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The 419eater Community Pulls Some Legs

timothy posted about 10 years ago | from the no-really-send-me-the-money dept.

It's funny.  Laugh. 219

trusteR writes "Always in the pursuit to rid the world of 419 scams with new and often very entertaining strategies, the class of 419eater.com have set new records in making scambaiting an entertaining and funny artform. Shipping ANUS laptops, $$$, Death treats, Audio and lots of pictures." This beats the amusement value of a Captain Kirk passport; the scam-baiters here managed to get cash in the mail and get rid of some less-than-perfect hardware.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I Fail It! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644428)

Slashdot declares victory over GNAA

Pater - Associated Press Michigan, Detroit Office

Slashdot [slashdot.org] , a prominent news web log claiming to be "News [cnn.com] for Nerds [imdb.com] , Stuff that Matters [ninenine.com] " has claimed victory over the Gay Nigger Association of America (GNAA).



With GNAA's trolls resorting to stale material which was relevant for five minutes about three months ago and enabling anyone to "cut and paste" a press release using the Open Source [stallman.org] philosophy has led to GNAA's [www.gnaa.us] demise. Netcraft [netcraft.com] confirms it.



GNAA's founder timecop [slashdot.org] was seen locking up the headquarters one last time. An unassuming outdoor mens room deep in the heart of Tennessee was once host to numerous sessions of blowjobs, anal and creampies attended only by homosexual [klerck.org] African-Americans [naacp.org] . "I reckon I jest likes fuckin' girls. White girls [malefactor.org] . [note broken link]" was the only statement given to the press at this time. Former lovers and Windows users Lysol and Roloffle were found standing at "half-mast" upon the sad but inevitable occasion.



Robert W. Malda shared his feelings regarding the event. "Oog the Caveman [slashdot.org] (a pioneer of ALL CAPS == TEH FNY), The Glorious Meept, Trollaxor [trollaxor.com] , The Turd Repor [slashdot.org] t, WIPO Troll [slashdot.org] , Recipe Troll even goatse [www.goat.cx] had something to contribute to our forums. GNAA is populated solely by crybaby attention whores who wouldn't know a rpm if it bit them on their tender, velvety asshole which is barely covered by a fine mist of downy, pre-pubescent hairs." After a brief reverie Mr. Malda conceded "At least GNAA uses valid xHTML instead of dicey HTML 3.2"



About GNAA:

GNAA [www.gnaa.us] (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) was a troll organization known for its "cut and paste" style of trolls which are written once every six months. It was founded in July 2001 by timecop, found its heyday with "ROR JEWS DID WTC" and slowly faded into the background radiation. Its namesake, a Danish humor movie [imdb.com] , is freely available via BitTorrent [bitconjurer.org] .



About Slashdot:

Slashdot is the first website dedicated entirely to duplicate articles, groupthink and brilliant trolls. Under the aegis of "News for Nerds, Stuff that Matters" and its connections with Open [catb.org] Source [stallman.org] Lobbyists [helsinki.fi] has ensured its continued presence on "teh intorweb".

Do you have an Email address? [google.com] ?

Do you have a computer [newegg.com] ?

If you answered "Yes" to all of the above questions, then Slashdotis exactly what you've been looking for!

Join Slashdot today, and enjoy all the benefits of being a full-time Slashdot member.

Why not? It's quick and easy - only 3 simple steps!

  • First, you have to obtain a copy of Linux [slackware.com] and attempt to install it. You can download the operating system [slackware.com] using BitTorrent.
  • Second, you need to succeed in First Post [wikipedia.org] on slashdot.org [slashdot.org] our website.
  • Third, you need to join the official Slashdot irc channel #Slashdot on EFNet and request to be kicked for refusing to acknowledge the brilliance of Michael Moore [michaelmoore.com] .


If you have mod points and would like to spread the word, please moderate this post up!
Vote Kerry [johnkerry.com] too.

Re:I Fail It! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644505)

Brilliant! Thank you so much.

Re:I Fail It! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644829)

Ah, you do us GNAA-haters proud with your moderately original frosty piss. I salute you!

Worse than 419 (4, Interesting)

fembots (753724) | about 10 years ago | (#10644432)

If I read the article (or discussion rather) correctly, this guy is conning a 419-guy from "LAGOS" into paying $200 cash + $4500 cheque for "large boxes of misc garbage with a broken laptop that has "ANUS" inscribed on the screen".

I hope the cheque bounced, if this guy did cash in the cheque, wouldn't he be in more trouble? ie receiving the money but providing bogus goods?

If the cheque didn't go through, this guy still can't touch that $200 cash, because there might be some 'misunderstanding' (well that's what the 419-guy will say in court). So this $200 must be held until the cheque is made and cashed (or cash be returned if the transaction cannot be completed).

re: worse than 419 (1)

ed.han (444783) | about 10 years ago | (#10644491)

hey, at least you got to read the discussion. someone mentioned it once before but are editors notifying webmasters about the incoming bandwidth spike when posting these stories?

ed

Re: worse than 419 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645052)

Thats ok, this storyis either a dup from earlier this year or it is a continuance from the other article. Google might have a cache of it if i can find it. maybe this link will work [nyud.net] It isn't a google but i think it is the link from the previous story.

Re: worse than 419 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645213)

Not a dup, old story this time, or continuance, it is a recent and on going bait that is still in progress.

This also explains why some of us 419eater readers are upset over the slashdotting.

Re:Worse than 419 (4, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | about 10 years ago | (#10644513)

"I hope the cheque bounced, if this guy did cash in the cheque, wouldn't he be in more trouble? ie receiving the money but providing bogus goods?"

Not realy, for the same reason that fraud is aparintly legal in the countries where most of these 419 scams. If the local government isn't doing anything to stop the 419ers because (as they claim) they can't then complain about this "turn about is fair play" stuff. I guess the 419er COULD try and press charges in the US (that would be funny) but so long as the guy sends the box o' stuff via UPS rather then USPS no mail fraud has taken place.

That having been said, I think all parties in this are jerks.

Re:Worse than 419 (5, Interesting)

Jucius Maximus (229128) | about 10 years ago | (#10644682)

"Not realy, for the same reason that fraud is aparintly legal in the countries where most of these 419 scams."

Are you aware that the name "419 Scams" comes from section section 419 of the Nigerian Criminal Code, which is used to prosecute these guys?

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 10 years ago | (#10644770)

Yup, and the problem with that code is that it requires the money to change hands and for the victim to complain. There is no law against the scam itself, often by the time the money is transfered the scammer is long gona (given a pile of cash would YOU stay in Nigeria?).

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

ninji (703783) | about 10 years ago | (#10644529)

Yeah, as if some anonymouse scam artist is going to come out of the shadows to get back 200$ in a court battle, where by revealing himself subjects himself to 10,000 charges of fraud for his attempts at it... No scam artist is going to publicly press charges if they get scammmed trying to scam...

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

phalse phace (454635) | about 10 years ago | (#10644774)

Not only that, but having other 419 scammers find out that you (a 419 scammer) were scammed would be pretty embarrassing too.

Re:Worse than 419 (3, Funny)

Ryosen (234440) | about 10 years ago | (#10644902)

>>Not only that, but having other 419 scammers find out that you (a 419 scammer) were scammed would be pretty embarrassing too.

Yeah, how could he ever face the guys down at the golf club? :)

Re:Worse than 419 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644543)

Read the thread: the 419er sent a fake cheque. The idea is that the laptops get sent before the cheque bounces. And do you really think someone who failed at a fake cheque fraud will sue his non-victim?

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

Mysticalfruit (533341) | about 10 years ago | (#10644545)

I guess I could write a diatribe about how vigilante justice doesn't solve anything, but I won't.

These FUCKERS deserve everything they've got coming to them. In my eyes they occupy the same rung on the internet food chain ladder as spammers, 2nd world extorionists and those people who create those fake popus telling you machine has a virus, but when clicked on attempt to install CWS...

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

fulldecent (598482) | about 10 years ago | (#10645218)

How would you know what happens when you click on that?

Re:Worse than 419 (0, Redundant)

hchaos (683337) | about 10 years ago | (#10644577)

I hope the cheque bounced, if this guy did cash in the cheque, wouldn't he be in more trouble? ie receiving the money but providing bogus goods?
He won't get in trouble unless the 419er presses charges. Generally speaking, fugitives from the law don't press charges.

Re:Worse than 419 (0)

Axe (11122) | about 10 years ago | (#10644796)

Generally speaking, fugitives from the law don't press charges.

They just may call Bubba to press a hot iron into your anus.

Re:Worse than 419 (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644658)

"hello 911? I need the police, my neighbor stole my crack."

Oh yeah, the cops will be all over the guy.

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

British (51765) | about 10 years ago | (#10644969)

If I read the article (or discussion rather) correctly, this guy is conning a 419-guy from "LAGOS" into paying $200 cash + $4500 cheque for "large boxes of misc garbage with a broken laptop that has "ANUS" inscribed on the screen".

I think we just found out how to solve the broken/obsolete computer recycling problem. Send it ALL to the scammer(saying it is new hardwrae for your new business parnter), with them paying for shipping!

Re:Worse than 419 (2, Interesting)

WormholeFiend (674934) | about 10 years ago | (#10645017)

IMO any money scammed from scammers should go into a fund to raise awareness about these scams... or some other pertinent beneficial goal.

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

Dimensio (311070) | about 10 years ago | (#10645043)

I hope the cheque bounced, if this guy did cash in the cheque, wouldn't he be in more trouble?

theFAILURE already knew that the check was fake when he received it. He has no intention of attempting to cash it. He just decided to take a traditional check scammer for a ride.

I'm attempting a little game with a check scammer, though nothing nearly as elaborate as the ANUS LAPTOP bait.

I have a default response to 419 (3, Funny)

IchBinDasWalross (720916) | about 10 years ago | (#10645081)

If I read the article (or discussion rather) correctly, this guy is conning a 419-guy from "LAGOS" into paying $200 cash + $4500 cheque for "large boxes of misc garbage with a broken laptop that has "ANUS" inscribed on the screen".

This is my form letter response to any 419 scam. Do not follow the link in it; it goes to a site with a large number of disgusting porn popups.

THANK YOU FOR THIS OPPORTUNITY TO INVEST.

I AM VERY GREATFUL YOU CAME TO ME FIRST, INSTEAD OF TO SOME OTHER PERSON, WHO MIGHT TRY AND STEAL MORE THAN HIS FAIR SHARE FROM YOU.

THAT WOULD BE A TERRIBLE TRAGEDY. I WOULD LOVE TO HELP YOU AND YOUR CAUSE. MY CONTACT PROFILE IS AVAILABLE HERE: http://www.aderkach.org/?u=Ich .

PLEASE RESPOND WHEN YOU WOULD LIKE TO MAKE THE TRANSFER.

GOD BLESS.

Re:Worse than 419 (1)

whataputz (549817) | about 10 years ago | (#10645226)

The cheque already bounced. I found out about that thread yesterday while surfing on the CWoS forums and immediatelly went on to read all the (then) 23 page thread. It was friggin hilarious! tF really nailed that dude right on the spot. 419ers deserve every bit of hell those people on 419eater gives them. All I hope now is that the scammer doesn't read slashdot and that 419eater.com is able to keep on running after being slashdoted. And good luck to tF!

sweet, and just in time for Halloween (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644447)

"death treats" from Nigeria

Hmmm.. gone already (4, Funny)

Phixxr (794883) | about 10 years ago | (#10644458)

Perhaps slashdot should change it's name to siteeater.com.

-Phixxr

google cache (5, Informative)

helfen (791121) | about 10 years ago | (#10644461)

Re:google cache (1)

neosake (655724) | about 10 years ago | (#10644540)

Yep, the 419eater site got eaten by slashdot yet again!

RE: google cache - NOT! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644854)

This isn't a cache of the article refered to!

This is a cache of the "James Kirk" article

Seems like a good plan (4, Insightful)

Thunderstruck (210399) | about 10 years ago | (#10644481)

I wouldn't worry too much about some scammer from Lagos challenging the payment in a US court. Those who come to the courts with unclean hands seldom get any relief.

Even if the scammer did arrive, how does one demonstrate that the goods shipped were not in fact what was ordered in such a way as to convice a court that your scamming activities are minor enough by comparison as to give you relief?

Re:Seems like a good plan (1)

Mikeydude750 (607965) | about 10 years ago | (#10644567)

Right...it's like if someone were to sue a drug dealer in court by saying the cocaine they bought was actually flour. The cause would be laughed out, and both parties would be arrested anyway.

Re:Seems like a good plan (2, Interesting)

Pandora's Vox (231969) | about 10 years ago | (#10645102)

a sex worker in Toronto actually took a john to court when he refused to pay up. After all, "escorting" is perfectly legal, and it was in neither party's interest to admit that sex took place :-)

-Leigh

(i know that this seems dubious, and the only reference i have is from a university paper [excal.on.ca] but i think it's pretty cool even if it's a myth.

If only so .... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 years ago | (#10644723)

I wouldn't worry too much about some scammer from Lagos challenging the payment in a US court. Those who come to the courts with unclean hands seldom get any relief.


Somehow the cynic in my brain (*) thinks of every time a company gets sued for violating the law, environmental considerations, or anti-trust issues they seem to get away.

(*) No, really. It's an entirely separate cynic that lives in my brain. :-P

Re:Seems like a good plan (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644860)

Oh, I don't know. Some Guantanamo detainees are trying to sue in U.S. Courts.

Re:Seems like a good plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645239)

And what did they do to get into Guantanimo? Oh, yeah, they were actively being Muslim. Somehow I think they have no problem admitting to that in court.

The difference between this and the fraud scenario is that committing fraud is a crime. Being Muslim is not. You can, however, be detained for both.

Glad to clear things up for you.

Re:Seems like a good plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644933)

If you scam a scammer, you're still guilty of fraud. Just because the victim was a bad person doesn't absolve you of your crimes.

just look for the urgency (3, Interesting)

liquidpele (663430) | about 10 years ago | (#10644492)

The Number One Rule: If you're every involved in something, and the other party has some crazy sense of urgency, there's a 95% posability it's a scam.

Just as a for-instance I got a call from some free cruze company for instance. they said if I hung up, I couldn't get the deal back, I had to say yes during the conversation. My scumbag bells went off, and I looked it up online while talking to them, found a nice site detailing the extra $800 they charge you, and promptly told them to piss off and hung up.

Re:just look for the urgency (3, Interesting)

to be a troll (807210) | about 10 years ago | (#10644563)

There was a time i had an outstanding debt on my credit report... i got a call once saying that they were a new collection agency handling my account and that if i paid them right then, they would significantly reduce the amount owed...

well i decided to ask them to mail me the details and they refused...they too had a sense of urgency that made me a little edgy. my scam alarms were going off so i hung up the phone and went on my way.

Re:just look for the urgency (2, Insightful)

wcrowe (94389) | about 10 years ago | (#10644663)

The old saws still apply:

If a deal sounds too good to be true, it probably isn't.

Re:just look for the urgency (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644727)

You mean,
If a deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is .

-rylin

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

wcrowe (94389) | about 10 years ago | (#10645163)

DOH!

Re:just look for the urgency (4, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | about 10 years ago | (#10644808)

"If you're every involved in something, and the other party has some crazy sense of urgency, there's a 95% posability it's a scam."

So when my doctor tells me I urgently need to have my pancreas removed there's a 95% chance that he's trying to scam me? That bastard, I'm going to tell him to go to hell right away!

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

david duncan scott (206421) | about 10 years ago | (#10644838)

Hence the phrase, "second opinion."

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 10 years ago | (#10644858)

"Hence the phrase, 'second opinion.'"

I get all my second opinions from Slashdot.

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

liquidpele (663430) | about 10 years ago | (#10644893)

In that case I concur with your doctor. ;)

Re:just look for the urgency (2, Funny)

david duncan scott (206421) | about 10 years ago | (#10645000)

"OK, you're ugly, too"

Thank you. I'll be here all week.

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

Ryosen (234440) | about 10 years ago | (#10644953)

>>So when my doctor tells me I urgently need to have my pancreas removed

It's not so much that it needs to be removed as he just wants to make the opening to it wider.

This probably would have been a hell of a lot funnier if he had said "prostate." Ah, well...

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

temojen (678985) | about 10 years ago | (#10644975)

(I'm not a doctor, but...) If your doctor tells you you urgently need to get your pancreas removed, get a second opinion. You will die very quickly without insulin.

Re:just look for the urgency (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about 10 years ago | (#10645149)

I've yet to ever hear of a doctor who tells you something urgent over the phone, and insist you schedule the surgery right then and there, otherwise losing out on some hot deal.

Re:just look for the urgency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645322)

So when my doctor tells me I urgently need to have my pancreas removed there's a 95% chance that he's trying to scam me?

No, moron, that would be part of the 5% that's *not* a scam.

Re:just look for the urgency (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645164)

The Number One Rule: If you're every involved in something, and the other party has some crazy sense of urgency, there's a 95% posability it's a scam.

Absolutely. This is exactly how I feel every time I visit a car dealership or mechanic. "You'll have to put $500 down so I can go clear this deal with my boss." What the heck is that about? Forget it. Or, "There are cracks in your serpentine belt, so it could break at any time. We'll put a new one on for $90. It's not safe to leave here without having it changed." Yeah, right... the belt costs less than $20 and I can change it myself in under 10 minutes, and I have next to no mechanical skills. I don't think so. Besides, a belt will start to show small cracks in a few months, and they're good for several years.

Re:S.C.A.M the acronym (4, Interesting)

Strudelkugel (594414) | about 10 years ago | (#10645312)


Might be folklore, but I read somewhere that "scam" stands for the following:
  • Sure thing
  • Confidence
  • Act now
  • Money up front

Right you are, urgency should always be a tip-off.

Oh no.... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644494)

Why did you have to report it now? They haven't even finished it, and the site has enough problems with bandwidth already.

Great, now the site is slashdotted.

what about violence? (5, Funny)

alarocca (683961) | about 10 years ago | (#10644496)

hows about some 419maulers.com ... instead of simply making fun of the scammers, we should abuse them with medieval torture devices and post the pictures on the internet!

Oh No! (4, Funny)

Blue-Footed Boobie (799209) | about 10 years ago | (#10644502)

"Tragedy struck today as a group of "nerds" called the '419Eaters' were killed in, what is being described as, a classic Organized Crime killing. In other news, Britney Spe...."

Re:Oh No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645276)

OH NOES! TEH 'Unnecessary, commas...' STRIEKS AGIAN!!!!111!!!

Great Stuff (4, Funny)

ravenspear (756059) | about 10 years ago | (#10644514)

They got this one guy to send a pic of himself holding up a sign that said "I take it up the arse."

i can't link it bc the site is /.

Re:Great Stuff (3, Informative)

Jucius Maximus (229128) | about 10 years ago | (#10644736)

" They got this one guy to send a pic of himself holding up a sign that said "I take it up the arse.""

See also: "I AMA DILDO" [scamorama.com] (source [scamorama.com] )

My personal favourite... (1)

Dimensio (311070) | about 10 years ago | (#10645202)

...is the guy pouring a cup of water over himself while holding a sign that reads "I SOAK IN GOLDEN SHOWERS"

But then, perhaps I'm a bit biased (look at the submitter) :)

"ANUS" Laptops? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644515)

Lemme guess, these are manufactured on Christmas Island.

Re:"ANUS" Laptops? (1)

MyDixieWrecked (548719) | about 10 years ago | (#10645086)

most people won't get the joke unless they understand the reference...

Lemme guess, these are manufactured on Christmas Island. .cx is the christmas island TLD. as in goatse.cx

Would it be safe to say (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644517)

That these people are master baiters now?

What are... (3, Funny)

TechnoLust (528463) | about 10 years ago | (#10644530)

"death treats"?

Re:What are... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644588)

cyanide-flavored jelly beans?

Re:What are... (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 10 years ago | (#10644685)

So they taste like almonds.

LK

Re:What are... (1)

SoTuA (683507) | about 10 years ago | (#10644870)

Grim Reaper-shaped sweets? Gravestone hard-candy?

Well... (2)

temojen (678985) | about 10 years ago | (#10645042)

4 days till Halloween.

Hmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644532)

Using morally suspect methods to beat the bad guys is so often lauded. Why?
Admittedly, there's a cool factor here, and I'm all for educating the public to prevent these types of scams, but using scammers' game against them distinguishes you from them how?

Re:Hmm.... (3, Insightful)

gcaseye6677 (694805) | about 10 years ago | (#10644926)

How about the fact that innocent victims are not being harmed? Old ladies are not being scammed out of their retirement funds. Only those that have shown a desire to scam others are being scammed here. While the legality is questionable, I certainly am not bothered by it.

And there goes the servers... (4, Insightful)

CheechBG (247105) | about 10 years ago | (#10644558)

Servers just succumbed to the /.ing. From what I read, guy packed 200 pounds of dead hardware in boxes and made the guy pre-pay for shipping. He put a value on the packages for 9500 bucks, which means the poor scammer at the other end will have to pay import fees or something along those lines.

Interesting note in the forum thread, for every 30lbs it is costing this guy $475. Funny stuff. He does have a picture of the 200 in cash.

Re:And there goes the servers... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644846)

Also since I frequent there, and since slashdot killed the site(thanks a lot trusteR!) here are some more details.

The scammer was trying to do a fake check scam, where they send you a fake check to pay for the goods. These scams count on people depositing the check, and thinking that the check cleared. They also tend to send some amount over what you requested, with them asking you to send the remainder to someone else(which is usually them or someone affiliated in the scam). Then when the bank figures out the checks a fraud, the victim is missing the goods that the scammer "bought," and owes the bank what ever money they gave back to the scammers.

The computers got the name Anus because the scammer called them that.

To continue the story, the scammer issued a threat about not receiving the computers, and only getting junk. The scammer then send a DHL shipper to pick the "real"(still more junk) package up. At this stage the package is not traceable, something is up with DHL. Both the scambater and the scammer don't know what is up at this point.

Also some of the scambaters found the place where the packages were being shipped to, and visited what appears to be someplace in the UK the scammers drop their ill-gotten goods off. They posed as inspectors, got pictures of the supposed scammer/scam helper, and took what appears to be pictures of some remains of the scammer/helper's other scams.

So that is all that is known at this point, and they tend to be frequent on updates when info comes in. Due to the slashdotting I doubt they will be updating this as frequent.

/. already (1)

RyoShin (610051) | about 10 years ago | (#10644559)

Wow, even with no comments it's gone splat. I guess a semi-work around [nyud.net] will have to suffice.

mo3 u3p (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644620)

about 770 users prima doNnas, and a need to play

Perfect in time for Halloween (3, Funny)

YetAnotherName (168064) | about 10 years ago | (#10644643)

From the summary:

...Death treats...

I just gotta get some of those! That'll take care of those pesky costumed kids with their shrill cries of "tricker-treat" about this time each year!

Eh (5, Insightful)

RyoShin (610051) | about 10 years ago | (#10644656)

While I don't mind a scammer getting karma-lized, I have to wonder about the whole procedure. Of course, the legality of the scammar isn't the question, but rather the legality of the counter-scammer. This sounds about the same as the P-p-powerbook (which I'm sure everyone remembers): Sending false goods, misappropiating funds, etc. However, for any charges to be pressed, it will have (had) to be intercepted by federal agents and seen for what it is, or the scammar will have to spill the beans. Both cases are very unlikely, so the counter-scammar is probably safe.

However, I suggest against going this far in the future. Keeping the guy going with fake e-mails is probably fine and well, but when you start with the exchange of funds or goods (sic), where is the line drawn that the counter-scammer doesn't become a scammer himself?

Re:Eh (5, Insightful)

ravenspear (756059) | about 10 years ago | (#10644827)

where is the line drawn that the counter-scammer doesn't become a scammer himself?

Obviously he is a scammer himself. But that is the whole point. The people doing this wouldn't consider it wrong becasue they are not scamming innocents, but rather those who would scam innocents. Whether that argument is valid is more of a personal opinion. This is just a new form of vigilante justice which has always been a topic of disagreement. If I knew you were going to kill me tomorrow would I be justified in killing you today?

Re:Eh (1)

RyoShin (610051) | about 10 years ago | (#10644959)

If I knew you were going to kill me tomorrow would I be justified in killing you today?

Looking at it from a legal perspective, if there was nothing else you could to stop me, then you could kill me with little to no negative effects upon yourself. If there was something else, such as contacting the police, you could possibly be tried for murder or manslaughter.

From that viewpoint, the counter-scammer in this case knew he was being scammed, and to stop the scamming to happen all he had to do was ignore the e-mail. Of course, one could argue that he took actions to protect others (going back to the killing thing, you could kill me to protect others, but not necessarily yourself.)

You're totally right, vigilante justice is indeed an argument of personal opinion. Thing is, if some prosecution lawyer with the juristiction gets a hard-on for a 'make or break' case and catches wind of this, he would probably be able to prosecute. Winning the case is another question altogether.

Re:Eh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645001)

You pretty much sum up what they are doing, they are wasting the scammers time and money, in order to discurage the scammers, prevent the scammers from getting real victims, and having people lose their money to the scammers.

There is much else they can do besides this, Nigeria's corrupt government doesn't care to do anything about this despite their so called 419 fraud laws, and governments like the US and UK don't care about doing any thing to prevent this. Then again, to be honest it isn't the other governments fault, governments like the US and UK can't really do much about what is going on in Nigeria.

Re:Eh (1)

stratjakt (596332) | about 10 years ago | (#10645106)

They don't know who they're scamming. This guy assumed the guy buying the laptops was a scammer sending him a rubber cheque.

If in the off chance it were to turn out the guy actually was legit then the counter-scammer could wind up in a pound-me-in-the-ass prison for fraud over 1000 bucks.

Hey, it's entirely possible that there really are legitimate Nigerian businessmen, or LAGOS or liberia or wherever. He's royally fucked if that cheque actually clears, and if I was the orignal scammer I'd make sure it did.

No need to get all rhetorical or theoretical. Two wrongs don't make a right, it's that simple.

The Cthulhu Nigerian chain-yank is still the best (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10644657)

Corny schemes (-1, Offtopic)

Profane MuthaFucka (574406) | about 10 years ago | (#10644664)

Anyone noticed the recent uptick in screwball get-rich Internet companies?

There's Google.com. Not screwball, but definitely get-rich Internet. Their stock is still crazy expensive.

Shopping.com is another one of these IPO's that made big gains in value overnight. And their idea isn't even new - they just allow you to compare prices from many vendor.

And now this one. They add the patents, but otherwise they are just a get-rich Internet company.

I think this is Bubble #2.

Re:Corny schemes (-1, Redundant)

Profane MuthaFucka (574406) | about 10 years ago | (#10644773)

How the hell did I post this to the wrong article? Guess I quit the wrong week to start sniffing glue.

Fake passports and Homeland Security (4, Interesting)

shoppa (464619) | about 10 years ago | (#10644700)

The Kirk passport is hilarious, but I doubt the FBI would look kindly on a USAian forging documents and sending them (selling them?) overseas, no matter how ludicrous the names and pictures.

It is interesting that a guy passing counterfeit $200 bills with Geroge W Bush's pictures cannot be charged for counterfeiting because there is no such thing as a $200 bill...

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | about 10 years ago | (#10644814)

It is interesting that a guy passing counterfeit $200 bills with Geroge W Bush's pictures cannot be charged for counterfeiting because there is no such thing as a $200 bill...

You can't counterfeit something that doesn't exist. It's not interesting. It's common sense.

If you offer for sale "Thomas Jefferson's Laser Printer" any normal person is going to assume that you're either joking or that someone other than the former President who happened to have the same name once owned the printer.

If you offer "Thomas Jefferson's Dualing Pistol" and it isn't a dualing pistol that was once owned by the former President, then you have a problem.

LK

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (2)

Dachannien (617929) | about 10 years ago | (#10644856)

Is it a forged document if there is no physical copy, only a Photoshopped image?

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (0)

shoppa (464619) | about 10 years ago | (#10645024)

You've got a point. He says he sent the passport to the guy, but he did it via E-mail, so there wasn't necessarily ever a physical document, I guess.

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (2)

stratjakt (596332) | about 10 years ago | (#10645039)

Yes

Online retailers will generally want you to fax or scan and email your ID to ship to any location other than your billing address.

If you send them a photoshopped ID, it's still forged, and it's still fraud, and you still go to a pound-me-in-the-ass prison.

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (1)

Kalak (260968) | about 10 years ago | (#10645130)

This is not the case. I have things shipped to my business all the time, since I'm here and not at home. Many other in my office do this as well. It may depend on the retailer, but I've yet to run into one where this is the case.

Re:Fake passports and Homeland Security (3, Informative)

zx75 (304335) | about 10 years ago | (#10644862)

Yes, but it is fraud if he purposely misrepresents said $200 bills as legal tender.

I'm surprised this scam even works (2, Interesting)

Powercntrl (458442) | about 10 years ago | (#10644721)

Let's see, these scammers send a rubber check written for an amount greater than the sum of their purchase, ask for a refund in cash - then cash and their items for free. How is this different than a standard bad check scam?

Who in this day and age still accepts checks from strangers over the Internet and ships without waiting for the funds to clear first, or verifiying the check electronically? Even newbie eBay sellers make sure funds clear before shipping. You want your item shipped now, you pay by a more verifiable method.

It seems to me, anyone that falls for a bad check scam nowadays gets what they have coming to them. I did RTFA and it's pretty damn funny that the baiters manager to get the scammer to send cash along with his rubber check, but truthfully, if you're a seller and you ship items to someone you don't know before clearing their payment, you deserve to be scammed.

Re:I'm surprised this scam even works (2, Interesting)

Electric Eye (5518) | about 10 years ago | (#10644851)

I wrote a story for a paper I work for this week about some guy here in town who got one of thses checks. You should see the emails these morons sent this guy. Hilarious and horrible English: You can make the transfer of our profit to our headquarters in London.
These morons gave him instructions on how to send the extra $2100 via Western Union. The fake check was sent from Greece in a crappy brown paper envelope and they wanted payemt sent to Scotland. What a racket they got going. The check looks pretty good, but these numbnuts used regular paper stock, notthe heavy paper used by banks, and no watermarks.

Anyway, I've heard a few other stories around here. People are just too trusting and/or dumb. They readily fall for this scam left and right.

Re:I'm surprised this scam even works (5, Informative)

stratjakt (596332) | about 10 years ago | (#10644923)

A cheque written on anything is legal, you don't have to use the slips of paper the bank sends you.

I could write "pay to the order of (whoever) 1200.00" on a kleenex, and it's still a cheque. All it needs is my account number and signature/stamp.

Banks would (and of course, should) give you a hard time cashing it, they'd probably call my bank, and my bank would call me, but in the end, after much bitching, it's a legal cheque.

All a cheque is is a written permission from whoever writes it for the bank to transfer the funds.

Re:I'm surprised this scam even works (1)

WiredOni (593210) | about 10 years ago | (#10645140)

The reason they get away with it is because people think when they deposit a check it seems to have been instantly cleared and cashed.

I can understand why people think this way, I deposit my checks in an ATM and the amount imputed instantly shows up on my balance. That is what I think causes people to think this way. At least some people know better then to assume that the check has been cleared, and believe they really have the cash that they inputted.

THE NEXT STORY SUCKS! (0, Offtopic)

Staos (700036) | about 10 years ago | (#10644778)

Car Hacks & Mods for Dummies
Hardware Hacking
Books
Posted by timothy in The Mysterious Future! donour (Donour Sizemore) writes "I recently bought a high-performance automobile that has a reputation for its tuning potential. Before making the purchase, I joined several online forums for enthusiasts in order to get a good reading on how happy people are with the particular model. I was amazed at the vibrant communities built around websites such as evolutionm.net and nasioc.com. A wealth of information is available, but the data is surrounded by noise. For every knowledgeable enthusiast, there are many more misinformed or incorrect speculators whose opinions usually spring from personal preference or a need to hear themselves talk. Enter David Vespremi's Car Hacks & Mods for Dummies." Read on for the rest of Sizemore's review.

Good idea! (3, Informative)

ggvaidya (747058) | about 10 years ago | (#10644873)

419eaters eating into your bottom line? Slashdot them into oblivia!

$Superhero: Not so fast, evil scammers! This website has been mirrordotted [mirrordot.org] !

[Cue: spammers cringe in fear, as the stampede of the nerds is rendered harmless.]

Re:Good idea! (2, Insightful)

Phexro (9814) | about 10 years ago | (#10645132)

And... you get to the second page how?

Shameless Self-Promotion (4, Interesting)

Dimensio (311070) | about 10 years ago | (#10645171)

September 18 was 419eater.com's first birthday, and it's the site where I learned about scambaiting.

The webmaster, "Shiver Metimbers" (obviously not his real name), held a contest in honor of the event. The goal was to get a scammer to hold up a sign reading "HAPPY BIRTHDAY 419EATER" -- and since a number of scammers already knew what the website was (and since 419 itself might cause the "smarter" scammers to twig anyway), it was something of a challenge. The successful baiter would win the contest. If multiple victories were secured before September 18, the readers of the 419eater.com forum would vote on the best picture.

I rose to the challenge. Though it took me until the last minute to secure an entry, I did finally have a worthy submission. I find it interesting that jonbarry, whose "nude gender-undetermined mugu" picture ended up taking second place, actually encouraged people to consider voting for me instead.

I don't attribute the end result to skill, just luck in finding the right scammer dumb enough to fall for it. You can read the email exchange that led to the pictures and see the pictures themselves at my Birthday Bait [iglou.com] page.

I've yet to update it with the final details, though I can report that I was unable to secure any nice new pictures from the lad. I got a little overeager (I figured that I had nothing to lose by asking for a nude group shot, but no dice).

As for the other entries...well, when the 419eater.com forum comes back up, search the Pictures forum for "Birthday" in the subject line. You should come up with a locked topic that has the entries and the final vote totals.

mmmmm, (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 years ago | (#10645175)

death treats.. a reward for a job well done

You can't cheat an honest man. (2, Insightful)

karlandtanya (601084) | about 10 years ago | (#10645190)

Con artists depend on the greed and self-delusion of the mark. It is the ability of the mark to lie to himself in order to steal from and cheat other people that makes a con work.


If I'm a con artist, I would love it if every mark thought he was going to turn the tables on me. Makes my job all the easier.


TANSTAAFL, people. Reality is not nearly as exciting as delusion. But it's a lot more reliable.

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