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Pioneer Ultraviolet Laser Promises 500GB Discs

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the i-love-lasers dept.

Technology 298

No Fortune writes "Here's an article indicating that Pioneer is developing an ultraviolet laser for data storage. Since the wavelength of ultraviolet lasers is shorter than the wavelength of blue lasers, the beams are finer and they can pack more data into per square inch. This gives a data rate 20 times more than the blue laser Blue-ray disk."

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In The Mysterious Future! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782949)

Microsoft Gamma Laser Promises 500 PB Discs

Here's an article indicating that Microsoft is developing a gamma laser [theinquirer.net] for data storage. Since the wavelength of gamma lasers is shorter than the wavelength of ultraviolet lasers, the beams are finer and they can pack more data into per square inch. This gives a data rate 1,000,000 times more than the ultraviolet laser discs.

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (5, Funny)

SpookyFish (195418) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782980)


Sweet, so Office XP 2k13 will still fit on one disc!

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783223)

Yes, but users will get so frustrated during the installation and multiple activation steps, that they'll turn green, grow huge muscles, and trash everything in site.

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (2, Funny)

Matimus (598096) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783242)

I know that this is supposed to be funny (it is funny). But I just have to point out that 2k13 takes the same number of characters as 2013, and is more ambiguous. Its kind of like saying WWII instead of World War II (double-ewe has more sylables than either world or war, so actually saying the abbreviation is less efficent than saying the actual name).

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783035)

wth offtopic? i'm still laughing but why is that offtopic? it's a jab at the fact that we're going to have to continue buying new hardware to keep up for the rest of our lives. Why don't they just cut straight to gamma and skip blue/ultraviolet/x? i'm willing to wait with my measly 4.6 GB DVDs if i only need to buy one more type of hardware afterwards.

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783062)

it's also funny to note that the article linked to in the grandparent has an id 1 higher than the slashdot article.

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783179)

No, I just want the soft-x-ray laser - and we know nobody'll be wasting their time using it to read discs when they can go one better than the Sony "see through clothing" camcorder.

Re:In The Mysterious Future! (1)

mehtars (655511) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783275)

I dont see how thats even funny....

Atomic spacing is on the order of angstroms, which is on the order of x-rays...

They're real pioneers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782952)

See subject.

All I can say is (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782954)

Looks like I have to buy the White Album again.

Re:All I can say is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783023)

Well, maybe if it's a 500GB disc, you can buy every single fucking album on the planet ... ALL AT ONCE!!

No (2, Funny)

oddmake (715380) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783194)

You can't buy 500GB White Album.You must buy Ultraviolet Album

So... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782955)

...what color is it?

(I'm a fan of blue...)

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783007)

...what color is it?

I think it's nigritude ultramarine.

Octarine (1)

Pan T. Hose (707794) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783038)

So... what color is it?

It's octarine [wikipedia.org] , the eighth color of the spectrum, the color of magic.

Re:Octarine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783088)

Or Nectarine [wikipedia.org] , a peachish-orange.

Re:Octarine (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783176)

Or octaroon, which is 1/8th black.

Pink! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783202)

Just to piss you off =)

yes, but (-1)

tacokill (531275) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782956)

Yes, but can it make my penis bigger?

That's all I want to know

Re:penis bigger (1)

Elder Entropist (788485) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782971)

No, but it can give you a nice tan!

Tenses, please (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783014)

Here's an article indicating that Pioneer is developing...

Quoth the article:

Japanese hardware maker Pioneer has developed a technique...

Though not of any extreme importance, one should note the mild distinction between "is" and "has."

Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782959)

That's almost big enough to put my entire MP3 collection on a single disk!

warning: CD encountered a tiny dust mote (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782962)

error correcting 15.8 megabytes of obscured data!

Bit Rot? (4, Insightful)

abrotman (323016) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782966)

So now i can lose [slashdot.org] 500GB of data?

I'm moving to punchcards ...

Re:Bit Rot? (5, Insightful)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783036)

Someone already moderated you funny, but I think it's a real issue. Sure, use UV if it helps, but I would rather have them make the bits a little bigger and a lot more reliable than as small as they can get them and have them rot away. I could live with 100 gig of data on a disc if I could trust it a lot more than 500 gigs on one disc I can't trust.

Re:Bit Rot? (4, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783145)

Maybe it's just me, but I'd rather them pack as many bits onto the disc as possible, then apply a reasonable error correction scheme to allow for significantly greater damage before data loss occurs.

Put another way, if you can fit 500G on a disc, you can fit 20 copies of a Blu-Ray disc, so when the first one dies, you have 19 spares. Admittedly, I'm not looking for something -quite- that extreme, but the potential for such high-density optical media in terms of improving reliability is tremendous if the vendors just had the guts to use it for that instead of saying "Ooh, we can fit all 17 seasons of The Simpsons on one disc".

Just my $0.02.

Re:Bit Rot? (1)

Vectorman0 (795415) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783040)

Make sure you have no dangling/dimpled/pregnant punch remnants.

Blue, Ultraviolet, Meh (0, Redundant)

theurge14 (820596) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782975)

Wake me up when we have Gamma-Ray discs.

Re:Blue, Ultraviolet, Meh (3, Funny)

Laser Dan (707106) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783025)

They would hold a lot, but since the gamma rays would go right through any CD-like disk it might be hard to read or write to them!

Better not put your feet under the table either or they might get cancer and fall off!

Re:Blue, Ultraviolet, Meh (1)

botsmaster25 (463073) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783073)

Will do Dr. Banner. The jeep is over there to take you back to the base.

Re:Blue, Ultraviolet, Meh (2, Funny)

mordejai (702496) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783207)

I have a Sugar Ray [sugarray.com] disc.
Is it the same?

Re:Blue, Ultraviolet, Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783214)

Ah, forget the gamma ray disks. I'm already using comic ray disks.

They take an awfully long time to read or write though, as I have to wait for a cosmic ray shower in my part of the world.

I've been experimenting with neutrino disks. The density data is really high but the data rate is around 0.000000001bit/year as I have to wait for a neutrino to interat with the disk.

Gamma-Ray Discs (1, Funny)

sparkhead (589134) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783228)

Here ya go. [208.203.139.88]

WHY DON'T YOU GO FUCK A HORSE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783288)

Wake me up when you say something funny.

Editors please make up your mind! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782977)

Is it "disc" or "disk"? I can't tell, 'cause you're using both spellings in the same article!

Re:Editors please make up your mind! (2, Insightful)

haruchai (17472) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783061)

When you're referring to hard drives, it's disk. When referring to CDs or other removable media, it's disc except when referring to floppies in which case it's diskette. FYI, there isn't a "discette" - yet

Hope this clears it up for you.

Ultraviolet? (-1)

Pan T. Hose (707794) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782979)

Wouldn't that be dangerous if reflected into the eye? Remember that we are talking about a pure ultraviolet light with no component in the visible spectrum (like the ultraviolet in the sun light), therefore the eye wouldn't notice any light at all and keep the iris open. I don't think I would buy any product with invisible laser to use outside a specialised laboratory with protective equipment and I don't expect most of consumers to do it either.

Re:Ultraviolet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783000)

Mod parent down, obvious and lame troll.

Re:Ultraviolet? (1)

s7uar7 (746699) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783004)

Yes, but how many times have you looked at the laser in your cd or dvd players? It's not like they'll be open.

Re:Ultraviolet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783029)

Troll...

But I'll bite anonymously...

Current CD and DVD players have lasers that are harmful to the eye. That's what the warning labels saying lasers are harmful to the eye. Go do some reading.

Re:Ultraviolet? (2, Funny)

Zeebs (577100) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783060)

When in the recomended use of your CD/DVD drives did you see the laser? Yes.

Re:Ultraviolet? (3, Informative)

rco3 (198978) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783090)

For the benefit of any idiot who thinks parent poster is serious, allow me to point out that your current CD and DVD players use Infra-Red laser diodes, which are also invisible and dangerous. That's why your CD player will often have a warning on the outside.

Dr. Pantyhose is a known Troll. Please don't try to engage him in discussion, that's what he wants. Well, that and karma.

Re:Ultraviolet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783104)

Don't look into laser with remaining eye.

Whoopee doo. (0, Redundant)

Typingsux (65623) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782981)

Get back to me when you have gamma ray disks.

I was wondering when this was going to happen (3, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782984)

How long is it going to take them to pack it into a consumer device? That's always been the real question. Maybe there's no point to blu-ray.

Now that I've paused to read the article...

The article only discusses write techniques. I'd like to hear if there are any peculiarities involved in reading it before I make guesses as to the delay before production. I'd also like to know if they only have a tube or if they have a diode already.

Cool but... (1)

DanteBlack (656808) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782986)

I have to wonder about the value added. Presumably they will suffer from the same degrading properties of other digital media with a proportionaly high price point. I suppose 10dvds could be storred on one makeing for only one point of failure for 10x much data.

Errg I meant 100 (1)

DanteBlack (656808) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783067)

Which makes the prospect even worse

Re:Cool but... (1)

Cuthalion (65550) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783107)

100 dvds on one disc? fine make three copies, and you probably have a lower chance of all three failing than you do of any one of your dvds failing.

Hmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10782988)

Have they looked at how ultraviolet light makes many plastics degrade? The laser is one thing, and I can only guess they'll have fancy sapphire optics, but if you can't make a durable package for the data, who cares? And if you can't leverage the existing infrastructure, the odds are the answer will be, "No one who counts."

Where is the end for "optical" media? (4, Interesting)

dustman (34626) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782989)

People more versed in physics than I am can answer this:

The lasers used for optical media keep on progressing to higher frequency light, which is better able to resolve things. Where is the likely end for optical media?

Past ultraviolet light is x-rays and gamma rays I think... Will they be used for optical media? They are known as "dangerous", but perhaps in low power situations they aren't too bad? Or, you could just have the optical drive shielded in lead :)

Microscopes haved moved past light, into "electron microscopes", which used streams of electrons to resolve things that light cannot. Will that be possible with our optical media techniques?

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (1)

slavik1337 (705019) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783058)

secondary cosmic rays ... forget gamma or x-rays :p

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (1)

slobber (685169) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783080)

you could just have the optical drive shielded in lead

Yeah, right, this makes a perfect match for an ultra light laptop!!! :)

Where is the end for "optical" media?-Team Force. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783099)

Maybe we'll be using "Atomic Force" DVDs?

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (5, Informative)

zx75 (304335) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783103)

The limit is defined by the amount of power you can reasonably draw from your system to generate the radiation. Higher frequency means more power is required to generate a 'low-power' beam.

The other limit is finding a suitably reflective material that is cheap enough to be used as media. X rays pass easily through plastics, and they are absorbed by lead. Gamma rays pass through most kinds of material. You need something that reflects well, and doesn't absorb the radiation, that can also be used to store distinct states and be mass produced easily.

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (2, Funny)

AbbyNormal (216235) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783110)

Scene in the future, with a Gamma Radiation drive.

CD stuck in drive.
ME: "You wouldn't like it when I'm angry. I have all my data on that cd."

BARGhhhhhhhhh@#$@#$ [Transforms into Hulk]

Hulk SMASH!

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783114)

We can keep going as your EM radiation isn't harmful and isn't destroying the media. That'll start somewhere ultraviolet depending on the materials used... There's my wild ass guess.

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (1)

mstefanus (705346) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783116)

Past ultraviolet light is x-rays and gamma rays I think...

Imagine what will happen to the media if you pass it through an X-ray scanner.

heh... (1, Funny)

interactive_civilian (205158) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783184)

so saith mstefanus:
Imagine what will happen to the media if you pass it through an X-ray scanner.
The Airport security personnel get to see and copy all of your archived pr0n?

;)

Re:Where is the end for "optical" media? (4, Informative)

jd (1658) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783239)

Gamma rays are extremely hard to generate and near-impossible to focus. To the best of my knowledge, artificial systems have not been able to do either to any useful degree.


X-Rays, on the other hand, are much easier. X-Ray lasers have existed for some time (though they tend to be on the bulky side) and lenses that can focus X-Rays are used.


However, with X-Rays, you can build systems that don't just rely on reflection (as per traditional optic media). There is a phenominon called X-Ray Fluorescence, in which an atom, when struck by an X-Ray of the right frequency, emits electrons of a specific energy.


A disk using such a system would need to be layered and etched multiple times, which would make it impossible to write on any kind of domestic scale. However, it would mean that you could have maybe fifty or so "layers" to the disk.


You couldn't use this to read at the atomic level, but you could use it to determine the quantity of a given isotope. This would let you increase the effective density still further.

Sharks... (-1, Offtopic)

TheDarkener (198348) | more than 9 years ago | (#10782991)

But will the FREGGIN' SHARKS with FREGGIN' LASER BEAMS coming out of their FREGGIN' HEADS have 500GB FREGGIN' capacity?

great galloping geraniums! (0)

Foktip (736679) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783001)

500 big ones could fit a lot of porno!

Why are we waiting? (5, Funny)

klubkid79 (792253) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783002)

And there is nothing I want more than to wait 3.6 days for a disk to finish writing..

Re:Why are we waiting? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783138)

Duh, that's what multi-session is for. No one writes all their porno to the disk at once, they do it as they download it!

Re:Why are we waiting? (1)

stephenisu (580105) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783241)

I would guess they would use a beam splitter and do simultaneous tracks at once. That would be the only way to defeat the physical rotation speed limitation.

So can we write-protect (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783009)

...by putting sunscreen on them?

gamma rays! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783015)

I'll invent a gamma ray lasor!

Not only is the wavelenght smaller than untravilot, but it will cut your disk into nice shapes for you too!

Great (1)

genessy (587377) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783019)

Just what my roommate needs. Now he'll hog the connection even more for his downloads with unlimited storage space.

Protective cover or lots of redundant information (5, Insightful)

3770 (560838) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783028)

These should really come in some type of protective casing. Like a floppy or something.

I have many CD's and they were pretty resilient to scratches. They played fine even if they had a pretty hefty scratch on them.

Then I bought DVD's and I brought them on over sea flights for entertainment. I was transporting them in one of those CD wallets and they just started getting unusable really fast. The smallest scratch and it would stop working.

I'm thinking that these disks can get a scratch that is smaller than can be seen with the naked eye and it'll still be a real problem for the disk.

So they should either have a protective cover like a floppy or they should have lots of redundant information physically far away from each other on the disk.

Re:Protective cover or lots of redundant informati (1)

ztirffritz (754606) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783089)

Take a look at this:

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/11 /0 2/0011220

Protection? (1)

logic hack (800754) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783143)

Protection for ultra-violet discs? Through a little sunscreen on there my good man.

Or better yet.. (2, Informative)

paintballluvr (411103) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783231)

Better yet cover them with this [slashdot.org] .

It should fix the knicks and scratches problem.

why now? (1)

majid_aldo (812530) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783039)

cd lasers are red
dvd lasers(?) and blu-ray are blue

after that is violet and UV

how come this is coming out now?

No no no... (2, Funny)

jettoblack (683831) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783123)

CD lasers are infrared

DVD lasers are red
Blu-ray lasers are blue
Sugar is sweet
And I love you

Re:why now? (2, Funny)

baitisj2 (671789) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783136)

CD's are red,
Blu-rays are blue.
UV DVD's store your data,
But WHEN? I have no clue.

*:)P*

Re:why now? (1)

DarthWiggle (537589) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783156)

Goddamnit, I thought you were starting a poem... I was all ready to chuckle and you dashed my hopes.

Oh, and, um... yay UV!

Sweet Jesus! (2, Funny)

botsmaster25 (463073) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783041)

That is a lot o p0rn!!!

Purple Patents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783043)

I can just see it now, Prince will patent the purple laser and the future discs will be known as NPG-ROMs.

The Lynxpro

Scratches? (1)

Xikteny (721781) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783055)

Anyone else think that dust/scratches would be a big problem for a caddy-less optical disc of that storage density? Seems like you could loose quite a lot of data to a single scratch.

Err... WHO developed the laser? (3, Interesting)

rco3 (198978) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783057)

I see nothing about who developed the UV laser, all I see is that Pioneer is using them to write (and read) optical storage. The innovation is that they had to use a carbon mask to reduce scattering.

Of course, I can't read Japanese, so perhaps the original article is more informative and/or accurate.

Other companies already have UV diode lasers in production, like Nichia since 2002. However, I see nothing here indicating that Pioneer has developed the UV laser that they're using for this new disc format.

Anyone who reads Japanese care to track back and get more details?

Re:Err... WHO developed the laser? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783245)

There were plans for making a UV pulsed laser in a Scientific American (in the Amateur Scientist) back in the early 70's. You basically made a long box of perspex, and filled it with low-pressure nitrogen/helium mix, and put the assembly in between two big sheets of copper. Imagine a giant capacitor.

It pulsed at 6Hz if I remember rightly (or was that (1/6 of a hertz?). Was pretty dangerous as you couldnt see the bean at all. I used an old TV tube as a detector (the phosphors lit up where it hit).

Was a fun project for a 15 year old.

These days I'd probably be assumed to a be a terrorist if I had a home brew laser...

UT (2, Funny)

Striker770S (825292) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783078)

and we quickly find out that pioneer is working on this project for epic in order to release the unreal tornament 2005 collectors edition. Just think, only 2 of these discs will fit the game on it!

One disc should be enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783096)

to store a single SlashDot article and all of its duplicates.

Great (0)

cloudkj (685320) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783101)

Great.... and I just bought a 200GB Seagate hard drive. Stupid Moore's Law... Oh well, it was a good deal [amazon.com] nonetheless. Only $89 after a $50 rebate!

diode? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783105)

So I assume the breakthough is that they made it into a diode? UV lasers exist now:
http://www.laserinnovations.com/sabrefred.ht m

to preserve or not preserve (3, Insightful)

spiffistan (608774) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783157)

We're missing a big point in all this: We need better ways of preserving data, not better ways of storing more data.

--
does our rule benefit the earth? does it help the grass to grow, the sun to shine?

New Term (and software needed) - RCOSM (2, Interesting)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783159)

Redundant Copies on Same Meida.

Just so I trust that my precious video of that birthday party is conserved...

I am willing to only get 100 GB per disc, if the redundant copies in the 500GB space give me a good chance of seeing the 100GB I want...

Super-redundant error-tolerant copy software anyone? I sure want it to tbe open-source, so that I can trust it will survive for a few years.

Re:New Term (and software needed) - RCOSM (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783222)

Sorry to reply to my own post, but I just wanted to point out that raw DV is about 12GB an hour, so most folks who have video of their kids can expect to want to store 500GB of home video with no problem.

Re:New Term (and software needed) - RCOSM (3, Informative)

Ph33r th3 g(O)at (592622) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783287)

Something along these [par2.net] lines could help with media dropouts. You can build these files with as little or as much redundancy as makes you feel comfortable. Of course, if Timmy Toddler uses the medium as a frisbee or the dog eats it, you're still SOL.

compared to aol cds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783164)

these discs have been known to create gi-nourmous explosions in microwaves that only 500gb capacity tech can do.

Non-plastic disks? (3, Interesting)

daemonc (145175) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783166)

I'm sure that Pioneer has considered the fact that UV light gradually destroys most plastics.

So what type of material will these UV laser disks be made of?

CD, DVD, BluRay, UVD(?)...what's next? (2, Interesting)

gozu (541069) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783169)

It's been what? 20 years now that we've been using CDs and their cousins. I wonder when we'll make the jump to a new medium and what that medium will be.

And what happened to FDs? they were supposed to be the next big thing (tm).

CD, DVD, BluRay, UVD(?)...what's next?-DNA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783279)

"It's been what? 20 years now that we've been using CDs and their cousins. I wonder when we'll make the jump to a new medium and what that medium will be."

DNA

A Poem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783172)

CD's use red
HD-DVD's use blue
Ultraviolet is sweet
OMG i just lost 500gb of data!

ummm... i think i'm missing something (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783193)

everyone seems to have gotten on the bandwagon that this is due to pictures taken at a rally in Geneva. I have a few minor issues with this line of thought.

1. The government is a little smarter than this. If they were interested in going after the pictures, they would have also gotten the disks from the 3-4 mirror sites that were posting at the time. I'm putting my faith in the government workers doing a good job. I may have issues with the administration - but that doesn't mean the grunts are doing a bad job.

2. wtf does Italy care about a rally going on in Geneva? I can see the Swiss and US ties - but no one has mentioned why Italy cares about these pictures at all. I'm not very politically versed, so maybe Italy just likes sticking it's nose in other people's business?

3. If rackspace was issued a gag order, they most likely know why and can't tell anyone. That's kinda the point of a gag order - not to say anything. And yes, some gag orders do specify that you cannot stipulate why you were issued the gag order.

I got a few more, but those seem to be the bigger items - and I expect that this will be mod'd to trolling. eh.

What!? Ultra-Violent Laser! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783196)

For a second there I thought it said Ultra Violent Laser and I got excited thinking it was some new deathray or something, but then I re-read it. Wake me up when have something exciting, like sharks with frickin' ultra violent lasers attached to their heads.

Tattoo? (0, Offtopic)

Dolly_Llama (267016) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783203)

How about temporary tattoos via a UV laser attached to a tattoo gun?

size is appropriate now (1)

justanyone (308934) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783246)

It occurs to me that 500 GB is just about enough space to store the 40,000 most popular songs of the last 60 years in 256-bit mp3 format.

I might be willing to pay as much as $200 for such a disk, as long as most of the money went to the copyright owners (performers?) instead of evil record company scumbucketry.

Alas, market forces have yet to work their magic to actualize this rather pleasant "convenience fantasy".

Laser warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#10783247)

Caution: Ultraviolet light. Do not stare into beam. May cause cancer in remaining eye.

Or 84615 minutes of MPEG4 Video per disk (1)

F34nor (321515) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783248)

Or 84615 minutes of MPEG4 Video per disk at 320x480p. That's about 770 DVD's (granted that's at a crapulent quality level) Anyone know who many porn DVD's are released each month?

Oh yeah? Well mine uses Gamma Rays! (1)

kevlar (13509) | more than 9 years ago | (#10783256)

.. but seriously though, why not just use X-Rays? Why the gradual progression towards larger and larger capacities?
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