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Australia Vulnerable to Korean Hacking Army

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the hacking-matilda dept.

Security 329

Nan writes "An army of more than 500 hackers hired by the North Korean military could find Australian businesses a "softer target" than their U.S. or European-based counterparts, according to security experts. The hacking army's mission is to break into South Korean, Japanese and American corporate networks to gather intelligence and steal trade secrets, according to reports."

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In other news... (4, Funny)

leonmergen (807379) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521951)

... Western countries unite in a global blocking campaign, virtually disconnecting North Korea from the internet, after a number of government-funded hacking threats from North Korea.

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

WaR.KiN (805785) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521972)

Time to send in Team America.

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

DigitumDei (578031) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522082)

Well a week ago it was 600 hackers [slashdot.org] .

Looks like some of them failed to perform and were "fired". ;) I figure every time they fail we should see this number drop. *can just see the article in a few months time "Korea's 34 man hacker army"

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522155)

Fired? Bah, they starved to death.

North Korea has a major Hot Pockets shortage.

Re:In other news... (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522169)

Nope, these were crackers [wareebiscuit.com] .
I guess they got eaten at Kim's apero.

Re:In other news... (1)

krymsin01 (700838) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522242)

No, they ran against the black ice.

Re:In other news... (2, Funny)

byolinux (535260) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522096)

Time to send in Jeff K.

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522014)

You mean Slashdotting them? ;)

Re:In other news... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522020)

And the Western Coalition comprises... Poland.

Re:In other news... (2, Funny)

essreenim (647659) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522142)

Yes, you just cant trust those kaola bears - always working with the enemy..

Crikey! (-1, Troll)

Silverlancer (786390) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521953)

Crikey!

No one hides trade secrets in site (-1, Troll)

earthstar (748263) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521961)

Who has trade secrets put up i websites?
It would if at if it existed, would have been safely put up in a locker.

This is nuts. (5, Insightful)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521963)

Why not just cut them off from the internet?
It's not like anyone but the govt there is using it anyways.
They can network their country all they like, but why let them play on ours if they can't play nice?

Re:This is nuts. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10521986)

1. Buy South Korean wireless gear.
2. Build Antenna
3. Download Team America: World Police
4. Get sent to prison camp with family
5. Become cannibal

Re:This is nuts. (4, Insightful)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521990)

Because we are not them.

And it would be a scary precedent. If it's N Korea today, why couldn't it be China tomorrow?

And you would be harming whatever little percentage of people who use the Internet in N Korea, in the process. Besides, the Internet would be a source of access to the people of that country.

We all know how well sanctions work, right? It wouldn't make a difference. They're just trying to rake up a noise to garner attention.

Better that they say they'd hack into networks rather than say they'd launch a nuclear offensive.

Re:This is nuts. (3, Interesting)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522058)

precedent? why not?
If a country tried to take an army into yours, you stop them don't you?
Well, if the artical is true, it's essentially a cyber-army, so why even give them the chance? For more analogy: You exclude violent people from society in jail don't you? It's common place to separate those who can't play nice from those who are willing.

Re:This is nuts. (-1, Offtopic)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521997)

Oh common moderators! Just how is this a Troll? That's just brutal. At the very least, you could mod it over rated, but Troll?

I'm sorry folks, but it's mods like these that give me less and less respect for Slashdot. Anyways, I will shutup now... *sigh*

Re:This is nuts. (4, Funny)

leonmergen (807379) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522001)

Yeah well, they should stop giving hackers from N Korea moderation rights anyway... :)

Re:This is nuts. (4, Insightful)

torpor (458) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522016)

yeah, coz you know, with that American Might you can just block the entire country of north korea from having internet access 'at the flick of a switch'.

dufus. the internet is everywhere. you can't block all the connections that a 500-man organized team of hackers can set up for themselves .. whatever country they're in, or from.

Re:This is nuts. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522074)

Bah. When the internet is controlled by the US they can disconnect who they like with it. But its not controlled by the US. If anyone had that kind of control to selectively disconnect people they didn't approve of would only serve to degrade the internet from the last truly free environment to just another mediated/monitored/censored medium like tv or the radio. You can't just kick out a country because you dont like their intentions, dont be an idiot.

Re:This is nuts. (1, Interesting)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522087)

It does not take much "American Might" to cut a few cables. And last time I checked, we have the influence to get that done.
As for "the internet is everywhere", that's like saying "electricity is everywhere", and that's certainly not the case in most of North Korea.
Also, I was assuming the hackers are actually in NK.

Re:This is nuts. (5, Insightful)

torpor (458) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522109)

"cut a few cables" .. uh huh.

look, all it takes is *ONE* connection to the internet, in safe harbour somewhere, and they're back on again.

just forget it. there's no way to 'cut them all off' from the 'net. its a preposterous idea.

the only solution is diplomacy. these people clearly think that their position is the right one; well, why is that? learn the answer to that question, and use diplomacy ...

Re:This is nuts. (1)

mirko (198274) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522122)

Excuse me, but unless there's actually an evidence, I don't see North Korea as a threat. What we have here is an increasing hype against them like there has been before the US carpet bombed Iraq.
And you're just showing everybody how receptive you are to war so that, if enough people like you show up, there won't need to be much more hype to just proceed with the strategic installation of more armed forces in SE Asia.

Re:This is nuts. (0, Troll)

asifyoucare (302582) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522163)

Would it be more effective for the U.N. to write a letter saying how angry they are?

I think North Korean chicks are hot... (0, Troll)

Stupid American (766263) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521965)

...because I am Stupid American!

Just a hype, most likely (5, Informative)

metlin (258108) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521968)

From the article -

"This is probably more boasting than a real threat. In the past we have seen similar claims from the Taiwanese and the East Timorese," said Hyppönen.

Heh. Probably yet another of those notice us! notice us! type publicity stunt by N Korea.

And even if they do hack into an odd website or two, people will start to take notice and will act on it. It's far easier to secure your networks than launch an offensive on N Korea.

These guys just need to be ignored while they jump around their cages trying to garner attention.

Re:Just a hype, most likely (1)

mikael (484) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522076)

If you've got a Linux system attached to the internet (firewall or home PC on broadband) trying looking at your security logs. On my system, there is always at least one group of login attempts as root/cisco/sysadmin/admin/various usernames coming from different IP4 addresses all over the world (Germany/South Korea/Hong Kong/USA).

Re:Just a hype, most likely (4, Insightful)

replicant108 (690832) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522177)

Probably yet another of those notice us! notice us! type publicity stunt by N Korea.

Or perhaps a "notice us! notice us! type publicity stunt" by western security experts?

I note the article does not quote any North Korean sources

Re:Just a hype, most likely (1, Troll)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522239)

It's far easier to secure your networks than launch an offensive on N Korea.
But not as much fun.

Cool (3, Insightful)

zxv (815649) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521969)

Australian-based firms hold the same intellectual property as their U.S. and EU-based offices, they are not as paranoid about security.
Sources?

Re:Cool (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522026)

hehe yeah i reckon, what a load of crap

Re:Cool (0, Flamebait)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522049)

Sources?

Exactly. However, while some are paranoid about security, many are too clueless to be able to enforce it.

I used to specialise in system security, and in my experience, the single biggest threat to most corporations' security is the humble post-it note. Passwords stuck to computer screens... Not good.

Sometimes the actual software used in Australia is quite good, but it is useless if poorly configured or if users are allowed to leave gates open for anybody with a dictionary.

Re:Cool (0, Flamebait)

goatan (673464) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522135)

Paranoid is when you think people are out to get you. being protective is when they really are. Australian companys are not as protective of there data as those in Europe and US.

Well - US does similar things... (2, Insightful)

dusty123 (538507) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521971)

The US established here in Europe a gigantic spy network, called Echelon. As we now know they also use this network for stealing trade secrets.

So, the situation here is not that different here unless no one seems to bother about this...

Re:Well - US does similar things... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10521994)

Whatever, and the CIA created AIDS to kill black people, but it got away from them.

Next!

Re:Well - US does similar things... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522032)

Echelon is a perfectly known and adkowledged spy network. It surely is not in the conspiracy theory domain anymore. And a report from the European Commission proves the stealing of European Companies trade secrets and subsequent use of said trade secret by US companies (Boeing being the most well-known exemple).

Welcome in the new world!

Re:Well - US does similar things... (2, Informative)

dusty123 (538507) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522103)

Well, this is surely no conspiracy theory. There are a number of examples that proove that Echelon is used for spying trade secrets.

Germany even sponsors projects like "GnuPG" and similar to protect EU companies from thefts.

There is nothing the EU can do against Echelon, I have no clue why - but they have probably political reasons.

Re:Well - US does similar things... (1)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522006)

Who doesn't? [securtelecom.com]

Re:Well - US does similar things... (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522105)

heh. I was told an old story about a Russian satalite that crashed in the US. They examined it, and it had what was basically a (very) old intel cpu in it, but reverse engineered with a couple bug fixes in it, but at the time the satalite was made it was the newest stuff. Not sure if the story is myth or true, but I found it interesting....

Re:Well - US does similar things... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522121)

This article is interesting. However, they don't provide a single source to back up their claims (Why France, Russia, Japan ? Where are the proofs ?). OTOH, such claims can only help comfort potential clients that they should buy into securtelecom security services.

Re:Well - US does similar things... (1)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522159)

Well, there are a couple of articles from the NY Times here [fas.org] , and one on the WASC [noaa.gov] website.

France, who was quite angry about Echelon, admits [ozemail.com.au] it.

"....all secret services of the big democracies undertake economic espionage." - French ex-intelligence chief

Re:Well - US does similar things... (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522037)

We have your IP number. Can you see the black van across the street?

Re:Well - US does similar things... (-1, Troll)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522102)

Guess you're kinda right, but it's not US does similar things, it's US DO SIMILIAR THINGS, you illiterate.

Re:Well - US does similar things... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522204)

Who modded this "Troll"? Is that you, George?

Out of curiosity... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10521974)

Last I checked you needed electricity to run a computer, and last satellite photo I saw, the North Koreans didn't have any of that.

I'm betting Aussie networks are safe from their North Korean TCP/Abacus layer attacks.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

El Batemano (821900) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521992)

Korea seems to be a very scared little country that is just desperate to bring itself onto par with everyone else. If they didn't have such an attitude problem then maybe everyone would like them Time for the Iron fist!

have you seen pics of NK at night? (0, Troll)

the-build-chicken (644253) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521978)

yeah...hack by candle light...

that article sounds like a lot of wank

What about nuclear weapons? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522162)

After all NK seems to have been able to produce nuclear weapon despite its backwardness.

You sure don't want to tell me that stealing some trade secrets online is more complicated than that.

500 hackers? (2, Insightful)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521983)

Note to Kim Jong-Il:
It's not how many hackers you have but how good they are. One really skilled hakcker can do a lot of damage if he manages to attack at the right point.

Re:500 hackers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522055)

Note to koi88:
If you have a team where each member has extreme skills on a certain area, you can do even more damage.

Re:500 hackers? (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522092)

That's right, Jong-Il. I didn't want to underestimate your team.
Are you still posting as Anonymous Coward? Still can't remember your password?

Re:500 hackers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522132)

Note to Stupid Westerner
Thankyou for your input. I shall immediately disregard the advise from my highly funded team of professionals and re-focus my plans around your armchair-pundit opinion that probably took you no longer than 3 minutes to conclude.

Yours, Kim Jong-Il.

Re:500 hackers? (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522168)

You're always welcome, Jong-Il.

Oh yee of ritter faith... (2, Funny)

csguy314 (559705) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522166)

Stupid American!
We have storen yor trade secrets aready!
We now have factories that are assembring *your* most powerfu weapon ever. Frickin sharks with frickin rasers on their heads! Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha!
Yours trury,
Kim Jong-Il

With my sincerest apologies to Dr. Evil, South Park, and all the people in North Korea (where millions are suffering from starvation...)

Re:500 hackers? (1)

lachlan76 (770870) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522191)

But if that one hacker teaches the other 499? They can't be as good, but they can still learn.

Bonsai Bush (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10521985)

Aussie is basically just another state of America with bloody Bonsai Bush in charge.

what about al-Qaeda? (0, Redundant)

marc252 (658303) | more than 9 years ago | (#10521998)

I think it's much more dangerous a dispersed group like al-qaeda that doesn't have any centralized structure but can act as a big group. Korea is not a big threat because they don't have the education to form 500 hackers nor the resources. But al-qaeda members are going to our universities and using the same broadband conections we use.
I would focus on protecting systems rather than trying to spot hackers.

Sensitive information on the net? (2, Insightful)

gilesjuk (604902) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522000)

Why have such secrets and sensitive information Internet accessible? it's their own fault if their security methods are weak and information can be accessed by hackers.

Re:Sensitive information on the net? (1)

jesuscash (668623) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522167)

Some networks like that aren't readily accessible to the internet. With some creative hackers and/or poor security practices by employees there can be ways of getting to that sensetive data from the internet.

Re:Sensitive information on the net? (3, Interesting)

n54 (807502) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522186)

Amen to that, any company (or individual, or government department) really serious about security practices physical seperation (when possible) with a strictly controlled, non-constant, individual data transfer across the physical gap (ie. no network interconnection, even for a limited amount of time) in addition to using all "ordinary" security measures. Not too many companies so far but I've seen some do it.

However most governmental systems seem to not do this well enough or be able to... North Korea (or any other cybercombatant) wont hack personal webpages or the mom'n'pop shop, they'll hack the power distribution grid, big corporate databases to introduce fiscal instability (this seems to be the weakest link as physically seperating it defeats its purpose and is basically the same method of operation as Osama Bin Laden but by different means; a "quick way" to manipulate markets for enormous gains), gridlock choice network areas (routers, DNS, DDoS) and similar unless they're just snooping.

The North Korean "crackers" are probably closer to scriptkiddies though, but it's not something one wants to underestimate (some kiddies learn).

Hype? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522002)

Why do I continually get service probes and scans from Korea and Taiwan?

Re:Hype? (3, Insightful)

jesuscash (668623) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522156)

It's typically worms that are scanning you. The reason they originate from places like Korea (most the scans I've seen are actually SOUTH Korea, not North.) and Taiwan is that they don't have the network or system security posture most in the west do. I can tell Austrailia's security isn't as strong as ours as I see some of the same worm looking scans coming from systems there.

Re:Hype? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522175)

I think if the Korean government ever did try to hack your box, they probably wouldn't do it from a connection that resolved to .kp if you RARPed it.

Seems that Mr. Il also plays computer games... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522009)

He must have come up with that idea while playing C&C:Generals. Since he's also rumored to be a great fan of pr0n he probably won't share his female superhackers with us. : /

easier dealt with than nuclear war (1)

redjupiter (718554) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522010)

Whether their threats are real or not, it is easier to deal with with our own army of hackers. Govts need to pay more attention to secure their internal network and sensitive data, and then ignore their threats. Fight hackers with hackers I say, better this than laucnh a nuclear strike to get attention :-)

Re:easier dealt with than nuclear war (2, Interesting)

horrens (785051) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522190)

don't know how other goverments handle this but here in estonia some goverment organisations don't connect their networks to the internet, all employees have 2 computers one for the sencitive data in the central network and for internet and other stuff

No way matey, not me beer (4, Funny)

poo203 (305282) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522012)

Crikey! Do you blokes reckon that those little North Koreeun fellas would be able to hack into my beer recipes?

I find this difficult to believe... (3, Insightful)

Goonie (8651) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522015)

I would be very surprised if Australian companies were any more or less vulnerable to hackers than any companies in any other modern Western country.

And the DPRK doesn't really want to piss us off - we are in a fairly unique position, as a close American ally that has diplomatic relations with the North Koreans. They may be tyrannical thugs, but they're not stupid either, and that diplomatic channel is surely worth more to them than hacking a few corporate websites.

As for Australia's defence and intelligence agencies, well, we're a branch office for America, and they let us in on a lot (but not all, obviously) of their stuff. That wouldn't happen unless the US agencies were comfortable that the only people that can hack in are, well, themselves...

Re:I find this difficult to believe... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522048)

And the DPRK doesn't really want to piss us off

Remember that recent attempt to ship drugs into Australia which was intercepted by the SAS?

This tells me that

  1. They don't care about pissing us off
  2. They are more interested in the money, than spying

N Korean hackers are a low grade threat, compared with the number of script kiddies we turn out

It sounds familiar... (5, Interesting)

Cronopios (313338) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522018)

I mean, it's just what the U.S. has been doing for years [thenewamerican.com] , wiretapping business and private conversations all over the world.

Quote:
According to a report commissioned by the European Union, entitled Development of Surveillance Technology and the Risk of Abuse of Economic Information, the system has, since the dissolution of the Soviet Empire, been partially dedicated to industrial espionage.

According to the New York Times, the report claims that information gleaned through Echelon helped U.S. aerospace firm Boeing win a lucrative Saudi Arabian contract away from a European competitor, and that Echelon was used to help the American company Raytheon "win a bid for a $1.3 billion surveillance system for the Amazon forest away from Thomson-CSF, a French company."

Money making algorithm ! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522027)


1. Create security firm in your neighborhood.
2. Write paranoid article in local journal.
3. Profit! ...err... it should work, shouldn't it?

If its becoming more clear N Korea is hostile (2, Interesting)

Trogre (513942) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522034)

... surely we can just cut their net cables?
No net access, low hacking risk.

Re:If its becoming more clear N Korea is hostile (4, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522084)

What if NK peer with countries that wont do it on request? So are you going to cut off all the uncooperative countries that peer with NK? What about countries that peer with them (and so on down the chain until you find a cooperative country - and bang, you jsut lost a bigger chunk than you initially wanted)? What about NK using dialup in another country? What about NK agents in other countries?

Plus these 'reports' are from South Korea (as shown in the last /. story), and can be classed as unreliable imho.

Re:If its becoming more clear N Korea is hostile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522116)

so, who's going to be the one to order hostilities towards a country with nuclear weapons and nuclear missiles? Besides, their internet links probably go through China.

Re:If its becoming more clear N Korea is hostile (3, Funny)

rts008 (812749) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522150)

Better idea: Spam them with GOATSE wallpapers for their desktops. They want "IP", give em more than they can stand!

Bullshit (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522041)

This reminds me so much of "The evil Jew" NAZI-propaganda, it makes me puke.

Korean Hacking Army (5, Funny)

Raseri (812266) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522042)

The most out-of-shape military force on Earth. Their base of operations is their parents' basements. Their rations consist entirely of pizza and Bawls. Their uniform is jeans and a shirt with either the word "w00t!" (for grunts) or the phrase "i read your e-mail" (for officers). Their recruitment literature looks like this:

HungLo2099: d000dz!!!!11!1!! u could 500000 pwn amerkians!!!1!!!!!
Z3r0k3wl: kewl!!1! wehre do w3 sign up?
HungLo69: OMG america iz teh suck!!1!!1 OMGWTFLOLOLOLOL!!!!!1!!1!111!!11!oneone!1
HungLo2099: d00dz!! u also get free pizza and a t-shirt!!!!1!!!11!
Z3r0k3wl: w00t!
HungLo69: pwnage11!11!

Trust me, I've seen it.

Now be careful (2, Funny)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522075)

Their base of operations is their parents' basements. Their rations consist entirely of pizza and Bawls.
Whoa. Don't insult your fellow Slashdotters. It's perfectly normal for a 30-year-old to live in his parents' basement. And pizza makes a fine meal -- how else could I have grown to be so, uhm, big and strong?

Re:Now be careful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522230)

And pizza makes a fine meal -- how else could I have grown to be so, uhm, big and strong?

Well, you're half right at least.

Not likely a problem (2, Funny)

subStance (618153) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522062)

As a closet Australian, I'd just to like to reassure everyone out there that there's nothing worth stealing in Australia anyway - not even information ... so it's all moot.

Move along .... nothing to see here.

Re:Not likely a problem (1)

lachlan76 (770870) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522214)

I dunno, from what I hear, our coffee and beer is much better than in the US. Never been there though, so it's hard to say.

And other than that, there's plenty of stuff you'd all want to steal. Why, yesterday, I just upgraded my video card to a Geforce 4! We're so far ahead of you USAnians, you only have the FX series cards ;)

Damn Australians (3, Funny)

linsys (793123) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522097)

...... should have kept it an island for criminals I tell ya....

You call that a root kit? (5, Funny)

mikeophile (647318) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522108)

That's not a root kit.

Here. Now this is a root kit, mate.

Stone age to information age (1)

goneutt (694223) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522115)

From the article
Countries like China and North Korea are not exactly poster children for copyright enforcement. North Korea's economic position is not favorable and that makes it more dangerous. They want the ability to manufacture goods better and cheaper," the security expert said.

I don't see how industrial espionage from the mechanized world is going to help a 4th world nation. Though this does show that when you don't have a culture of innovation you do have one of immitation.

Learn something new every day.... (2, Informative)

Beolach (518512) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522200)

I learned this [wikipedia.org] a couple days ago. The "First World" is made of Capitalist/Western countries, the "Second World" is made of Communist/Eastern countries, and "Third World" countries are those that don't fit into either catagory. So North Korea is really a Second World country, not 4th.

Australia not as backwards as people think (5, Informative)

Exter-C (310390) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522117)

Many people like to think that australia and new zealand are backwards counties down in the middloe of nowhere. In reality many of Australian businesses adopt technology and security standards much faster than thier US counterparts.

Its funny that many of the best security professionals throughout the 80s where based from Australia. This trend has continued and Australian businesses are often well prepared and secured. This is obviously a fairly big generalisation with companies like Optus having major breakings etc most of the major corporates in australia have a very good security history.

Re:Australia not as backwards as people think (1)

hayds (738028) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522143)

I havent heard of Optus having any problems. Ive been on Optus Cable for a few years and Ive only noticed about 1/2 an hour downtime.

Its Telstra that's the problem, their ADSL network is up and down like a yoyo. Of course then theres the problem that most ISPs buy bandwidth from Telstra...

All we need now is affordable broadband... (1)

ReKleSS (749007) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522189)

That may be the case (I don't pay all that much attention to corporate aus), but our broadband access still sucks. $70/mo for 12gb of transfer is just... crap. When oh when will stupid telstra do something...
-ReK

Re:Australia not as backwards as people think (1)

Exter-C (310390) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522208)

Optus has had several major security issues where crackers gained access to customer information. it has nothing to do with general connectivity. DoS attacking a country or provider and causing outages is one thing. Getting thier entire customer bases' personal information is a completely different ball game.

Who cares about a DoS attack if you can get the IRS or ATO information (just a hyperthetical)

Re:Australia not as backwards as people think (1)

freedom_india (780002) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522216)

With Telstra as the sole DSL provider, Good luck to the N.K. hackers/crackers.

Australia need not worry about these guys. Telstra's Network is err...so hacker-proof (that's it! that's the right word) that N.K. are going to break their teeth.

Keep it up telstra. Continue protecting the final frontier of western civilization !

Simple Solution? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522125)

How about disconnecting the entire country of NK until they behave?

Hackers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10522134)

An army of more than 500 hackers hired by the North Korean military

More like an army of Star Craft and Counter Strike players to me.

OMFG the Koreans!!!!1 (0, Troll)

Geekkake (822049) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522141)

omfg zerg rush kekekekeke =^-^=

They won't get all our secrets (1)

rat7307 (218353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522144)

coz we keep 'em both locked up in a safe....

We're still safe. (1)

O-SUSHi (820452) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522160)

at least most Australians have upgraded from Windows 95. (referring back to a comment in previous newspost about this)

I... (1)

mixter (468793) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522181)

for one, welcome our superior north korean hacker army overlords!

Nothing to worry about then (2, Informative)

mrjb (547783) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522197)

"The hacking army's mission is to break into South Korean, Japanese and American corporate networks to gather intelligence and steal trade secrets, according to reports."

So, if I understand correctly, Aussie businesses may be a softer target, but they aren't targeted.

invalid assumptions (4, Insightful)

rob101 (809157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522238)

I think that this report was perhaps written from an angle that assumes we ride kangaroos to school, after all we have to. They are the only thing that gets us out of range of those pesky crocs! IMHO - As a PhD comp-sci student 'down-under' we are FAR from being the bottom of the pile in the tech industry and further from being a soft electronic target. I'll worry about the north korea electonic threat when they can feed their own population!! -- Throw another shrimp on the barby luv!

This message... (4, Funny)

Izago909 (637084) | more than 9 years ago | (#10522241)

Brought to you by the same people that guaranteed WMDs in Iraq and Osama captured within a year, and a link betwen them.
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