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Japan's Newest Linux Supercluster: 13TB RAM

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the hey-is-that-DDR-you've-got-there dept.

Silicon Graphics 163

green pizza writes "Following its sale of a 10240 processor cluster to NASA, Silicon Graphics Inc has announced that it's supplying a 2048 processor Altix 3700 Bx2 to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Aside from running Linux on Itanium2 processors, the beast also features 13 TB of RAM!"

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That'll suffice (5, Funny)

tgv (254536) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710886)

I guess that'll be enough to run Longhorn then.

Re:That'll suffice (0, Redundant)

di0s (582680) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710901)

And *maybe* Half-Life 2.

Re:That'll suffice (2, Funny)

waynelorentz (662271) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710990)

I guess that'll be enough to run Longhorn then.

But OS X on Pear PC will still be a laggy.

(Posted from my beloved Powerbook, so Apple fanbois shouldn't mod me down. I'm in a two-Mac household).

Re:That'll suffice (0)

danormsby (529805) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711039)

Wonder how long it would take to realise you had a memory leak?

Re:That'll suffice (1)

logic hack (800754) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711077)

Until SP1 of course.

Is this the BIGGEST sale for Itanium2, so far ? (5, Funny)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711085)



A whooping sale of 2048 Itanium2 processors in one shot - is this the BIGGEST sale for the Itanium2 chip, so far ?

Re:Is this the BIGGEST sale for Itanium2, so far ? (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711538)

No, last week NASA bought 10240 Itanium processors.

KERRY CONCEDES (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10710888)

This nation is FUCKED

13 TB of ram... (-1, Redundant)

krunchyfrog (786414) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710889)

That thing should play Doom 2 pretty well, no?

Nothing to see here. (-1, Offtopic)

Big Nothing (229456) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710890)

Move along.

Re:Nothing to see here. (4, Insightful)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710915)

I agree. These rather wasteful supercomputers are getting less and less impressive.

You know what would be impressive? Published results!

I mean they consume gobs of resources [power, material, waste]. That's not impressive. That's an American city block. What would be impressive is having to show for it at the end of the day.

Tom

Re:Nothing to see here. (0)

Big Nothing (229456) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710974)

I was actually refering to the fact that it was impossible to read or post comments on this article for a few minutes. When trying to enter the article slashdot replied "Nothing to see here, move along".

I guess the moderators didn't find it too funny, though, it's been modded -1.

Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (1)

USAPatriot (730422) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710891)

I notice now slashdot has gone silent with the political stories. Good.

It's about time to shut down politics.slashdot.org, aka Kerry/Edwards for President.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10710942)

Have some respect. michael killed himself, and he was the primary poster. That's why there are no stories now.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

gcaseye6677 (694805) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710979)

Speaking of Michael, I'm just waiting to hear Michael Moore's conspiracy theories about how Bush's little green men rigged the election. He seemed absolutely certain that Kerry would win, so I'm sure he'll have a hard time dealing with this.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711023)

It did not require little green men. Simply required one company in Ohio to have some bad math on their product that is being used in a number of states.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711041)

As gracious as ever... Hope your old enough to avoid the upcoming draft.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711068)

No, the Democrat lost.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711207)

You are a gullible moron if you actually believe that.

Oh, I'm sorry. Did I say 'Gullible Moron'? I ment, 'Typical Conformist Slashdot Poster'.

I love slashdot, it is much better than "Cat's". I will post on it again and again...

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711062)

The good thing about Bush winning(again), is that it shows how irrelevant Michael Moore really is.

The bad thing is that we get another 4 years of that Moore-on ranting and raving like a lunatic.

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711170)

Have some respect. michael killed himself, and he was the primary poster.

What's that, I missed this, any more details/links?

Re:Kerry Concedes, Suck it Bitches (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712447)

DBAI

Obligatory... (-1, Redundant)

Moby Cock (771358) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710892)

What about Doom3 benchmarks?

Wow! (-1, Redundant)

plover (150551) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710894)

I can't even imagine a beowulf cluster of these babies!

Re:Wow! (1, Funny)

KillaKen187 (794540) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710996)

I think the line should be: now that's one impressive Beowulf cluster... In Japan

Re:Wow! (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712013)

Imagine a cluster of those machines.... that would be called mmm Clusterzilla?

Wonder what linux they run, probably they need the RAM for something, so Damn Small Linux [damnsmalllinux.org] would be the right distro for them.

so ? (-1, Flamebait)

selderrr (523988) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710902)

Why is this news ? 3TB of ram on 2K processors amount to 1.5GB of ram per processor. Is this so ridiculous ? It's about as stupid as mentioning transistor count on a multiprocessor machine.

Oh well, we all now it's a slow news day, right

Re:so ? (3, Informative)

szo (7842) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710932)

it's 13TB, not 3TB. Which is according to the article: "over 13 terabytes of memory - the world's largest memory capacity"

Szo

Re:so ? (1)

WhiteLudaFan (634444) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710934)

So it says 13TB of RAM... that's a cool 6.5 GB per processor. Beats anything i run :)

SGI: Unix-Linux Migration Initiative (-1, Offtopic)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710909)

Unix to Linux migration "Time to Migrate" [sgi.com] . Maybe it's old news, but looks like SGI's pushing it's Altrix servers running Linux in a big way:

Unix to Linux migration makes sense.
Just remember: not all Linux platforms are created equal. Just consider:
Moving from Unix to the world of Linux gives you new control over your compute environment, at a lower cost. However, not all Linux platforms are created equal.

What are the growth/scalability limits for your platform?
Can you increase only the compute resources that you need?
Will you have to call multiple vendors for support?

The SGI Altix family of servers lets you run Linux with no limits. Unlike other systems, Altix scales from 2 processors up to 256 processors in a single Linux system image, and enables you to independently increase I/O, memory, and processors for perfectly right-sized systems. Altix is also easy on your budget, with the ability to start small and grow big, all in a unified architecture - no more "forklift upgrades"! With over 20 years of industry leadership in developing high performance systems, we know what it takes. We've helped to extend the Linux kernel with performance optimizations. We also know that you want to go to a single vendor if you have a system problem, so will be your single point of contact for system problems - regardless of the source.

So, expect the best - SGI Altix.

oh my... (5, Interesting)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710910)

I remember back in my electronics course when we had to design the flip-flop grid for memory... the teacher said he'd give 100% to anyone that could draw out 64K of memory... 13TB just makes me cringe...

Re:oh my... (0, Offtopic)

Big Nothing (229456) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710988)

"I remember back in my electronics course when we had to design the flip-flop grid for memory."

You mean the Kerry grid?

*cough*

Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

Luxury... (1)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712267)

pah... when I were a lad building my first machine... I had to gang nine 1Kbit chips together to make 1 Kbyte + parity... aye, they were the days... and you could cram a full chess playing program into that 1 Kbyte as well. A 4K ram expansion cost an arm and a leg... well it felt like that having to give up beer and ciggies for ages to scrape up the wonga...

Re:oh my... (1)

norkakn (102380) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712728)

that was sram though (and probably not very efficient sram)

Dram is a whole lot simpler and scales better

I wonder (-1, Redundant)

Ironsides (739422) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710911)

How fast can this thing do SETI@HOME and Distributed.net computations? Thats a lot of processors and what do they need 6.5Gigabytes of Rame perprocessor for anyway?

bottleneck (5, Insightful)

igny (716218) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710922)

Do all processors share 13TB? Because if they don't the bottleneck is that subprocesses have only 13TB/1024 available ( a mere 13GB each), and still have to communicate a lot.

Re:bottleneck (1)

lweinmunson (91267) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711055)

Yes, that's what SGI does. Large single image systems with ccNUMA memory.

Re:bottleneck (5, Informative)

amorsen (7485) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711078)

The whole point of Altix is that it's a single system image, not a cluster. Every processor can access all 13TB. That doesn't mean communication is free, of course, but it's vastly faster than your favourite Beowulf cluster.

Luckily (5, Informative)

bmajik (96670) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711306)

SGI has been working through this in hardware for over 10 years.

The distributed shared memory concept of the Altix (first seen on Origin 200 / Origin 2000 in the commercial space, and previously based on the Standford DASH/FLASH projects) uses a hardware based memory router.

Each PE has local ram and local CPUs and a "MAGIC" chip that routes cache invalidations, memory block "ownership", etc messages to other PE's as necessary. Unlike SMP designs, cache coherencvy doesn't destroy the whole shebang because its not a shared bus, it's a heirarchial directory system. I.e. PE0 knows it only needs to contact PE3, PE6, and PE13 to invalidate a cache block. Turns out that thats much more efficient than broadcasting a message to PE0-PE63 saying "invalidate this block!"

Now, as far as _all_ processor sharing the full 13TB - i am not sure.

The memory density / system image equation is sort of a tradeoff, as more PE's require more router hops in the topology. More router hops increase latency. SGI has sold 256 and 512p single-image systems, and may have gone up to 1024 or 2048p / system.

To be perfectly honest, the system-system latency is different than the intra-system latency, but nothing like it would be on an x86-with-ethernet shared nothing cluster.

SGI's big installations are cool as they have advantages of both SMP and MPP designs.. each autonomous machine gives you signle-image benefits but with really high proc counts.. . and then you link a bunch of those together to get this outrageously sized machine.

Re:Luckily (2, Informative)

jon3k (691256) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712005)

http://www.sgi.com/products/servers/altix/

"Scaling to 256 Itanium 2 processors in a single node, Altix 3700 leverages the powerful SGI® NUMAflex(TM) global shared-memory architecture to derive maximum application performance from new high-density CPU bricks." So I'm guessing its still 256 CPU's per node.

Re:Luckily (1)

browngb (823753) | more than 9 years ago | (#10713326)

This is dicrimination. If you keep talking over my head, I'll feel short. That violates my human rights.

Calculation Nazi... (1)

kmmatthews (779425) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711746)

Actually, that'd be 13TB/20480, not 13TB/1024.

so, 0.000634765625 TB's per machine... too lazy to do it properly right now :)

Re:bottleneck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712788)

I just thought that I'd point out that the 13TB of RAM for this computer, as well as for NASA's, came from the good ol' US of A - Micron Technology.

640kb (1, Funny)

digitaltraveller (167469) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710924)

I hear this is the reccomended base configuration for Windows Longhorn...

Re:640kb (1)

schwillyd530 (766780) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710980)

Too bad you still coudn't run Doom 3 on it.

Re:640kb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711091)

I'm not sure why that much ram would be needed. That is 21,810,380.8 times more than anyone would ever need in a computer!

-Bill Gates

SWEET (-1, Redundant)

megarich (773968) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710940)

That's pretty darn cool 13 TB of Ram. But too bad that won't be enough to run longhorn........

Default Joke (-1, Redundant)

Ricardo Lima (29902) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710948)

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these!

Oops!

Nuclear research (5, Informative)

Big Nothing (229456) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710954)

The puter will be used for nuclear research (bushspeak: nucjular reesatch) by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. More info about the organisation, their projects, etc. can be found at: http://www.jaeri.go.jp/english/index.cgi [jaeri.go.jp] .

Bush is back in The Seat (2, Funny)

Teun (17872) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712008)

Yep, Colin tells me that's nucjular reesatch just off the coast of North Korea, a bad omen for the Free World
I call for a US export ban on Memory to protect the Homeland's national security.

Ow! Dr. Condoleezza just informed me they make Memory all by themself, lets pre-emptively nuke 'em!

13 TB RAM? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10710955)

And KDE is still slow.

Re:13 TB RAM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712193)

Of course, GNOME developers are still trying to work out how to make GNOME not crash with an out-of-memory error.

got us beat (5, Funny)

theMerovingian (722983) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710956)



2048 processors, 13 terabytes of ram, AND it comes with a smaller, more ergonomic controller.

Nuke Simulator? (2, Interesting)

k0de (619918) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710962)

So an American company is selling a computer to a Japanese organization that is ideal for simulating nuclear explosions. Interesting.

Re:Nuke Simulator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711895)

japan isn't exactly one of the so called rogue countries..
but maybe that's not thoroughfully explained on us tv ^^

Re:Nuke Simulator? (1)

djdavetrouble (442175) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711949)

surprised to not see a bunch of
"Global Thermonuclear warfare" jokes.....
Seems ripe for the picking.

RTFA (1)

News for nerds (448130) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712141)

About JAERI

Devoted to comprehensive research on nuclear energy since1956, JAERI challenges research and development in the realm of frontier science and engineering with focus on the realm of nuclear research and developments. Projects include the establishment of light-water reactor power generation technology in Japan through its endeavors including the success in Japan's first nuclear power generation and achievement of the leading and systematic research on nuclear safety. JAERI has also attained the world's foremost level of R&D in nuclear fusion and has applied radiation to the field of industry, agriculture and medicine, supported by extensive basic research to underscore the advancement of all its R&D activities. For additional information, visit www.jaeri.go.jp.

MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10710971)

This just in: CNN is reporting that Kerry has conceded the election to Bush. That means:

1) Bush wins the majority of electoral votes
2) Bush wins the popular vote by approximately 4 million votes
3) Bush wins a majority of popular votes (51%)
4) Republicans gain in numerous House seats
5) Tom Daschle (the LEADER of the Democrats in the Senate) LOSES his election and gets kicked out of office by his electorate
6) The Democratic Vice Presidential candidate LOSES his HOME STATE by a wide margin of votes
7) Same sex marriage and other extreme liberal ballot measures fail
8) Very few issues reported from either side regarding electronic voting machines
9) 91% of people still use Windows. Less than 1% use Linux
10) Americans still don't care about the irrelevant Eurotrash opinion

Re:MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711012)

At least dems cant bitch that Bush was appointed this year. Maybe some of them will move to Canada.

Re:MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711037)

One can only hope. I would help them pack the truck.

Re:MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (3, Insightful)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711099)

Haven't we had enough rudeness the last four years? I happen to be pleased by most of those results (though not, for example, that anyone still uses Windows). But you're a cowardly troll for anonymously posting such off-topic flamebait. - Get some stones and at least use a pseudonym - Stay on topic - Avoid calling people names like "Eurotrash" - In short, show a little class

Re:MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711302)

Sorry, the gloves come off when Europeans dare to judge us unfairly just because our country (and Britian) has the cojones to oppose evil in the world. Just because you guys have given up trying to change the world for the better, doesn't mean we will.

I would post under my account, but the moderators have seen to it that I never get to post my opinions anywhere. I am here to help destroy the anti-reality shield around the slashbots. You guys need to WAKE UP and see what is really going on out there. It isn't pretty.

Re:MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712591)

You'll be a lot more effective if you keep your tone civil. In this forum, it's not what you say, it's how you say it that counts. The slashdot crowd, whom you hope to influence, quits listening and clicks "flaimbait" when you start calling names (except some comments directed at conservatives or ).

Sorry for the formatting of the first reply.

Others aren't necessarily evil... (1, Interesting)

elgatozorbas (783538) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712816)

Sorry, the gloves come off when Europeans dare to judge us unfairly just because our country (and Britian) has the cojones to oppose evil in the world. Just because you guys have given up trying to change the world for the better, doesn't mean we will.

I will not go into a discussion about the methods you use to better the world, but will share you a consideration a lot of Europeans have about the US foreign policy: have you ever considered why some of these evils in the world don't turn to Europe, only to the U.S.?

Z

Dude, he's a _troll_ (1)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712230)

And you bit. So, I'm sorry to say:
YHBT. YHL. HAND.

undecided (0)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710981)


running Linux on Itanium2 processors

But isn't Itanium kinda evil (as opposed to slashdot darlings PPC/Power and Opteron)?
While Linux is super cool? So should I like it?

Re:undecided (2, Informative)

hype7 (239530) | more than 9 years ago | (#10710994)

But isn't Itanium kinda evil (as opposed to slashdot darlings PPC/Power and Opteron)?

While Linux is super cool? So should I like it?


I know you're trying to be humourous, but it raises an interesting question: is this thing faster than the Big Mac [apple.com] ?

-- james

Re:undecided (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711094)

Anything is faster than that piece of shit mac.

good question (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711208)


is this thing faster than the Big Mac?

Interesting question. Especially considering they have roughly the same number of processors...
But from the article I get the idea the SGI is kind of... less clustered. It seems to share its memory while on the Big Mac, each G5 computer has its "private" 4 GB of memory.

Re:undecided (3, Informative)

RalphBNumbers (655475) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712718)

is this thing faster than the Big Mac?

And the awnser is: it depends on what you're doing with it.
This thing is significantly more tightly coupled than VT's cluster, and uses shared memory as opposed to clustering, so for alot of tightly coupled problems it will be *far* more efficient.

As for raw processing power, the Itanium2 has the same theoretical peak floating point performance as a PPC970 at the same clock. In reality the Itanium is likely to come closer to achieving it's peak than the PPC970 due to it's massive cache (9MB compared to the 970's 512KB). However the Itaniums in an Altix3000 are only running at 1.6Ghz according to SGI's page, while the 970s in VT's cluster are now at 2.3Ghz. So the BigMac would have some advantage on loosely coupled problems that it can fit in it's smaller cache and memory.

So while the BigMac might beat this system at Linpack, the benchmark used to determine the top500, in the domain this system is to be used for (3d modeling of nuclear blasts) it's tighter coupling and greater RAM will make it much faster.

Re:undecided (2, Informative)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711200)

serious response to funny comment:
The deal is that the Itanium2's are better(relative) processors when everything is compiled for them. The hitch is that in terms of price for performance Itaniums are near the bottom of the pile (highest performance != best value).
Finally, in this situation (price be damned), there is not any reason to worry about value, just performance. Thus Itanium wins.
-nB

Re:undecided (1)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711203)

I do wonder why they went with the Itaniums. Perhaps Intel is having an "All 64-bit chips must GO!!" clearance or something.

Re:undecided (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712263)

Itanium is pretty good as a HPC CPU.

Re:undecided (1)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712758)

I don't dispute that. So are the other chips. And they are otherwise outselling the Itaniums by an order of magnitude. Intel has been quite sheepish about their 64-bit line & the performance/price value you get isn't that spectacular. I'm just wondering why Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute bucked the trend--not saying the Itaniums are actually bad.

Re:undecided (1)

Leffe (686621) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711217)

But isn't Itanium kinda evil (as opposed to slashdot darlings PPC/Power and Opteron)?
While Linux is super cool? So should I like it?


Nonono, on Slashdot Itanium is the best thing since sliced bread. And if it isn't... I'LL MAKE IT!!

Re:undecided (1)

turgid (580780) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712742)

But isn't Itanium kinda evil (as opposed to slashdot darlings PPC/Power and Opteron)?

But isn't saying that offensive to turkeys [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:undecided (2, Informative)

drw (4614) | more than 9 years ago | (#10713182)

The Itanium2 is a fast processor, especially when it comes to optimized floating-point calculations. Yes, it is expensive and so the price/performance ratio is not as good as common desktop processors mostly for two reasons:

1. Large die area (mostly due to huge amounts of on-die cache) - chip price is directly related to how many cores that fit on a silicon wafer.
2. The Itanium2 is a low volume product, so R&D and verification costs are a higher percentage of chip costs.

The biggest problem with the Itanium2 is not its performance, but the innability of Intel to lower its cost. This causes it to being relagated to niche markets like HPC where performance is everything.

This comes as a shock (0, Redundant)

fr0dicus (641320) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711006)

Linux is a good choice for a supercomputing cluster? No shit sherlocks. This isn't front page news, it's barely news at all. No wonder readership figures are declining [alexa.com] .

Obligatory (1)

schleyfox (826198) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711079)

13TB should be enough for anyone

Honest curiosity (2, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711134)

I hear gobs about huge clusters and Linux as the OS that makes it all happen but I don't think I've ever heard other OSes uses like this.

Could someone make an "off the top of their head" list of SuperComputing cluster and OSes that are used in them?

I *am* a Linux user and I'm actually kinda curious if Microsoft has an answer to this area of computing?

Re:Honest curiosity (4, Informative)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711758)

Most clusters run the vendor Unix. IBMs runs AIX or Linux, SGIs run IRIX or Linux, Alphas run Tru64, x86 clusters run Linux. The ultra-high-end custom machines run obscure custom Unix ports. Microsoft is trying to break into the HPC market, but so far only Cornell and Rice are buying.

Re:Honest curiosity (1)

Junta (36770) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712220)

Actually, I would say IBM sells more Linux than AIX clusters anymore...

Dibs on Doom 4! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711253)

I figure this might meet the minimum requirements.

Aye, but... (3, Funny)

Lardmonster (302990) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711397)

13Tb of RAM, but how much swap?

13 TB * 2 (3, Funny)

BlurredWeasel (723480) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711855)

isn't it recommended you have 2x ram as your swap? so that'd be *does difficult calculations in head* 26TB of swap. You really don't want the kernel killing off processes because you run out of ram....that'd be bad.

Re:Aye, but... (1)

jandrese (485) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712335)

Typically it is highly reccomended that on Irix (dunno if they're running Irix or not, but it would make sense) you have a swap space at least as large as main memory (for crash dumps). That said, back in my SGI days we had a lot of machines with 4GB of RAM (this was several years ago) and 4GB disks (the vendor was stingy with the system disks). Since Irix required about a GB of disk back then (early 6.5 days) we only had room for 3GB of swap. This wasn't a huge problem because the OS was rarely taking up more than 3GB of memory when it crashed, and even when it was the undumpable data was rarely interesting.

Old Myth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712534)

... strikes again.

No, with Linux you don't need twice as much swap as RAM (and iirc didn't need it from the very first beginning).

Actually, with such big swap you waste a lot of kernel-mem for the bitmaps (managing the swapspace) and so on.

Re:Old Myth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10713388)

You're wrong. At least during part of the 2.4 series you had to have either no swap or more swap than memory. Check the lkml archives.

Not the largest memory capacity (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711489)

Sorry to spoil the excitement for everybody but actually, Columbia far exceeds the Japanses system's memory capacity at 20 TByte. See this description [nasa.gov] for details of Columbia's config.

(plus one I8formative) (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711501)

Japanese Nuclear Program? (1, Funny)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711650)

You don't suppose they ever do any weapons research, do you? Hmmm, what to do...

  1. Make sure GWB is really, really truly reelected
  2. Hint to Japanese you'll tell White House that Japan has WMD program - "Okinawa has such pretty beaches - it'd be a shame if they got all shot up now, wouldn't it?"
  3. ...
  4. Profit!

Doom 4 (1)

rrrrrrrrrrrrrob (823242) | more than 9 years ago | (#10711966)

Now all they need is a *4d* accelerated video card with 512GB memory and they'll be at the minimum hardware requirements for the (up until now) highly secretive pre-beta version of Doom 4.

itanic processor shipments - giving them away free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10711967)

SGI recently gave NASA [nasa.gov] a free 10240 processor itanic cluster [theregister.co.uk] thus accounting for a full 10% of this year's itanic shipments.

I wonder if they gave this one away free too?

Re:itanic processor shipments - giving them away f (2, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712657)

Reading through both links, I fail to see where it mentions that SGI & Intel *gave* the system to NASA for free.

The SGI press release http://www.sgi.com/company_info/newsroom/press_rel eases/2004/october/columbia.html mentions NASA having to put together a business case and justification for Congress and that normally means asking for funds.

Even if they did just give it away for the press (and I dount it). When dealing with the gov't, the support contracts are separate. No one but SGI could properly support the system, so I'm willing to bet they got a fat support contract out of it.

-Charles

mod d03n (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10712166)

40,,,0 workstations but with Netcraft here, please do Mr. Raymond's FreeBSD used to and what supplies would you like to supplies to private

There's only one reason... (1)

Microsift (223381) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712328)

a Japanese Atomic Energy Research foundation would need that kind of computing power...Godzilla!

In Other News.... (1)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 9 years ago | (#10712518)

The Japan Nuclear research team who just acquired a 13TB RAM supercluster also gained a nuclear power plant to power this bad boy. Projections speak of a 2.5 hour battary life, although Limrick Power Plant has offered their Nuclear facility which will generate a whopping 5.5 hour battary life span.

640K (1)

masouds (451077) | more than 9 years ago | (#10713051)

And I thought 640k memory was enough for everyone. Wait a minute, was it me or...?

In my day we didn't even have 32k bytes. (1)

crovira (10242) | more than 9 years ago | (#10713180)

Man this shit makes me feel old.

I worked on a machine that had 24k (that 24,576) bytes of wire-wrapped, core memory. At the time though I new where RAM was trending. I had an Apple][ with 32 K of semi-conductor memory.

I wrote a Pascal-like HLL compiler and a payroll system for the damn thing. In 24k bytes of memory.

What the [expletive deleted] do you DO with all those terabytes or high-speed RAM? Lets pretend something goes KABOOM!

I don't know wether to be wow-ed or depressed.

No doom 3 joke? (1)

Carlbunn (817714) | more than 9 years ago | (#10713216)

I can't believe any of you didn't do a single doom 3 joke yet!
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