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83 comments

heh (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756838)

cool

w00t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756844)

can i get a w00t w00t!?!?!?!?

Re:w00t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756855)

hah missed FP omfglol!!!!!

Your bowels cleansed (-1, Troll)

GhostseTroll (582659) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756850)

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Intelligent (5, Interesting)

kc0re (739168) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756853)

I hope all the feedback from the slashdotters got back to Intel. It was a misguided and dare I say non-intelligent decision to remove it. Wi-fi is a part of all things now, and Intel needs to stay with the times. While money could be made from a marketing perspective to release one chip, then release another chip with wi-fi. People would buy both, or buy one and then the other.. People are dumb.

Re:Intelligent (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756911)

That's funny, I prefer our laptops without WiFi or USB for that matter!

Re:Intelligent (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756956)

I bet you still run Windows 3.1 don't you.

Not Surprisingly, there has been an uptick in ... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756967)

Not surprisingly, there has been an uptick in hiring of H-1B workers in recent weeks at Intel. The shocking truth about Intel [faceintel.org] is that management prefers foreign workers and has created a hostile, competitive environment (within the company) that resembles the Darwinian environment in China and India.

Most Indians support this kind of work environment. They feel that there is nothing wrong with total, unrestrained "competition". So, if a woman has no skills and no job, then she should be a prostitute, according to the Indians. After all, the Indian says, "You need to compete, girl!"

Re:Intelligent (2, Insightful)

lukewarmfusion (726141) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757103)

I'm not as informed on this subject as many others here, but didn't Intel's first integrated wireless chipset run 802.11b? And didn't it become a problem as soon as 802.11g hit the shelves? I'm not an Intel user, so maybe this is solved with some other mechanism (I dunno what, though).

Personally, I like the fact that I can upgrade my individual components and customize my machine. I'd rather my CPU not lock me into its integrate features when they might become obsolete.

Re:Intelligent (1)

Psykus (827143) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758173)

You know you can probably just disable the wireless functionality in the BIOS, and add in your own card? That's what PCMCIA is all about. :P

Re:Intelligent (2, Informative)

sglane81 (230749) | more than 9 years ago | (#10759598)

didn't it become a problem as soon as 802.11g hit the shelves?

B and G work together as it should (mostly). They're both on 2.4 Ghz. 802.11A is on 5.4 Mhz. G is backwards compatible with B, so either B or G will work on B or G. From what I've seen, if you have a heterogeneous B & G network, you will experience B speeds, whereas if you had a homogenous G network, you can expect the full 54. You probably meant 802.11A in your statement.

I'd rather my CPU not lock me into its integrate features when they might become obsolete.

Which is why you have expansion slots like PCI, AGP, and PCI Express (ISA, VLB). Your motherboard probably comes with integrated video, but you probably have upgraded it to an AGP card (or PCI Express). The same is true with the WiFi integration. They're not forcing you to use their WiFi (which has little/no linux drivers). You can always add an expansion card.

Re:Intel wifi with linux support (1)

183771 (572184) | more than 9 years ago | (#10762167)

Intel support Linux. They took longer to release drivers to support it, but actually there is support on at least 3 Intel chipset (Intel 2100, Intel 2200BG, Intel 2915ABG).
Check drivers homepage:
- http://ipw2100.sourceforge.net/
- http://ipw2200.sourceforge.net/
or this other driver comparison page:
- http://www.seattlewireless.net/index.cgi/LinuxDriv ers

Re:Intelligent (2, Interesting)

Not_Wiggins (686627) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757518)

It was a misguided and dare I say non-intelligent decision to remove it. Wi-fi is a part of all things now, and Intel needs to stay with the times.

From a populist POV, you're absolutely correct.

But, I'm not all that excited to see WiFi making its way "back" into a mainstream product without there being significant (enough) strides to securing the communication.

Wireless is still not easily secured enough for the general populace, and making it even more pervasive before an intelligent solution to our current problems is presented is being non-intelligent.

Take a walk around your area with a laptop/PDA and Kismet to see what I mean.

Wot's next? (1, Insightful)

adsl (595429) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756859)

Back to an ADSL chipset? Back to a LCoS HDTV Chipset? The future is encouraging again..well maybe? "I am Intel, believe what I do NOT what I say I will do"

Re:Wot's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756981)

Actually, the idea of integrated WiFi sounds good... think about all the workstations in your company, with both wired an wireless lan! The wired one is used, and the wireless left unconfigured... what a great thing! You can now broadcast DHCP packets around the company and become the AP to the whole range of machines with integrated WiFi!

Re:Wot's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757164)

I'm still getting the hang of this, but that sounded sarcastic.

Maybe they would be doing better (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756867)

If they knew what they wanted to be doing?

I have yet to see AMD have these poor planning issues (also thinking of those TV chips that could have cut costs for consumers that were cut recently).

Re:Maybe they would be doing better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757331)

AMD is still the King of poor planning. They have the best x86 processer on the market and yet are still crippled by shoddy 3rd party chipsets/motherboard vendors. They simply have nothing to compete with Intel in the lucrative integrated workstation space.

Sure... Thats what they always say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756869)

Till it's ready to ship then they just "disable" it more worthless marketing hype.

AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy far, (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756907)

"The next generation of chips are also expect to include 1066MHz frontside bus Intel introduced this week and support 667MHz DDR 2 SDRAM."

Still not as fast as AMD's 1600mhz FSB which has been around a while now. And who cares about quadruple pumped ram when we (AMD fanboys) have 64 bits and DDR4 to playwith!?

Question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10756971)

Can I buy some of that pot from you?

Re:AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy fa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757274)

64 bits and DDR4 to playwith!?

Not sure if you're referring to 64-bit processor or 64-bit memory...

Socket 939 uses 128 bits when its in Dual Channel mode, and ALL Athlon 64 systems use DDR1... which is still faster than DDR2.

Re:AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy fa (1)

Anonymous Cowdog (154277) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757802)

>...1600mhz FSB ... 64 bits ... DDR4

We are seriously off topic here, but this sounds very tempting. I hadn't been paying much attention lately to AMD (due to the heat differences which lead to more need for fan noise or extra cooling options), but wow.

So that leads me to wonder... which GNU/Linux or BSD distros have good support for this kind of hardware currently?

Re:AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy fa (1)

xgamer04 (248962) | more than 9 years ago | (#10763629)

So that leads me to wonder... which GNU/Linux or BSD distros have good support for this kind of hardware currently?

NetBSD?

*ducks*

Re:AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy fa (1)

MojoStan (776183) | more than 9 years ago | (#10760651)

Speaking of AMD being ahead of Intel, a recent Anandtech article [anandtech.com] says that Intel's next gen Xeon server/workstation chipsets, Blackford and Greencreek, will finally have multiple front side buses.

For those that don't know, Intel's current dual-Xeon chipsets (E7520 [intel.com] and E7525 [intel.com]) share a single 800MHz front side bus between both CPUs. AMD's Athlon MP platform [amd.com] has had dual, independent front side buses since 2001.

Re:AMD is far, far ahead of Intel.. in a galaxy fa (1)

SlinkyDink2004 (812208) | more than 9 years ago | (#10761798)

AMD's bus runs at 1600mhz, but its only 16-bits wide! (and technically the fsb on the Athlon 64 is only 400mhz, as thats the width of the memory link...The system bus is 1600mhz) Intel's FSB runs at 800 (and soon 1066) and its 64-bits wide.

"Wi-Fi" meaning... (4, Insightful)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756922)

Do they mean 802.11a, b, or g? Certainly not 'a', I hope not just 'b'.

I bet they're struggling with heat dissipation and power consumption.

Probably they see that 'g' is commoditized and ripe for inclusion on the motherboard, and that the practical concerns over heat and power will be solved..

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (1)

Monkelectric (546685) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757013)

Isn't 802.11n on its way as well?

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (1)

RealProgrammer (723725) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757072)

>Isn't 802.11n on its way as well?

Yes, but it's not commoditized and flatline stable yet. They don't want anything in their chipset that might change or have security problems.

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757442)

They don't want anything in their chipset that might change or have security problems.

Instead, they settle for standards that are known to have security problems. Ah well.

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (1)

El (94934) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757069)

You forgot 802.11n, which is their eventual goal. Yes, I'd expect it to have at least b/g support.

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757267)

Last I read, they were looking to but a, b & g in the same chip. You don't seem to like a, but IIRC, it has eight non-overlapping channels, and b/g only have three, meaning less RF congestion and interference.

Re:"Wi-Fi" meaning... (1)

MojoStan (776183) | more than 9 years ago | (#10760371)

Do they mean 802.11a, b, or g? Certainly not 'a', I hope not just 'b'. I bet they're struggling with heat dissipation and power consumption.
Intel already has a tri-mode (802.11a/b/g) mini-PCI card for notebooks: the Intel PRO/Wireless 2915ABG [intel.com].

If Intel can get a tri-mode wireless card into a Centrino notebook, why would it be difficult to include their tri-mode wireless chip in a desktop chipset? Is it more difficult to deal with heat dissipation and power consumption when the wireless chip is in the chipset and on the motherboard, rather than on a separate mini-PCI card?

Also, according to an Inquirer.net article [theinquirer.net], it looks like Intel will be pushing the BTX form factor [intel.com] with these new chipsets. Maybe the improved thermal environment of BTX will solve any problems with heat dissiptation, if they exist.

Speeds? 802.11? (4, Interesting)

VE3ECM (818278) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756946)

Okay, the article is a little light on details.

What 802.11 protocols is this going to support?
The article claims Intel's main reasoning for this is to make the PC "...act as a Wi-Fi access point."

Okay, if they're not going to put in the new protocols (ie 802.11n, etc.) what's the point?

Anyone have anymore details?

Re:Speeds? 802.11? (1)

notthe9 (800486) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757039)

They'll probably use Pre-N... when it gets any market share whatsoever. I mean, really, no one is using it yet, Intel isn't going to attempt to set trends in a market they aren't even that interested in. Wireless-G currently dominates, that is bound to be what they use.

Disappeared (1)

Nomeko (784750) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756955)

Anyone noticed that the original story has dissapeared? (The one linked to in the old slashdot story.)

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&u=/zd /20040924/tc_zd/135947

WTF? (5, Funny)

Zemplar (764598) | more than 9 years ago | (#10756976)

I'm still waiting for Intel to put WTF back in their chipsets.

Perhaps it's been delayed until after the RTFA implementation?

Re:WTF? (2, Funny)

johnalex (147270) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757448)

Honestly, I read too much /. The seminary I attend has a Women's Theological Fellowship, which the participants always abbreviate "WTF" in their e-mails and memos to the students. I can't tell anyone why I always break into spasms when I get a message from WTF. They just wouldn't understand.

New Slogan (5, Insightful)

Arbin (570266) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757029)

"Insecurity Inside! Now 150% easier to hack!" I've had bad experiences with integrated systems that include everything on the motherboard. Back when, it was so nice to just replace the bad component, and not just the entire bloody motherboard.

Re:New Slogan (1)

ocelotbob (173602) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757258)

Or do what I do whenever I discover inadequate integrated peripherals. Turn them off at the bios and buy my own cards. Thus, business continues as normal. Real hard concept, isn't it?

Re:New Slogan (1)

Arbin (570266) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757403)

That works if you have a decent amount of available slots. Many of these all-in-one motherboards have two or three slots at most. On some of the cards with integrated video, they lack an AGP slot. Gets rather difficult to replace / upgrade. Also consider, I've had a couple boards fail because of some dead add-on that caused everything else to die. I would rather a motherboard with nothing but the basics (ala 1994 basics) loaded up with PCI/AGP slots.

Re:New Slogan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757492)

Wouldn't you just buy one of those then? "all-in-one" motherboards have their place in the universe, just perhaps not under your desk.

Re:New Slogan (1)

Naffer (720686) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758577)

Unless you're looking at those mini-sized motherboards, I haven't seen a motherboard with less then 3 PCI slots in a while. Your NIC, Sound, and Firewire/USB is all integrated. That is 3 cards you don't have to have. If you nic dies? Add a PCI nic. Someone seems stuck in 1994.

Re:New Slogan (3, Interesting)

timster (32400) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758967)

I know I won't buy a CPU unless the ALU is a separate component. I hate to replace a whole CPU just because it blew its multiply circuit.

Everything on the motherboard is not so great, but as technologies become more stable they tend to migrate there. If I'm just building a business PC and I don't need stellar graphics I'm just fine with integrated video. If I don't have any special networking needs I'm happy with integrated Ethernet.

I remember when your IDE interface was a card, and your serial port was on a card, and your sound was on a card... that wasn't so great, either.

Wifi Access Point (5, Informative)

Denis Lemire (27713) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757071)

If I recall correctly, it was pointed out in the last article along this line that Intel was NOT removing WiFi from their laptop chipsets. The new chipset under developement were to have a built in access point. This is what was being removed. There was NEVER any intention to remove WiFi client support.

Re:Wifi Access Point (1)

qweqazfoo (765286) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757250)

A built-in access point? Isn't that more a matter of software? All an access point is, after all, is a wireless card connected to a embedded system, which runs software that allows the device to act as a layer 2 bridge. I know many people that have turned old laptops, or PCs with wireless cards, into access points.

Re:Wifi Access Point (1)

Denis Lemire (27713) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757573)

Agreed, I have myself built PC based access points out of a wireless card. Thats definately a valid point. I just recall reading in the original article that it was only AP functionality that they intended to remove.

Re:Wifi Access Point (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758103)

Just like their "built-in RAID" is software RAID. They draw no distinction between what is implemented in hardware and what is in the driver.

Nothing changed (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757131)

no, nothing changed. The original interpretation of Wi-Fi having been "dropped" was a misinterpretation.

The original decision was to remove *soft AP functionality* from the chipset. Not to drop Wi-Fi entirely. Go back and read what was said back then.

everyone sing along (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757139)

Put your Wi-fi in you take your Wi-fi out
you put your Wi-fi in and you shake it all about....

Intel is putting the Why back into WiFi (1, Informative)

3770 (560838) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757181)


Well,

I don't have anything interesting to say. I just thought that that was a witty subject for someone that might have something clever to say.

More fodder for us wardrivers! (2, Informative)

drewzhrodague (606182) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757182)

Hooray! More fodder for us wardrivers! More units made = more units sold = more units wardriven! Game ON!

Re:More fodder for us wardrivers! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757485)

Just hope they don't have Mac-Filtering enabled. That shit takes forever to crack! If you're lucky, they'll just be using 512bit WPA and VPN encryption.

in7ormative niiganigga (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757212)

v@iolated. In the

I know what I'll do with mine... (2, Interesting)

RandoX (828285) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757216)

...build a new MAME cab. Because let's face it, what could be cooler than MAME?

This begs the question: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757226)

Does this mean the days of tangled wires are numbered?

But what about WiMAX? (2, Informative)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757353)

I hear Intel is integrating WiMAX into a chip to go on the laptop motherboard - and that this chip/core/whatever is also capable of WiFi.

WiFi(b, g) could be viewed as a slightly degraded version of the OFDM/OFDMA PHYs of WiMAX, operating just adjacent to one of WiMAX's several bands, with a somewhat different MAC. So it's easy to do with the same hardware. The DSP has more than enough capacity and runs much the same algorithms, the radio can tune the band, and the MAC logic is related but simpler, and well-debugged. 802.11a isn't that much different either, and also in range of the radio. So once you have working designs for each it's pretty trivial to do both WiMAX and WiFI in the same chip (at least if you're not trying to do them at the same time).

Perhaps this release thrash is related to that.

What I want to know is when WiMAX becomes a standard part of the laptop support chip line.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757675)

WiMAX may require too much power for a light-weight laptop. I've heard stories of using trucks to convert WiMAX to WiFi.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 9 years ago | (#10762528)

WiMAX may require too much power for a light-weight laptop.

I've heard that a lot. But I haven't seen evidence for it yet.

WiMAX can run the link farther - which takes more power. But it also uses a modulation scheme that gets closer to the shannon limit yeilding more bits per watt - which takes less power in the radio. There's a bit more crunch - but crunch per watt has also come down with time.

Yes, if you want to hit a tower mounting an omnidirectional antenna from ten miles away using your laptop, you'll have lower battery life than you would talking to a WiFi access point across the room. But if you want to bounce off the relay on the lamppost down the block - or on your neighbor's roof - or if the base station's smart antenna steers a tight beam onto your house or has a high-gain sector antenna pointed your way - it's a whole 'nother story.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758164)

For WiMAX you need a relatively large, outdoor antenna that is pointing towards the tower. It physically won't fit in a laptop.

Now 802.16e is a different story, but it's also vaporware.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 9 years ago | (#10762469)

For WiMAX you need a relatively large, outdoor antenna that is pointing towards the tower.

If that were true you'd need the same for your cellular phone - and your WiFi card.

An outdoor antenna pointed toward a tower is more efficient. But in the 2-11 GHz low-bands used by the SCa, OFDM, and OFDMA PHYs it's NOT necessary.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 9 years ago | (#10763600)

Wi-Fi usually operates at much smaller distances than WiMAX; that's why you can get away with a smaller antenna. Cellular operates at much lower speed than WiMAX; that's why you can get away with a smaller antenna.

Look at all the pre-WiMAX equipment out there -- it's all got large antennas. I suspect WISPs will need all the efficiency they can get if they want to be competitive.

Re:But what about WiMAX? (2, Insightful)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 9 years ago | (#10771112)

Wi-Fi usually operates at much smaller distances than WiMAX; that's why you can get away with a smaller antenna. Cellular operates at much lower speed than WiMAX; that's why you can get away with a smaller antenna.

Nope.

Antenna size (beyond a half-wave dipole or a quarter-wave whip above a relatively large ground - such as a handset) doesn't give you any more power. It just lets you direct the power you have more selectively, making your signal stronger in some directions by stealing power from other directions. (When receiving it lets you intercept more approximately in proportion to the area of the antenna plus an imaginary quarter-wavelength "aura" region around it, provided it's coming from the correct direction - expanding the antenna unavoidably makes it directional.)

But "size" is in terms of wavelengths of the frequency in question.

WiFi usually operates at shorter distances - but it uses less efficient modulation and coding schemes. WiMAX can pack more bits per unit of bandwidth and its forward error correction lets you pull them out from much closer to the noise floor. So (at the same frequencies as WiFi - and one of the WiMAX bands is right there) it can go farther or send more bits with a given amount of power.

WiMAX is similarly more efficient than the codings used on most cellphone systems - so again you can go farther for a given bit rate or run a higher bit rate over the same distances for a given unit of power. If you want to send live HDTV you'll still drain your batteries faster than if you want to send voice. But if you're sending voice (or anything with a similar bit rate) you might come out ahead.

A typical WiFi deployment uses omnidirectional antennas at both the transmitter and receiver. With the energy going in all directions from the transmitter and noise picked up from all directions at the receiver. A typical WiMAX or cellphone deployment uses a high-gain directional antenna at the base station, acting as a spotlight rather than a floodlight on transmit, a telescope collecting lots of light from that particular direction on receive. Just as with cellphones (or WiFi with a beam antenna at one end) you can get a good connection over several miles to a small omnidirectional antenna this way.

Just as with cellphones (or WiFi with beam antennas at BOTH ends) you can go still farther if you use large aimed (or electronically "steered") directional antennas at BOTH ends. But you can happily go miles with a directional antenna at the base and a rubber duckie at the subscriber station.

WiFi g is 52 MBps raw, while a 14 MHz WiMAX channel is 70 MBps raw. But WiFi is pure contention while WiMAX uses allocated timeslots (similar to DOCSIS cable TV boxes) so WiMAX makes more efficient use of the spectrum - you don't have to waste power retransmitting because of collisions. WiMAX can operate on licensed bandwidth, too, so you can have a lower noise floor (no microwave ovens, speed-trap radar, cordless phones, or non-system hotspots to compete with) and that means lower transmit power again.

So for distances of a couple miles without obstacles, using directional antennas at the service provider end, a WiMAX enabled laptop with an internal antenna could be running at a battery drain comparable to a similar WiFi setup running at your local coffee shop, airport, or office hotspot.

1066 MHz? (-1, Flamebait)

dynamic_cast (250615) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757660)

Still lagging behind apple, who is currently at 1.25 GHz bi-directional bus.

Re:1066 MHz? (1)

das_katz_socrates (641745) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757936)

" Still lagging behind apple, who is currently at 1.25 GHz bi-directional bus."

yes because everybody knows on Intel chips your data has to take a taxi for the return path.
of course AMD got around this by using jetpacks.


-
I'm insane I tell you...

Mod parent down. Offtopic (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10757989)

So?
Who the fuck is talking about Apple?
Go play with your one button mouse and leave real computing to real computers!

Wi-Fi to China (1)

SolidCore (250574) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757789)

Intel and Broadcom will stop selling Wi-Fi chips in China at the end of May because of an encryption standard being imposed by the Chinese government, as trade tensions between the United States and China heat up.

The Chinese government has passed a law stating that, starting June 1, all Wi-Fi chips sold must comply with the Wired Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure (WAPI) standard. The encryption algorithm was developed in China and is controlled by local Chinese companies.

Intel spokesman Chuck Mulloy said Wednesday that while his company and others have looked at the technology, the Santa Clara, Calif., chipmaking giant has not figured out a satisfactory way to incorporate the standard into its existing line of Wi-Fi chips. As a result, Intel will stop offering its Wi-Fi chips in China after the beginning of June, because selling them would be illegal, he said.

The Nand gates were found working (1)

narsiman (67024) | more than 9 years ago | (#10757965)

Intel decided to put the WiFi back because of flip-flop problems in their systems were resolved.

Sorry - its just monday

This is a good thing (1)

killmeplease (50275) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758335)

Home netwroking can be a pain the ass. I don't want to open up someone's computer to put in a Wifi card, I hate USB devices that really should be PCI devices. I love when a laptop has the Wifi built in. What is the drawback? $10 more for a new computer is well worth it when you don't have to go to the parts store, get a Wifi NIC, install it, troubleshoot it, and maintain it. That makes sense to me.

War in 1066? frontside bus of 1066? coincidence? (2, Interesting)

Alives (821196) | more than 9 years ago | (#10758461)

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/bayeux.htm I think this is foreshadowing some kinda tech war... Intel invades AMD's corporate offices? More on this story as it unfolds...

Who cares? (1)

trippinonbsd (689462) | more than 9 years ago | (#10759171)

Who cares? Their firmware isn't even free enough to be redistributed in binary form making it unsuitable for use any any o/s but Windows.
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