Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Kaiser Foundation Shows Little Video Game Violence Concern

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the parents-with-their-heads-screwed-on-straight dept.

Games 39

Thanks to EvilAvatar for the heads up about a new Kaiser Foundation study showing that parents are simply not worried about video game violence. "Overall parents are more concerned about inappropriate content on TV than in other media: 34% say TV concerns them most, compared to 16% who say the Internet, 10% movies, 7% music, and 5% video games."

cancel ×

39 comments

You know I could write it all out again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556074)

but I already put up a shitload of stuff about this on my blog [xdfgf.com]

Not spam, but just a pointer

Shows that American parents don't care (1)

gazbo (517111) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556079)

I also understand that many parents are damning their children from birth, by not taking them to Sunday school, or any similar Christian learning events. I think this is more important than ignoring the violence inherent in video games, but symptomatic of the same uncaring attitude.

More than that (-1, Offtopic)

Safety Cap (253500) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556332)

You must follow ---'s LAW AT ALL TIMES. Those who fail to heed Dt 18:21-22 [thebricktestament.com] will have WICKED children and will BURN in the HELLfires for all ETERNITY!!!!

The POWER OF ------ compels YOU!!!!

Re:More than that (1)

gazbo (517111) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556369)

I appreciate that you were just trying to be light-hearted, but you have to have respect for the Christian faith. Personally I find the site you linked to very offensive; I pray not just for you but for whoever it is that felt The Bible was a worthy target for parody.

a religion is just a cult with more followers (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556650)

you have to have respect for the Christian faith

oh, really? i'll have respect for it when it earns it. the great crusades and the inquisition, not to mention all the priests molesting children, have pretty much eradicated any respect i might have had for that particular organized religion. you can believe whatever you want to believe, but don't demand respect where none is due. oh, and BTW, EVERYthing is a worthy target for parody, by definition. but then, as i always say, "fvck 'em even if they can take a joke..."

Re:a religion is just a cult with more followers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556973)

You can't hold the Crusades and the Inquisition up against the Christian faith. Sure looking back some people may dislike their methods, but what you have to understand is that they were doing what they felt, in their hearts, was right by G*d.

What they were seeing was an unsaved people who were risking their immortal soul, and so they tried their best to help them in the only way they could. Sure in hindsight it seems brutal, but when you weigh up their immortal sould, you can surely understand that in a way they were actually trying to be kind.

Re:More than that (4, Interesting)

realdpk (116490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556928)

Nobody has to have respect for the Christian faith. I have to tolerate that other people believe in it, but that's as far as I have to go in our society.

I may actually start respecting Christians if they can manage to keep their noses out of other people's business and out of public government. I don't know if they can do that, though -- history (modern and "ancient") indicates that they can not.

Concerned about what's on tv? (5, Insightful)

sparkie (60749) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556087)

If parents would be a little more concerned with their children, rathar than concerned about what's on TV, then there'd be no problem.

i.e. watch your own kids and the tv won't have to baby sit for you.

Re:Concerned about what's on tv? (3, Insightful)

arsepit (823125) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556274)

I agree.
Two things responsible parents can do:
- Monitor and limit the amount of time your child is watching tv.
- Decide what their child is allowed to watch.

Lazy parents stop pushing your responsiblility to the government. Do your parenting.

Re:Concerned about what's on tv? (1)

ooby (729259) | more than 9 years ago | (#10558245)

"I learned the facts of life... by watching the facts of life" ~Cable Guy.

Thanks Janet (4, Funny)

StocDred (691816) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556093)

Special thanks to Janet Jackson's tit for taking the heat off of us for a while.

Re:Thanks Janet (1)

Impotent_Emperor (681409) | more than 9 years ago | (#10558501)

I was offended that her breast wasn't very attractive.

Re:Thanks Janet (1)

mutewinter (688449) | more than 9 years ago | (#10561706)

"One specific incident that sparked a great deal of controversy - the Janet Jackson incident at this year's Super Bowl - was of less concern to parents with only 17% "very" concerned about the impact of the incident on their children." Did the heat really get taken off us? I think all this bull shit is being overblown by lawyers and politicians...

This happens every couple years... (4, Insightful)

vasqzr (619165) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556128)

Remember Mortal Kombat? Night Trap?

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 93 11:21:59 PST

WASHINGTON (UPI) -- Sen. Joe Lieberman, D-Conn., supported by
television's gentle ``Captain Kangaroo,'' said Wednesday the video game
industry is contributing to violence in America with its graphic
depictions of force and sex and warned it to regulate itself before the
federal government does.
``We're talking about video games that glorify violence and teach
children to enjoy inflicting the most gruesome forms of cruelty
imaginable,'' Lieberman said.
Lieberman, 51, the father of four children, said he will introduce
legislation calling on the video game industry to set up a uniform,
credible system to warn parents about the content of such games as
``Mortal Kombat'' and ``Night Trap.''
Shown at a news conference, ``Mortal Kombat'' involves a martial
contest with blood gushing from a fighter's head, and the winner
decapitating his opponent, then displaying the head attached to a spinal
cord. ``Night Trap'' involves hooded men seizing a sorority woman in her
nightgown and draining her blood.


Every couple years a game comes out and people try to put blame on it. More kids have killed each other imitating 'pro wrestling' than video games.

You don't see anyone trying to shut down the WWE, do you?

Re:This happens every couple years... (4, Informative)

Otter (3800) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556289)

You don't see anyone trying to shut down the WWE, do you?

The WWE has toned their act down considerably in the last year, under FCC pressure. They get plenty of complaints, from both the right and left.

I used to watch semi-regularly but it got so repulsive a few years ago that I just couldn't stomach it anymore. As a parent, I'd be far less likely to let young kids watch pro wrestling than play almost all video games.

Re:This happens every couple years... (2, Interesting)

MMaestro (585010) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557865)

Don't forget about other medias. After the broadcasting of War of the Worlds, radio got slammed and blaimed for causing a panic despite repeated notices of the broadcast being fictional. Then television media got turned down in the 80's and 90's after news reporters started running ahead of military personnel, getting themselves shot at, and then complaining about not being protected. Returned to the radio, again we see the radio being slammed with censorship against critics who protest against the government's policies. All this, newspaper censorship, more censorship against radio in the past, recent censorship of the internet, and a bag of chips to munch on while we wait and see some more censorship in the future.

Newsflash: parents are morons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556277)

Imply that there is a threat to their children, and logic goes out the window. Exactly how is music a threat to children? Or is the 7% made up of the idiots that think playing a record backwards will turn their children into killers?

Re:Newsflash: parents are morons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556387)

>Newsflash: parents are morons

Obviously. You are here.

Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (4, Insightful)

Andy_R (114137) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556279)

The survey [kff.org] does NOT imply that parents are "simply not worried about video game violence."

It states that 89% of parents are very, or somewhat concerned about inappropriate content in entertainment media, and 34% of parents rate TV as the medium they are most concerned about. It says nothing about their other concerns, and how strongly they rate them.

Reading the survey, it is possible to reach the conclusion that somewhere between 5% and 89% of parents are very or seriously concerned about video game violence. Hardly a level of confidence that should be used for a headline!

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (2, Insightful)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556533)

Yet they are not worried enough to turn the damn things off.

What does that tell you?

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 9 years ago | (#10559007)

Yet they are not worried enough to turn the damn things off.

Some do "turn the damn things off" (or just refuse to have tham in the house), but that doesn't erase the concern, because home isn't the only place kids spend time.

So, how do you handle this issue with your kids?

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10560524)

If they watch a program that I have told them not to, they are punished.

It's that simple and just because people are bad parents doesn't mean the rest of the responsible adults should be punished just so they don't have to do their most import job.

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 9 years ago | (#10561450)

If they watch a program that I have told them not to, they are punished.

And you know that how?

It's that simple and just because people are bad parents doesn't mean the rest of the responsible adults should be punished just so they don't have to do their most import job.

Certainly not. Being concerned about a problem is not the same as advocating draconian solutions.

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (1)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10562122)

Listen to what they talk about and they will drop hints.

Re:Article Completely Misinterprets the Data (1)

swillden (191260) | more than 9 years ago | (#10564430)

Listen to what they talk about and they will drop hints.

Good point. Kids really are not very good at hiding things for very long. Doesn't change the fact that there is cause for concern, though, because most likely you won't hear about the issue until after it's been going on for a while. If they know they'll be punished, they'll keep it quiet for as long as they're able -- and as they get older they get better at it. The real trick is to build trust and convince them that if Dad says they shouldn't do something, it's because it's in their best interest to avoid it, not because he's old and doesn't understand.

That's the goal, but it's rather hard to achieve.

How old are your children?

Re:More than that (1, Offtopic)

StocDred (691816) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556516)

And you have to have respect for other faiths. Respect that you did not show in your parent post, which directly states that Christianity is the only option.

It's not. Please go dredge for new converts somewhere else.

And for a revelatory look (pun intended) at the bible, please see skepticsannotatedbible.com [skepticsan...dbible.com] . You should probably take a lok at that site and actually investigate some of the crazy crap in the bible, instead of just feeling good with your glossed-over Daily Inspirational Calendar.

Re:More than that (1)

HeavyK (822279) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557613)

Yeah! Christian bashing. You can't go to one forum without that being in there. Sigh.

the squeaky wheel gets bashed! :) (1)

Xtifr (1323) | more than 9 years ago | (#10558922)

I'd happily participate in bashing of other religions, except that members of other religions don't show up on slashdot to lecture me about what I should or shouldn't do, say, or think.

If Christians don't want to be bashed, they shouldn't go around trying to shove their beliefs down people's throats, whether or not those people are interested.

New generation of parents? (3, Insightful)

Jakhel (808204) | more than 9 years ago | (#10556568)

What would be more interesting is to see what the age range of the parents is. You have to remember that today's younger (as in 30's) parents were more than likely yesteryears' occasional/hard core gamers (since games didn't really become popular until late 70's early 80's).

The fact that they grew up around games and are more comfortable with them than previous generations would surely have some effect on their view of how violent games are as well as their concern for that violence. An interesting parallel would be that of the music industry and parents concern about the type of music their kids listen to.

If you were to ask an older generation of parents if they were concerned about the disco their kids listen to, they would probably say they were very concerned. However, ask a generation of parents who grew up around disco and they would more than likely say they are more concerned about the rock music their kids listen to than the disco. Ask the next generation about rock music and they would be more concerned about rap than rock..etc.

Re:New generation of parents? (1)

urbaer (778997) | more than 9 years ago | (#10560651)

I think the fact that this new generation of parents are gamers, they'd also have some knowledge of games and can therefore determine what games are appropriate to buy for thier kids.

Thanks to....? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10556742)

Shouldn't that read thanks to RedAssedBaboon [redassedbaboon.com] ? Evil Avatar just linked to the RAB article. Sheesh.

You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (2, Interesting)

vhold (175219) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557085)

The kids I knew who were banned from watching hardly any TV were all relatively more intelligent then their peers, but also were lacking socially quite badly.

The kids I knew who were not banned from watching TV, but had hardly watched it because they had constructive hobbies and parents that supported that, were relatively more intelligent then their peers but also had friends.

Re:You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (3, Insightful)

Deagol (323173) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557397)

The kids I knew who were banned from watching hardly any TV were all relatively more intelligent then their peers, but also were lacking socially quite badly.

You're shittin' us, right? Or are you equating popular culture with socialization? Or perhaps that the kinds of folks in your neck of the woods that would forbid their kids to watch TV are more on the extreme side of things (such as hardcore Christian fundies or something). Don't assume causation with the correlation of your observations.

My household hasn't watched broadcast TV of any kind for 2 years. My family, when it watches the tube, watches movies or TV shows we own or rent from Netflix.

My kids are pretty well adjusted, having friends and all.

I have noted a slight disconnect from pop culture and its memes and references, so I assume my kids do, too. I can't think of specific examples right now, but it would be akin to me not knowing what "master of my domain", "sponge worthy", or "going commando" meant had I not watched TV during the heydays of Sienfeld and Friends.

While I do think cultural references of this kind are slightly enriching for the human experience, I can't reasonably argue that their absense is something to be concerned about.

Re:You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (2, Insightful)

vhold (175219) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557509)

My point is that the parents who make a big deal out of preventing their children from exposure are creating a void without neccesarily putting anything there, and that the parents that instead try to fill their kids' lives with something positive are indirectly pushing TV out of it because there is simply no room.

Re:You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (1)

Mattintosh (758112) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557543)

If you read his comment correctly and realize (again, correctly) that it's a contrast between two approaches to parenting, you'll see the difference.

One group of parents is illustrated to be excessively strict, yet distant and unsupporting. They ban their children from watching TV, yet do nothing to fill their child's time.

The other group of parents is illustrated to be more balanced in their approach, not banning TV, but discouraging it, all the while giving their children something better to do.

The first group has smart, yet emotionally stunted children. The second group has emotionally balanced children, yet with even higher intelligence (in general).

Re:You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (2, Interesting)

DarkAdonis (810354) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557820)

My parents never restricted me from watching TV when I was growing up. Today, I probably "watch" about 3hrs of TV per week, and that's only because I'd be in the living room while my roommate watches TV. The interesting thing, is that my roommate's parents restricted her from watching TV when she was growing up, but today, she watches alot of TV. This is also true of people I've met who had similar restrictions or people who did not have cable TV when they were young. My point is that I haven't seen that placing these kind of no-TV restrictions actually work. I find that a person who watches alot of TV are not necessarily TV junkies and given an alternative activity that is interesting to that person, would rather engage in that activity. I'm no parent, but I think if you allow your kid the opportunity to explore other activities, the kid will limit his own TV watching.

Re:You don't subtract bad exposure, you add good. (1)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 9 years ago | (#10559567)

Same here... Only thing I wasnt allowed to watch was MTV, today I think I watch maybe 2-3 hours a week and its usually like law and order or the news. And I had cable growing up...

Simply put people who are exposed to TV early find it to just not be that interesting when they see the SAME things over and over in a different shell. Ill watch something if its new, but the minute it becomes like everything else Im back to dooing other things like reading.

Great! (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557340)

Great!

Now back to Bloodrayne 2... I've figured out the combo where you whip them into the fireplace, but I don't have the angle right to throw them into the elk antlers where they get impaled...

Weak minds will believe anything (0)

infonography (566403) | more than 9 years ago | (#10557471)

We have yet to rid violence from this planet, either by persuasive arguements or main force. Video games are no where near has violent as your back yard is for the insects that live there.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...