Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

176 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

GNAA announces victory over Matthew Tanner Bonig (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603215)

GNAA announces victory over Matthew Tanner Bonig

GNAA freedom fighters attack mbonig into submission

Cakedrink KillsPics - Sinclair Broadcasting Correspondent

In the GNAA.s continued effort to combat mindless idiocy, blogging, and bigoted oppression of gay nigger rights, GNAA member Penisbird has announced victory over mindless slashbot and blogger [blogspot.com] mbonig.

In true Hitlerian fashion, mbonig wanted to deny freedom speech to gay black men under the guise of his own nazi-esque values of censorship. .Gasgaynigs., mbonig was quoted as saying to a swooning crowd of neo-nazis ready for a golden shower of his drivel.

GNAA member Penisbird, who is considered of one of the most gifted and intelligent members, according to the GNAT or Gay Nigger Aptitude Test, excellently crafted his arguments against the nazi, as shown here [slashdot.org] , and was able to counter every point with concise and irrefutable facts. In the usual Slashdot hypocrisy, anyone who fights for the legitimate rights of the unpopular is considered a troll and this thread was no different.

The tragic defeat on Slashdot forced mbonig to retreat to his blog [blogspot.com] and admit that the GNAA.s posts are free speech (unlike what he said earlier) while at the same time slandering Penisbird.s impeccable character. Penisbird does not tolerate such insolence and proceeded to attack his wretched blog.

In the most skilled fashion, Penisbird proceeded to flood his blog as a form of legitimate protest. Like an relentless flood of nigger cocks, Mbonig (which is an intentional slur against niggers) tried to squelch the massive flood of protest posts by deleting hundreds of comments but could not keep up. His next step was to disable commenting for a couple of days. The very morning he restored comments and declared that by requiring logins, the attacks would cease. Wrong. Penisbird was on the attack and continued the assault.

After the morning offensive, mbonig quickly and embarrassingly disabled comments, declaring that .script kiddies. (the scripts in question consist of Microsoft Internet Explorer and the refresh button) do not deserve the same free speech rights he enjoys. However, Penisbird was victorious in that he caused mbonig to permanently disable comments. Penisbird vows to keep up the assault on his Slashdot posts and anywhere else he tries to oppress free speech rights online.

mbonig claims that he is not hiding who he is. Really? What is your last name? Where do you live? Oh, it seems that you are hiding who you are. Hypocrite.

About mbonig:

mbonig is a mindless Slashbot and blogger [blogspot.com] who constantly tries to oppress free speech online. He is a known neo-Nazi and supports the gassing of Gay Men of African Descent.

Mbonig is currently offering gmail invites, You may partake his invitation below:
https://gmail.google.com/gmail/a-b0ab39f1a8-51723 [google.com]

About GNAA:

GNAA
(GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the first organization which
gathers GAY NIGGERS from all over America and abroad for one common goal - being GAY NIGGERS.

Are you GAY [dickcream.com] ?
Are you a NIGGER [mugshots.org] ?
Are you a GAY NIGGER [gay-sex-access.com] ?

If you answered "Yes" to all of the above questions, then GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) might be exactly what you've been looking for!
Join GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) today, and enjoy all the benefits of being a full-time GNAA member.
GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the fastest-growing GAY NIGGER community with THOUSANDS of members all over United States of America. You, too, can be a part of GNAA if you join today!

Why not? It's quick and easy - only 3 simple steps!

  • First, you have to obtain a copy of GAY NIGGERS FROM OUTER SPACE THE MOVIE [imdb.com] and watch it. (You can download the movie (~130mb) using BitTorrent, by clicking here [idge.net] .
  • Second, you need to succeed in posting a GNAA "first post" on slashdot.org [slashdot.org] , a popular "news for trolls" website
  • Third, you need to join the official GNAA irc channel #GNAA on irc.gnaa.us, and apply for membership.
Talk to one of the ops or any of the other members in the channel to sign up today!

If you are having trouble locating #GNAA, the official GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA irc channel, you might be on a wrong irc network. The correct network is Niggernet, and you can connect to irc.gnaa.us as our official server.

If you have mod points and would like to support GNAA, please moderate this post up.

.________________________________________________. fucking
| ______________________________________._a,____ | CmdrTaco
| _______a_._______a_______aj#0s_____aWY!400.___ | will
| __ad#7!!*P____a.d#0a____#!-_#0i___.#!__W#0#___ | he ever learn that
| _j#'_.00#,___4#dP_"#,__j#,__0#Wi___*00P!_"#L,_ | GNAA is totally
| _"#ga#9!01___"#01__40,_"4Lj#!_4#g_________"01_ | unstoppable? Teamed
| ________"#,___*@`__-N#____`___-!^_____________ | up with the other troll groups,
| _________#1__________?________________________ | GNAA will absolutely own
| _________j1___________________________________ | the shitty place that is slashdot.
| ____a,___jk_GAY_NIGGER_ASSOCIATION_OF_AMERICA_ | Just remember, the longer the lines are,
| ____!4yaa#l___________________________________ | the smaller CmdrTaco's penis.
| ______-"!^____________________________________ | This logo is (C) 2003, 2004 GNAA [idge.net]
` _______________________________________________'

(C) GNAA 2004

Re:GNAA announces victory over Matthew Tanner Boni (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604374)

Dear penisbird,

You seem to have a lot of drive and enthusiasm, which is obviously not finding a productive outlet, have you thought about getting some part-time work in IT? Perhaps try doing some volunteer work!

Maybe you've not yet graduated and are going through that 'difficult' stage. Girls don't seem to like you, the sporty kids bully you. We've all been there, it'll pass. The simple fact that is girls mature faster than boys.

In a few years, you'll look back on these days and laugh! :)

Anyway, take care.

AC.

Re:GNAA announces victory over Matthew Tanner Boni (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604889)

Racist.

Re:GNAA announces victory over Matthew Tanner Boni (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10605012)

Ageist.

Other industries (5, Interesting)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603219)

The clothing industry actually established something like this in the 1930's. My father worked in the garment district in Manhattan and he said it made a big difference.

Re:Other industries (5, Interesting)

Feminist-Mom (816033) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603241)

Yes, that actually was initiated by the Mayor of New York, La Guardia, when he first took office. The garment industry had quite a reputation for being uncivilized. You can even get a sense of it today if you go to that part of town.

Re:Other industries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603311)

the garment district is a ratrace

mascilinist dad

Triangle Shirtwaist fire (4, Informative)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603624)

Yes, that actually was initiated by the Mayor of New York, La Guardia, when he first took office.

Only took twenty years since the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire [eyewitnesstohistory.com] for someone to do something about it. Wonderful, mmm?

Re:Other industries (5, Interesting)

Kenja (541830) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603286)

"it made a big difference."

Yes it did. Now most clothes are made by pre-teens in third world sweatshops.

Re:Other industries (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603380)

Now most clothes are made by pre-teens in third world sweatshops.

Yeah, it's deplorable. Some of that stuff just falls apart at the seams in no time at all! Damn kids can't get anything right...

Re:Other industries (1)

The Only Druid (587299) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603633)

Come on, they're children! How refined were your fine-motor skills at age seven?

Re:Other industries (2, Funny)

Oliver Wendell Jones (158103) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603694)

not very... that's why I had to work in a coal mine... as a shovel.

recent difference (2, Informative)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603454)

For 70 years after such shocking events as the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire [cornell.edu] , American labor organized to protect the labor market, its workers, and the economy that depends on it from the shortsighted profit hunger of American corporations. In global ports like Boston, New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere, American labor turned skills, productivity, quality and reliability into globally superior goods, filling global markets with American brands. But American corporations turned the tides in the 1980s, undermining labor and outsourcing manufacturing to other countries without the labor or environment protections in the US, while reducing those safeguards here. So yes, now we've got overseas sweatshops polluting the globe, while a few shareholders and executives keep the profits. After generations of success under American labor laws, that's the consequence of selling out labor to the profiteers.

Re:recent difference (0)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603721)

Very well said.

We are a nation of Law and Democracy. Corporatism is neither lawful nor democratic, as it is an engine with the extremely effecient wheels of chaos and the limitless engine of greed.

We would be fools to ban Corporatism, but bigger fools still to let it lead us to anarchy and feudalism.

Re:recent difference (4, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603985)

228 years ago, the Continental Congress turned the tables on the government, harnessing it in service of the people, relegating its rights to its natural inferiority to people. Rather than ban the government, they created the most stable and productive government structure since then, possibly ever. We the people allowed the creation of the synthetic "person", the corporation, by ignoring the legal deceptions at its creation in California in the late 1800s, and feeding its growth through the 20th Century for its benefit to those who administer power in our country. But just as it took hundreds of years for English colonists to realize they were Americans, who could no longer suffer the injustice and exploitation of monarchy, after about as long under the corporation, we must rip that power structure out, and replace it with a manageable system that keeps its productivity, enhances it, by subordinating it to human rights. Along the way, we'll reset much of the creeping autocracy that corporations have institutionalized in our government, too. We've got a lot of work to do, but the alternative is all work and no pay.

Re:Other industries (3, Insightful)

prell (584580) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603365)

A generic code of conduct for all of the plants operated by a company (i.e. the same treatment, rights and possibly adjusted pay) is a very positive and heartening ideal. Treating workers in a foreign country the same as the workers in the company's home country (assuming the latter treatment is better) is, without hyperbole, one of the most important steps towards a fair world without resentment, and in which we can have a happy conscience. Imagine a clean electronics factory in a neighborhood that is otherwise strewn with rubble and terrorized by drug smugglers. It's hard to give a bad impression of the United States when their companies begin lifting people so substantially (and fairly) out of crippling poverty and other hardships.

I paint a pretty idyllic picture, and the reality wouldn't be perfect, but I imagine it would be better than our current situation, and as a side effect it would create a (possibly artificial) quasi-level playing field, so you wouldn't see jobs bittersweetly given (outsourced) to people in other countries just because their standard of living is so low.

Now, we just need to make this law.

Re:Other industries (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603581)

Wait until the companies move their head offices to Taiwan.

Equal pay for all you say?
You mean you actually NEED a lunch break?

Re:Other industries (2, Insightful)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604114)

"...but I imagine it would be better than our current situation, and as a side effect it would create a (possibly artificial) quasi-level playing field, so you wouldn't see jobs bittersweetly given (outsourced) to people in other countries just because their standard of living is so low. Now, we just need to make this law. "

And in the meantime, bring our (US) standard of living down...just so we can all reach a low level of equilibrium....?

Please don't make that a law. I don't mind another country's standard of living rising...but, not at the expense of my own, and certainly not with my own country's corporations actively moving to make this a reality.

Re:Other industries (3, Insightful)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604162)

Now, we just need to make this law.


WHY the HELL would you bring the GOVERNMENT into this? What the HELL are you thinking. Name one thing that the Government didn't screw up the moment it stucks its fingers into the pie?

It is THIS kind of thinking that gets people the GWB and JFK (current) elected to office. If the damn government got out of the way and let people actually do stuff, things would be 10 times better.

But NOOOOO. We have to have the government regulate the HELL out of everything to the point that it multiplies the cost of doing anything.

The Government causes more problems than it solves.

Re:Other industries (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604236)

Ok ok, you can go ahead and marry your cousin. Sheesh.
- The Government

Re:Other industries (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604309)

It is THIS kind of thinking that gets people the GWB and JFK (current) elected to office. If the damn government got out of the way and let people actually do stuff, things would be 10 times better.


If you took your head out of your ass for a second, you might notice that the big bad government is actually made up of real, live, people actually doing "stuff". The idea that everything the government does is immediately inferior to what corporations do is at best outdated and at worse completely incorrect. For every government fuck up you present as "evidence", I can list 100 corporations that fucked things up worse. The big difference, when the government fucks up, heads roll, when corporations fuck up, the executive directors take their multi-million dollar bonuses and leave the blue collar types to take the hit.

Re:Other industries (1)

Bun (34387) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604447)

Treating workers in a foreign country the same as the workers in the company's home country (assuming the latter treatment is better) is, without hyperbole, one of the most important steps towards a fair world without resentment, and in which we can have a happy conscience.
...except that the foreign workers won't be treated the same as those in the home country. The companies are basically agreeing to comply with the laws of the nations in which the factories are located (which they must do anyway), with the additions of forbidding torture, discrimination, and forced/indentured/child labour:

"For example, the labor standards section of the industry's code states that forced, bonded or indentured labor is not allowed, nor is child labor. Discrimination and harsh or inhumane treatment are forbidden; companies must comply with minimum-wage laws; and overtime and benefits policies must be in accordance with the law where the factories are located."

Frankly, it is a rather minimal set of standards they are requiring themselves to maintain.

West = #1 on Environment and Worker's Rights (1)

reporter (666905) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603486)

The clothing industry actually established something like this in the 1930's. My father worked in the garment district in Manhattan and he said it made a big difference.

The West has always been on the forefront of human rights and worker's rights. Ditto for the environment.

Check out the last study [igc.org] by the Silicon Valley Toxics coalition. The study evaluates each computer companies' commitment to the environment. The top-ranked companies were all companies based in Western countries (e.g. Japan and the USA) and run on Western principles.

In the study, Dell received a failing grade. That Dell is finally cleaning up its act is good news.

Note that all the Korean and Chinese (including Taiwanese and Hong Kong) companies received failing grades. Interestingly, Korean and Chinese clothing factories in South America and Southeast Asia are notorious for abusing garment workers [sweatshopwatch.org] . Abuse includes beatings and rape.

The companies that treat garment workers best are American [reebok.com] and Japanese.

If you hate the state of world affairs, join me in writing the following on the November ballot.

president: Bill O'Reilly [billoreilly.com]
vice-president: Tammy Bruce [tammybruce.com]

Your sig is funny. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603607)

A president who is more of the same while grabbing at those under him; A lier, a cheat, and a big mouth who refuses to take ANY responsibility for his action.

A lesbian who is hated by her own party and even the admin (I suspect that she must really hate herself).

They will really change things.

Re:West = #1 on Environment and Worker's Rights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604232)

If you hate the state of world affairs ...

... vote Nader.

Re:West = #1 on Environment and Worker's Rights (1)

GreyPoopon (411036) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604238)

If you hate the state of world affairs, join me in writing the following on the November ballot.

I'll say the same thing I told one of my colleagues here at work... I don't believe any vote is ever wasted, but this year really requires some hard decision making. Kerry and Bush are just about tied in the polls. We can be pretty sure one of them will win. If you choose to vote for someone who is neither Democrat nor Republican, your vote will not be wasted. It will help strengthen whatever party your candidate belongs to, so that they have a greater chance of winning a future election. But you have to balance that desire against how much you care about whether Kerry or Bush wins. If you are truly against either one of them (and it doesn't matter which), you might be better off voting for the lesser of two evils. On the other hand, if you really don't care that much about which of them wins, you should by all means vote for your favorite candidate. The decision would be much easier if there was a clear lead in the race.

No Vote is Wasted if ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604898)

No vote is wasted if the person casting the vote has made an effort to learn about the issues.

Furthermore, voting for Bill O'Reilly will not be a wasted vote even if he cannot win. Indeed, he cannot win even if he receives more than 50% of the popular vote in all the states because, by the rules of most states, even a write-in candidate must register his candidacy.

However, if O'Reilly receives a sufficiently large percentage of the vote, then he can alter politics for the next decade. Consider Ross Perot. He lost the election, but because he received a large percentage of the popular vote, his ideas won. The Republican party adopted most of his ideas in "The Contract with America", and most of them became law. A good example is "workfare".

So, let's rebuild America into the "shining city on the hill". Write the following on the November ballot.

president: Bill O'Reilly [billoreilly.com]
vice-president: Tammy Bruce [tammybruce.com]

Re:Other industries (1)

thomasdelbert (44463) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603789)

"Those who fail to study history are doomed to repeat it." Nike tried this. They took a lot of flak for the way the asian third-party manufacturers operate, especially in regards to the human rights of their employees.

In response, Nike implemented several programs to enforce a formal code of conduct on their contractors, making them give their workers a bill-of-rights card to wear, pay their workers at least minimum wage, and limit their hours.

Whenever an auditor comes, they will always learn that their factories are always run strictly according to the code-of-conduct specified by Nike... ...only because the contractors instruct their employees to lie to auditors or get fired. The contractors instruct their employees not to complain about "rights" violations or they get fired. The contractors prolly had several sets of books too, one for the tax man, one for Nike auditors, and one for their real day-to-day operations.

The point is that a code of conduct is very difficult to enforce when contractors put up a strong resistance and are very skilled at lying to naive American companies.

"If you want to do things right, you ahve to do it yourself".

- Thomas;

wow... (1)

Low2000 (606536) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603223)

Can't we all just get along...? Erm... wait. Wow. I'm shocked! They are getting along!

Re: hike the price damn the users... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603288)

all big corp biz get along, where you been? hike the price damn the user...

No more polluting, no more poisoning of workers? (2, Insightful)

Trigun (685027) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603236)

What will they think of next? I guess that the dollar isn't worth as much as it once was, as it seems to take more of 'em to buy out these corp's ethics.

Smoke that Enron!

The Weak Dollar (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603377)

What will they think of next? I guess that the dollar isn't worth as much as it once was, as it seems to take more of 'em to buy out these corp's ethics.

The almighty buck is weaker than you think. There was an interesting discussion going on on alt.fan.pratchett regarding where books are coming from. Even Euro booksellers are shipping US printed copies of Going Postal (the latest book) because they can get them cheaper than the UK editions. A big clue as to which you have is the cover (US: Arm reaching out of a stack of envelopes, UK: A central man in a gold uniform in a scene reminiscent of the Star Wars Ep:IV poster)

So we're exporting some things, thanks to Europe getting their sh!t together and developing a strong Euro. They can feel good about buying from us for taking care of our environment, even if many workers are now in parttime jobs w/o healthcare, pension, etc. Maybe this is the way to get our manufacturing base back together? Let the dollar slide some more.

They're just figuring this out??? (1)

Virtucon (127420) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603261)

Man, shipping jobs overseas is old hat and the same old model applies. The low wages = low standards of living. Keep them pinned down, keep wages low. But yes, we're making profits and selling our stuff cheap. This is a rehash, anybody ever remember Phil Knight and Nike's fiasco on this? So, now it's the manufacturers turn.

I watched the Discovery program on the IT boom in Bangalore, a few yards away, kids being left unattended while their parents work in a glass sweat shop.

Anybody out there have some Wipro TP?

You're WRONG, atleast about the documentary (2, Insightful)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603424)

This article is mainly about Hardware/Electronics companies where most of the work is done on an actual shopfloor. Usually conditions at silicon manufacturers are *far* worse than those at software companies because of environmental hazards and actual physical labor.

Regarding your point about LOW wages in the software services business (which you call the IT Boom in Bangalore), most of the profits for companies shipping work to other countries comes *not* from paying low wages, BUT because of the *low* Cost of Living in these countries. For example, (according to the same program you saw) the cost of living in India is 1/5th (0.2x) that in the US. This means that you can pay employees 1/5th of the wage and still keep them happy. There's also the exchange rate factor which comes in, but I've rambled enough.

The Conditions being targetting by this Code of Conduct are not for software programmers (usually White Collar workers) but for workers in the actual silicon chip manufacturing units (usually a Blue Collar job).

I'm tired of people claiming that Software engineers in India/etc work in pathetic conditions, while most of the people I know who work live at a *higher* standard of living than the rest of the population. Just because they get paid 1/5th the equivalent in US Dollars does *not* mean they're working for less. It's just that it costs less to maintain a comfortable lifestyle there.

Re:You're WRONG, atleast about the documentary (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604169)

"Just because they get paid 1/5th the equivalent in US Dollars does *not* mean they're working for less. It's just that it costs less to maintain a comfortable lifestyle there."

While I freely admit I've not been there (India) and my opinions are formed completely on what I've seen on TV and read....

I think there is a wide descrepancy between what a comfortable lifestyle is there vs. what one is here (US). The living conditions I've seen over there...even in the moderately affluent parts of cities...looks like pretty low income places in the US. I'd venture to guess it is a much lower standard of living over there than here...in general.

Finally (1)

Pan T. Hose (707794) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603264)

No more dire working conditions at least for some workers. It is a good start. A very good start. I wonder what companies would follow this trend. Judging from which one of them I would trust to do no evil, it would be Google. From the rumors I've heard, it would be Sun. Only time will tell.

Re:Finally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603396)

Until Google starts into manufacturing operations, they're about as irrelevant a comparison here as you could get.

This will last how long? (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603265)

IBM, Dell and HP have agreed to a code of conduct for not only workers, but the environment as well.

And they'll be clobbered by the scumbags who undercut them on price by sh!tting on the rest of the world for a buck.

(Ok, I'm a bit down right now, because I was just looking for a jersey on eBay and see they sell tonnes of knockoffs straight out of SE Asia.)

Re:This will last how long? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603338)

(Ok, I'm a bit down right now, because I was just looking for a jersey on eBay and see they sell tonnes of knockoffs straight out of SE Asia.)

Now agreed that many of the workers in SE Asia are not treated according to our workers standards, but is the overinflated price that we pay for licensed apparel (esp. shoes) really worth paying? Maybe this will drive local-made prices to reasonable levels, without harming quality and/or workers rights. (Same thing that will hopefully happen here)

Re:This will last how long? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603367)

Its most likely the rest of the world that will defecate on itself. Chances are pretty good it will be Korean, Chineas, or Twianes, companies that take advantage of their own local work force. Most likely conditions in there facilities are already poorer then anyhting Dell, IBM, or HP was willing to get involved in. People are quick to blame America and American Companies for all these types of ills. Truth is though we don't directly contribute all that often, mostly we just provide a market.

Re:This will last how long? (1)

prell (584580) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603391)

And they'll be clobbered by the scumbags who undercut them on price by sh!tting on the rest of the world for a buck.
That's why this needs to be law :-)

Re:This will last how long? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603457)

That's why this needs to be law :-)

There are and have been trade laws. Notice many people in SE Asia actually obeying them? It was rather impressive that PRC finally refused to accept anymore high tech trash from the USA (which was polluting streams and ground water), but I'm hearing quite a bit in news how little control the central govt of even that country has on every little enterprise. Taiwan has major problems with metals in their well water (I think they import most of their drinking water now, sucks to be poor there and have kids develop brain damage) Most other countries are so eager to get business they overlook pollution and working conditions as merely a minor side effect of the capitalism they so badly want (even those countries which professed to be communist or socialist before.) Makes me wonder what the Nepalese Maoists really think they're going to end up with in 10 years if they succeed.

Re:This will last how long? (1)

parliboy (233658) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603667)

Aw, man, poor guy. Hey, to cheer you up, I'll let you borrow the new anime DVDs I got in from China last week.

no, they'll all just outsource for deniability (3, Insightful)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603680)

And they'll be clobbered by the scumbags who undercut them on price by sh!tting on the rest of the world for a buck.

No, because IBM, Dell, and HP will all just use convoluted supply and manufacturing chains, and guard their supplier's identities as best they can.

Why? Obfuscation and "plausible deniability". Every time a human rights organization actually manages to figure out what sweatshop is actually making (insert major fashion label here), the label acts all shocked, says "Gosh, we had NO idea, we have POLICIES to PREVENT this sort of thing, we TOLD them we didn't want them to use sweatshop labor, heads will ROLL!" So they simply find another company, in secret of course, and the whole thing repeats all over again.

We need human rights laws, both nationally and on an international level- backed up by hard monetary sanctions scaled so that they make it completely unprofitable, not just a slap on the wrist. The world court should be able to command banks of UN member nations to seize the assets of the company involved so they can't hide behind foreign incorporation (and most major US companies now do- they're incorporated out of a PO box in the islands- also handy for getting out of taxes, and they do that too; current corporate share of tax burden is about 2%; in 1950 it was 50%).

Re:no, they'll all just outsource for deniability (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603945)

No, because IBM, Dell, and HP will all just use convoluted supply and manufacturing chains, and guard their supplier's identities as best they can.
Why? Obfuscation and "plausible deniability".

Sure. I worked in the logistics industry, I know how this whole thing works with supply chain management, etc. i.e. Cabinet: Made in china, Mobo: Made in Taiwan, PSU: Made in Korea, Keyboard: mMde in China, DVD/CD drive: Made in China, HD: Made in Singapore, Mouse: Made in Thailand, Monitor: Made in Korea -- all shipped to Compton, CA and assembled by minimum wage foreign workers, BUT IN THE USA!

We need human rights laws, both nationally and on an international level- backed up by hard monetary sanctions scaled so that they make it completely unprofitable, not just a slap on the wrist. The world court should be able to command banks of UN member nations to seize the assets of the company involved so they can't hide behind foreign incorporation (and most major US companies now do- they're incorporated out of a PO box in the islands- also handy for getting out of taxes, and they do that too; current corporate share of tax burden is about 2%; in 1950 it was 50%).

Whoa! You are NOT a friend of President Bush, are you? A court made up of foreigners and OUR banks (which are mostly offshore anyway, but still ...) being held to standards of foreigners, which could affect Americans and their jobs and -- good gosh amighty -- next they'll be telling us what flag to wave and what kinda fruit we should put in our pies!! Blasphemy!

Actually, I'm all for it, but as you can imagine, the above overboard reaction is something you can easily find throughout the USA today, particularly on the part of people who are inbred and never get outside of their own country to have a look around.

Re:no, they'll all just outsource for deniability (1)

Wanker (17907) | more than 9 years ago | (#10605036)

Obfuscation and "plausible deniability". Every time a human rights organization actually manages to figure out what sweatshop is actually making (insert major fashion label here), the label acts all shocked, says "Gosh, we had NO idea, we have POLICIES to PREVENT this sort of thing, we TOLD them we didn't want them to use sweatshop labor, heads will ROLL!" So they simply find another company, in secret of course, and the whole thing repeats all over again.

Sadly, this happens in lots of other places as well. One that I'm quite familiar with are the US anti-corruption laws that make it illegal for a US company to offer bribes-- even when operating in a foreign country where such things are common, expected, and required in order to do business.

Now the way this is "supposed" to work is the US company refuses to offer bribes, accepts the penalties that will be applied by the corrupt government official, and eventually finds that they simply can't do business this way and pulls out. This deprives the corrupt government of the revenue/taxes/local employment of this US company and provides an incentive to clean up their act.

How it actually works is the US company hires local "consultants" to take care of things they know will require bribes (building permits, employment taxes, etc.), and the consultants pay all the bribes but charge the company for the cost of the bribes plus their "consulting fee". Not only is there no incentive to clean things up, this creates additional local employment for the corrupt government.

The more I learn about how the world works, the more bitter I get... :(

Something tells me... (4, Insightful)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603273)

Something tells me that their 'envirnomental' protections they are agreeing to would get them thrown into prison if used in Europe or America.

Re:Something tells me... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603317)

Something tells me that their 'envirnomental' protections they are agreeing to would get them thrown into prison if used in Europe or America.

Remember when Wal-Mart would carry American Made goods? That lasted how long after Sam Walton died? Fifteen seconds?

In America (even under King George) companies must respect the environment, but you can't stem the tide only with manufacturers, you have to hold the retailers up to scrutiny.

Re:Something tells me... (1)

Lost Race (681080) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603528)

You can't possibly get thrown into prison in America for any amount of environmental devastation at all, unless you provably did it with direct intent to harm some specific person. As long as your just "doing business" the worst you can get is a fine, and not a very big one at that.

Re:Something tells me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603865)

All right! Working for a company precludes you from having to follow laws, and work for a company! I think it's time for me to pull a bank job, claim that I was "doing business" and then get a small fine.

On the other hand, back in reality, anyone intentionally violating environmental laws faces not only fines but jail time, and that they can safely report violations ordered by their employeer, because it's illegal to fire someone for making such a report.

BTW: It's great to see that you aren't just corporation bashing without understanding the issues, because that would be totally lame.

Re:Something tells me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10605018)

About that reporting of violations, you think making it illegal to fire someone for reporting ever stopped anything? Companies will still fire people and invent all kinds of excuses. The enforcement mechanism here is that companies will always fire people and make enemies anyway, and those disgruntled employees who have already been screwed will then report the environmental problems in revenge.

It's actually a pretty neat system that way, because the logical outcome of one of these situations where everyone is completely greedy, immoral, and cynical is for everyone to report each other's violations to the government, and everybody involved will demand that the courts step in to clean up the mess.

It's good! (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603283)

"Child Labor Child labor is not to be used in any stage of manufacturing. The term "child" refers to any person employed under the age of 15 (or 14[...]" This IS GOOD! BRAVO! However... Some C/C++ prodigies might get hurt, or will they? BTW, what is the expected age of programming prodigies to attain professional level? 14, 16, 18? I think Linus was something like closer to 20 or something.

Re:It's good! (3, Insightful)

Ignignot (782335) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603342)

By definition a prodigy is someone who is exceptionally young to do what he or she is capable of doing. For example, Mozart was a child prodigy, not because he could write amazing music, but because he was an exceptional pianist. (Which later helped him write music). So I'd say that a prodigy programmer would have to be younger than 13. At least.

Re:It's good! (1)

lskziq (778173) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604011)

By definition a prodigy is someone who is exceptionally young to do what he or she is capable of doing

Sorry, but you were just begging for it ; )

www.dictionary.com says a prodigy is: 1. A person with exceptional talents or powers: a math prodigy.
2. An act or event so extraordinary or rare as to inspire wonder.
3. A portentous sign or event; an omen.

The world-net dictionary seems to say something about age, though. Perhaps you were thinking "precocious"?

Re:It's good! (1)

EvilSporkMan (648878) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603438)

You're right around 16, aren't you. Easy on the hubris, killer...=P

Wow, a step in the right direction! (1)

WilliamGeorge (816305) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603285)

Kudos to all involved. I haven't read the actual agreement yet, but from the article it sounds like a very promising begining. Technology and computers these days are great, and I hope they keeps going strong, but I'd hate to see people trampled on along the way. Now, I guess thats one less thing to have to worry about, eh?

Easier to talk, harder to walk (1, Offtopic)

wombatmobile (623057) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603292)

Do as HP says not as HP does [theregister.co.uk] .

Globalspeek/Businesspeak (4, Funny)

Cade144 (553696) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603308)

Man, I just love it when PR-types find new uses and abuses for the English language.
My favorite businesspeak phrase in the article:
An HP executive said the companies were not responding to anything other than the fact that "we are globalizing in many parts of the world."

Yeah, globalization, would, by it's very nature, occur in many parts of the world. Sheesh!

Re:Globalspeek/Businesspeak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603431)

Give them a break; they're "inventing" new phrases.

What about... (0, Offtopic)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603339)

What about including "not locking users into Windows via OEM agreements with Satan! er...Microsoft!

"we are globalizing in many parts of the world." (3, Insightful)

FerretFrottage (714136) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603361)

As opposed to globalizing in just one part of the world?

"we are globalizing in many parts of the world." == we are shopping jobs to those areas where our cost is the least and will enable us to maximize profit. Typical pump-up shareholder stuff, typical another worker in a higher paying region loses a job.

Re:"we are globalizing in many parts of the world. (3, Informative)

(SM) Spacemonkey (812689) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603443)

"It has been said that arguing against globalization is like arguing against the laws of gravity."
-Kofi Annan, Ghanaian diplomat, seventh secretary-general of the United Nations, 2001 Nobel Peace Prize

I can cut'n'paste after googling too ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603699)

"This is a very exciting time in the world of information. It's not just that the personal computer has come along as a great tool. The whole pace of business is moving faster. Globalization is forcing companies to do things in new ways."

-Bill Gates

Re:I can cut'n'paste after googling too ... (1)

(SM) Spacemonkey (812689) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604156)

Globalisation has no set direction or magnitude. Globalisation inevitably constantly occurs, however the direction can change, we call it "deglobalisation" and "reglobalisation". The magnitude of globalisation can also change, as seen by the exponential growth in the last 20 years. Anther axiom is that globalisation neither spreads nor contracts evenly. This raises the question to whether globalisation increases or decreases equality. This question speaks to whether globalisation is a malevolent or benevolent force, and is the major cause for your concern.... and infact the concern of exploited workers in 3rd world countries.

Globalisation is apathetic it cares not whether you are a upper middle class professional from America, or a 14year old clothing slave in Indonesia. If your job can be done for a better price else were, the market determines it will. Protectionism, offer little temporary security, at the harm of your countries place in the market overall, it makes you less competitive. There is really nothing you can do. The end of the cold war confirmed it, Economic liberalisation is the progressive way forward. It might suck a little for America, since you have 5% of the world's population and consume 33% of the worlds wealth. You have to continue to compete at that high standard, or the market will even you out. I suppose there is still time for you to change to a Maxian economy. But, that still wouldn't ensure you keep that job, and you spent half of last 100years beating those damn communists anyway.

Re:"we are globalizing in many parts of the world. (1)

cplusplus (782679) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603786)

That's a great quote. BUT... It over-simplifies things quite a bit. The rapid outsouring of high paying skilled labor needs to slow down a little to give those economies that are losing jobs time to re-adjust.
High tech (high-skill) jobs require a major investment to get... 4 to 6 years of college at a cost of thousands of dollars for many of us. It's dangerous to confuse manufacturing jobs which require little or no training (and thus little or no skill) with high tech jobs that require years of training. Jobs that require very little training tend to pay much less.
Right now in the US the average new job created pays about $800 less a month than the jobs that are lost overseas. If the trend continues and the outsourcing increases at an exponential rate, it could lead to a serious economic disaster and a hollowing-out of the middle class.
Okay. I'm done venting. Feel free to yell at me if you wish.

Translation ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603645)

"we are globalizing in many parts of the world."

We're firing engineers in America and replacing them with cheap foreign labor.

How about a "No Prostitution" clause? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603452)

How about a clause that says they won't do evil things to bolster their relationship with other vendors, just to make a quick buck?

Re:How about a "No Prostitution" clause? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603558)

that would kill groups like the republican (and many democrat) party.

Holy Liberals, Batman! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603496)

Now we can pay more for our computers and still have the jobs outsourced at the same time. Yay for free trade!

toothless announcement (4, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603497)

This is what corporations do when they give Congress an excuse to "deregulate": "police themselves". This agreement has no teeth for violations, as it's just a mutual agreement, public relations. If they standardize their global labor contracts, and commit to these standards in those contracts, with specified consequences for breaking them (contractual or under enforcable local laws), they'll have something. Until then, all they've written is a "get out of jail free" card.

Re:toothless announcement (5, Insightful)

saintp (595331) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603594)

Agreed! Everyone else seems to be too busy giving the companies cockrubs to notice that the agreement basicall says: "We'll follow all the laws of the country, and, in addition, we won't kill anyone. On purpose. Unless they deserve it."

What I'd like to see is an agreement that says:

a. We'll follow all labor laws of the U.S.

b. We'll pay a liveable wage (which is an altogether different beast from minimum wage).

That would be an impressive step in the right direction. This is just pablum. Stop applauding them for coming up to a basic level of expected decency.

Re:toothless announcement (2, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603714)

This agreement is the thin edge of the wedge to dragging US employment standards down to that of, say, China. They build their labor policies on this announcement, to which most of the US electronics brands subscribe when the dust settles. The lobby for labor laws to be written in terms of this policy. Then they find an excuse to lower the standards to, say, Chinese local laws, based on competition, or some contrived lawsuit, or because "the time is right". Then there are so many laws, contracts and precedents in the way of US legal remedies, that it's too expensive to undo their submarine "legitimate current practice".

This agreement, in a vacuum, is better than nothing. But we're not in a vacuum. It's a gridlock payload that inhibits effective legal protections by blocking them and dissipating public pressure for real reforms. It's a "poison placebo" that will entrench the disease.

Re:toothless announcement (1)

freeze128 (544774) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603762)

Well, they just made the charter public, and they had more than one company agree to it. Now if any one company does anything that violates these guidelines, the other companies will initiate legal actions (It's in there, RTFPDF). Plus, they will be up for public humiliation by the press, which results in (you guessed it), lost profits!

Re:toothless announcement (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604018)

They've created a cartel, and are as likely to let each other slide, in a codependency that collaborates to lower standards for all of them. And their current practices haven't generated any public (*cough* Enron *cough*) humiliation in the corporate media. That's why we have laws - these people have no shame, and little accountability.

How about publishing lowest wage paid (3, Interesting)

acidrain (35064) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603519)

How about publishing lowest wage paid anywhere along the supply chain? I'd like to have the lowest Euros/hour paid right next to the price tag on all goods in stores. It should be international law, and developed countries insist on it for all imports...

How would you react to seeing two toasters: one for $20, with a minimum wage of $3, and another for $18 with a minimum wage of $1?

Re:How about publishing lowest wage paid (1)

Bob Uhl (30977) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603585)

I'd purchase the $18 toaster, seeing that it was made more efficiently.

Back in college I was an office boy earning $4.15/hour, but the work I was doing was worth maybe $2/hour. Minimum wage laws are stupid--and ironically enough, end up hurting those at the low end of the job market (by pricing them out of jobs).

Re:How about publishing lowest wage paid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603844)

Well, I assume then that you gave the other 2.15 back to your employer or to charity.

Um... (1)

MacFury (659201) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604044)

Yeah...because working 40 hours a week for $2 an hour earns you more than enough money to buy the essential food, water and shelter.

Abolish the minimum wage law and you create even richer rich people and even poorer poor people.

Re:Um... (3, Insightful)

Bob Uhl (30977) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604337)

Sigh--that's the kind of economic illiteracy which will spell the doom of our nation.

If a candy bar is worth 50 cents to you but costs $7, will you buy it? Of course not--you'll do without. Likewise, if a job is worth $2/hr, but costs $5/hr, it won't be done. The effect of the minimum wage is thus to change that job from a $2/hr job to a $0/hr job.

There are plenty of jobs which can be satisfactorily performed by those who don't need to buy food, water or shelter: we call these people teenagers. Why should a job be done for more money when it can be done for less?

Note that low wages are not actually a problem in the US. My kid brother makes $9/hour working in fast food, for Pete's sake! Employers pay more than the legal minimum wage precisely because jobs are actually worth more than that, and because they realise that they are in competition with other employers for labour (even when I was a kid working in fast food, I made more than minimum wage).

Indeed, what the Congress typically does is wait until the prevailing wage is well above the minimum, and then adjust the minimum to be slightly therebelow. This minimises the economic disruption an actual minimum wage would cause.

Or, to put it differently, if a minimum wage of $7/hr is such a good idea, why not make it $1,000/hr and make everyone rich? Work that out, and you'll understand.

Re:Um... (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604818)

Or, like most minimum wage jobs they will expect 3 times the productivity out of you. If they pay you $6 an hour to do what would be comfortably done at $2 an hour the diffrence is going to have to be made up. Some will be taken by raising prices, again screwing the person makeing minimum wage, some will be taken by profit margine, screwing the people doing the hireing, the lions share will be taken by slave driving the minimum wage person to 200% of what a resonably productive person should do.

Re:How about publishing lowest wage paid (3, Informative)

jsebrech (525647) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604262)

I'd purchase the $18 toaster, seeing that it was made more efficiently.

A fine member of the human race you are. Your genes will surely survive your equals.

Back in college I was an office boy earning $4.15/hour, but the work I was doing was worth maybe $2/hour. Minimum wage laws are stupid--and ironically enough, end up hurting those at the low end of the job market (by pricing them out of jobs).

The basic philosophy behind minimum wage laws is that if you work a full work week, you should be able to have enough money to feed, clothe and otherwise care for you and your immediate family. In the absence of minimum wage laws jobs have only to pay well enough to improve the quality of life beyond joblessness, which doesn't need to mean that it necessarily actually provides anything approximating a quality of life we would consider "humane". Without minimum wage laws people will literally work themselves to death, as long as that death arrives later than it otherwise would have.

The one strong argument against minimum wage laws is that in the presence of minimum wage laws some jobs aren't created, and so people who would otherwise take those jobs make nothing instead of making something. However, it's an argument bred from shortsightedness, pessimism and laziness, from the belief that it is acceptable to merely aim for survival, instead of a healthy world economy which serves all, and that it is foolish to even try to do better. But then maybe I'm a hopeless utopian for believing we can improve upon a worldwide economic system that statistically doesn't do all that much better than that of the middle ages, with a large group of people having as their best choice something akin to slavery.

Re:How about publishing lowest wage paid (1)

dr-suess-fan (210327) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604347)

The 20$ toaster may last longer and be made by
your local economy. Nothing against overseas products, but shopping is a political choice.

Buying the toaster at wallmart for 2$ less
saves you money today, but what does that say about your concern for the future.

Even the crappiest toaster may last a few years. Saving 2$ over that time period is pointless.
Save the penny pinching for T.P.

( or is it )

Re:How about publishing lowest wage paid (3, Insightful)

be-fan (61476) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603648)

That'd be nothing more than political misinformation. To give the real picture, you'd have to, along with those wages, also give a detailed break-down of cost-of-living in the area where the lowest-wage job was, and also include statistics about how that low-wage offset what would otherwise be unemployment in that area.

Sun???? Gateway??? MS??? (2, Insightful)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603533)

Where are these companies?

and Yes, MS is into hardware these days. While they may not directly manufacture the devices, they buy them from others. Do they go with the cheapest, od do they buy only from quality companies?

Likewise Sun. How do they act outside of a regulated area?

Re:Sun???? Gateway??? MS??? (1)

Tyler Eaves (344284) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604041)

Well, you know, it's funny that you put it like that. I've found the MS hardware to be basically the most wellmade, durable (Outside of stuff like the old IBM Model M) hardware on the market.

Odd "Code of Conduct" entry (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603547)

Section C, subset 4 which states
"Air Emissions
Air emissions of volatile organic chemicals, aerosols, corrosives, particulates, ozone depleting chemicals, and combustion by-products generated from operations and the massive eating of curry are to be treated as required prior to discharge and entry to work."

is this a hint at more outsourcing in the future?

Corporations = Corruption (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603564)

As we've seen over the last decade, corporations are above the law. If they aren't above the law then they will use their political influence ($$$$) to get said laws in place. The sad thing is that these companies create a document which justifies their motivations to hire disadvantaged people in third world countries.

What happens if they don't follow all the codes?
Loopholes can be found and more than likely they will be exploited.

1. Hire people under quetionable working coditions.
2. Create code of conduct to cover my ass.
3. PROFIT $$$$$

Yes... (1)

3nuff (824173) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603626)

America is going to have to expect to pay more for goods and services, just like the rest of the world.

Our exploitation can only last so long before we run out of countries to exploit.

Ugggh!

Contracted Manufacturing (2, Informative)

Associate (317603) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603651)

I don't know about the rest, but IBM doesn't make most of their own computers. They contract it out to companies like Sanmina-SCI, Solectron and others. S-SCI has moved most of the work to Mexico. But given IBM's relationship with their contractors, they may decide to slide this in after the contracts are signed.

Re:Contracted Manufacturing (1)

svoloch (805462) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603713)

read the document ( or even the article ) and you will see that it includes the contract companies specifically.

Re:Contracted Manufacturing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603947)

I can't speak for all product lines, but right now I happen to be sitting in the very plant in Rochester, Minnesota where the IBM iSeries (AS/400) machines are manufactured.

it's crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603664)

Great.. there are thousands of kids and struggling families that would love to have their 12 year old do work at one of these factories. This stupid document is just part of the growing socialism. What 16,17,o r18 year old needs to be restricted for night work.. its bullshit.

Export Processing Zones (1)

thechrisproject (824579) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603704)

"companies must comply with minimum-wage laws; and overtime and benefits policies must be in accordance with the law where the factories are located." Okay, that's well and great, but many/most of these factories are located in export processing zones where the laws are way more lax than the countries in which they are located. It sounds like another hollow attempt to appease people with consciences. Great marketing ploy!

Consumer's Bill of RIghts in Global Economies (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10603746)

These companies are trying to self-regulate the industry for these reasons:
1) Look better in the public eyes
2) They hope that if they self-regulate, governments won't regulate them
3) With self-regulaton they can optimize the conditions for large corporations. This will help them to fight off smaller competitors, who can't afford to comply.

What is really missing is a new Consumer's Bill of RIght in Global Economies.

Corporations pushed forward for laws, regulations which opens up free flow of capital, investment, manufacturing, etc.

In the meantime, the very same corporations are trying to keep the old system, in which consumers are forced to act by local rules.

Some examples: Senior Americans are trying to buy drugs from Canada. Drug manufacturers are trying everything to make this illegal, becouse they want to maintain different price structure in different countries. Some drug companies even making threats to establish quota's or even not to sell their products in certain countries.

DVD makers establish "countru codes", with the clear purpose of maintaining different prices in different countries.

It's obviously absurd: if corporations are free to buy, manufacture, invest anywhere in the world, then consumers should have the same right to purchase anything from anywhere in the world, without duties, extra taxes.

I am waiting for the universal Consumer's Bill of Rights, which will make illegal for corporations to prevent custumers to buy globally.

Companies which would not allow consumers to buy globally, should not be allowed to invest, manufacture, etc. globally.

Just Another Random.Idea

RTFA. The document is a joke. (3, Insightful)

melted (227442) | more than 9 years ago | (#10603957)

"60 hour work weeks except in some circumstances" - it's 6 days a week 10 hours per day

"children 14 and above are considered adults where law permits"

"hazardous waste to be "characterized"

It's littered with zero-accountability phrases like this. The range in which this document can be interpreted is pretty wild.

Sounds like "get out of the jail free" document to me.

As a side note, if their foreign workers aren't even getting this much respect, then I see why everything coming out of third world is so cheap. It's all made by 14 year old kids working 12 hours a day six days a week without any protection, medical insurance, etc.

I've lost any desire to buy anything from HP, IBM or anyone else involved in this crap. Give me "made in the US" label or give me death.

Way things ought to be (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604097)

THIS is exactly the way things OUGHT to be. Forget Government regulations which do nothing but cause problems. In addition, these three companies have banded together in a unified way to do something GOOD (tm) for no just the US of A, but everyone.

These guys did NOT have to partner with their COMPETITORS to come up with something, let alone this.

However, I hate to be the bearer of bad news. This is NOT going to be good enough for some wacked out leftwing unibomber types. I am willing to bet that there is at least one complaint that this is NOT good enough, and is some sort of corporate pandering, that does nothing. The sad thing is, it is wackos that don't even let the ink dry, before they start harping.

Re:Way things ought to be (1)

smcavoy (114157) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604247)

Is it not naive to think that corporate self regulation is like the tax system, i.e. you can get away with anything till your caught. And without any sort of third party to monitor compliance, do we just assume that everything is fine?

Save us from the tyranny of the well meaning. (4, Insightful)

tsotha (720379) | more than 9 years ago | (#10604984)

I don't understand how this will actually help. No, I'm not trolling. Look, people work in those sweatshops for a reason - because where they live it's the best they can do. Sometimes the sweatshop job is an alternative to nothing - is sewing shoes for Nike all day really worse than, say, prostitution or digging through garbage? Is it worse than back-breaking manual labor?

There are really only two ways this can go - either the multinationals will use shell companies to get around it, or lots of people in the very poorest countries will lose their jobs. Either they'll be replaced by machines, or by workers in countries with a better infrastructure. So jobs would move from, say, the poorest areas of Guatemala to slightly-less-poor areas in Eastern Europe, where the wage/infrastructure ratio is a better fit to the agreement.

Also, I'm all for getting rid of child labor, but if the child is feeding his family, who is being helped by throwing him out of work? Child labor laws only make sense in countries that are wealthy enough to give people an alternative to starvation if the child doesn't work (because he's an orphan, or has sick parents, etc).

This is a classic example of applying rich-world-thinking to places it doesn't make sense. These people need jobs - as many as they can get. I'd rather see 1000 people making just enough to feed their families than 500 making twice as much and 500 starving.

If you really want to help people in the third world, the best way is to stop subsidizing the destruction of poor-country economies. A good place to start would be the abolition of farm subsidies in the rich world. Rich world farm subsidies have destroyed the major source of work in the less developed (mostly agrarian) countries. That's what creates the huge pool of jobless workers available for factory jobs. Does it seem reasonable a farmer in California can grow rice (which reqires lots of irrigation in California) and ship it to Asia and undercut a farmer who's making virtually nothing compared to the American farmer?

How about having real free trade, not just free trade when no first-world jobs are in danger? How about cutting some of the reasonable-sounding regulations that exist solely to keep out third-world competition. How about not lending development money to corrupt governments (so they can buy military hardware from the lender) and then saddling the next three generations of the country with a debt-induced inflationary spiral?

If these people had an alternative to sweatshop work, the Nikes of the world would have to compete for their labor. Then you would have a real improvement in the lives of poor people around the world and not just some salve for the conscience of well-meaning people in rich countries.

But, hey, isn't it all about people in the rich world feeling better?

Not a Yahoo! Report (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10604995)

Read the byline, the correct source is:
By Therese Poletti, (San Jose) Mercury News

informbative trollkoreTrollxkore (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10605016)

mechan1cs. So I'm Prima donnas, and
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>