or you aren't.

Can somebody explain how this should work, please?

Re:How is this possible techincally? (0, Troll)

Kiffer (206134) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501414)

you cant ...
i think its just to stop people whining ...
if you can block calls with out blocking 112 / emergency calls then you can have a jammer ... otherwise shut the hell up.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

Kiffer (206134) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501452)

sigh ... how is my last modded troll... it makes no sense.
let me rephrase said post.

you cant jam calls with out jamming emergency calls, i think its just to stop people whining about not being able to set up a jammer in there place of bussiness. If they can block calls with out blocking 112 / emergency calls then they can have a jammer ... otherwise they should shut the hell up.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

MegaT (672432) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501427)

I can't see that it does work. It's the most pointless bit of legislation ever. Better would be new standard whereby a signal can be used to tell phones to set themselves to silent mode. Or just remove the fucking ringtones entirely from all phones... I don't understand why everybody can't just use the vibrate function.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (2, Informative)

DrXym (126579) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501440)

It could mean setting up your own "emergency calls only" cell in the cinema and blocking all other frequencies. If this were the case, your phone would 'roam' to the cinema network and patrons would make emergency calls through that. It would be very expensive for the cinema to shoulder the cost and possibly have some interesting legal repercussions.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

SmilingBoy (686281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501448)

Hm, not sure. This might work in the US, but in Europe, phones will not generally roam to a cell that does not belong to your operator. Maybe if you can convince the phone that it is abroad!

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

castlec (546341) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501442)

i could see it being possible by having their own "tower" for the cinema. make the signal strength so hi that every phone chooses to listen to that tower, rather than other towers, then don't connect the tower to anything other than emergency calls. granted, it would be easily hackable, but it would be 99% effective.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501469)

A high power transmitter close to public. Bad idea. Second it's very hard to control how far it will block the cell phones. Rather use a low power version and put a lot of metal in the walls and ceilings.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

forgotten_my_nick (802929) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501445)

Here is how I Think it works.

They have their own base station within the movie room. So any phone trying to ring goes through that exchange. The exchange blocks everything except emergency calls.

After that you block any frequencies getting into the room.

That may not be how it works, but it is how I would set it up.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (2, Informative)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501446)

It is possible, although not as simple. First put a lot of metal in the walls and ceiling to block all radio signals. (cell phones are nothing more than advanced radios)
Then put a small cell phone tranceiver (a small version of those cell phone towers) inside the room and program it to only allow outgoing calls to the emergency numbers (e.g. 911).

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

famebait (450028) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501495)

You don't need the metal, you just have to fool the phone to use your cell.

You can (4, Interesting)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501447)

Contrary to other replies, you can actually do this. I imagine it's some sort of flag built into the GSM system that forces handsets not to function.

The reason I know you can do it is that there is an area in the building I used to work where signals are intentionally blocked somehow, and my phone comes up with "Emergency Calls Only" when I am in that area.

Re:You can (3, Interesting)

SmilingBoy (686281) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501467)

The reason I know you can do it is that there is an area in the building I used to work where signals are intentionally blocked somehow, and my phone comes up with "Emergency Calls Only" when I am in that area.
Doesn't it show this in some countries if you have only reception from other operators than your own? (At least that's what I remember from the time I lived in the UK.)

Re:You can (1)

csteinle (68146) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501536)

Depends on the phone. SonyEricsson GSM phones certainly do this. Nokias don't. However, as the UK operators don't actually route emergency calls for phones that are not registered to there network, it won't actually work.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

ectizen (128686) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501496)

Maybe install a low-power cell base-station thingy in the area you want to block. With it being low power, it shouldn't affect usage outside the blocked area, but it should still be able to provide a strong enough signal for most phones to prefer it over a real one that's outside the blocked area. Then simply configure the blocking cell thingy to only allow pass through outgoing emergency calls to the "real" network. And since the phone's not registered at a real cell, it won't receive incoming calls.

Re:How is this possible techincally? (1)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501526)

Welcome to Windows Mobile for Smartphones

You have just entered an area where Phone Rights Management is enabled, while you are in this area, you would be unable to:

-deactivate vibrator mode
-speak on the phone

Circumventing these control restrictions may violate the terms and conditions regarding your entry into XYZ Theatres and may be prosecuted to the fullest extent allowed by the law.

Currently you have the following prerecorded responses available:

-I'm currently in a shower
-I will get it done tomorrow first thing tomorrow.
-OMG! Is he aright? Which hospital is he in?
-Go fuck yourself .....

In soviet russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501395)

Cellphones jam you!

oh wait.. that's everywhere else in the world.

Re:In soviet russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501401)

Cellphones jam you!

Oh, i always figured it was something like "in soviet russia, you give cellphone cancer."

I wonder (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501396)

I wonder when some cracker finds hack to circumvent a jammer.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501416)

By doing what? Upping the wattage on his phone's transmitter? That'll just help finish off his batteries... With the way phone jammers work, there really isn't any other option.

Re:I wonder (1)

famebait (450028) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501517)

Actualle, the way GSM jammer work, that is not an option. You could do it by modifying the how you negotiate cell stations, but that would require new low-level firmware.

I for one really welcome this. (3, Insightful)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501406)

I have been to many theater preformances where suddenly in the middle there is some totally unsuitable melody ringing from the mobile phone of someone sitting nearby.

For me atleast it causes a loss of the "magic" that I get from a good preformance and thus it really affects the overall impression.

Like once in middle of a serious scene there were double mobilephone rings with some really annoying happy tunes at highest possible volume. If I had been armed at the moment there might have been two extra bodies...

Re:I for one really welcome this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501424)

Well how is this different from someone farting really loudly during a really tragic scene? It's happened, and I can tell you the result was a shyte-sight worse than somebody's mobile going off. They pretty much converted their tragedy into a comeby on the spot!...and it was the last time I visited the theatre after eating a burrito!

Re:I for one really welcome this. (1)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501435)

Well, the difference is that someone who is talking loudly is missbehaving, whereas most people with the mobile on have simply forgotten to switch it off. From the reactions of most of the people I have seen with the mobiles in the theaters, they seem very embarrased, but by that time others have allready been disturbed.

Re:I for one really welcome this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501456)

Hello? The Grand parent is talking about Flatulence...you seem to have missed the topic....

next, the cafes and restaurants (3, Interesting)

davejenkins (99111) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501415)

It will be a short hop from here to allowing any business the right to install a cell-phone jammer. Restuarants and certain cafes in the Latin Quarter will jump at the chance to push out that vile modern convenience.

Pretty soon, we will see little icons in windows:
*WiFi ici!
or
*cell non!

Re:next, the cafes and restaurants (3, Insightful)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501423)

Personally there are times I would welome this too, as long as there are clear signs at the doors telling about it. So i would not go to such a place if I needed to be reachable, but would go if I need to relax without the disturbances they cause.

Yes! (4, Insightful)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501428)

Eat it connectivity junkies! The rebellion has begun!

Seriously though... who REALLY needs to be contacted IMMEDIATELY 24-7? I would suggest that if you are really that important, you might want to skip the movie and stay in the Oval Office doing your job.

And if a friend or relative is dead or dying, well, if it takes until the end of the movie for you to find out, they'll be just as dead after as they were during. Plus you will have had an extra 2 hours of Matt Damon (or Gerard Depardieu?) induced happiness before the terrible news reaches you.

Basically anything that reduces our addiction to instant satisfaction of our every wish is ok with me. We don't NEED to be hooked up to a communication network all the time. They should also install these things in:

- university lecture theatres
- conferences
- crowded public transport
- you could have one in your house to turn on during mealtimes and other gatherings to encourage actual social interaction with people who are physically present

Re:Yes! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501444)

Basically anything that reduces our addiction to instant satisfaction of our every wish is ok with me

When do you want it?

Re:Yes! (2, Interesting)

luvirini (753157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501462)

Well, I agree on most of these, but not the public transporation part. One of the specific reasons I took often public transportation when in my previous job, was that I could work while traveling, I had my laptop open, and was actually handling email and then making occasional simple calls and such. Now travel with car is just waste of time.

Re:Yes! (OT) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501476)

It's YOU! You're that Dad who switches the TV off and asks "Why don't we ever do things as a family?" You suck, and no-one wants to talk to you - deal with it!

Re:Yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501478)

Hey asshole, your mom's been trying to get thru to you on your phone - she says you left your diaper at home. Don't wet the cinema seat. Bitch.

Re:Yes! (0)

Chanc_Gorkon (94133) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501484)

Take a chil pill and start fine tuning your senses. I personally can block out when someone insists on yammering loudly in public. I really think it's annoying that some people seemed to have a problem blocking out things when they don't care to hear it. Sure, thast polyphonic ringtone can be a bit annoying, but it's off in a few seconds. After that, it's usually a hushed conversation. And yes, some calls ARE that important. If I and my wife are out for dinner and a movie sans child, we're using our phones for emergency contact numbers. Granted, we aren'd dolts who have the ringers ON in the theature, but we do want to have it on.

Re:Yes! (4, Insightful)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501502)

I really think it's annoying that some people seem to have a problem blocking out things when they don't care to hear it.

So basically you think we should all be like George W Bush? :P

Explain to me how it's not ok for me to be annoyed by some dickwit talking on his phone in the middle of a quiet bit in a thriller that I have paid to see, but it IS ok for you to be annoyed at me for being annoyed?

As for you and your child... well, that's what DVD players are for. Having children involves certain sacrifices, one of which is your ability to go out alone for a while. Either trust your baby sitter or rent a DVD, but don't let your stupid phone ring in my movie!

I'm packing my bags (2, Interesting)

Magickcat (768797) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501431)

If they eventually include art galleries, libraries and restaurants, then I'm packing my bags.

I've seen a person unabashedly use a mobile at a church funeral service. Perhaps churches would be keen on them, however in Australia, most church steeples are used as mobile antennas. In many cases, the cross on the steeple is disguised to match the original building's features.

If I was an alien, I'd probably assume that God had a mobile phone.

So dumb, when we resort to technology (3, Interesting)

tod_miller (792541) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501432)

Instead of education.

This will not stop idiots who have a 50,000 ansi lumens bright display playing some dumb-ass mobile game right in the corner of your eye when watching a movie (wtf, why did they go to the cinema?)

Also, those stupid giggly-bitches who laugh/scream/cry at the dumbest of moments, or who have not left the house for months on end, and the cinema is their biggest social event, and they catch up on all the gossip until about 10 minutes into the start of the film, at which point the hushes from other cinema goers has long since drowned out thier mind numbing dialogue.

The worst, when the stupid do not use your mobile advert comes on (Orange has some great ones - but trigger happy tv should be commissioned to do them worldwide) people take out thier mobile, check for messages, and then slide them back, not even switching them.

Or if they are on silent, they bloody answer them and talk in that hushed-shouting whisper that is actually about 50 decibels above normal talking.

Using technology to enforce peoples social awareness is lame. Just make it legal to hit them repeatedly with a length of lead piping until they learn.

Re:So dumb, when we resort to technology (1)

farnz (625056) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501492)

I often look like I'm taking my phone out to check for messages when in the cinema; this is because I sometimes leave my phone on silent without vibrate anyway. Once I've confirmed that the phone won't ring or vibrate, I can just put it back, leaving it registered to the network, and thus making it quicker to return to normal when I leave the theatre.

This also has the added advantage that once I leave the theatre (and pull the phone out to set it back to vibrate), I can see if I've got any messages and respond quickly.

Re:So dumb, when we resort to technology (2, Funny)

neuro.slug (628600) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501494)

Or if they are on silent, they bloody answer them and talk in that hushed-shouting whisper that is actually about 50 decibels above normal talking.

That's some fierce punk-rock concert whispering...

-- n

Just phone calls? (1)

jginspace (678908) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501434)

The technology has been around for ages but it hasn't been implemented due to legal concerns.

...and then just when it looks like reality mobile computing comes in ...so I wonder: are we going to be blocking phone calls only or will PDA functions in general get blocked? How about SMS?

I suppose France had to (1, Funny)

tod_miller (792541) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501458)

If anything is more annoying than someone talking in a cinema - it is French people talking in a cinema :-) I guess they had to impose a law!

Hahah even though this is true, I love France, and French people.

It *is* true though!

Before you start screaming bloody murder (-1, Redundant)

palad1 (571416) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501466)

The law requires the jammers to allow cellphones to dial emergency numbers.

Jam at the network level (2, Interesting)

jolyonr (560227) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501470)

The best way to do this is to jam at the network level. Rather than having a jammer installed in these places, you actually get the networks to install a short-range cell transmitter/receiver in the building (would need to be carefully placed). The network would control this, so that when a phone is connected via that cell, incoming calls won't get connected (except with operator intervention, so that emergency call you're worried about will get through), but emergency calls can still be made.

In places where there are a great number of cells already, it may even be possible for the networks to triangulate positions, and stop reception of non-emergency calls when they can see that the cellphone is currently within an area on their 'quiet' list.

Best of all (for the networks), they get to be in control and charge for the service.

Jolyon

ps. Somebody print this out and keep it in the Prior Art folder just incase someone tries to get rich :)

How about... (0, Redundant)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501472)

1. before admitting them into the venue, they must be subjected to a bag check, and their cellphones would be kept by the staff temporarily and they get issued a cordless phone with just one big button on it that says "Polis"
2. No more crappy phone calls during movies
3. Advertise this advantage and raise ticket prices
4. ????
5. Profit!

How this can be done technically (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10501473)

For all those who are wondering how this can be done technically, here is a possible solution:

Install a picocell in the theater. Jam all GSM/GPRS/UMTS frequencies except for the one used by that picocell. Give that cell its own network id and accept roaming from any other operator network, but only let emergency calls through.

What the users would see when the enter the theater is exactly the same thing as if they were roaming to another country. The phone would display "emergency calls only" and would display the id of the theater (or the company providing the jamming equipment) instead of the usual id of the operator that user is subscribed to.

Is that really necessary ? (1)

herve_masson (104332) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501483)

I must be over tolerant or lucky, but I don't suffer from such annoyance in theaters really; it may have occured once over the year (I see about a movie per week), and people usually get out promptly.

Also, imposing a complex and costy solution sounds somewhat strange to me (it must be an intelligent box that filter calls): who really need to place an emergency call that cannot be done from a few metters away, outside of the room ?

Anyway, it must be good for someone...

selective jam? (0, Redundant)

MrSpiff (515611) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501489)

how would they go about jamming all signals but emergency calls? that would require screening the actual numbers people dial no?

emergency (2, Interesting)

PerlDudeXL (456021) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501490)

In germany the firefighters (usually two fireman walking around and taking care that everything is fine) have to attend theater performances in case of some emergency. I'm almost sure france as similar regulations. Cinemas are something different, but the personal can make emergency calls using conventional phones.

My cell phone doesn't even work in the local cinema. I don't get a signal. and why should I take my cell phone anyway to a movie theater?

Just use the Theatre's payphone in an Emergency (1)

legomad (596194) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501504)

You can just install payphones in the lobby of the cinema.

Ideal solution? (1)

antivoid (751399) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501506)

In my honest optinion, the most suitable solution for this would be a cooperative effort between cellphone manufacturers and the companies selling the jammers. Of course, doing it the way I am about to describe will only apply to new phones being manufactured, but hey.
Here's how I see it working; In the cellphone being manufactured, the software should include a feature where it listens for a certain signal, on a certain band (not the GSM band.) This signal will originate from a transmitter placed in the centre of the cinema room for example, with the range extending just over the boundries of the room. The cellphones must obey these signals, and automatically place the cellphone on silent, for example. Also, when the people leave the cinema, the phone will detect the signal has dissapeared, and un-silence the phone autmatically. This way, cell-phone jammers (which use a substancial amount of power, for one thing) would be simplified to the point where they are easy to make and affordable as it only needs to transmit a weak signal on a well-known frequency.

BUT, for now, I dont forsee any simple method of only allowing emergency calls through when they're dumping white noise over the GSM band to block phones.
Maybe they can put emergy phone calls on their own special band which doesnt get blocked. It will be interesting how the get the "only allow emergency calls" system up and running...

A great idea. (4, Insightful)

neuro.slug (628600) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501512)

I can tolerate a mobile phone going off in a movie theater, but I shall bring down fiery justice on those who leave their bloody phones on during a live performance. There has to be intervention when people don't have the decency to turn off their damned phones during a classical performance, an opera, or a play. It's not only rude to the audience, but it's also insulting to the performers.

-- n

how will it be implemented... (1)

Yousef (66495) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501513)

I'm all for this. great idea that should be law everywhere.
However, the question is, how each cinema/theatre will go about implementing this "feature".

I hope there are some uniform guidelines about this...

My Solution to Cellphones in Public Places (1)

kagaku (774787) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501518)

Instead of outright jamming cellphones, I propose a new feature for cellphones. This feature, when it detects a signal on a certain frequency, would automatically put the cellphone into silent/vibrate mode. When the cellphone no longer detects the signal, it'll go back to standard ringing mode. This would, in my opinion, keep almost everyone happy. You wouldn't be annoyed by ringing cellphones, and everyone would stll get their calls, as well as be able to make emergency calls.

This seems easy to impliment in my opinion, we'd just need a law that states that all cellphones sold in the US need this feature. Then theaters, resturants, concert halls, churches, etc.. would just need to buy 'cell-silencers' that emit a signal telling the phones to go silent.

Emegency calls made from OUTSIDE the venue (1)

mcrypt (574231) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501535)

So basically they're limiting the range/coverage of the jammer.

Lit displays (1)

ddum (821321) | more than 9 years ago | (#10501543)

Quite frankly, what really cooks my goose isn't as much the _occasional_ ringing. It is the _constant_ glimmer of backlights and lit keypads from dweebs who just can't seem to handle being without their SMS-capabilities for the duration of a movie.
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